Israeli repression wave continues – Palestinian leader in Haifa detained; case placed under gag order

Israel/Palestine
on 165 Comments

The green line is certainly getting blurry. Thursday morning at 3:00 am sixteen Israeli Security Agency (ISA) agents accompanied by Israeli police raided the home of Ameer Makhoul, a well known Palestinian human rights activist in Haifa, and detained him. According to a statement made by Palestinian human rights organizations:

The 16 ISA agents and police officers immediately separated Makhoul from his family, including wife Janan and daughters Hind, 17 and Huda, 12, and conducted an extensive search of the home. According to Janan, the police confiscated items including documents, maps, the family’s four mobile phones, Ameer and Janan’s laptops, the hard drives from the girls’ two desktop computers, a camera and a small tape recorder containing un-transcribed oral histories Janan collects as part of her work. At one point during the police search, Janan says, one officer violently restrained her, twisting her arm and pushing her when she attempted to leave the home’s living room to observe the confiscations. The security forces also refused to identify themselves and showed her a warrant authorizing Makhoul’s arrest only after she repeatedly insisted. The order was signed on 23 April 2010 and cited unsubstantiated "security" reasons as the grounds for Makhoul’s arrest.

Makhoul is the the director of Ittijah, a network on grassroots Palestinian organizations throughout Israel. Police also raided Ittijah’s offices and confiscated documents and the hard drives from all of the organization’s computers.

The raid came two weeks after Makhoul, an Israeli citizen, was placed under a travel ban by the Israeli Ministry of the Interior. Before his detention Makhoul sent a piece to the Electronic Intifada about his travel ban. He explains:

Last month, when I traveled from Haifa to the land border between Jordan and Israel, the Israeli border police prevented me from leaving my country. The police handed me an order issued by the Israeli Minister of the Interior Eli Yishai prohibiting me to leave Israel for two months. The travel ban imposed on me is part of an increased campaign to intimidate and to spread fear among Palestinian civil society. The repression is meant to divide us, but it has had the opposite effect. We Palestinians in Israel, the West Bank, Gaza and the diaspora are only more determined and united to claim our rights and to build a nation where we can live in freedom and have equal rights.

The Israeli minister of the interior holds the opinion that my travel outside the country "poses a serious threat to the security of the state," according to article 6 of the 1948 emergency regulations. I am the director of Ittijah, Union of Arab Community-Based Associations and the chairman of the Popular Committee for the Defense of Political Freedoms, which is a sub-committee of the High Monitoring Committee of Arabs in Israel. All three bodies unite Palestinian Arabs in Israel and we jointly decided not to appeal my travel ban at the Israeli high court.

Any meeting in the Arab world or with any Arab person anywhere in the world arouses the suspicion of the authorities. The accusations against me are made on the basis of secret evidence that I am not allowed to see, and the high court merely acts as an extension of the Israeli General Security Services (GSS), or the Shin Bet. Israel does not need to prove that there is reason for suspicion; instead, I have to prove that there is no need for their suspicion. The Israeli legal system is far from fair for Palestinians.

Israel is intimidating Ittijah and the Popular Committee for the Defense of Political Freedoms because we are reasserting our community’s stake in the Palestinian struggle. Twenty years ago few considered the Palestinians in Israel as a part of the Palestinian people or the Palestinian cause. During the Oslo process of the 1990s, we were considered an internal problem for Israel to deal with, but our networking, advocacy and lobbying has changed this. Israel is increasingly repressing us to divide Palestinians from each other and isolate us from the outside world.

The human rights organizations’ statement referenced above makes a similar point and connects Makhoul’s arrest to the wave of Israeli repression against dissent on both sides of the green line: 

Makhoul’s case is only one example amidst a recent escalated campaign by Israeli authorities against Palestinian human rights defense and civil resistance. In addition to arbitrary arrest and detention, Israeli authorities have met Palestinian human rights activism in recent months with a variety of measures, including raids, deportations, travel bans, visa denials and media attacks against nongovernmental organizations. Moreover, Palestinian communities involved in grassroots human rights defense efforts are frequently levied with collective punishment measures in the form of curfews, sieges and destruction of property, threats to individuals and the community as a whole, beatings, the use of lethal and "non-lethal" ammunition, including 40mm high velocity tear gas canisters, denial of permits, tear-gassing, army incursions and intentional injury and killings.

165 Responses

  1. Avi
    May 7, 2010, 12:44 am

    Well, sarcastically put, let’s look at the bright side.

    Between 1948 and 1966 Israeli citizens of Palestinian origin (20% of the population of Israel) were subjected to Military Rule, a form of martial law in US parlance.

    During those years, restrictions on the freedom of movement, among other more egregious restrictions and abuses, were commonplace.

    It seems that Israel is regressing.

    In addition,

    The accusations against me are made on the basis of secret evidence that I am not allowed to see, and the high court merely acts as an extension of the Israeli General Security Services (GSS), or the Shin Bet.

    It should come as no surprise that the Shin Bet does NOT actually have any evidence against this man. It certainly has no evidence that will stand the test of legitimate court proceedings. In other words, the GSS is lying to Ameer Makhoul.

    Mind you, in 99.99999% of the cases involving state “security”, the Shin Bet has the final say. No court, certainly no bureaucrat, can reverse that decision or shed light on it. Even if the Supreme Court were to get involved, there is a good likelihood that the Shin Bet will ignore the decision, as has been the case with the use of torture on Palestinian detainees, both citizens and non-citizens of Israel.

    If you are looking for a good source of information on this subject matter, in general, have a look at a book authored by the Israeli Hillel Cohen. The book is entitled Good Arabs. It’s available in both Hebrew and English. Although the cases discussed in it are somewhat dated, the basics, i.e. the methods of operation and the behind-the-scenes political maneuvers should provide the reader with the framework and perspective from which to judge and research current events.

    • James Bradley
      May 7, 2010, 12:58 am

      Since Operation Cast Lead there seems to be an even harsher crackdown on any and all non-violent movements among the Palestinians.

      Non-violent movements in my opinion threaten Israel far more than crude bottle rocket attacks, and they know it.

      They’ll attempt to do what they did in both Intifadas – provoke, provoke and provoke the Palestinians until they get a violent response.

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 1:18 am

        “They’ll attempt to do what they did in both Intifadas – provoke, provoke and provoke the Palestinians until they get a violent response.”

        I agree James, and I suspect the event that will trigger an outbreak will be some sort of action at Al Aqsa Mosque. If you recall there as a flareup there in March with rumours circulating that Al Aqsa was to be destroyed in line with some 18th century prophecy:

        “If the Vilna Gaon was right, the 3rd Temple is on its way”
        link to haaretz.com

        And there is the marketing of the Third Temple – an ongoing provocation:
        “J’lem posters call for 3rd Temple”
        link to jpost.com

        An action against Al Aqsa Mosque would achieve two goals for Israel: to detour the current non-violent campaign into one of violence, and simultaneously inject a religious element which is currently absent – and which Israel knows how to exploit for hasbara purposes.

        I hope there is sufficient fortitude in Palestinian leadership to anticipate and head off any violent response to Israeli provocations. The non-violent campaigns are growing within Palestine and getting increasing coverage in the wider world so *perhaps* that will be enough.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 6:43 am

        Deep in my heart, we shall overcome someday…

      • eljay
        May 7, 2010, 6:42 am

        >> They’ll attempt to do what they did in both Intifadas – provoke, provoke and provoke the Palestinians until they get a violent response.

        If the Palestinians truly despise “terrrrr”, if they are sincerely interested in listening to ‘the other’ and working to untie the knot of mutual mistrust, if they would only present themselves as human beings rather than victims – why, then, no amount of so-called “provocation” could force them to respons in a violent, maximalist or destabilizing manner.

        Violence on the part of the Israelis is clearly a noble thing. Violence on the part of the Palestinians is nothing more than Israel-bludgeoning anti-semitism.

        “Remember the Holocaust.”

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 8:11 am

        eljay – that’s just creepy when you do witty-speak.

