Is Occupy Wall Street anti-Semitic?

Israel/Palestine
on 53 Comments

Are the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations anti-Jewish? That is what the Emergency Committee for Israel is claiming in a new video (below). The video features clips of Democratic politicians expressing sympathy for the OWS protesters, followed by clips of some protesters alleging a Jewish conspiracy controls the banking cartels that exploit the American people.

Of course, the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations are not anti-Semitic or anti-Jewish. That is to say, some of the participants are surely anti-Semitic, just as some are surely anti-Black, some are surely anti-Asian, and some are surely anti-Gay. All of these haters are probably found at OWS in more or less the same proportion as they appear in the rest of the population.

The attempt by the Emergency Committee for Israel to paint the entire
Occupy Wall Street movement as anti-Semitic when its messages are only
representative of an extreme minority and condemned by a large majority is a shoddy, sloppy example of how right-wing elements in the Jewish community cynically smear their ideological, and now their economic, opponents.

What the Emergency Committee for Israel has actually done by producing this pathetic piece of propaganda – as has Commentary magazine and other outlets, by uncritically re-broadcasting this disingenuous disinformation – is revealed that they are card-carrying 1%-ers. They are choosing sides against the exploited 99%. They should have the integrity to do so honestly.

But when they try to scare off other Jews from supporting the OWS protesters with obviously false claims of pervasive anti-Semitism, they are engaging in the lowest form of cowardice. As the 99% finally rises up, the 1% knows they will soon receive their comeuppance. So these modern-day slave-masters, the 1%, are trying to hide behind the skirt of American Jews, the 2%.

They are also stupid for not doing their homework; upwards of 88% of Israelis support the July 14th Movement, the ‘Israeli Summer’ that predated the ‘American Autumn’. Most Israelis agree that the wealthiest 1% are responsible for their economic woes. And here, it’s not just some CEOs that are Jewish, it’s almost every single one. Does that make nearly all Israelis anti-Semitic, as well?

David Sheen is a reporter and content editor at Haaretz Newspaper in Israel and has authored award-winning blogs on ecological sustainability and social justice. His website is www.davidsheen.com

David Sheen
About David Sheen

David Sheen is a documentarian, journalist, and designer who lives in Dimona. His website is http://www.davidsheen.com/

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53 Responses

  1. ehrens
    October 16, 2011, 1:32 pm

    I guess they missed or decided to ignore the 1000 Jews who probably had the most meaningful Kol Nidre service of their lives at the NYC protest:

    link to 972mag.com

    • American
      October 16, 2011, 2:14 pm

      Of course they ignore that….it doesn’t fit their smear job.

      • seafoid
        October 16, 2011, 5:31 pm

        Not going to work. The 99 % meme is dynamite.

        Anyway most Jews aren’t beneficiaries of the current system where the top 15000 families control 8% of the wealth in the US.

    • Ellen
      October 17, 2011, 10:45 am

      If a label is going to be slapped onto the OWS movement, they could/should be called “Jeffersonians’.”

      Jefferson fought hard to try and prevent a powerful banking sector of the economy as it would inevitably undermine the functioning of a democratic government representing citizens.

      So we can call the supporters The Jeffersonians.

  2. POA
    October 16, 2011, 1:35 pm

    Why of course OWS is “anti-semitic”. ANY rhetoric, action, or belief system that doesn’t subscribe to the far right wing efforts to maintain the status quo are “anti-semitic”.

    Besides, who cares? Don’t you realize that these protestors are defecating in our nation’s prestine parklands, have no message, no leaders, and expect nothing but handouts from our government? Thank God that Sean Hannity and Mark Levin are keeping us well informed about the motives and tactics of these filthy street urchins and hooligans.

    Can’t help but wonder though…..

    When these two were screaming for Obama to support the Iranian protestors, did that include sending Andy Gump over with shiploads of outhouses?

  3. DICKERSON3870
    October 16, 2011, 1:54 pm

    RE: “Most Israelis agree that the wealthiest 1% are responsible for their economic woes. And here, it’s not just some CEOs that are Jewish, it’s almost every single one. Does that make nearly all Israelis anti-Semitic, as well?” ~ Sheen

    MY COMMENT: Technically, the ‘July 14th’ Israelis are called self-hating Jews.
    This is how it works:
    Any non-Jew who says that the wealthiest 1% are responsible for their economic woes is an anti-Semite.
    Any Jew who says that the wealthiest 1% are responsible for their economic woes is a self-hating Jew.
    And, as Hermann Goering famously said during the Nuremberg Trials: “It works the same way in any country.”
    I know everything there is to know about anti-Semitism because I’m a proud graduate of Glenn Beck Universty® (GBU™).

    P.S. MEET MY NEW “¡MUY MACHO!” ICON/AVATAR. Are those “Bette Davis eyes” (VIDEO-03:38), or are they the cold, calculating eyes of a sociopath (or perhaps even a psychopath)?
    Fulgencio Batistalink to en.wikipedia.org

    • DICKERSON3870
      October 16, 2011, 2:28 pm

      P.S. My homage to Fulgencio Batista is dedicated to his most renowned protégé, Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R- FL). She and her mentor are truly the very best friends that the downtrodden have ever had!
      SOME OF ILEANA’S RECENT HANDIWORK: House Foreign Affairs Committee Votes To Defund UNICEFlink to thinkprogress.org
      P.S. Anyone who says that there is something wrong with Ros-Lehtinen’s being a stooge for AIPAC is either an anti-Semite or a self-hating Jew. (To distinguish between the two, please refer to the above tutorial).

      • Potsherd2
        October 16, 2011, 4:01 pm

        See if you can distinguish Ileana from that other hyphen woman, Obama’s “other first lady,” Debbie Wasserman-Shultz.

      • DICKERSON3870
        October 16, 2011, 7:05 pm

        One has straight hair, and the other has curly hair. And the one with curly hair is a lot better than the one with straight hair! But, not very much so when it comes to the issue of Israel/Palestine.
        P.S. The one with straight hair is depraved and demented. The one with curly hair is not.

      • POA
        October 16, 2011, 8:03 pm

        Well, I wouldn’t kick Wasserman Schultz out of the sack…..

  4. Real Jew
    October 16, 2011, 2:20 pm

    The rich, jews and gentiles alike, will do nearly anything to protect their status and maintain their dominance over the masses. They thought hey, what can we accuse his movement of to discredit them the most? And considering NY’s demographics the answer is obvious, antisemitism. And lucky for them there were a few assholes there who really are antisemitic that supplied the gas for the fire.

    Like in most cases where accusations of antisemitism are carelessly thrown around it does little to convince the majority. The same will apply to wall street.

