The forest through the trees: What the Carmel fire reminds us about Israel’s history

Israel/Palestine
on 43 Comments

Max Blumenthal has an important new piece for the Electronic Intifada on the Carmel fire and what it reveals about Israel’s history and current politics. From The Carmel wildfire is burning all illusions in Israel:

Among the towns that have been evacuated is Ein Hod, a bohemian artists’ colony nestled in the hills to the north and east of Haifa. This is not the first time Ein Hod was evacuated, however. The first time was in 1948, when the town’s original Palestinian inhabitants were driven from their homes by a manmade disaster known as the Nakba.

Most of the original inhabitants of Ein Hod, which was called Ayn Hawd prior to the expulsions of ’48, and was continuously populated since the 12th century, were expelled to refugee camps in Jordan and Jenin in the West Bank. But a small and exceptionally resilient band of residents fled to the hills, set up a makeshift camp and watched as Jewish foreigners moved into their homes.

In 1953, a Romanian Dadaist sculptor named Marcel Janco convinced the army not to bulldoze Ein Hod as it did the scores of nearby Palestinian towns it had ethnically cleansed five years prior. He proposed establishing an art commune to generate tourism and contribute to the culture of Zionism. Today, the rustic stone homes that once belonged to Palestinians are quaint artist studios, while the village mosque has been converted into an airy bar called Bonanza. Visitors to the town are greeted at the entrance by Benjamin Levy’s “The Modest Couple in a Sardine Can,” a sculpture depicting a nude woman and a suited gentleman in a sardine can, which was unveiled by Israeli President Shimon Peres in 2001.

After the catastrophe of 1948, the original Palestinians of Ayn Hawd set up their own village three kilometers away from what is today known as Eid Hod. For decades the villagers resisted attempts to dispossess them and were surrounded by a fence during the 1970s to prevent them from expanding according to natural growth. But they finally won official recognition in 2005. This meant that for the first time since the establishment of Israel they could receive electricity and trash service. Meanwhile, more than forty other Palestinian villages inside Israel remain “unrecognized.” The 80,000 or so residents of the villages, which lay mostly in the Negev desert, are tax-paying citizens of Israel. However, they have few rights; their homes are routinely demolished to make way for Jewish settlements and they are deprived of basic services.

I visited both Ein Hod and Ayn Hawd in June. When the residents of the Jewish village Ein Hod saw me filming, they reacted with a mixture of suspicion and hostility. “I know what you’re doing!” an elderly woman sneered at me, insisting that I not film her. Inside the bar, I asked patrons if the place was in fact a converted mosque. “Yeah, but that’s how all of Israel is,” a woman from a nearby kibbutz told me as she sipped on a beer. “This whole country is built on top of Arab villages. So maybe it’s best to let bygones be bygones.”

I provoked another annoyed reaction when I began filming a tour guide leading a group of elderly Israelis around the village. Speaking in Hebrew, the guide told the tourists as she took them through the art studios that they were inside “third generation houses” — forget the Arabs who lived in them for hundreds of years. In the studios I noticed that much of the art being produced was Judaica kitsch for sale to foreign tourists — generic shtetl scenes from the long lost, distant world immortalized in films like Fiddler on the Roof.

Later, before taking her group to the town’s Hurdy Gurdy museum, the guide mentioned a “welcoming committee” that vetted potential residents. Presumably this was how Ein Hod kept the pesky Arabs down the road from returning home. That and the Absentee Property Law of 1950 which placed all “abandoned” Arab property in the hands of the Jewish National Fund and the Israeli Land Administration, a provision that consolidated what the exiled Palestinian member of the Israeli parliament Azmi Bishara called “the largest armed robbery in history.”

During a break, the tour guide pulled me aside and demanded to know who I was. It was clear the villagers had grown wary of curious outsiders. Introducing herself as Shuli Linda Yarkon, a PhD candidate at Tel Aviv University, the tour guide told me she the leading authority on Ein Hod. She said I had to allow her to review all the footage I shot. She claimed that this would ensure that I not mistranslate words she used like kibbush, a Hebrew term that means “conquest” but is commonly used to refer to the occupation of Palestine.