      • marc b.
        May 7, 2010, 8:51 am

        i’ve warned eljay. it’s kafkaesque. one day eljay will wake up staring down the length of witty’s star of david-embossed feety pyjamas.

      • eljay
        May 7, 2010, 9:22 am

        >> one day eljay will wake up staring down the length of witty’s star of david-embossed feety pyjamas.

        Talk about destabilizing! 8-o

      • Chaos4700
        May 7, 2010, 9:28 am

        I’d rather wake up as the giant cockroach, myself.

  2. VR
    May 7, 2010, 12:44 am

    This may be a moot point having already been done, but if not all these organizations inside of Israel should send their information to undisclosed sites outside of Israel and throughout the world. This so it can be used as future reference to this oppression, since there seems to be an escalation in the offing. I would say do this immediately, so the world can grasp what Israel does to its own citizens, should the doors of communication be shut at some point.

    • Avi
      May 7, 2010, 1:04 am

      This so it can be used as future reference to this oppression, since there seems to be an escalation in the offing.

      There have been several cases in the past involving Palestinians from the Occupied Territories of the West Bank and Gaza, scientists who studied nuclear physics, for example, who have been killed and or disappeared in strange circumstances – think Alexander Litvinenko. In his case, he was a Russian journalist who was poisoned in Britain by suspected Russian agents for having been critical of Putin’s policies. He died of exposure to high levels of Polonium.

      But, in several Palestinian cases, several scientists ate or drank something during a job interview and mysteriously keeled over and died a few days later.

      Incidentally, the Palestinian citizens of Israel are usually excluded from academic university disciplines involving physics, chemistry, geology and aeronautics, especially on the Masters and PhD levels.

  3. thankgodimatheist
    May 7, 2010, 12:48 am

    Let’s just sit back and wait for the usual cowards to show up and ridicule and snarl and dismiss any wrong doing..You know the ones, the ethnic cleansing aficionados, the Nakba deniers, the “what’s so bad about the occupation after all?” crowd..
    Let the circus begin and the clowns brought in!

    • James Bradley
      May 7, 2010, 12:59 am

      Don’t forget the new argument:

      “Its not really an occupation!”

      • Avi
        May 7, 2010, 1:14 am

        I don’t doubt that you have noticed this, but it bears repeating that this case is “different” from other cases in the occupied territories, for the simple reason that this man is an Israeli citizen and lives in Haifa, an Israeli city (whatever difference that makes nowadays anyway).

  4. Shmuel
    May 7, 2010, 1:21 am

    Israel is intimidating Ittijah and the Popular Committee for the Defense of Political Freedoms because we are reasserting our community’s stake in the Palestinian struggle. Twenty years ago few considered the Palestinians in Israel as a part of the Palestinian people or the Palestinian cause.

    When Israel started building the wall, I had quite a few arguments with friends and relatives, who said that the wall would prevent attacks, and was therefore justified even at the cost of hardship for some Palestinians. I argued (among other things) that over a million Palestinians, citizens and Jerusalem residents) would still remain on “our” side of the wall, and it was only a matter of time before they joined the struggle as well. So far, the struggle conducted by Palestinian citizens of Israel has been almost entirely non-violent, but as Israeli violence against Palestinians in the OT escalates, settlements expands, the “peace” process goes nowhere, discrimination within Israel continues, and the non-violent actions of Palestinian Israelis are met with harsh repression, that will change.

    • Shmuel
      May 7, 2010, 1:22 am

      Messed tags. The first paragraph is a quote from Makhoul’s piece; the second is mine.

      • Avi
        May 7, 2010, 1:58 am

        Shmuel,

        What I find amusing, is the fact that the Israeli government — and all the shills and hacks that run interference for it, you know, the Ethan Bronners in the media or politicians like Joe and Chuck — would have us believe that the wall is actually providing security, preventing attacks and exists for the sole purpose of protecting Israelis.

        Surely, if Gazans have the technical know-how to dig and build elaborate tunnel systems linking Gaza with Egypt, then the Palestinians in the West Bank could very well do the same by digging tunnels under the wall to cross into Israel proper. As the saying goes, where there’s a will, there’s a way.

      • marc b.
        May 7, 2010, 8:57 am

        so, shmuel, there are the makings of a civil war in israel, no? (if that isn’t already happening.) and as the pal-jewish israeli conflict hots up, so will the secular-religious conflict amongst israeli jews. not pretty. you have to wonder what has happened to the keen sense of self-preservation that has steered jews through centuries of oppression.

      • Shmuel
        May 7, 2010, 10:52 am

        marc b:what has happened to the keen sense of self-preservation that has steered jews through centuries of oppression

        I would have thought Zionism had dispelled that particular myth by now. Along with the myth of Jewish “genius”.

    • zamaaz
      May 7, 2010, 10:46 am

      Possible messages read between lines:
      [because we are reasserting our community’s stake in the Palestinian struggle.]

      [are only more determined and united to claim our rights and to build a nation where we can live in freedom and have equal rights.]

      [we were considered an internal problem for Israel to deal with, but our networking, advocacy and lobbying has changed this.]
      [and it was only a matter of time before they joined the struggle as well.]
      […that will change.]
      If I were to read the key points in these messages;

      – the Palestinian communities of Israeli citizenship have joined the Palestinians (Gaza and West Bank) in the Struggle to build their own Palestinian nation over the land of Israel they called Palestine. They recognized they were considered potential internal problem, yet they considered themselves successful in allaying suspicions by enabling themselves to project an image of advocacy and lobbyist for ( it appears from the other statements – freedom, equal rights ).
      – Perhaps on psychological reason, now through Ittijah and the Popular Committee for the Defense of Political Freedoms they are beginning to assert their stand to unite with the Palestinian arabs for some real causes – the Palestinian nationalist struggle.
      – and it was only a matter of time before they the Palestinian Israelis physically join the struggle as well. So far the struggle of Palestinian Israelis are mainly non-violent for the moment, but because of the ’violence and discrimination of Israel against Palestinians’ that type of struggle will change to violent…(Shmuel interpretation)

      Indeed these exchanges indicates a struggle to unite, and the existence of internal dissent and agitation among Palestinian Israelis to create a new nation from inside…a movement of subversive nature….
      These statements were also strong indications of movements of Palestinian Israelis to physically combine with the Palestinians Arabs in the goal to establish the Palestinian nation within Israel, further proving the common perception of liberals on the issues in the Palestinian struggle for human rights, against discrimination, etc. are only ‘icing on a cake’…These sentiments, as contrasted with the factual equal government privileges given to the Palestinian Israeli citizens, appears to be only ‘apparent driving forces’. The real undercurrent is first – to supersede the Israeli government. Thus, the suspicion over loyalty of the Palestinians to the Israel government is very factual and strongly based…

      • Chaos4700
        May 7, 2010, 10:56 am

        As opposed to all those German, Polish and Russian immigrants who did absolutely nothing to undermine the sovereignty of the native population when Great Britain was releasing it as a colonial possession, huh?

      • zamaaz
        May 7, 2010, 11:03 am

        On the other hand, if someone takes seriously interpretations such as these, it could mean some trouble… real trouble….

      • Chaos4700
        May 7, 2010, 11:04 am

        Oooh, I don’t think you have to worry about anyone taking you seriously around here.

  5. Shmuel
    May 7, 2010, 2:26 am

    For a better idea regarding the absolute necessity of every millimetre of the “security barrier” to save Israeli lives, see Uri Avnery’s article on the case of al-Walaja.

  6. eee
    May 7, 2010, 3:13 am

    It is interesting that this guy was using the land border to Jordan. It could very well be that his destination is Arab countries like Syria that have no peace agreement with Israel. Let’s wait and see. If he was going to Europe, he would go through Ben-Gurion most likely.

    • thankgodimatheist
      May 7, 2010, 3:28 am

      Talking about Syria, eee, when are you going to give back what you stole, land thieves? You know the Golan that you made yours overnight? Colonialist cancer!

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 3:43 am

        The Golan will be returned right after Hawaii is returned to its original owners, meaning probably never. If you got used to American Colonialist Cancer, you will get used to the Israeli one in a couple of generations.