  5. justicewillprevail
    October 16, 2011, 2:36 pm

    It illustrates the collusion of interests, the greed and self-serving exceptionalism, between right-wing financial and corporate interests and the Zionist state. Not all of these people are Jewish, even if many are. It is the oldest meme in the Zionist handbook to identify Zionist interests with Judaism, and thus equate anti-Zionism, and now anti-corporate robbery with antisemitism. It is so tired and pathetic I doubt it will have much traction. Quite frankly I couldn’t care less what the personal religious and cultural preferences are amongst this super-privileged elite, with their direct line to state policies are. There are all sorts of unsavoury political and religious beliefs in there – support for right wing extremists, war, apartheid and the daylight robbery of ordinary citizens to subsidise grossly extravagant lifestyles. Israel’s state has become enmeshed with them for political advantage, the influencing of lobbies and a direct line to power. It is no wonder they are all corrupt, power-seeking demagogues who couldn’t care less about the human life they are prepared to sacrifice in pursuit of their hold on power and privilege.

  6. Proton Soup
    October 16, 2011, 2:42 pm

    it used to be the “rich greedy bastards” were WASPs. it’s going to take some time for them to get used to this, but just as brown is the new black, jewish is the new white.

  7. radii
    October 16, 2011, 2:56 pm

    cue irony committee:

    if they had not produced the pathetic hit-piece video and just said and done nothing, the majority of participants and observers would have dismissed the cranks as obvious cranks … now the overreaction raises eyebrows – my, the zio-squad is sure sensitive about the issue of the percentage of jews among the wealthy banking elite … and, hence, lends credence to the very argument they sought to rebut

    • annie
      October 16, 2011, 3:33 pm

      the overreaction raises eyebrows

      it seems obvious to me how some people prioritize anti semitism over other forms of racism and bigotry and assume the rest of us do too. the willingness to find their own victimhood on the opposite end of the spectrum from the 99%, and frame that victimhood as anti semitic is beyond telling.

      they just don’t get it.

      • seafoid
        October 16, 2011, 5:29 pm

        Antisemitism is no more than a career for Abraham Foxman. If Jews can only have rights at the expense of others what is the point of Abraham Foxman?

        link to pbs.org
        Dear Mr. Foxman:

        You made several errors in your letter to me of January 13 and I am writing to correct them.

        First, to call someone a racist for lamenting the slaughter of civilians by the Israeli military offensive in Gaza is a slur unworthy of the tragedy unfolding there. Your resort to such a tactic is reprehensible.

        Earlier this week it was widely reported that the International Red Cross “was so outraged it broke its usual silence over an attack in which the Israeli army herded a Palestinian family into a building and then shelled it, killing 30 people and leaving the surviving children clinging to the bodies of their dead mothers. The army prevented rescuers from reaching the survivors for four days.”

        When American troops committed a similar atrocity in Vietnam, it was called My Lai and Lt. Calley went to prison for it. As the publisher of a large newspaper at the time, I instructed our editorial staff to cover the atrocity fully because Americans should know what our military was doing in our name and with our funding. To say “my country right or wrong” is like saying “my mother drunk or sober.” Patriots owe their country more than that, whether their government and their taxes are supporting atrocities in Vietnam, Iraq, or, in this case, Gaza.

        Contrary to your claim, I made no reference whatsoever to “moral equivalency” between Hamas and Israel. That is an old canard often resorted to by propagandists trying to divert attention from facts on the ground, and, it, too, is unworthy of the slaughter in Gaza. Contrary to imputing “moral equivalency” between Hamas and Israel, I said that “Hamas would like to see every Jew in Israel dead.” I said that “a radical stream of Islam now seeks to eliminate Israel from the face of the earth.” And I described the new spate of anti-Semitism across the continent of Europe. I am curious as to why you ignored remarks which clearly counter the notion of “moral equivalency.”

        And although I specifically referred to “the rockets from Hamas” falling on Israel and said that “every nation has the right to defend itself, and Israel is no exception,” you nonetheless accuse me of “ignorance of the terrorist threat against Israel.” Once again, you are quite selective in your reading of my essay.

        Your claim that “the checkpoints, the security fence and the Gaza operation” [I used the more accurate “onslaught”] are not humiliating of the Palestinians is lamentable. I did not claim that these were, as you write, “tactics of humiliation rather [emphasis mine] than counter-terrorism,” but perhaps it is overly simplistic to think they are one and not the other, when they are both. Also lamentable is your description of my “promotion” of the Norwegian doctor in Gaza when in fact I was simply quoting what he told CBS News: “It’s like Dante’s Inferno. They are bombing one and a half million people in a cage.” The whole world has been able to see for itself what he was talking about, and as one major news organization after another has been reporting, is reeling from the sight.

        And, to your claim that I was “declaring Jews are ‘genetically coded’ for violence,” you are mistaken. My comment – obviously not sufficiently precise – was not directed at a specific people but to the fact that the human race has violence in its DNA, as the biblical stories so strongly affirm. I also had in mind the relationship between all the descendents of Abraham who love the same biblical land and come to such grief over it.

        From my days in President Johnson’s White House forward, I have defended Israel’s right to defend itself, and still do. But sometimes an honest critic is a government’s best friend, and I am appalled by Israel’s devastation of innocent civilians in this battle, all the more so because, as I said in my column, it is exactly what Hamas wanted to happen. To be so indifferent to that suffering is, sadly, to be as blind in Gaza as Samson.

        Sincerely,

        Bill Moyers

      • Potsherd2
        October 16, 2011, 8:00 pm

        So Moyers got a taste of being Foxmaned, but he’s still bending over too far backwards to suck up to Zionism.

        Contrary to imputing “moral equivalency” between Hamas and Israel, I said that “Hamas would like to see every Jew in Israel dead.” I said that “a radical stream of Islam now seeks to eliminate Israel from the face of the earth.”
        Likewise, look at the radical stream of Judaism that now seeks to eliminate any possibility of a Palestinian state from the face of the earth.

        Oh, really? And just who is “Hamas” who would like to see every Jew in Israel dead? Every member of Hamas? Every resident of Gaza, the target of Israeli bombers?

        If you want to see moral equivalency, just go to Israel and see who would like to see every member of Hamas dead. See who cheered on the bombers carpeting Gaza.The difference is that while some members of Hamas may well want these things, they are unable to bring this goal about, even if they were trying. Whereas Israel is actively working to eliminate Hamas, kill thousands of Gazans in the process, and kill all chances for a Palestinian state.

        Equivalency? No. Israel’s actions are, as usual, far worse. But you won’t hear this from Moyers, as much of an Israeli apologist as the rest of them. Maybe one day we’ll hear him declare the right of Palestine to defend itself, but I’m not holding my breath.

      • AhVee
        October 17, 2011, 9:51 am

        “it seems obvious to me how some people prioritize anti semitism over other forms of racism and bigotry and assume the rest of us do too.”