“So what about the conquest you mentioned?” I asked her. “Why didn’t you tell the tourists who lived in the houses before 1948?” Visibly irritated, Yarkon remarked, “I’ve concluded after years of research that there are really no facts when you discuss this issue. There are only narratives.” She assured me that Ein Hod’s Jewish population maintained excellent relations with the expelled residents: “Go ask them. They will tell you how they feel.”

So I did. After following a winding dirt road around a hillside for several kilometers, I was inside Ayn Hawd, the Palestinian village. There was no installation art here, just ramshackle houses, dirt roads, a mosque with a tall minaret and lots of kids playing in the streets. Almost immediately some of the town’s residents appeared from their homes to greet me. Abu al-Hisa Moein, a village council member and schoolteacher, invited me to spend the rest of the afternoon with his family on a patio beside his home, which appeared newer and more stately than those of his neighbors. He told me his ancestors arrived in the village more than 700 years ago from what is now Iraq. His relatives who were expelled to Jenin in 1948 told him they would be too angry to even lay eyes their former homes with the new occupants inside. When I mentioned the bar built into the old mosque, Moein shook his head in disgust. “It’s very bad. It’s an insult,” he said.

Moein took me inside his home for a tour, showing me the spacious, immaculately clean parlor and the picture window with a sweeping view of the valley below. He had built the whole place, he said with pride. Down a hall, his 13-year-old daughter, Ansam, was reclining on the floor of her room reading John Knowles’ classic bildungsroman, A Separate Peace. She leapt to attention when I entered and spent the next ten minutes showing me her library of literature. With night setting in, Moein and his family took me back on the patio. There, he unfurled a map of Mandate-era Palestine and ran his fingers over the names of scores of villages destroyed on the coast between Jaffa and Haifa by Zionist forces in 1948. He pointed to towns like Kafr Saba, Qaqun, al-Tira and Tantura, the site of a horrific massacre of unarmed Palestinian prisoners on the beach just one month after the Deir Yassin massacre. Moein was a history teacher, but Israel had forbidden him from discussing these events in his classroom, and is in the process of criminalizing any public observance of them.

As darkness blanketed the hills, I realized that I had lost track of time. I told Moein that I needed to get back to Tel Aviv. With that, his wife rushed into the house and gathered a bundle of grapes she had picked from a tree in the family’s yard, packing it for me in some tupperware from their kitchen. Then Moein walked me to my car and hugged me goodbye.

Read the entire article here.

About Max Blumenthal

Max Blumenthal is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author.

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43 Responses

  1. lysias
    December 7, 2010, 10:51 am

    If arson was the cause of the fire, would Israel admit it, or dream up a cover story?

    • annie
      December 7, 2010, 11:42 am

      i recommend reading the entire article lysias.

      • Kathleen
        December 7, 2010, 11:57 am

        Annie let’s get this one up at other places. Linked to Washington Note, INformed comment, and Race for Iran. Contacted Huffington Post. They need to put Max’s latest front and center. Hell they put up Dershowitz’s hooey up over there all of the time. Let’s get some diversity of opinion, and the facts that Max shares about Palestinians being run out of their villages, and his direct experience up over there. Huff Po needs to widen their scope

      • annie
        December 7, 2010, 12:26 pm

        i agree it is an excellent article. i wish i could see some of those film clips. i’m sending out on my listserves. it deserves widespread exposure.

      • Susie Kneedler
        December 7, 2010, 12:49 pm

        Sad, sick film of the former Ayn Hawd here, from Gilad Atzmon: link to mwcnews.net.

  2. Sumud
    December 7, 2010, 10:56 am

    The Mount Carmel nature reserve was planted over the “depopulated” Palestinian village of Umm Al Zinat, and the village’s land. Article from EI:

    ‘Umm al-Zinat: Commemorating the Catastrophe’
    link to electronicintifada.net

    Umm Al Zinat was ‘transferred’ to the JNF in October 1950 and planted with conifers. The first report here:

    link to plands.org

    …about the JNF specifically mentions Umm Al Zinat in Appendix 2 – entry 140.

    • eljay
      December 7, 2010, 11:26 am

      >> The Mount Carmel nature reserve was planted over the “depopulated” Palestinian village of Umm Al Zinat, and the village’s land.