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 4:07 am

        in your dreams 3e. We will see this when Iran will get the nuclear bomb, i bet Syria is just waiting Iran so it can deal with the cancer.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 4:29 am

        How exactly would a Iranian nuclear bomb help Syria capture the Golan? Care to elaborate?

        The Golan is part of Israel, it was annexed. You will just have to get used to it.

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 4:40 am

        I’m not American so I care little about Hawaii and I never heard of Hawaiins putting up a fight to get back their island anyway. But if you chose to keep what you have stolen from the Syrians then you should expect hostility, no? Do you understand this basic concept, Israeli swindler? Of course this logic doesn’t work out properly for the thieving Israeli mind but for everybody else, normal human beings, it really does! That’s why we should all support Syria in its efforts to get the Golan back from the rogue thieving state of Israel.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 4:47 am

        Syria lost the Golan because it employed violence against Israel. If it will employ violence to attempt to recapture it, it will lose more land. It is their choice. Do you understand this basic concept? If you think we are bluffing, go ahead and call our bluff.

        TGIA, you are a coward. Go join the Syrian army and help them capture it back. Otherwise, don’t send them to war that will bring Syria to ruin.

        What nationality are you?

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 4:47 am

        What amazes me beyond description is when Israel paints itself as the one who wants peace when Syria is nothing but!!. I mean how much more evidence one needs to see the Orwellian side about this totally absurd group of people? The whole frigging thing is taking place now not in the 17th century America..

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 4:52 am

        Stop it right there, eee asshole! In Moshe Dayan’s admission Israel provoked Syria to no end in order to get a fight coming where Israel would try to capture the Golan. He frankly admitted it.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 4:52 am

        What we want with Syria and Lebanon is a state of no war. What we have now is fine with us. If the Syrians or Lebanese don’t like it, let them start a war and pay the price. There is nothing absurd about Israel and the IDF.

        What is your nationality?

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 4:55 am

        Moshe Dayan’s so called “admission” is BS. It was published way after his death by one source and is hardly credible. It is telling that it was not published while he was alive. You are grasping at straws.

        The Golan is Israeli forever. Learn to live with that. Otherwise, your blood pressure may rise too much.

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 4:59 am

        eee
        Theft is theft and you do not have to get all worked out when I call you a thief. Because this is how the whole world see it. Or are you trying to redefine the meaning of theft now!

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 5:07 am

        You are hilarious. You can call it what you want. The Golan is Israeli forever. It was not stolen. It was lost by Syria in a war in which they were the aggressor. Start getting used to the idea. There is no difference between the Golan and Tel-Aviv.

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 5:08 am

        “The Golan is Israeli forever. Learn to live with that.”

        Yeah, I see perfectly the philosophy of ‘might makes right’ but don’t go complaining when people compare your methods to the Nazis because that’s the glaring truth , is it not?

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 5:19 am

        The Golan heights/Jerusalem are occupied territories under International law, so lets Israel consider it as it wish.

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 5:19 am

        eee
        I’m quite satisfied thatI got you to state clearly how it works in the Zionist mind and the philosophy and the principles you and your country live by. It ain’t pretty but it’s not up to me to judge buty to whomever is reading your prose..

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 5:22 am

        “Moshe Dayan’s so called “admission” is BS. It was published way after his death by one source and is hardly credible.”

        You adolescent twerp, whenever you hear something you don’t like you pretend it’s made up.

        “After all, I know how at least 80 percent of the clashes there started. In my opinion, more than 80 percent, but let’s talk about 80 percent. It went this way: We would send a tractor to plow some area where it wasn’t possible to do anything, in the demilitarized area, and knew in advance that the Syrians would start to shoot. If they didn’t shoot, we would tell the tractor to advance farther, until in the end the Syrians would get annoyed and shoot. And then we would use artillery and later the air force also, and that’s how it was. I did that, and Laskov and Czera did that, and Yitzhak did that, but it seemed to me that the person who most enjoyed these games was Dado. We thought that we could change the lines of the ceasefire accords by military actions that were less than war. That is, to seize some territory and hold it until the enemy despairs and gives it to us.”
        link to en.wikipedia.org

        His daughter actually verified the interview was authentic:
        “General Dayan died in 1981. But in conversations with a young reporter five years earlier, he said he regretted not having stuck to his initial opposition to storming the Golan Heights. There really was no pressing reason to do so, he said, because many of the firefights with the Syrians were deliberately provoked by Israel, and the kibbutz residents who pressed the Government to take the Golan Heights did so less for security than for the farmland.
        General Dayan did not mean the conversations as an interview, and the reporter, Rami Tal, kept his notes secret for 21 years — until he was persuaded by a friend to make them public. They were authenticated by historians and by General Dayan’s daughter Yael Dayan, a member of Parliament, and published two weeks ago in the weekend magazine of the newspaper Yediot Ahronot”
        link to nytimes.com

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 5:22 am

        What is your nationality?
        Why are you afraid to say, TGIA?

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 5:23 am

        eee, because of your likes Israel is going to fall like Nazi Germany.

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 5:26 am

        “You will just have to get used to it.”
        “Learn to live with that. ”
        ” Start getting used to the idea”

        eee you are *so* confident that Israel will exist now and forever yet you spend all day here at Mondoweiss, why? Because we all know Israel is down for the count, and it has no-one and nothing to blame except zionist arrogance of the sort you exhibit in every post.

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 5:32 am

        I bet the 3e, is one of the asshole cowards paid by the Israeli fascist to come here and twist the debate. Paid by the IDF information intelligence baby killers crap. 3e why not behave nicely to Americans and those who give you some dollars to exist in stolen lands?

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 5:43 am

        “What is your nationality?
        Why are you afraid to say, TGIA? ”

        For that you’ll have to ask gently. Say please and I’ll oblige.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 5:50 am

        Can’t you guys be a little more creative? You are repeating the same old cliches the Arabs have been using for years: Israel is weak, Israel will soon disappear etc. etc.
        The facts are that Israel has never been stronger both economically and militarily by any objective measure.

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 6:00 am

        Yes aparisian but let’s look at the positive side here. I got him to state clearly what quintessentially the zionist project is about ; one of dispossession, theft and expansion by wars of aggression, all in the name of the fascistic philosophy of might makes right…C’était exactement l’idée que j’avais en tête depuis le début et il est tombé dans le panneau

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 6:01 am

        Where’s the please I asked for eee. I thought you were eager to know, swindler!

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 7, 2010, 6:05 am

        Well, for that I can’t wait any longer because I’ll have to go no..
        Sad, I know!

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:09 am

        TGIA,
        Well you are French or Belgian. Same thing.
        Perhaps a pied noir, not that I a favor that term.
        The Zionist project is about building a villa in the jungle. Just compare what Israel has built since its inception to what its neighbors have done, and you will see that Israel is indeed a miracle.

      • Cliff
        May 7, 2010, 6:09 am

        It was stolen because it is illegal to acquire territory by war. You are a parasite and thief.

        You cause war and suffering to all your neighbors. Go to hell, you scumbag.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:11 am

        Now, now. No need to be a sore loser. Don’t worry, BDS will take care of everything. And if it doesn’t, there are always the murals.

      • Cliff
        May 7, 2010, 6:12 am

        Israel may be strong, but it is only because it sucks the life out of it’s neighbors. It starts wars, steals land. It steals resources and wages.

        Israel purposefully de-developed the Gazan and overall Palestinian economy. It has stolen water. It has withheld wages.

        Israel is a parasite, a homeland for Zionist thieves and criminals who delude themselves into thinking their a ‘light unto the nations’.

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 6:13 am

        Can’t you little bitch be more creative? Israel has never been isolated and perceived as a pariah state than today.

      • Cliff
        May 7, 2010, 6:14 am

        At least you’ve admitted to all that read this blog, that you’re the villain of this story eee.

        It’s good that you – like the Nazi settler, UNIX – have stopped the charade.

        I will look forward to the day, when thieving, lying, scum like you are brought to justice and are totally unable to use Jewishness for political purposes.