        It’s quite clear, as evidenced by the drastic difference in narrative when something bad happens to Jews (or something bad might, possibly, around two corners, happen to Jews) and the narrative on display when bigotry hits a gentile. In the latter case, it’s an unfortunate exception that doesn’t warrant any form of larger-scale action or exceptionalism, in the former, it certainly does.

        Well, what about those other groups?

        “A 2005 study estimated that over 90 million females were “missing” from the expected population in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, China, India, Pakistan, South Korea and Taiwan alone, and suggested that sex-selective abortion plays a role in this deficit. [...] India’s 2011 census shows a serious decline in the number of girls under the age of seven – activists fear eight million female fetuses may have been aborted between 2001 and 2011

        For all those people who know that around 6 million Jews died in the Shoah, how many know the above figures off by heart? And what does the fact that most don’t know these figures tell us about our society? After all, it affects us too. Women were considered inferior in the West up until very recently, historically. Many lives have been lost or ruined by the idea of male superiority in the West, too. This should affect us too.

        The moment something bad that’s happened to a group of people is in the past, and a society has largely overcome it, that’s that. Tabula rasa, start again, once it’s over, you have no right to make yourself the victim, or to claim any meaningful compensation. It may be crudely remembered, but next to nothing is truly owed over a significant stretch of time. When it happens to Jews? Tabula rasa my ass. Nothing owed my ass. Dealt with in the same way other groups misfortune is dealt with my ass. You’d have to be blind to miss the exceptionalism going on here.

        People need to wake up to this and acknowledge that anything more or less than equal treatment and dealing with problems each group faces in an equal way is crucial. We’ve all seen what exceptionalism can do, it brings out the worst in people, regardless of if it swings into a “positive” or negative realm. It’s poisonous, dangerous and anti-democratic. I’m not a self-hater for refusing to make use of my right to whine, or for refusing to make demands that others cannot afford to make, or for refusing to claim resources that others cannot afford to claim. I want one thing, that is equal rights. Equal rights.
        ‘positive’ exceptionalism creates hate in those who are not included, and by the ludicrous rhetoric that needs to be resorted to in order to keep something so obviously unjust upright. It creates danger. It creates spite. It creates jealousy and resentment. It makes those who are included feel like they deserve more than others, just for being born into the ‘right circle’. It creates a caste system. It’s an active danger that has a looming backlash so obviously built into its very foundation, that it’s a ticking time bomb. I believe it is currently the biggest threat to both the safety and the sanity of Jews everywhere.

        I say this as a person who loves and practices my religion, as someone who is proud of it and proud of (most of) our contribution to society. If anyone wants to tell me I’m a bitter self-hater, or not a Jew because I don’t endorse the exercise in fascistoid exceptionalism and ethnic cleansing that is Israel, I welcome them to tell me into my face and look me in the eyes while addressing me by my real name (my name’s Avichai Saltzman and you can get my adress per e-mail if you wish), because quite frankly, it doesn’t mean shit to me over the interwebs and I have no reason to believe these people even stick up for their filthy words offline, or would dare to say these things without sinking in shame anywhere else but on the internet.

        You’d think if they were so behind what they say, they’d actually come out and tell their fellow non-Zionist Jews at gatherings, you know. GTFO our community you non-Jew! You do not support Israel! You are quite obviously a bitter, paranoid self-hater and you don’t deserve Judaism if you don’t equate it with Zionism! If that’s what you think, come out and say it IRL to people in your community, that you celebrate and pray with…

      • annie
        October 18, 2011, 12:07 am

        AhVee, People need to wake up to this and acknowledge that anything more or less than equal treatment and dealing with problems each group faces in an equal way is crucial.

        i absolutely agree. not sure our opinions totally segue in your post (re ‘no right to meaningful compensation’) but you comment cuts to the heart of the matter and is a conversation worth having for sure. thanks for the extensive response to my comment.

        I say this as a person who loves and practices my religion, as someone who is proud of it and proud of (most of) our contribution to society. If anyone wants to tell me I’m a bitter self-hater, or not a Jew because I don’t endorse the exercise in fascistoid exceptionalism and ethnic cleansing that is Israel, I welcome them to tell me into my face and look me in the eyes while addressing me by my real name

        y’know it just may have to come to this kind of confrontation to flush out the implication of these accusations. i support you for your determination, courage and willingness for a calling out..a willingness to stand up. it means a lot.

      • AhVee
        October 21, 2011, 12:14 pm

        Thank you Annie for taking time out of the day to censor the hot-headed bits rather than preventing the entire post from being published, it seems I still lack the calm it takes to prevent my stronger emotions from getting the better of me, at times. I appreciate the way you handled it. I’ll try my best to practice some restraint, if something that isn’t acceptable does slip through despite my efforts, please feel very free to cut those parts out of it, I’d rather parts went missing than the entire post, mostly because it usually takes me quite a while to write them.

        Thank you equally for your support, not only to me, but to most posters here and to the creators of this blog, I respect and look up to your important and time-consuming efforts, you have a strength in you I don’t presently have, and can only hope to obtain one day.

        “not sure our opinions totally segue in your post (re ‘no right to meaningful compensation’)”

        I don’t mind disagreeing with anyone, in this case though I don’t think we do. I meant the above outlined is society’s way of dealing with some other groups who have witnessed / witness discrimination whereas the idea of compensation never seems to get old for the West where Jews are concerned. I believe due compensation is important, regardless of the potential difficulties in defining the fine line marking where compensation ends and where exceptionalism starts (and the obvious problem of defining what “due” compensation is, and what forms it may or may not take, in the first place, a problem Zionists have been profiting from by playing on society’s will to compensate them for the Shoah).
        Despite obvious problems, due compensation is important, it’s part of acknowledging that something went wrong somewhere down the line, and marks society’s readiness to engage in a symbolic (or material, or both) gesture of apology and respect.

        “y’know it just may have to come to this kind of confrontation to flush out the implication of these accusations.”

        I believe so. It’s against my nature to play hardball, but how far can you go seems to be the question many are asking by their provocative behaviour, my challenge to them is to be consequent about the game they’re playing without turning most people’s stomachs (or even their own).