      “A land without trees for trees without a land!” :-)

  3. Susie Kneedler
    December 7, 2010, 11:05 am

    Max Blumenthal continues, ‘An area on the south slope of Mount Carmel so closely resembled the landscape of the Swiss Alps that it was nicknamed “Little Switzerland.” Of course, the nonindigenous trees of the JNF were poorly suited to the environment in Palestine. Most of the saplings the JNF plants at a site near Jerusalem simply do not survive, and require frequent replanting. Elsewhere, needles from the pine trees have killed native plant species and wreaked havoc on the ecosystem. And as we have seen with the Carmel wildfire, the JNF’s trees go up like tinder in the dry heat….

    [Meanwhile] ‘”GOD TV is planting over ONE MILLION TREES across the Holy Land as a miraculous sign to Israel and to the world that Jesus is coming soon.”

    [And from violence to projections of it]
    ‘In his 1970 short fiction story “Facing the Forest,” the famed Israeli author A.B. Yehoshua portrayed a mute Palestinian forest watchman who burns down a JNF forest to reveal the hidden ruins of his former village. Thirty years later, as the JNF forests around Mount Carmel burn, right-wing Israeli lawmakers have demanded a search for the Arab who must have sparked the blaze, even though there is no firm evidence about the cause of the fire. Michael Ben Ari, a extremist Member of Knesset from the National Union Party, called for “the whole Shin Bet” — Israel’s domestic intelligence agency — to be mobilized to investigate what the right-wing media outlet Arutz Sheva said “may turn out to be the worst terror attack in Israel’s history.”‘

    See also Gilad Atzmon’s fascinating essay on Ein Hod, camouflage forest, and the unrecognized Palestinian villages in Israel*–including video of kitch art:
    link to mwcnews.net.
    (*Atzmon seems unaware that Israel finally recognized Ein Hod.)

    And remember this insight: link to mondoweiss.net.

    • Chu
      December 7, 2010, 4:14 pm

      Aztom is one of the few Israelis,
      whose cynicism is a breath of fresh air.

    • DICKERSON3870
      December 7, 2010, 8:14 pm

      RE: “GOD TV is planting over ONE MILLION TREES”
      ALSO SEE: Isaiah Weeps: Jewish National Fund, GOD-TV Erase Israeli Bedouin Village to Bring Jesus’ Second Coming ~ By Richard Silverstein, Tikun Olam, 12/06/10
      LINK – link to richardsilverstein.com

  4. Mooser
    December 7, 2010, 11:08 am

    ” I noticed that much of the art being produced was Judaica kitsch for sale to foreign tourists — generic shtetl scenes from the long lost, distant world immortalized in films like Fiddler on the Roof.”

    Oh yeah, there’s a special Jewish-Zionist gene all right. But somehow I don’t think it’s related to intelligence, or even financial skill. From everything I have seen in my life, it seems to be related to credulity and herd-instinct. With a strange genital-mutilation component built in to it.
    It’s a “we” thing.

    What the Zionists have done with the Jewish religion, Jewishness, whatever you want to call it, is the equivalent of deciding, after you lose your IT job, that the only sensible solution is to send your wife out to turn tricks, because you might have to take a job as a dishwasher.

    BTW, if anybody needs a dishwasher, I’m here, available and out of work.

    • Bumblebye
      December 7, 2010, 8:46 pm

      You could pen that fictional biography!

      How about “Deep in the urban wetlands, where the murky blog-creatures lurk…”

      Never know, you might make your squillions from it, be able to stop washing dishes!

  5. Citizen
    December 7, 2010, 11:14 am

    Max’s article goes on, despite the firee, to discuss the continuing ironical greenwash of the unsavory aspects of contemporary Israel’s history. He says the JNF is advancing plans to plant one million trees in a plot called “GOD TV Forest.” To do this requires expulsion of an old but thriving Bedouin village that officially does not exist, home to many Arab Israeli citizens who have furnished the IDF with its frontline tracking troops, and rebuilt each time Israel destroyed it.

    The kitsch name for the proposed forest refers to GOD TV, an evangelical Christian broadcasting network that “hosts faith-based fraudsters like Creflo Dollar and rapture-ready fanatics like Rory and Wendy Alec.” According to its website, “GOD TV is planting over ONE MILLION TREES across the Holy Land as a miraculous sign to Israel and to the world that Jesus is coming soon.
    Calling Groucho Marx.