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 6:14 am

        Oui, TGIA mais tout le monde le sait. Il est payé pour diffuser sa merde ici.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:21 am

        Israel isolated? How so?
        It has excellent relations with the US, Europe, India, China and even South Africa.

        Pour votre information, je comprend Francaise tres bien.

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 6:23 am

        Brick by brick, Wall by wall, Apartheid Israel is going to fall!

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 6:23 am

        “The facts are that Israel has never been stronger both economically and militarily by any objective measure.”

        If that were so you wouldn’t feel the need to be here eee, spouting (dribbling) your hasbara line.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:28 am

        Sumud,

        I find this very entertaining. That is the only reason I am here. You guys are more fun than a barrel of monkeys.

        You should take Shmuel’s advice and ignore me. Why are you feeding the troll?

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 6:31 am

        @3e

        On s’en tape si tu comprends le Français ou pas.. T’es fasciste,
        you are a fascist, אתה פשיסט

        Israel isolated? How so?
        link to haaretz.com

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 6:34 am

        nope 3e i won’t ignore you, you are so fucking troll, a clown, you make me laugh.

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 6:39 am

        “I find this very entertaining. That is the only reason I am here. ”

        Not convincing at all eee. Not one little bit.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:39 am

        How is the fact that Israel is not popular related to isolation? Israel may not be popular but it certainly not isolated.

        Aparsian,
        We know what you are, an Aryan Brotherhood bigot. How do like Sarkozy and his support of Israel?

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:40 am

        Sumud,

        Believe what you want, you are an expert in conspiracy theories anyway.

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 6:48 am

        “Believe what you want, you are an expert in conspiracy theories anyway.”

        I am? Tell me more little e.

      • RoHa
        May 7, 2010, 6:49 am

        “. There is no difference between the Golan and Tel-Aviv. ”

        Both taken by force. So if Arab armies marched into Tel Aviv and took it by force, you wouldn’t complain.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:55 am

        Not only I wouldn’t complain, I am sure I would be murdered and therefore wouldn’t be able to complain if I wanted to.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 6:57 am

        A 1959 referendum asked residents of Hawaii to vote on the statehood bill. Hawaii voted 17 to 1 to accept. The choices were to accept the Act or to remain a territory, without the option of independence. All residents of the US state of Hawaii have full
        US citizenship rights. Those rights do not depend on one’s ethnic or religious affiliation.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 7:30 am

        The isolation of Israel is growing across the whole world. Without US aid, support, protection, given by the US in every way conceivable under the sun and with great charity, Israel wouldn’t last more than a few weeks:
        link to eurasiareview.com

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 7:41 am

        And what happened in Hawaii in the hundred years before it became a state? It was settled by a majority of non-natives at the whim of the American plantation owners and supported by the US Navy and the natives had absolutely no say about anything.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 7:43 am

        Israel was not seriously supported by the US till after 1967. It survived very well. In fact, it was the period in which Israel’s economy grew the fastest. And Israel would last very well without the special relationship with the US. Get used to it.

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 7:49 am

        Aparsian,
        We know what you are, an Aryan Brotherhood bigot. How do like Sarkozy and his support of Israel?

        Sorry who is “we”? the ZioFascits (Baby killers) you mean? don’t call your fellow Jews this kind of names you little scumbag, otherwise i will call your Rabbi.

        Oh yeah Sarkozy = the Zionist by excellence, has to follow up the CRIF (French AIPAC) but don’t worry 3e Sarozy follow the winds direction, the day Israel will start to fall, he will turn you his back. This is how puppets work.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 7:56 am

        So you have the AIPAC problem also in France? Wow! It’s an epidemic. We already established that when the wind changes, Mary Poppins will come and that is good, non?

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 8:10 am

        3e yes we have a French AIPAC (CRIF) problem as well which abuse of Judaism. We also have Zionist terrorists here.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 8:17 am

        You know how it is, we have to follow the Protocols.

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 8:29 am

        Which protocols you little crap? Listen eee i don’t want scumbags like you and your fucking country to use my name to commit baby killings, is that a good protocol for you? Don’t ever use the word Jewish state because you just represent yourself.

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 9:44 am

        “Israel was not seriously supported by the US till after 1967. It survived very well. In fact, it was the period in which Israel’s economy grew the fastest. ”

        1948/49 being the bumper years. Israeli historian Simha Flapan on the ethnic cleansing and subsequent looting of Ramleh / Lyddah:

        “With the population gone, the IsraeIi soldiers proceeded to loot the two towns in an outbreak of mass pillaging the officers could neither prevent nor control. In those day there was no military machinery able to deal with the problem. Even soldiers from the Palmach – most of whom came from or were preparing to join kibbutzim – took part, stealing mechanical and agricultural equipment. One must remember that soldiers from the Palmach had a reputation for maintaining a high moral code, even in the thick of fighting. However mythical, this code, known as “purity of arms,” is still consIdered the educational basis of Israeli military conduct. That they stole not so much for themselves as for their kibbutzim may have provided them with some justification, but only a marginal one.
        This was not the first time that Israeli soldiers had engaged in
        looting. Nor was looting a problem confined to the army. Jewish civilians also rushed to plunder Arab towns and villages once they were emptied of their inhabitants. Ben-Gurion had shown considerable concern over the phenomenon even before the events at Ramleh and Lydda. On June 16, he wrote: “There is a moral defect in our ranks that I never suspected existed: I refer to mass looting, in which all sections of the population participated. This is not only a moral defect but a grave military defect.” Six weeks earlier, on May 1, he had noted that, in Haifa, professional thieves took part in the looting initiated by the Irgun, and that booty had also been found in the possession of Haganah commanders. He described other unsavoury aspects of the operation al well: “There was a search for Arabs; they were seized, beaten and also tortured”. In October, he again referred to large scale looting by the Haganah in Beersheba, which would appear to indicate that his previous exhortations had not been effective. His moral revulsion, however, did not lead him either to insist that offenders be brought to trial or abandon the strategy of evictions. Indeed, very few soldiers and civilians were tried for looting or indiscriminate killing.”
        p101, “The Birth of Israel”, Simha Flapan, 1987

        “When we entered this gate, we saw Jewish soldiers spreading sheets on the ground and each who passed there had to place whatever they had on the ground or be killed. I remember that there was a man I knew from the Hanhan family from Lod who had just been married barely six weeks and there was with him a basket which contained money. When they asked him to place the basket on the sheet he refused—so they shot him dead before my eyes.”
        link to en.wikipedia.org

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 10:03 am

        The Syrian ambassador to US spoke to an audience at my university about a year ago. He showed slides of Syria in the background; it’s breathtakingly beautiful. It’s also pretty small, and scraping by economically. On top of all that, it is home to the largest contingent of refugees from Iraq, most of whom have very little money, so Syria is supporting them. (btw, Iran is also sheltering about 750,000 Iraqi refugees. Israel really screwed up the entire region, and millions of people’s lives.)

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 10:27 am

        Actually, eee, Hawaii was engaged in its own native tribal civil wars during the hundred years you mention. Further, the Brits were much more prominent than Americans as a cultural influence in Hawai–that’s why today the state flag of Hawai includes a corner showing the British flag. It is true that the brown natives never really fought european-US colonialism as much as they fought amongst themselves, and the appearance of US troops in Hawaii
        was decisive as far as physical protest was concerned.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 10:33 am

        Eee:
        excerpt:
        “Israeli expansion on Palestinian land has continued for decades and there is little indication that this will stop anytime soon. Successive U.S. Presidents have meekly complained about the occupation of the West Bank and Gaza but continued to fund the Zionist state. Washington claims to believe in a two-state solution between Israel and the Palestinians but the occupation has made this viably impossible. The alternatives are unpleasant for the Zionist mind to consider, not least a bi-national state or one-state equation, where soon Jews will be outnumbered by Arabs. But Israeli Jews should not fear this. Like the whites in South Africa under apartheid, they have to make a choice, either more years of oppressing another people and facing global isolation or a nation with equal status for all its citizens. ”
        link to eurasiareview.com

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 10:36 am

        consistency is the bane of lower-case minds.

        jeeebus, eee: Golan belongs to Israel for evah because Syria lost it in a war

        ::

        Jerusalem is LOST to the Jews for evah because Jews lost it in a war.

        see how that works?