      • annie
        October 21, 2011, 2:30 pm

        AhVee, i was a crucial important point you made, one i feel is a conversation that must be had and a problem i find repeated over and over in threads all across the internet in the i/p conflict. in fact i was just blogging about it this morning after phil linked to lisa goodman’s post in Props for the amazing political space OWS created (but who is talking about Palestine?)

        some of the discourse in the comments wrt jews practicing their religion is horrible. interestingly it appears our comments (mine there and yours here) are one minute apart so we must have been thinking along the same lines. here is part of my comment there, the last comment on the 2 day old thread:

        i have witnessed many times in these discussions accusations jewish activists here in the US are not religious or are not really jewish or ‘real jews’ which is stupid and frankly anti semitic. i know lots of jewish peace activists who participate in religious activities but it’s nobodies business and they shouldn’t have to advertise it. so this should not be surprising in the least to see progressive activists jews participating in their religion on Yom Kippur. it was just a coincidence the OWS landed on the day and exposed the ’shocking’ sight of jews practicing their religion! and so beautiful it was.

        i’ve discussed this before somewhere here (here it is, 2 comments..love the archive research function) and said i thought it was some kind of cultural thing within the jewish community that perhaps is not matched in other cultures. this crazy assumption activist jews are less jewish or are more prone to embrace their jewishness or their religion.

        when something means a lot to me, personally offends me and pushes all my buttons it’s more challenging to write about it without using my ‘natural voice’ (when i get mad i have a foul mouth) and depending on who is moderating or what their personal buttons are it might place an important post at risk of being deleted. that’s just how the cookie crumbles. so my advice would be (and i should remember this for myself too) is the more i feel emotional about something the more i have to express myself within the framework of the mod policy without compromising what it is i want to communicate.

        People need to wake up to this and acknowledge that anything more or less than equal treatment and dealing with problems each group faces in an equal way is crucial. We’ve all seen what exceptionalism can do, it brings out the worst in people, regardless of if it swings into a “positive” or negative realm. It’s poisonous, dangerous and anti-democratic. I’m not a self-hater for refusing to make use of my right to whine, or for refusing to make demands that others cannot afford to make, or for refusing to claim resources that others cannot afford to claim. I want one thing, that is equal rights. Equal rights.

        it is really at the heart of it. it’s also a really dicey topic to discuss. i remember at dkos it was one of the very hot button issues surrounding the ‘chosen people’ issue. what seems clear to me is depending on the the way people interpret or practice their judaism, ‘chosen’ can mean different things to different people.. as it pertains to equal rights.

        thanks btw

      • AhVee
        October 21, 2011, 4:37 pm

        Thanks for refreshing my memory.. I’ve been following that blog for some months now, and I remember that entry, I enjoyed it, too. I remember that MW article & your contributions to the discussion, too.

        “[calling people self-haters is] a cultural phenomena that has not permeated cross culturally imho.”

        Absolutely, I agree- it’s a cultural thing, the concept isn’t confined to Jews at all in common discourse. That said, I’ve heard ‘self-hating’ used to describe gentiles too, but as you mentioned, it gains potency when used against a Jewish person (by whom is irrelevant), because in contemporary culture, it alludes to something beyond the mere statement of a fact or suspicion on a personal basis, rather it suggests the problem is down to a general flaw in the greater Jewish population, that is exhibited in the weak-willed, a meaning that is, of course, not contained within the word itself, but is an additional meaning given to the term through culture.

        “it’s also a really dicey topic to discuss. i remember at dkos it was one of the very hot button issues surrounding the ‘chosen people’ issue. what seems clear to me is depending on the the way people interpret or practice their judaism, ‘chosen’ can mean different things to different people.. as it pertains to equal rights.”

        I remember commenting on this issue somewhere before, personally I don’t see any controversy in it whatsoever on a societal level. I think how people interpret “chosen people” is relatively irrelevant, as long as their interpretation doesn’t result in actions that endanger democracy, and they adhere to the principles set down by a secular democratic state, in which citizens of all religions, cultural and demographic backgrounds are to be treated as equal on all grounds, and no religion is favoured over the other. As long as they stick to it, fine. If they don’t and break the law in the process, they should be punished accordingly.

        I feel that any problematic situations that arise out of controversial interpretations need to be solved through law, and citing rules of the respective countries these individuals agree to by residing in (or international law and human rights conventions that all countries are bound to), rather than ending up in a discussion around whether or whether not to deny people the right to interpret the word of G-d the way they wish / were taught to, or what is or isn’t the truth, that won’t work without creating more problems than it solves IMO, it’s the type of approach to the discussion that creates the trigger, it can be easily avoided by a different, more neutral approach.

        “i know lots of jewish peace activists who participate in religious activities but it’s nobodies business and they shouldn’t have to advertise it.”

        I agree. I’ve always assumed the issue was confined to the online world, and a bit of a non-issue offline. Me personally nobody’s ever questioned my religious alignment off the internet (then again I wear a kippah so I’m assuming they’d figure.) I’ve also never heard anyone accuse anyone else of this off the net, or report having been accused of it. Then again culture and mindset over here is generally very different to the way things work in the US, so I couldn’t say to what extent this is / isn’t an issue off the internet, or how international this is. Feel free to clue me in / elaborate, though, I’d be interested.

        I’m continually amazed at some of the discourse happening in the USA / Israel, seems so little of it makes its way over here, things are discussed in completely different ways over here, for the most part, through a completely different cultural lense. People we’d consider extremists over here might pass as moderates over in the US, the general sentiment over here is that Americans are prone to extremism and sensationalism, both in their ideology and in their rhetoric (irregardless of political alignment). For what it’s worth.

      • annie
        October 22, 2011, 10:56 am

        it’s a cultural thing, the concept isn’t confined to Jews at all in common discourse. That said, I’ve heard ‘self-hating’ used to describe gentiles too, but as you mentioned, it gains potency when used against a Jewish person

        i will just say i had not heard of it elsewhere until recently, unlike the terms self loathing and self esteem. just like i had not heard blood libel used outside jewish references until sarah palin used it.

        I think how people interpret “chosen people” is relatively irrelevant, as long as their interpretation doesn’t result in actions that endanger democracy

        yeah, democracy is what i was trying to reference by “‘as it pertains to equal rights.”

        I feel that any problematic situations that arise out of controversial interpretations need to be solved through law, and citing rules of the respective countries

        that’s kind of hard in an aparthied state. but originally you were talking about ” ‘positive’ exceptionalism”

        ‘positive’ exceptionalism creates hate in those who are not included, and by the ludicrous rhetoric that needs to be resorted to in order to keep something so obviously unjust upright. It creates danger. It creates spite. It creates jealousy and resentment. It makes those who are included feel like they deserve more than others, just for being born into the ‘right circle’. It creates a caste system.

        so how can that kind of exceptionalism be dealt with in law? when it seems the law in the US is going in the opposite direction as it pertains to israel. and how do you deal with this wrt mainstream media portrayals? (please read her whole article. there was so much incredible information at the litigating palestine conference i wouldn’t know where to begin, but read her whole article).

        anyway..even outside the law like what you were talking about wrt victims in history, how do we even the playing field thru legislation? how is legislation going to get all those holocaust movies to stop being produced by hollywood? how can we get hollywood to quit shoveling out bad persians and arabs thru legislation? this is more in the realm of a national psyche issue. that’s carried out by carefully nurtured propaganda and the main feature threatening that propaganda now is the internet.