  6. James North
    December 7, 2010, 11:25 am

    A terrific post, Max. I love the triumph of post-modernist vapidity: “There are no facts. Only narratives.”
    My experience in South Africa during the time of apartheid was identical to yours. The white people would tell me the black people were happy, and that I should just ask them. So I did, and got the same kind of truths, along with courteous hospitality, as you report so effectively here.

    • RoHa
      December 8, 2010, 5:37 am

      “I’ve concluded after years of research that there are really no facts when you discuss this issue. There are only narratives.”

      The facts are what happened. If there are no facts, nothing happened. If nothing happended, no accusations can be made against Israel, no guilt attaches, nothing is wrong.

      Post-modernist vapidity indeed.

  7. Kathleen
    December 7, 2010, 11:30 am

    “But a small and exceptionally resilient band of residents fled to the hills, set up a makeshift camp and watched as Jewish foreigners moved into their homes.”

    Attended a Palestinian Solidarity March in D.C. about 10 years ago. Spent my time audio taping older Palestinians who had been run out of their homes in the late 40’s by Jewish terrorist. Powerful, sad, horrendous stories. That most Americans have never heard

  8. Kathleen
    December 7, 2010, 11:35 am

    “The 80,000 or so residents of the villages, which lay mostly in the Negev desert, are tax-paying citizens of Israel. However, they have few rights; their homes are routinely demolished to make way for Jewish settlements and they are deprived of basic services.

    I visited both Ein Hod and Ayn Hawd in June. When the residents of the Jewish village Ein Hod saw me filming, they reacted with a mixture of suspicion and hostility. “I know what you’re doing!” an elderly woman sneered at me, insisting that I not film her. Inside the bar, I asked patrons if the place was in fact a converted mosque. “Yeah, but that’s how all of Israel is,” a woman from a nearby kibbutz told me as she sipped on a beer. “This whole country is built on top of Arab villages. So maybe it’s best to let bygones be bygones.”

    It is called apartheid.

  9. Kathleen
    December 7, 2010, 11:37 am

    Thank you Max. Will be spreading this post far and wide. Amazing. Thank you for your important and compassionate work.
    “So what about the conquest you mentioned?” I asked her. “Why didn’t you tell the tourists who lived in the houses before 1948?” Visibly irritated, Yarkon remarked, “I’ve concluded after years of research that there are really no facts when you discuss this issue. There are only narratives.” She assured me that Ein Hod’s Jewish population maintained excellent relations with the expelled residents: “Go ask them. They will tell you how they feel.”

    So I did. After following a winding dirt road around a hillside for several kilometers, I was inside Ayn Hawd, the Palestinian village. There was no installation art here, just ramshackle houses, dirt roads, a mosque with a tall minaret and lots of kids playing in the streets. Almost immediately some of the town’s residents appeared from their homes to greet me. Abu al-Hisa Moein, a village council member and schoolteacher, invited me to spend the rest of the afternoon with his family on a patio beside his home, which appeared newer and more stately than those of his neighbors. He told me his ancestors arrived in the village more than 700 years ago from what is now Iraq. His relatives who were expelled to Jenin in 1948 told him they would be too angry to even lay eyes their former homes with the new occupants inside. When I mentioned the bar built into the old mosque, Moein shook his head in disgust. “It’s very bad. It’s an insult,” he said.

    Moein took me inside his home for a tour, showing me the spacious, immaculately clean parlor and the picture window with a sweeping view of the valley below. He had built the whole place, he said with pride. Down a hall, his 13-year-old daughter, Ansam, was reclining on the floor of her room reading John Knowles’ classic bildungsroman, A Separate Peace. She leapt to attention when I entered and spent the next ten minutes showing me her library of literature. With night setting in, Moein and his family took me back on the patio. There, he unfurled a map of Mandate-era Palestine and ran his fingers over the names of scores of villages destroyed on the coast between Jaffa and Haifa by Zionist forces in 1948. He pointed to towns like Kafr Saba, Qaqun, al-Tira and Tantura, the site of a horrific massacre of unarmed Palestinian prisoners on the beach just one month after the Deir Yassin massacre. Moein was a history teacher, but Israel had forbidden him from discussing these events in his classroom, and is in the process of criminalizing any public observance of them.”

  10. Kathleen
    December 7, 2010, 11:48 am

    Linked this story over at Race for Iran, Informed Comment, Washington Note.