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 10:37 am

        Well, eee, we know you don’t follow Mary Poppins. Not even Anne Frank. You must be inspired by Horst Wessel. And Doctor Goldstein.

      • yonira
        May 7, 2010, 11:10 am

        LOL, Tel Aviv was taking by force? It was created by Jews from the ground up. Learn a tad bit of history my friend.

        link to jbuff.com

      • NorthOfFortyNine
        May 7, 2010, 11:14 am

        >>LOL, Tel Aviv was taking by force? It was created by Jews from the ground up.

        That’s what it has come to. Apologists now resort to citing the parts of Israel that were not taken by force.

        Proud, yet?

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 11:25 am

        youyou, youyou youyou excuse me whats the hell the Jewish Buffalo has to do here?

      • Chaos4700
        May 7, 2010, 11:25 am

        Yonira? Where was Jaffa located?

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 9:47 am

        heard something extraordinary at J Street conference: the proposal that Israel will ‘return’ Golan, but only in exchange for Palestinians from Gaza and West Bank relocating there.

        The fine humanitarians at this most liberal and humanitarian of confabs registered worry, however, that “this will give Palestinians a strategic location from which to attack Israel.”
        oh, and somebody mentioned that Palestinians probably do not want to give up their homes, farms….

        But you must admit, this is genuine zionist generosity: We will give up — pluck from our very bosoms — something we stole, in exchange for YOU surrendering to us something that we haven’t yet been able to completely steal.

      • Chaos4700
        May 7, 2010, 9:53 am

        Doesn’t the Golan need to be returned to, you know, the Syrians who lived there?

        So even J-Street is adopting the “Mein Kampf” school of thought with regards to population transfers? No wonder Witty pushes them so hard as a solution — they’re just like him, flowery talk and false platitudes and then, when you give them that inch of trust, they’re wiping their feet on the Geneva Conventions and everything modern international society stands for in the modern era post-WW2.

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 10:38 am

        J Street is rock-solid four square in support of a two state solution.

        which they know without a doubt is impossible to implement.

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 11:22 am

        Chaos,
        Not sure Witty push for 2 states solution, i m sure Witty, eee and yonira support the transfer of Palestinians and Syrians to Syria and Arab countries. Zionism is like a cancer, it continues to spread.

    • Shmuel
      May 7, 2010, 4:55 pm

      The Ministry of the Interior had it on good authority that, while in Jordan, Makhoul was planning on meeting with Arabs, and that there was a good chance that he might converse with them in Arabic.

  7. eee
    May 7, 2010, 5:19 am

    Unlike the Nazis, Israel was not the aggressor in the Six Day War. The Arabs were. Asad had his chance in 1978 when Carter brokered the peace treaty between Israel and Egypt. He could have joined and gotten the Golan back but decided he wasn’t ready for peace. Now it is too late. You make strategic mistakes, you pay the price.

    • aparisian
      May 7, 2010, 5:29 am

      Thats your point of view eee.
      Who started the aggression in 1967? Was it Egypt?

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 7:42 am

        It’s arguable that Egypt’s blocking the Straits of Tiran to Israeli shipping was an unacceptable act of aggression. If so, Israel’s blockade of Gaza may be seen in the same way?

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 7:46 am

        Absolutely. A blockade is an act of aggression. Acceptable or not, is another matter. Hamas and Israel are at war anyway so no casus belli is needed to start one.

      • NorthOfFortyNine
        May 7, 2010, 8:51 am

        3e,

        If Hamas and Israel are at war, as you state, why the bitching when things don’t go your way? Here is a clip from Wiki on Israeli perceptions of Giliad Shalit:

        “”Here we see the basic dilemmas between the individual and the collective, and we see victim pitted against victim. Gilad Shalit is a victim who was violently kidnapped, in a way that Israelis do not consider to be a normative means of struggle. Therefore, one side says, he should be returned at any price. But the families of those killed in terrorist attacks and the people who were wounded in those attacks are victims, too, and they say that no price should be paid to the murderers. And it is truly a dilemma, because no side is right, and no side is wrong.”[54]

        link to en.wikipedia.org

        Note the language here: “kidnapped”, “terrorist attacks”, “murderers”. Is this the language of war? No, the language of war, respectively, is: “captured”, “assaults”, and “combatants.”

        This linguistic trait offers insight into the Israel mindset. When Israel starts wars (and except for ’73, they’ve started them all), when successful, as with the Golan, it struts about in big swinging dick fashion intimating yeah, baby, we stole it, we stole it fair and square. Watcha gonna do about it?

        But then, when things don’t go there way – Lebanon, Shalit, etc. — look how they revert! Look how they bitch and whine! Victims! Poor Israel!

        Witness the rockets started falling in the north during the 2006 war. The populace scattered like rats. Bomb shelters! To the bomb shelters! Even as they were, for an order of magnitude comparison, more likely to get hit by lightening.

        This suggests that, deep down, Israelis are pussies. Their bravado is paper thin. Their nuts the size of raisins.

        All Hezbollah has to do to see these wankers flee back to New Jersey and Miami and all places whence they came is land a couple of firecrackers in a Tel Aviv mall parking lot. “My God!”, they’ll say, “it’s ’39 all over again!” and book the first ticket out. Think Saigon ’75.

        So take 3e’s posturing in stride. He is simply scratching his raisins, making the best of it. For fans of South park here, the following mental image may be helpful:

        link to southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com

      • Chaos4700
        May 7, 2010, 9:24 am

        So Israel basically LIED when it said it agreed to the terms of the cease fire?

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 11:35 am

        NorthOfFortyNine,

        What do you think bomb shelters are for idiot? Not to get into when rockets are shot at you? 44 Israeli civilians died in the 2006 war. They all died because they had no shelter to go to or were caught outside a shelter.

        If you really think that a few rockets will make people leave Israel you are sorely mistaken. Sadam sent quite a few SCUDS our way in 91 yet immigration to Israel was huge in the nineties. 1000 Katyusha rockets were shot at Kiryat Shemona during the 2006 war. During the war people left the city but almost all returned after the war.

        In any case, give it a shot. If you really think that it will be end of Israel recommend to Hizballah to shot rockets at us. But don’t complain if instead of the end of Israel it will be the end of Lebanon and Syria.

      • Chaos4700
        May 7, 2010, 11:41 am

        Um, eee, while you’re here can you explain to us that Israel lied about the ceasefire? Since the blockade was never ended, Israel never technically held fire and the acts of aggression against Gaza were ongoing.

        Blockades are still considered acts of war, right?

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 11:45 am

        cry me a river, raisinuts,

        Sadam sent quite a few SCUDS our way in 91 yet immigration to Israel was huge in the nineties.

        US military manned Patriot missile sites to shoot down those Scuds. More American soldiers died manning those missiles to defend Israel than Israelis died as a consequence of Saddam’s Scuds.

        The “huge immigration in the nineties” was all the Russian Jews neocons conned Scoop Jackson into advocating for — USSR didn’t care if Jews left, they just wanted them to repay the State for the value of their education, provided by the USSR, that Jews took with them. Jackson-Vanik Amendment greased the wheels by greasing Israeli palms with American money. Again.

    • thankgodimatheist
      May 7, 2010, 5:29 am

      Yeah nice piece of “hasbara” here but guess what eee? Nobody buys your crap anymore. As the French say “Ça êut payé, mais ça ne paie plus””
      Google that..

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 11:58 am

        No American soldier died and only one Israeli died because the Israelis were in shelters. Which turn out to be very useful. The Patriots were not effective at all by the way.

        The Russian Jews did not need to pay anything when leaving Russia in the nineties. What are you talking about?

        In any case, if you think it will bring down Israel, why don’t you shoot a few missiles at us? You know why? Because you know exactly who will be destroyed.