        I’ve always assumed the issue was confined to the online world, and a bit of a non-issue offline.

        yeah, that is where i have been exposed to it. i am not privy to private conversations with jews accusing others of being self hating offline. i’ve just heard it commonly online just like the way i heard it yesterday right before i commented here. so it is not rare, that is how i assessed this was a common kind of bullying within the jewish community, from witnessing it myself so often and i can tell you this is definitely not something i’ve encountered elsewhere with any regularity whatsoever. the only equivalence i can think of is rightwingers accusing others of not being patriotic or american by not supporting the war or whatever, but that’s not referenced as ‘self hating’, it is just the same kind of vibe.

      • AhVee
        October 22, 2011, 6:33 pm

        In hindsight, what I said about law assumes it’s free from bias in the States (something the article you linked to quite clearly refutes), and international law is actually enforced in places such as Israel, which is relatively utopian.

        “so how can that kind of exceptionalism be dealt with in law?”

        I’m a European in his early twenties, I don’t have much knowledge to fall back on and I don’t know much about the American law system, so a lot of this is new to me. I can’t give you much more than my uneducated opinion. I don’t have the insider knowledge of the workings of America as a society or any of its institutions to give an adequate answer.

        “how is legislation going to get all those holocaust movies to stop being produced by hollywood? how can we get hollywood to quit shoveling out bad persians and arabs thru legislation?”

        I can give you some thoughts, if you care for them.
        We get every single Holocaust movie Hollywood churns out, we’re made to watch at least two documentaries on WWII in school, forced to read anecdotes by Zionists such as Wiesel, we have field trips to Holocaust memorials, and were made to visit a concentration camp.
        How then can Jewish exceptionalism be next to a complete non-issue on a local level over here, while gaining enough momentum to take over jurisdiction, politics and popular culture in America? Some questions I’ve been asking myself are- is it the lobby in America that creates that kind of culture, or the culture in America that tolerates powerful lobbies to spread that kind of message as powerfully as it does? How much of it is down to the wealth these lobbies command, and how powerful would they be without calling on some fundamental elements already present in American culture, and which should be changed first?

        The overwhelming majority of post-WW2 literature published by Jews that influenced popular culture over here were very much appeals to stop exceptionalism, recognise and reject mind-pollution and agitation and stop hatespeech, and fascism in all its forms. A lot of them were philosophical in nature, and drew heavily on socialist ideals. Among the many notable works by Jews who had a large influence on post- WW2 discourse over here are Adorno’s The Authoritarian Character, Lukács’ The Theory of the Novel, Löwenthal’s False Prophets and Hessel’s very recent bestseller Time for Outrage, calling for collective grassroots action against the growing gap between the rich and the poor (it’s a good enough essay, though like quite a few European left-wing political pieces, it’s sufficiently utopian, too).
        Completely different picture in America, where the message seems to be except where Zionism and Jews are concerned!. This additional message was never subject to any kind of larger debate over here, rather it seems to be seen for what it is – a completely contrary notion to the ones being advocated by the aforementioned intellectuals, and many more non-Jewish intellectuals like them. Accepting both these works and Zionism’s messages would be seen for the hypocrisy that it is and the message of exceptionalism rejected, it simply makes no sense. It pretty much starts and ends at this realisation over here.

        Attempting to stop Hollywood from making Holocaust flicks, or discouraging certain religious interpretations isn’t at the heart of the issue at all, IMO. I believe a lot of the problem is already contained in the culture, othering and fear mongering is something we’ve generally been afraid to engage in as a population after WW2, while the same things have been actively encouraged in America throughout the 20th century, the face of evil changing with every war or conflict America has been involved in. It’s a culture that seems to have continually been motivated to hate / other / put down -something-. I see it as an unholy alliance of a culture that has a richer history of this type of behaviour (and hence a higher tolerance for it), paired with a wealthy and expansive Zionist lobby who promote othering for their own means.

        What can be done about it that would have a meaningful impact? I can’t think of anything that isn’t already being attempted in some way, shape or form, and is continually being over-powered or discredited by the dominant mindset most of the time. Only thing I can come up with is mass outrage, Hessel style. (On a negative note, one thing he has in common with some other like-minded intellectuals is the utter cluelessness about how this could viably be engineered on a meaningful scale). I’m hopeful that the WS protests that have taken America by storm result in a longer-term change in perspective.

        Apologies for the ramble, it’s the best I can do.

    • Keith
      October 16, 2011, 5:14 pm

      RADII- “now the overreaction raises eyebrows – my, the zio-squad is sure sensitive about the issue of the percentage of jews among the wealthy banking elite … and, hence, lends credence to the very argument they sought to rebut.”

      I doubt that these Zionists have any interest in “rebutting” any argument about Jewish financial power. Their goal has consistently been to create the perception of anti-Semitism to motivate Jewish Zionists. If, in the process, they create some real anti-Semitism, all the better for them. The perception of anti-Semitism and the induced fear of pogroms and a new Holocaust is the mothers milk of Zionism.

      • ToivoS
        October 16, 2011, 8:52 pm

        Keith that is a good point. I happen to believe that though antisemitism is not currently a problem in the US it remains a potential problem. It is something that does worry me. The problem is that the Israeli firsters need antisemitism and it does seem that they will stoke it in order to justify their Zionist agenda. After all if it wasn’t for the Holocaust, Israel would never have happened. Given that the Zionist experiment in Palestine remains unsettled they need that threat to justify their existence. In short the Zionists would be quite happy to sacrifice Jewish communities in the US, Europe and Latin America if it would strengthen Israel.

      • pabelmont
        October 17, 2011, 10:29 am

        The rich Zionists will stoke the flames, and the poor Zionists and non-Zionist Jews will get burned. (The rich, whether or not Zionists, t6he whole lousy 1%, live in gated communities, have police or private-militia protection, and don’t care how hurt or angry the 99% become. The two-flavor, one-party American democratic system nearly guarantees that voters will never have a significant choice — nearly, not always, because one of the 1% paid an entry fee for the Tea-Party and now voters DO have a bit of a choice (but not progressive voters).

  8. Potsherd2
    October 16, 2011, 2:56 pm

    Someone ought to point out that the Occupy movement essentially copies Israel’s “social justice” movement, in which protesters with very similar aims occupied public spaces all over Israel this summer.

    And the latest Peace Index survey in which 80% of Jewish Israelis supported the movement. link to peaceindex.org

    • teta mother me
      October 16, 2011, 4:17 pm

      “Occupy movement essentially copies Israel’s “social justice” movement, in which protesters with very similar aims occupied public spaces all over Israel this summer.”

      that’s a problem, not a refutation.

