Romney seems to be positioning himself to capture neoconservative support

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Two Romney items. Justin Elliott reports at Salon on Mitt Romney’s foreign policy adviser’s support for a terrorist group that is aimed at Iran. You’ll note that Daniel Pipes loves this group:

A foreign policy advisor to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has been active in recent months in an advocacy campaign to rehabilitate the reputation of an underground organization in Iran known as the Mujahedin-e Khalq. The MEK has been designated by the U.S. State Department as a “terrorist” organization.

Mitchell Reiss, former director of policy planning at the State Department during the Bush administration, is now advising the former Massachusetts governor on foreign policy, the New Republic recently reported. Reiss also advised Romney’s 2008 campaign…

The Obama administration, which has engaged in complex negotiations with the Iranians over their nuclear aspirations, is being pressured to “delist” the MEK by those who say this would help undermine the Iranian regime, which is seen as a threat to Israel, a U.S. ally.

“With one simple signature, the Obama administration can help empower Iranians to seize control over their destiny — and perhaps end the mullahs’ mad nuclear dash,” wrote Daniel Pipes in National Review last month.

Then there’s this from Business Insider. Romney taking Wall Street money from Obama. I don’t know who these guys are (apart from the fact that Schafer once worked for Michael Steinhardt, a giant Israel supporter), but I’m guessing they’re pretty conservative on Middle East issues:

At least 67 Wall Street executives who backed President Barack Obama in the 2008 campaign are abandoning his campaign for former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney’s, The Hill reports.

Romney, who founded Bain Capital, is viewed by many as better for the financial sector than Obama — who signed the controversial Dodd-Frank regulatory bill.

Among the donors who have changed sides are Joshua Harris of Apollo Management, Oscar Schafer of OSS Capital Management, David Solomon of Goldman Sachs, Barry Sternlicht of the Starwood Capital Group, and David Blitzer of the Blackstone Group.

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