    • Sumud
      May 7, 2010, 5:31 am

      “Israel was not the aggressor in the Six Day War”

      LOL that’s why the Six Day War was named the Six Day War by Rabin – because it started on the day Israel attacked Egypt.

      “Yitzhak Rabin, who served as the Chief of the General Staff for Israel during the war stated: “I do not believe that Nasser wanted war. The two divisions he sent into Sinai on May 14 would not have been enough to unleash an offensive against Israel. He knew it and we knew it.”
      Menachem Begin stated that “The Egyptian army concentrations in the Sinai approaches did not prove that Nasser was really about to attack us. We must be honest with ourselves. We decided to attack him.” [77]
      Former Chief of Staff of the armed forces, Haim Bar-Lev (a deputy chief during the war) had stated: “the entrance of the Egyptians into Sinai was not a casus belli,” but argued instead that the Egyptian blockade of the Straits of Tiran ultimately caused the war.
      Major General Mattityahu Peled, the Chief of Logistics for the Armed Forces during the war, said the survival argument was “a bluff which was born and developed only after the war… …”When we spoke of the war in the General Staff, we talked of the political ramifications if we didn’t go to war —what would happen to Israel in the next 25 years. Never of survival today.” [78] Peled also stated that “To pretend that the Egyptian forces massed on our frontiers were in a position to threaten the existence of Israel constitutes an insult not only to the intelligence of anyone capable of analyzing this sort of situation, but above all an insult to Zahal (Israeli military)[79]””
      link to en.wikipedia.org

      I’ll save you some time eee – you can copy and paste this in as your response:

      “It’s all made up BS”

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 5:45 am

        It is very simple. Egypt blockaded the Straits of Tiran. That was an act of war and therefore Egypt started the war. Whatever some specific Israeli thought or assumed does not matter. What matters is that clearly Egypt was the aggressor.

      • Avi
        May 7, 2010, 6:20 am

        The Straits were in Egypt’s territorial waters.

        Since you admit that a blockade is an act war, then quit whining about Hamas putting up a fight.

        It’s a lose – lose situation for an ignoramus like you. Too bad you can’t download Wikipedia straight into your brain like Johnny Mnemonic.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:26 am

        Of course a blockade is an act of war.

        You are a liar. Where did I whine about Hamas fighting? It is your idol Goldstone that complains about how Hamas fights. I don’t expect anything from them, especially after I saw how they treat their own brethren. The unassisted flying lessons were very impressive.

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 6:28 am

        What matters is that if Egypt were the aggressor it would have been called the Twenty-One Day War – having commenced on the day Egypt blockaded the Straits. Yet it is not.

        I have to laugh that lower-case you (an internet nobody, just like me) think you know better than Yitzhak Rabin and Menachem Begin.

      • Avi
        May 7, 2010, 6:32 am

        You use that liar label so often, it has lost all meaning, certainly coming from an avid liar like yourself.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:32 am

        There is difference between a casus belli (a justified reason to go to war) and a war. The blockade, which is not a war, was a justified reason for Israel to go to war. The war did not start with the blockade. It started only after Israel was sure that there would be no international effort to remove the blockade.

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 6:33 am

        3e you mean Gold Stone who called you officially War criminals?

      • Avi
        May 7, 2010, 6:37 am

        It started only after Israel was sure that there would be no international effort to remove the blockade.

        Except for one little problem, care to guess what it is?

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:42 am

        Yes, that you can’t bring yourself to acknowledge that Nasser was an idiot and brought ruin on himself.

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 6:43 am

        “Except for one little problem, care to guess what it is?”

        The meeting arranged in Washington for June 7th with Egypt’s VP – to resolve the blockade?

      • RoHa
        May 7, 2010, 6:46 am

        “There is difference between a casus belli (a justified reason to go to war) and a war. The blockade, which is not a war, was a justified reason for Israel to go to war. The war did not start with the blockade.

        So you agree that Israel started the war, and not Egypt. Egypt may have provided a causus belli , but Israel chose to go to war over it.

      • Avi
        May 7, 2010, 6:50 am

        Yes, that you can’t bring yourself to acknowledge that Nasser was an idiot and brought ruin on himself.

        Nope. Egypt had no attack plans drafted. Their plans were defensive in nature. It’s that simple. Read Avraham Sela’s account of the lead up to the war.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 6:56 am

        So the Egyptians were even bigger idiots. What did they think, that Israel would accept to be blockaded?

      • Avi
        May 7, 2010, 7:04 am

        So the Egyptians were even bigger idiots. What did they think, that Israel would accept to be blockaded?

        Jeeez, you’re not the sharpest tool in the shed, are you?

        The blockade of the Tiran Straits, which are a good 120 miles south of Israel’s southern-most border was a reaction to Israeli attacks and raids in the preceding months.

        You really are out of your element. Did you actually think that Nasser was doing so because he was an anti-Semitic Joooo hater?

      • RoHa
        May 7, 2010, 7:14 am

        “Israeli attacks and raids in the preceding months.”

        But they don’t count as starting a war, or even a causus belli, do they?

      • Avi
        May 7, 2010, 7:21 am

        But they don’t count as starting a war, or even a causus belli, do they?

        Of course not. Because they were magical Zionist attacks with Zionist rainbows and Zionist unicorns. That casus belli stuff only applies to Egypt. They have leprechauns doing the attacks. So, you can see Israel’s justified outrage. [/sracasm]

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 7:25 am

        Avi,

        You are a prize idiot. You lost the argument but can’t admit it. Look at the map. Closing the straits of Tiran blocks all shipping to Eilat. It is the natural and easiest place to blockade the port of Eilat.

        Nasser did what he did because the Russians agitated him to believe that Israel was amassing troops to attack Syria. That was of course false. So Nasser was indeed a prize idiot like you. He was easily manipulated by the Russians that though that a war would be in their favor.

      • RoHa
        May 7, 2010, 7:26 am

        Leprechauns? Those little Irish buggers get everywhere. No wonder the Israelis were outraged.

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 7:26 am

        “Israeli attacks and raids in the preceding months.”

        Which attacks exactly? Care to provide a reference?

      • aparisian
        May 7, 2010, 7:42 am

        and why Godamn Israel attacked Egyptians in 1956 link to en.wikipedia.org ?

      • eee
        May 7, 2010, 7:52 am

        Because it was getting fed up with the cross border attacks on civilians.

        This is what Abba Eban told the UN:
        During the six years during which this belligerency has operated in violation of the Armistice Agreement there have occurred 1,843 cases of armed robbery and theft, 1,339 cases of armed clashes with Egyptian armed forces, 435 cases of incursion from Egyptian controlled territory, 172 cases of sabotage perpetrated by Egyptian military units and fedayeen in Israel. As a result of these actions of Egyptian hostility within Israel, 364 Israelis were wounded and 101 killed. In 1956 alone, as a result of this aspect of Egyptian aggression, 28 Israelis were killed and 127 wounded.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 8:28 am

        It’s clear who started the six day war: Israel The record shows Israel secretely moved up its well-developed attack plan by about a week as soon as Johnson, given a promise by the Israel’s he had to act before June 11, showed he was about to tell Egypt to it’s diplomat’s face it would face an international fleet (already being set up) protecting Israeli vessels if it did not call off its blockade against Israeli shipping. Part of the Israeli plan all along was to take more land, which it did. It would have taken even more but for the sudden reality of a violent face off between
        US & USSR, that is, WW3.

        link to wrmea.com

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 8:29 am

        aparisian that was really very generous of you to throw eee a lifeline and change the subject to 1956.

        However, I’m still waiting for eee to explain why he/she knows more than Rabin and Begin on the causes of the Six Day War.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 8:30 am

        The Israeli attacks and raids mentioned here, eee:
        link to wrmea.com

      • Sumud
        May 7, 2010, 8:30 am

        “This is what Abba Eban told the UN:”

        A professional liar – who cares what he said?

      • Taxi
        May 7, 2010, 8:33 am

        eee

        You’ve got about another four years of re-inventing the history of the Arabs before they finally crush every walking zionist numb skull, every zionist kuckle and limb walking around the holy land.