      The Israel “social justice” movement demanded social justice for ISRAELIs, not, to a large extent, for Palestinians.

      Honestly, it’s hard to be sympathetic to many of the OW protesters who demand jobs, when US government has taken so many steps to deprive people of other nations of their jobs and their very lives.

      All you bible-believers, riddle me this:

      “The sins of the fathers are visited on their children.”
      “Who sows the wind reaps the whirlwind.”
      “Do unto others as you would have others do unto you”
      [and its Karmic corollary: if you elect legislators who kill, bomb, impoverish, bankrupt, destabilize other nations, what the f*@k makes you think you are entitled to enjoy a different fate]?

      • Potsherd2
        October 16, 2011, 7:19 pm

        Despite the accuracy of your characterization of both movements, the close connections between them are nonetheless a refutation of the charge that the OWS movement is anti-semitic or anti-Israel. As well as the fact that protesters in Tel Aviv turned out in support of the movement in the US.

  9. munro
    October 16, 2011, 4:41 pm

    who’s the smarmy lisping narrator, Omer Gershon?

    link to electronicintifada.net

  10. Mooser
    October 16, 2011, 4:46 pm

    “Most Israelis agree that the wealthiest 1% are responsible for their economic woes”

    Yes, but all Israelis agree that the continued existence of the Palestinians, in defiance of Geneva Conventions and all human decency, is at the root of all their problems, really.

    ROTFL! I’ll bet they do, because it’s a hell of a lot easier than maybe considering that Zionism is responsible for their position.
    But then it hits me: My oh my, according to our atheist-Jew troll, all those 88% of Israelis are “left-wing extremists”.

    • Mooser
      October 16, 2011, 4:47 pm

      Anyway, I’ll be waiting for the Haaretz expose’ on how the richest 1% of Israelis engineered the Occupation.

      • seafoid
        October 16, 2011, 5:33 pm

        They just kind of walked into it, Mooser. There was this naked lady in the middle of the road and one thing led to another and now it’s a 44 year occupation with torture and home demolitions and none of it was planned.

  11. yourstruly
    October 16, 2011, 6:29 pm

    at the occupy ____County rally that I attended yesterday, there were about a thousand participants, many of whom were carrying signs, mostly about economic issues, although “medicare not warfare” was prominently featured. One sign criticized the siege of Gaza, otherwise nothing on the i/p conflict. That isn’t to say that the connection between U.S. support of the settler entity Israel and budget cuts (except for Israel) isn’t well understood by most of the participants and won’t be brought up in the future. Decentralized as the Occupy America cum the world is, with everyone a leader, it’s doubtful that I’ll be the only one to bring up the issue. Count on the Israel-firsters using the antisemitic card (they’re aldready doing so), but it won’t work this time, being that msm’s focus on the movement will give us a chance to educate americans about the fact that israel does not speak for all jews as it claims, and that since zionism is not judaism, anti-zionism is not antisemitism. What’s more the public will notice that Jewish-Americans will be among those who demolish the Israel-firsters claim that ows participants are antisemitic, and they’ll be thinking “Hmm, how could Occupy Wall Street be antisemitic when many of these participants are Jewish?”

  12. RoHa
    October 16, 2011, 7:25 pm

    Let me try to get this straight. I’m reviewing the situation.

    99% are exploited by the 1%.

    Protesting about this exploitation implies being anti- the 1%.

    But protesting about this this exploitation is anti-Semitic.

    Therefore, being anti- the 1% = being anti-Semitic.

    That seems to me to imply that the 1% are Jewish.

    Suggesting that 99% of Americans are exploited by Jews is an anti-Semitic claim.

    Therefore, claiming that Occupy Wall Street is anti-Semitic is an anti-Semitic claim.

    So the Emergency Committee for Israel is making an anti-Semitic claim.

    Nope, can’t be. I think I’d better think it out again.

    (And thanks to Lionel Bart.)

    • yourstruly
      October 16, 2011, 8:08 pm

      not only can be, is antisemitic

      zionism has always carried the seeds of antisemitism within itself

      jews colonizing another people’s homeland and ethnic cleansing them?

      saying that the bible told them to do so?

      along with the one about a land without a people for a people without a land?

      and claiming that the colonial entity israel speaks for all jews?

      so when the world is on to them, their lies, their brutal treatment of the indigenous palestinians

      jewish people everywhere have been set up to take the fall

      including jews who oppose the zionist enterprise

      which is why zionism is anti-jewish

      from its earliest days

    • RoHa
      October 16, 2011, 10:06 pm

      (Psst! There is a flaw in that argument. Can you spot it?)

    • RoHa
      October 19, 2011, 8:13 pm

      O.K. Much as I enjoy painting the Emergency Committee for Israel as a bunch of anti-Semites, my commitment to logic means I have to reveal the flaw for anyone who didn’t spot it.

      Here’s the flaw.

      “That seems to me to imply that the 1% are Jewish.”

      should be

      “That seems to me to imply that the Emergency Committee for Israel claims that the protesters believe that the 1% are Jewish.”

      And the conclusion does not follow.

      What does follow is the interesting question

      “Why does the Emergency Committee for Israel claim that the protesters believe that the 1% are Jewish?”

      • Bumblebye
        October 19, 2011, 9:02 pm

        The anti-OWS ad ends “Hate is not an American value”.
        Yet it does seem to be an ECI value, as Rachel Abrams, who sits on its board, demonstrates in this blog snippet caught by 972:
        link to 972mag.com
        This must be close to the worst I’ve seen. And on the heels of that ad?!

      • RoHa
        October 20, 2011, 7:53 pm

        Nasty.

  13. Taxi
    October 16, 2011, 10:05 pm

    The mistake that OWS/99% ers made is that they named themselves wrongly/fancifully.

    They shoulda called themselves simply ‘THE BREAD REVOLUTION”.

    Cuz that’s what it’s all about really – bread (and butter).

    Remember Mohamed Bouazizi, the Tunisian who started it all – it was about food for him.

    Food and the dignity that securing your food gives you.

    The revolts in europe and the middleast too are quintessentially about food.

    Bread.

    The revolution that’s going global is about food.

    The global family is starving while it’s ruling step-parents practically live in a Roman vomitorium.

    That’s the world’s shared problem in a nutshell.

  14. mudder
    October 17, 2011, 8:56 am

    Gus at Little Green Footballs has a good post yesterday:
    ‘“It’s Yom Kippur. Banks should atone.” — The Truth Behind the Sign
    Zombie and Pajamas Media smear a 14-year old Jewish girl with false charges of antisemitism’
    http://littlegreenfootballs.com/article/39299_Its_Yom_Kippur._Banks_should_atone._–_The_Truth_Behind_the_Sign

    And Charles Johnson has a followup post on the right-wing reaction on the debunking of the antisemitism claim:
    ‘Breitbart’s Fans React to Facts Like Vampires to Sunlight
    Right wing echo chamber circles wagons’
    link to littlegreenfootballs.com

    (A few years ago I thought Johnson was the most loathsome blogger on the net, but that has changed.)