    If Huffington Post will put up pieces by Dershowitz, and other blind pro Israel supporters. Why not Max Blumenthals latest. Please contact Huffington Post and demand that they put Max’s latest up at their site

    Contact info
    link to huffingtonpost.com

    • Kathleen
      December 7, 2010, 11:54 am

      Hope folks contact Huff Po we need to get this well done piece by Max up at that site. Contact Huff po. I just did

  11. eee
    December 7, 2010, 1:42 pm

    Max’s article is just as relevant as “What the Katrina disaster reminds us about US history”.
    Or what this article about Native American poverty reminds us about history:
    link to spotlightonpoverty.org

    Interesting but irrelevant for how to move forward.

    • Potsherd2
      December 7, 2010, 2:28 pm

      Sure it tells us how to move forward – by moving backwards and restoring things to the way they were.

      Expel the interlopers and return the houses to the rightful owners. Clear out the booze desecrating the mosque.

      If you did a story about how a synagogue was turned into a pork sausage shop, you’d go deaf from the screams of Jewish outrage, yet these Israelis can’t see anything wrong with turning a mosque into a bar.

      • Chu
        December 7, 2010, 4:10 pm

        because so many are just completely demented. Take this guy your replying to. Probably does not even understand the irony of your last paragraph.

    • Mooser
      December 7, 2010, 3:58 pm

      So, you won’t be satified until every Palestinian suffers the fate of America’s Indians, in the interests of justice?

    • seafoid
      December 7, 2010, 5:01 pm

      Israel has never been more fragile. There is nothing permanent about Israel. It was always an audacious gamble . And now with YESHA having morphed into a golem and aliyeh all dried up one does wonder about how Israel is going to face the challenges of the future. Especially with Lieberman going on bended knee to Turkey.

  12. lareineblanche
    December 7, 2010, 3:02 pm

    “I’ve concluded after years of research that there are really no facts when you discuss this issue. There are only narratives.”

    Of course. It couldn’t be any other way, really, when what is taking place is so far divorced from any kind of common sense.
    This moves the argument into the realm of force, and persuasion. Those who have the force to bend the historical narrative to their image are the winners, any actual events are almost irrelevant.

    “Winning hearts and minds”
    (“Narratives” in this case is a word for “propaganda”.)

    • seafoid
      December 7, 2010, 5:03 pm

      Bending the historical narrative is fine but you need to back it up with demographics. And Erez Israel no longer has a Jewish majority.

    • Potsherd2
      December 8, 2010, 6:17 am

      Go out and say the six million Jews killed in the Holocaust isn’t a fact, and the Nazi narrative is just as legitimate.

      • lareineblanche
        December 8, 2010, 2:51 pm

        Yes, this was (sort of) what I was trying to say.

        As we all know, the victors write the history books. If you take, every single event that ever happened, and tried to put it into a book, obviously it would be impossible. So, there is a filtering process involved in the recounting of historical events, and facts will be selected. Anyone authoring a “narrative”, as it’s called, will obviously try to make oneself look good, and explain that they HAD to do what they did, because, well you understand, “we had no choice”

        So, it’s really revealing that the woman says, that there are only “narratives, and not facts” – she has really no choice, because if she is to recount the facts, the whole thing falls to pieces, and she must rely on a “narrative”. Make sense?

  13. optimax
    December 7, 2010, 3:10 pm

    Marcel Janco painting, Ein Hod.

    link to artnet.com

  14. seafoid
    December 7, 2010, 5:10 pm

    Blumenthal in the full article says Israel has diverted billions towards the settlers at the expense of its ordinary citizens. And here are the consequences :

    link to haaretz.com

    The withdrawal of the Mizrahi Ultra Orthodox from modern society doesn’t help either.

    • Potsherd2
      December 7, 2010, 10:44 pm

      The education ministry retorts that if you only count the “Hebrew-speaking” sector (ie, Jews), the rank rises.

      Of course the “Yiddish-speaking” sector doesn’t even take the test.

      • annie
        December 7, 2010, 11:02 pm

        yeah, he ignores the yeshiva students. i don’t think science and math are their forte…to say the least.