        Out out out Khazars!

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 8:35 am

        From wiki:
        The interests of the parties were various. Britain was anxious lest it lose efficient access to the remains of its empire. France was nervous about the growing influence that Nasser exerted on its North African colonies and protectorates. Both Britain and France were eager that the canal should remain open as an important conduit of oil. Israel wanted to reopen the canal to Israeli shipping, and saw the opportunity to strengthen its southern border and to weaken what it saw as a dangerous and hostile state.
        Prior to the operation, Britain deliberately neglected to take counsel with the Americans, trusting instead that Nasser’s engagement with communist states would persuade the Americans to accept British and French actions if they were presented as a fait accompli. This proved to be a fatal miscalculation.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 8:55 am

        There were constant clashes between Egyptian and Israeli border troops. Egypt had constantly interfered with Israeli shipping via waters within Egypt’s maritime jurisdiction.

        From history.com:
        “The catalyst for the joint Israeli-British-French attack on Egypt was the nationalization of the Suez Canal by Egyptian leader General Gamal Abdel Nasser in July 1956. The situation had been brewing for some time. Two years earlier, the Egyptian military had begun pressuring the British to end its military presence (which had been granted in the 1936 Anglo-Egyptian Treaty) in the canal zone. Nasser’s armed forces also engaged in sporadic battles with Israeli soldiers along the border between the two nations, and the Egyptian leader did nothing to conceal his antipathy toward the Zionist nation. Supported by Soviet arms and money, and furious with the United States for reneging on a promise to provide funds for construction of the Aswan Dam on the Nile River, Nasser ordered the Suez Canal seized and nationalized. The British were angry with the move and sought the support of France (which believed that Nasser was supporting rebels in the French colony of Algeria), and Israel (which needed little provocation to strike at the enemy on its border), in an armed assault to retake the canal.”

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 9:00 am

        the failure of Russia to achieve its objective in 1967; namely, the destruction of Israel’s nuclear weapons program in Dimona, is perhaps the most tragic failure in the last half-century. While the Russians DID fail to destroy Dimona, they did succeed in revealing to the world the destructive core of zionism, a destructive element that has mushroomed and now threatens to destroy not only Israel and Palestine, but also to eviscerate Iran just as Israel clamored for the destruction of Iraq.
        Israel’s attack on the USS Liberty, killing 37 US sailors, in the course of the 1967 Dimona war presaged Israel’s vicious campaign to destroy the United States as well, a campaign that is STILL in full force and only gathering steam.
        Zionists are destroying the US from within and without.
        It has been done before: predators of little talent and less moral scruple, finding themselves on hard times in their native country insinuated themselves into positions of influence in Egypt, sucked at Egypt’s most fruitful teats for over 400 years, then turned on their generous hosts, stole their treasure, killed their children, and fled the land that had nurtured them, clutching their stolen booty.
        These predators turned their attention to the land of Canaan. Twisting all sense of morality with the claim that “god told them to kill,” these thieves suborned a prostitute, Rahab (the “R” in Hillary R Clinton), to conspire with them to destroy the world’s oldest agricultural village, Jericho, slew its inhabitants, stole the wealth of the people of Jericho and called it their own.

        A house built on a foundation of sand cannot stand.
        A people built on a foundation of criminality and immorality cannot stand. And if Israel has been “persecuted” throughout the millenia, it is because it lives as a predator on the life’s blood of others.

        Hasbara is the most astonishing phenomenon: How stupid must a nation or a people be to believe that if they tell enough lies about themselves people will trust them?

        For several years I’ve been trying to define anti-semitism. Last week the leaders of major Jewish organizations from Israel and the United States met in Washington, DC, with corralled US legislators and bureaucrats, and demanded that the US do something about the “pandemic of anti-semitism” that is abroad.

        What IS reaching pandemic proportions is the awareness on the part of more and more Americans that Israelis and zionists are evil, deceitful, murderous thugs. To say so openly is “anti semitic.” Thus, anti-semitism is defined as the process of discovering the truth about zionism and Israel. We can only pray that this ‘pandemic’ will infect our leaders, and that they will awaken to the truth about the evil of zionism and take the proper course of treatment to carve the disease out of themselves and the body politic.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 9:06 am

        Israel loved the blockade because it gave them a pretext for war to grab more land–that’s why they attacked before Johnson’s international navy could be sent to break the blockade, even before Johnson had a chance to give official notice to Egypt it would face an international navy if it did not cease its blockade.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 9:27 am

        It is interesting that jewish religious lore always leaves out Pharaoh only sent his army after the Israelites after they plundered
        Egyptian storage towns, killed the inhabitants thereof, and ran out of Egypt with their plunder. Prior thereto, the Israelites were happy as a border army nation/ally of Egypt. They grew unhappy when Egypt decided to take away their status as Egyptian “Hessian” warriors and turned them into municipal construction workers (with fringe bennies) as Egypt often did to peoples they controlled. Before the looting and killings by the Israelites and their subsequent escape out of Egypt, Pharaoh told them they could leave Egypt, no problem. After they left Egypt, they attacked the inhabitants of Canaan, most notoriously, at Jericho as PG describes.

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 10:13 am

        eee is very good at fighting the last war, and future wars with someone else’s blood.

        Egypt, on the other hand, is trying to PREVENT war and bloodshed (try to incorporate the concept, eee; we know the learning curve is steep for you, so we’ll go s l o w. )

        Here’s what Egypt is doing NOW, today, to achieve peace:

        Egypt wants talks over nuclear-free Mideast zone

        Egypt is leading non-aligned nations in a push to convene a conference next year on turning the Middle East into a zone free of nuclear weapons.

        The non-aligned states also want Israel, which is believed to have some 200 nuclear warheads, officially to declare its arsenal and then join the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in order to disarm.

        Israel, supported by its puppet US, says, Oh, yes, definitely, we agree, no nukes in the Middle East, but WE won’t think about it until there is peace between Israel and Palestine.

        Israel has spent the entire 60 years of its sorry existence sabotaging any attempts at a just peace between Israel and Palestinians.

      • thankgodimatheist
        May 8, 2010, 7:10 am

        Who started the war? Kai Bird: Isreal did..

        Kai Bird on “Israel’s culture of victimhood”
        1. In your description of the Six Days War you write that this was “a calculated war of aggression”. The aggressor, in your story line, seems to be Israel. The Egyptian leadership of your story is portrayed as close to harmless (if bombastic in tone). I don’t think most Israelis – and Americans – see this war the way you do. Can you explain the differences?

        I understand that most Israelis and Americans still believe that Egypt provoked the June War and perhaps they even believe that Egypt was the aggressor. But historians are constantly churning the archives for new evidence. Our job is to revise the historical narrative with new evidence. To this end, I am firmly persuaded that the war happened as a result of a series of miscalculations on the part of Nasser, the Syrians, and the Soviets. Moreover, it is also clear that the Israeli leadership understood that Nasser had no intention of launching an attack — but that he had provided them the public provocations that allowed them to seize the opportunity to deal his regime a blow and seize the Sinai. The Israelis fired the first shot — and they initiated this war of choice after obtaining a green light from the Johnson Administration. I know this goes against the grain of Israeli opinion, but I believe my narrative in Crosssing Mandelbaum Gate is highly persuasive.
        link to cgis.jpost.com

    • Psychopathic god
      May 7, 2010, 9:50 am

      bullshit eee

      You make strategic mistakes, you pay the price.

      bar kochba made a strategic mistake in 67 Anno Domino; Rome crushed the little turd. Losing wars has consequences; Israel LOST.

      • Chaos4700
        May 7, 2010, 10:00 am

        Of course, we ended all of the “war as a tool of policy” at the end of WW2. Or at least we tried to. Apparently Israel didn’t want to let go of that little slice of barbarism, and they waved it in front of the burgeoning US military-industrial complex as raw meat.

    • Citizen
      May 7, 2010, 11:24 am

      excerpt from wrmea.com:

      “For some time the Syrians had been supporting Palestinian guerrilla raids across Israel’s borders. True to their policy of retaliating against moderate Arab regimes, however, Israeli reprisal raids were carried out against Palestinian West Bank villages under Jordanian rule.