  15. richb
    October 17, 2011, 10:28 am

    I can relate to the Jewish self-perception problem here. Namely, people are upset at rich bankers and it gets internalized as being anti-Jewish since many rich bankers are Jewish (of course, not the other way around). Next week, our Sunday School class will be discussing a 2005 essay by Philip Yancey where he bemoaned the effect on evangelicals of the perception (!) that the Religious Right and by extension evangelicals are hateful and the left will have nothing to do with evangelicals as I result. He tried to explain to his liberal friends what was going on — he believes it’s more fear than anger — but to no effect. I plan on bringing up the point on Sunday that it’s our politics and not necessarily our religion that bring about the opposition from the left. Like the Jews that see anti-semitism where it doesn’t exist my friends see the opposition as anti-Christian persecution.

    My challenge is my friends truly don’t see their behavior — or more commonly behavior of people they support — as hateful. It’s far easier to see the sins and flaws of others like the videos being discussed here. To see that you are doing the exact same thing takes much more humility and introspection. I plan on raising the following local example of the anti-John Hagee demonstration in Arvada yesterday.

    link to coloradocalendarofevents.com

    This was co-sponsored by Jewish Voice for Peace, and Sabeel Colorado, and Strait Gate Ministries. Here’s the letter that Charles Carlson wrote the pastor of Faith Bible Chapter, a Denver-based mega church.

    link to whtt.org

    Dear Pastor Morrison:

    Project Strait Gate has organized peace vigils on public right-of-ways outside many churches around the country. We visited Faith Chapel several years ago, and we are again planning to visit your church on October 16, 2011, for your Annual Israel Awareness Day, where John Hagee is your announced guest speaker.

    Our prayer is that you will examine your own position and make a Christ-like commitment in regard to the continued American slaughter in the Middle East, and the Israeli occupation of Palestine. We trust that you are concerned about the destruction of human life, but your guest for this program, John Hagee, is not.

    Israel’s abuse of human life, both to its own unborn, and to its neighbors, the Palestinians, is no secret. Anti-war demonstrations have turned to demonstrations for independence all over the world. Evangelical churches like yours and your members should be, but are not, the most peace-seeking persons on the globe. They are not peacemakers because of your support for Israel, a nation at war with its neighbors for all of its existence, and the only country in the world that is openly imprisoning an entire population at gun point. If you deny this is fact you have not visited Gaza, as has this writer.

    A nationwide movement, Project Strait Gate, has initiated silent vigils at American churches with a message of peace and brotherly love, as taught by Jesus in a similar time of war and hatred. Jesus calls the leaders of His church to be “peacemakers.” Churches like yours can not be a peacemaker church if you support the occupation of the Palestinian people, and wars that kill civilians in other countries. We have learned that Christian Zionism is a distorted departure from Christianity. We have described it as an acquired mental disease, similar in some ways to Anorexia Nervosa, where those who have it not only break the hearts of others, but often destroy themselves. Your association with self-proclaimed Zionist John Hagee labels Faith Bible Chapel as infected with Christian Zionism.

    Your mission statement states you believe, “the Bible is true in every way.” But Jesus is believed by Christ Followers to have said, For as much as you have done it (both kindness and evil) to the least of my brothers you have done it unto me. Your guest John Hagee has said many times the USA should bomb Iran, and that the Palestinians have no right to the land they live in. We invite you to show us where Jesus ever made even one statement that allowed a Christian to approve or participate in taking the life of an Iraqi, Afghani or Palestinian, and most especially the lives of women and children.

    Jesus’ words dictate the need for Project Strait Gate. I am personally available to you with a detailed biblical explanation of why “Evangelical Christian Right” leaders should not support serial wars, including Israel’s ongoing occupation of the land of the Philistines, and why your followers should not be among these. I would be pleased to discuss with you the question. “Is political Israel the fulfillment of Biblical Prophesy?” If you would like a presentation for your staff, Sunday school, youth group, etc., please contact me.

    Toward the Strait Gate,
    Charles Carlson

    What I plan on discussing is not the particulars of the debate here but rather how the demonstrators were treated. Note the contrast between the conference attendees and the Christians and Jews mentioned in the bolded paragraph at the end.

    link to robertjprince.wordpress.com

    Overall the responses were not particularly friendly, although we were prepared for that. Most of those with whom we spoke were hiding behind their bibles. They could quote the Old Testament, but had hardly read newspapers. Indeed the level of ignorance revealed was so impressive that I hardly knew how to respond to much of it. Did I have a personal relationship with Christ someone asked me. `No, only with Nancy’ I responded. Several people asked me if I were Christian, as if that would determine whether or not they would even engage in conversation. Alot of nasty comments, curses and let us say unfriendly gestures. Still we talked to a fair number of people who were curious as to why we were there, and what it was exactly that we were protesting.

    It is good for the soul – a kind of reality check – to picket at the Faith Bible Chapel. I think that in the future, whenever I begin to have a little hope that humanity is `turning towards the morning’ as Gordon Bok, Ann Mayo Muir and Ed Trickett put it, I return to the Faith Bible Chapel to be reminded just how dumbed down and inhumane is modern humanity.

    It was not an easy place to be.

    Although it was not at all dangerous in the sense that we were physically threatened (or we threatened them), it was difficult – a kind of culture shock actually – to respond politely and rationally to many of those who engaged us, pickled as they were in their particularly narrow brand of Christianity. The place had the appearance of a beehive of little brainwashed ants. When some one tells me to `read Genesis 16 (or was it 17) in order to understand the current Middle East crisis or excuse Israeli practices against the Palestinians it is hard to overcome the urge to respond, let’s say, `unkindly’. I was amazed watching Charles Carlson, from Project Straight Gate. He handled these folks like a pro, quietly, efficiently, countering all their quotations from scripture (a talent at which I am somewhat lacking).

    A number of racist comments about Moslems came our way.

    There was one woman who made particularly vile comments about Moslems from her car window. The bumber sticker on her car truck had a pro-vegetarian message. Reminded me of an animal rights type from Boulder who felt a great deal of compassion for dogs, but very little for Palestinians.

    Another meshugeneh, on the verge of apoplexy, imagining that he had to power to do so actually cursed us and our children. If I remember correctly he said that our children would turn to worms. I could have easily told him to #$@!, but since I was on `sacred grounds’ (actually – no – on city property) and this was a Christian event, I was trying muster up a bit of Christian charity and so I just smiled.