  15. jon s
    December 8, 2010, 4:44 am

    The Carmel fire reminded us that such disasters don’t make distinctions between Jews and non-Jews. It was heart-warming to see Jews and Arabs and Druze battling the flames together, as well as the international response, which included Palestinians, Jordanians and Turks. We won’t forget.
    The writer sees fit to tie last weeks’ calamity to the Naqba. Let’s not forget that the Naqba was a result of a war which the Palestinian leadership and the Arab states initiated with the aim of preventing the implementation of the UN partition plan, and annihilating the Jews. Had they accepted partition not a single Palestinian would have become a refugee.
    Also: the story of a massacre in Tantura has been discredited.

    • Walid
      December 8, 2010, 6:15 am

      “… In 1953, a Romanian Dadaist sculptor named Marcel Janco convinced the army not to bulldoze Ein Hod as it did the scores of nearby Palestinian towns it had ethnically cleansed five years prior. He proposed establishing an art commune to generate tourism and contribute to the culture of Zionism.”

      So obscene to use the homes of ethnically cleansed Palestinians to create an art colony and to “generate tourism and contribute to the culture of Zionism.”

      These people have no shame.

    • Potsherd2
      December 8, 2010, 6:16 am

      No, jon s, half the population would have become refugees as they were expelled from the “Jewish” state. Even if the Zionist leaders didn’t carry out their plan of encroaching on the rest of the territory.

    • eljay
      December 8, 2010, 10:55 am

      >> Let’s not forget that the Naqba was a result of a war which the Palestinian leadership and the Arab states initiated with the aim of preventing the implementation of the UN partition plan and annihilating the Jews. Had they accepted partition not a single Palestinian would have become a refugee.

      1. Please provide evidence to support your assertion that the Palestinian leadership and Arab states wished to “annihilat[e] the Jews”.
      2. Please provide evidence to support your assertion that, by accepting Partition, not a single Palestinian would have become a refugee.

      • jon s
        December 10, 2010, 5:24 am

        Eljay,

        1.Azzam Pasha, Secretary-General of the Arab League, speaking at the outbreak of the 1948 war: “This will be a war of extermination and a momentous massacre which will be spoken of like the Mongolian massacres and the Crusades.” Also -the most prominent Palestinian leader ath the time was the Mufti , Haj Amin Al-Husseini, an admirer and ally of Hitler.

        2. OK, I admit that it’s impossible to prove a “what if” scenario in history, so naturally I can’t “prove ” what would have happened had the Palestinians and the rest of the Arab world accepted partition. I made an assumption.

  16. RoHa
    December 8, 2010, 5:46 am

    My son’s school had the end of year ceremony today.

    The first words spoken in the procedings were a call to us to remember that the Turrbal people were the traditional owners of the land we are on (Brisbane area) and that we should always be mindful of that heritage.

    Not much, but better than ignoring them.

  17. VR
    December 8, 2010, 10:25 am

    Take a look at J Streets response, tell me what you think –

    J Street Response To Carmel Fire

  18. MHughes976
    December 8, 2010, 4:16 pm

    As to facts and narratives – if the Zionist Literary Theory Corps is advancing over this postmodern territory, I want to put up a fight.
    If – if! – we decide in the postmodern way that all histories are fictions, and replace the search for the record that is true with the search for the narrative that is authentic, we encounter certain problems. Authenticity seems to exist when we find a moving, compelling quality in the plot of the narrative that makes it seem really to reveal the subject matter.
    It’s no accident, as they say, that postmodern literary theory is very interested in detective stories, whose point is that something is revealed and someone is unmasked. To whom are things revealed? To the ‘implied audience’ – the kind of people to whom the narrative, by its structure, is addressed. By whom? The person who tells the story, who may be the famous ‘unreliable narrator’.
    Agatha Christie is something of a heroine in this context because she broke new ground by making the narrator of one her first stories the murderer, Doctor Shepherd, who is until the end trying to deceive us.
    The Zionist narrative is based on the idea that the human race is eternally riddled with irrational hatred of Jewish people, who must therefore separate themselves and form a state of their own, whatever the cost to others. By basing the whole plot of his or her narrative on this point the Zionist narrator separates him/herself from the implied audience, saying that there is always a barrier of mistrust between them. That is to say (s)he proclaims herself a classic unreliable narrator, embracing the menacing, inauthentic role of Doctor Shepherd: twist or turn as (s)he may, that is the mask that will stick. The Palestinian narrator, by contrast, proclaims common humanity, and so has an increasing chance of being accepted as authentic, one of us.
    So it seems to me that postmodern Zionism ties itself in more and more knots.

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