      In November 1966, a PLO mine planted by Al Fatah guerrillas on an Israeli road near the Jordanian frontier killed three and wounded six Israeli soldiers. An Israeli armored column, supported by Mirage aircraft, crossed the frontier and destroyed the West Bank village of As-Sammu. Eighteen Palestinians and Jordanian soldiers were killed and 134 wounded.

      At this time, King Hussein was the most effective spokesman for the Arabs with U.S. audiences. His English was excellent and he had become a familiar television personality on his frequent visits to the United States, explaining the Palestinian and Arab cause moderately and effectively, time and again.

      The U.S. joined in U.N. condemnation of the Israeli raid. President Johnson, however, did not ask the Israelis why, if they were retaliating against Syria, they kept pounding Hussein’s subjects on the West Bank.

      With little U.S. intelligence capability in Israel, there was no one with easy access to the president to tell him that Israeli planners had calculated that, if Hussein appeared too weak to defend his subjects, those subjects would find a way to replace him. Nor did anyone warn Johnson that the new ruler probably would be more like Nasser or the hard-line rulers of Syria. Then the Israelis would have an excuse to do what they had wanted to do in 1948 and again in 1956: expel Jordan’s Arab Legion militarily from East Jerusalem and the West Bank, and ensure that as many Palestinians as possible went with it.”

  8. Avi
    May 7, 2010, 6:55 am

    The meeting arranged in Washington for June 7th with Egypt’s VP – to resolve the blockade?

    That too, the US wasn’t interested in yet another flare up in the region.

    • eee
      May 7, 2010, 6:58 am

      Sure, the US would have just asked and the Egyptians would have stopped the blockade.

      • Citizen
        May 7, 2010, 8:59 am

        No, eee–the US was fully prepared to send an international naval force
        to break the Egyptian blockade. As soon as Johnson made that clear to the Israelis they secretely moved up their plan to attack because they needed the blockade as a pretext for the war they planned to obtain more land.

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 9:17 am

        The USSR deliberately instigated the crisis and the war of 1967;…it did so in the context of blocking Israel’s nuclear program; and…it committed Soviet personnel and weapons for a direct military intervention. … military coordination with Israel’s Arab neighbors, especially Egypt, accompanied the Soviet naval buildup for direct military intervention. Such coordination, which had been solidified by the nuclear guarantee that the Soviets gave Egypt in February 1966, led to “the Egyptian measures that provoked war with Israel in 1967, including the eviction of the United Nations Emergency Force (UNEF) from the Sinai Peninsula and the closure of the Tiran straits. Both were inspired by the Soviet military.

        The Soviet Union instigated the war, because, in December 1965, “the Soviets received an unambiguous message from an authoritative Israeli source that Israel was developing an atomic bomb and intended to arm itself with such a weapon.” According Ms. Ginor and Mr. Remez, “the main news for Moscow must have been not the Israeli intent but the fact that it had not yet been realized, and that a window of opportunity still existed to prevent its fruition” [p. 47]

        Given Moscow’s (heretofore unknown) strategic objective, “the Soviet leadership…preferred to act when and where a US response seemed less probable. One way to reduce this probability, the Soviets correctly perceived, was by ensuring that Israel would strike first, thus incurring international condemnation and US disapproval. And finally, Israel was to be attacked on an issue in which it was at serious odds with the United States: its nuclear program, at a moment when Washington was almost as apprehensive as Moscow about the prospect of Israel acquiring nuclear weapons.” [p. 26]

        Over a million people have lost their lives because USSR failed in its mission to destroy Israel’s nuclear weapons in Dimona.

        It’s time for those nuclear weapons to come under the control of NPT, and subject to rigorous and intrusive IAEA inspection and oversight.

        Israel is a dangerous, nuclear armed, rogue state whose civilian population is teetering on the edge of sociopathy. It is a sick society in possession of an uncontrolled nuclear arsenal.

      • eljay
        May 7, 2010, 10:07 am

        >> The Soviet Union instigated the war, because, in December 1965, “the Soviets received an unambiguous message from an authoritative Israeli source that Israel was developing an atomic bomb and intended to arm itself with such a weapon.”

        That sounds like a g*ddamned “existential threat” to other nations in the region! At the very least, it would have been “destabilizing”. Instead of developing weapons of mass destruction, Israelis should have cared enough about “the other” to show themselves as human beings instead of victims (“Remember the Holocaust!”), to make the “better argument” and to work toward loosening the knot of escalation.

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 11:03 am

        eljay, get with the program. IRAN is the “existential threat.”
        climb into your footie ‘jamies (that was really funny) and repeat after Professor Hasbara:
        “Israel is the perpetual victim; Iran is an existential threat.”
        “Israel is the perpetual victim; Iran is an existential threat.”
        “Irael is the perpetual victim; Isran is an existential threat.”
        “Irael is the perpetual victim; Isran is an existential threat.”
        “Iral is the perpetual victim; Israen is an existential threat.”
        “Iral is the perpetual victim; Israen is an existential threat.”
        “Iran is the perpetual victim; Israel is an existential threat.”
        “Iran is the perpetual victim; Israel is an existential threat.”

        I knew if you repeated it often enough you would arrive at the truth.

  9. VR
    May 7, 2010, 8:49 am

    The fact of the matter is that Israel is at war with its own citizens, it is bleeding from the inside out. A democracy for the chosen few is no democracy, it is a lie apparent. The little Afrikaners will be dismissed with prejudice.

  10. Shmuel
    May 7, 2010, 9:27 am

    Apparently, Didi Remez was injured again today (tear gas canister in the leg – fired at the crowd from a distance of under 80m) at a peaceful protest. He’s ok.

    • Psychopathic god
      May 7, 2010, 9:57 am

      a thread yesterday had a comment and a video link from Michael Levin. The video was of Levin telling IDF that what they are doing is shameful, and that they can and must make a moral choice whether to continue to act immorally or to take advantage of the opportunity Israel gives its soldiers to opt out.

      • Shmuel
        May 7, 2010, 10:24 am

        The man in the video is not Michael Levin, but the wonderful Prof. Mazin Qumsiyeh. ML just posted it along with MQ’s report from al-Walaja.

      • Psychopathic god
        May 7, 2010, 10:45 am

        thanks for the correction, Shmuel.

      • Colin Murray
        May 7, 2010, 10:24 am

        The moral choice to which you refer reminds me a line from REH Howard’s Conan short story “The Vale of Lost Women.”

        The ways of men vary in different lands, but a man need not be a swine, wherever he is.

  11. Colin Murray
    May 7, 2010, 9:52 am

    Guys, no need to get worked up about eee’s proclamations about Israel never returning the Golan. He’s indulging in a bit of hubris; it’s not his call to make.

    • Chaos4700
      May 7, 2010, 9:58 am

      He’ll be one of those who picks up a gun and tries to shoot any of the expelled citizens of the Golan when they are finally given their property back, so you’ll understand that some of us are a little bit anxious about the Nakba in progress as it extends into the future and affects more and more nationalities.

  12. NormanF
    May 7, 2010, 8:13 pm

    The Shin Bet is working hard to disrupt extremist activity in Israel. But Israel has yet to ban radical Islamist associations seeking the overthrow of the state.

    • Chaos4700
      May 7, 2010, 8:14 pm

      The Shin Bet is extremist activity.

    • Shingo
      May 7, 2010, 8:22 pm

      “The Shin Bet is working hard to disrupt extremist activity in Israel.”

      By extremism, I take it you are referring to peace groups and human rights organizations.

      They’re nothing but a Zionist Gestapo.

      “But Israel has yet to ban radical Islamist associations seeking the overthrow of the state.”

      There aren’t any in Israel, so no need.

  13. NormanF
    May 7, 2010, 8:21 pm

    Protecting a country’s existence by your lights is extremist activity. The Shin Bet hasn’t done to the Arabs what Russia’s FSB did to the Chechens.

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