    There were a fair number of Jewish people in attendance. It was not their facial features which gave them away but their yalmulkas. (or the fact that several of them identified themselves to us as being Jewish). Most of them were not happy to see our new Front Range Jewish Voice For Peace banner which read `Not In Our Name’ (see photo above). With one lady, an esteemed member of Denver’s Orthodox Jewish Community I could not help but to engage in `lively exchange’. She was visibly upset that some of us protesting Israeli policies are Jewish.

    But many more people – both Jewish and Christian – were glad we were there and they told us so in emails, phone calls and the like. Two Jewish women contacted me `I can’t make today’s protest due to a sinus infection…but I am with you in spirit. ‘ Another, who works for a conservative Jewish organization wrote `I wish I could be with you today. I hope you give them hell.’

    Then I plan to tie it back to Yancey’s conclusion:

    I thought, too, how tempting it can be—and how distracting from our primary
    mission—to devote so many efforts to rehabilitating society at large, especially when
    these efforts demonize the opposition. (After all, neither Jesus nor Paul showed much
    concern about cleaning up the degenerate Roman Empire.) As history has proven,
    especially in times when church and state closely mingle, it is possible for the church
    to gain a nation and in the process lose the kingdom.

    • MHughes976
      October 17, 2011, 1:44 pm

      Have the narrow Christians read Genesis 21/22 where Abraham, who has maltreated the kindly Philistines, promises on behalf of his descendants that there will be better treatment in the future?
      Ishmael, a central figure of Genesis 15, presumably represents the unruly desert tribes of the eastern lands, compared to the ‘Philistines’ who are conceived as living close to the sea and the trade routes. His personally wild condition does not seem beyond remedy among his descendants, who will include twelve rulers. His mother Hagar was granted a face to face vision of God (more than has happened to me, I must say) which ought to mean something positive for the future.

      • richb
        October 17, 2011, 4:23 pm

        Here’s Paul’s interpretation of that passage when he was talking to Gentiles in Galatia. So anytime Paul uses the word “we” he is referring to predominately Gentile believers. Emphasis mine:

        21 Tell me, you who want to be under the law, are you not aware of what the law says? 22 For it is written that Abraham had two sons, one by the slave woman and the other by the free woman. 23 His son by the slave woman was born according to the flesh, but his son by the free woman was born as the result of a divine promise.

        24 These things are being taken figuratively: The women represent two covenants. One covenant is from Mount Sinai and bears children who are to be slaves: This is Hagar. 25 Now Hagar stands for Mount Sinai in Arabia and corresponds to the present city of Jerusalem, because she is in slavery with her children. 26 But the Jerusalem that is above is free, and she is our mother. 27 For it is written:

        “Be glad, barren woman,
        you who never bore a child;
        shout for joy and cry aloud,
        you who were never in labor;
        because more are the children of the desolate woman
        than of her who has a husband.”[e]

        28 Now you, brothers and sisters, like Isaac, are children of promise. 29 At that time the son born according to the flesh persecuted the son born by the power of the Spirit. It is the same now. 30 But what does Scripture say? “Get rid of the slave woman and her son, for the slave woman’s son will never share in the inheritance with the free woman’s son.”[f] 31 Therefore, brothers and sisters, we are not children of the slave woman, but of the free woman.

        If a Christian is going to claim a Zionist perspective that Zion is the heavenly one and not the physical Jerusalem which according to Paul was under slavery and a child of Hagar. In short, Christian Zionism is a contradiction in terms because the promises in the OT are to be taken figuratively and not literally. This is the case both for the content of the promises (spiritual ones) and to whom it applies (the spiritual descendents of Sarah).

      • MHughes976
        October 17, 2011, 5:44 pm

        There’s a good commentary on this passage in Beale and Carson’s ‘Comm. on NT use of OT’.
        Paul remained in Arabia for his first three years as a Christian, so maybe his first converts were, in spite of the King’s hostility, Ishmaelites. What a shame we have no Epistle to the Arabians.

  16. pabelmont
    October 17, 2011, 10:32 am

    “The video features clips of Democratic politicians expressing sympathy for the OWS protesters, followed by clips of some protesters alleging a Jewish conspiracy controls the banking cartels that exploit the American people.”

    This echoes the Arbabsiar plot line, tying big shots in Iran to a little-shot in USA to get the big shots to back down on something entirely different (the Iran nukes). Here, effort is to paint these DEMS as anti-Israel. If only.

  17. Les
    October 17, 2011, 12:39 pm

    Wikipedia reports that 1.7% of the US is Jewish. New Yorkers don’t need to look too far to notice that few of these are part of the 1% that matters. Strangely enough we live in a time not unlike Germany in the pre-Hitler 1930’s when Einstein observed how pitiful were the numbers of Jewish bankers in Germany compared to the very disproportionate numbers of Jews in Germany’s media. In the US the power of the Israel Lobby is exercised, not with Jewish money, but via our media which, like Einstein’s Germany, has a disproportionate number of Jews at the top who are 100% united in their support for taxpayer dollars to fund the occupation and ethnic cleansing of the Palestinians. Name one Jewish publisher, editor, owner, manager, at the upper levels of the US media, private as well as public, who is Jewish and is not part of that 100%. Nothing personal, but Mondoweiss is not on a high enough rung on the ladder to qualify as “upper.”

  18. dumvitaestspesest
    October 17, 2011, 12:45 pm

    Excellent video. Marine vs 30 NYC cops. You have to see it in case if did not do it yet.
    Very Powerful.
    He is soooo damn right that is painful.
    Send this video wherever you can.

    • Dan Crowther
      October 17, 2011, 1:40 pm

      dumvitaestpesest, GREAT VIDEO! –

      This was a comment of mine on a thread a couple weeks back:

      A society coming apart at the seams: Settlers attack IDF in the West Bank

      Dan Crowther October 7, 2011 at 10:53 am

      shingo,

      there is a mention of this dynamic in “Common Sense” where Paine talks about the “strong” taking orders and being subservient to “the weak” – he is of course referring to the kings of europe and elsewhere. But what really baffles Paine is the PHYSICAL dimension. That these strong, powerful men would bow down to a boy or a infirmed old man was ridiculous to him. If you look around at who calls the shots in our society and who does the dirty work, its the same thing. Our popular culture reinforces this – the smart are always small, skinny hipster types – and the big guys are always dumb and need to be lead around by the nose by the lil guy. Pinky and the Brain style.

      the more “big guys” (marines, vets etc) show up and support what is going on here in NY, Boston and elsewhere, they will not only bring their strength in a physical sense, but they will also bring the strength to say “you dont have to be afraid.” And that cuts to the foundation of the “security state” – the security state was made by small men, big men will need to lead the charge against it.

      Maybe the “big guys” have arrived on the scene?

    • Potsherd2
      October 19, 2011, 9:53 pm

      One black Marine vs 30 WHITE cops.

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