‘Corporate Watch’ publishes guide on targeting Israeli apartheid

ActivismIsrael/PalestineUS Politics
on 49 Comments
corpwatch
Corporation Watch’s newest publication.

Corporate Watch has published a BDS handbook for activists, Targeting Israeli Apartheid,  breaking down successful BDS campaigns and profiling occupation profiteers. The 368-page guide focuses, in three sections, on the Israeli economy, case studies of specific companies profiting off of the occupation, and British corporate complicity in Israeli militarism. Each section includes a “What’s next,” sub-heading, which provides boycotters with practical directional advice.

This booklet details all of the information groups will need in targeting companies that profit off of the occupation of Palestinian and Syrian land. Charting corporate contracts that further different aspects of the occupation (transport, academia, roads, housing construction, etc…), Corporate Watch’s thorough publication moves BDS from a discourse of morality and preferences—is it moral to single out Israel?—to numbers and facts. The introduction states:

When campaigning, many of us encounter anti-Semitic claims that the reason the occupation and colonisation of Palestine has gone on for so long is because Jews control the world, that there is a Jewish conspiracy. This book busts that racist myth. There is no conspiracy; capitalism has no ethnicity. The primary reason the occupation and colonisation of Palestine has gone on for so long, with little intervention by states to stop it, is because it is an international phenomenon rooted in material power interests and benefits for capital and state authority. This oppression is lucrative.

As the guide demonstrates, the culprit is not pathological “anti-Israel” racism, rather an economic system that tilts in favor of exploitation. This system is comprised of specific companies that can be found in the book, on charts and list citing violations of international law. It’s all very simple, actually, and the booklet makes it digestible. 

Working on BDS? The booklet can be downloaded here.
 

49 Responses

  1. Les
    January 18, 2012, 9:38 am

    Let’s hope it becomes a best seller among free downloads.

  2. dimadok
    January 18, 2012, 9:52 am

    It is indeed very thorough. One small point though-it seems that every aspect of Israel’s economics is viewed in the context of occupation and therefore has to be boycotted. Simple solution proposed-let’s cancel the state of Israel. Problem solved and peace on Earth is restored.
    Such a blatant effort to undermine my state and my economics, with smear campaign and overreaching generalization, will discredit the BDS as the same boycott attempted by the Arab League states.

    • Chaos4700
      January 18, 2012, 10:01 am

      One small point though-it seems that every aspect of Israel’s economics is viewed in the context of occupation and therefore has to be boycotted.

      Most of the water you drink (and fill your swimming pool with… and water your lawn…) comes from outside the Green Line. Your economy is the occupation.

      • Winnica
        January 18, 2012, 10:38 am

        Evidence about the water? Evidence about the economy being based mostly in the occupation?

      • Robert
        January 18, 2012, 12:13 pm

        Winnica,

        Israel’s National Water Carrier originates in the Golan, which is one of the main reasons for its capture. The aquifer for the settlements runs under Maale Adumim, which is why the settlement was built there.

        Here is a map. link to think-israel.org

        And this article explains it. link to think-israel.org

        Take a look at the chart showing the ratios of Israeli water usage to Palestinian water usage. It is 10-1 to 50-1.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 18, 2012, 1:55 pm

        winnica, have you read French parliament report accuses Israel of water ‘apartheid’ in West Bank

        link to haaretz.com

      • Winnica
        January 18, 2012, 4:20 pm

        Did you read the Haaretz report all the way to the bottom, Annie? I recommend.

      • Winnica
        January 18, 2012, 4:34 pm

        Robert,
        The National Water Carrier originates in the Sea of Galillee, as any schoolchild knows, and was built in the 1950s when the Golan was controlled by Syria. The map you link to is odd, in that it shows only water sources to the east of the lake, thus suggesting the areas to the north and west are desert, which, of course, is silly. Such lopsidedness is an easily identified indication that the source is not trustworthy.

        Your statement about Maaleh Adumim is ever stranger. Next time you go there, see if you can see any water pumps. There aren’t any. As for the reasons the town was put there, for that you’d have to read the documentation of the ministries involved. I doubt you’ve done that, and moreover, I doubt you’ll be able to dig up any website which has – but perhaps you’ll surprise me. In which case I’ll follow their footnotes and go look at the documents themselves to check.

        Although I’ve been making a living from Internet-related matters for years, I’m not of the opinion that it’s the only source for facts. Rather on the contrary: a very large majority of human knowledge is still not on the Web, and thus can’t be linked to. Still, if you’re interested in a website which is chock-full of scientific, evidence-based data on Israel’s water policies, you might start here:
        link to water.gov.il

        Finally, you might be interested in noting that Israel is one of the most advanced countries in the world in desalination, and that within a few years it will be the only country in the world where the entire supply of water for private consumption will come from desalination, making the entire thesis about how Israel needs Palestinian water irrelevant.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 18, 2012, 5:05 pm

        speaking of water desalination have you read about water in gaza lately

        link to mondoweiss.net

      • Shingo
        January 18, 2012, 5:27 pm

        It’s funny reading your post Winnica,

        You begin by denying that Israel steals and relies on Palestinian water, then conclude that it doesn’t matter, because according to your hyped desalination sectror, Israel won’t need to steal Palestinian water for much longer.

        As for desalination, Israel will never be able to fulfill the supply of water for private consumption with desalination. Such a scale of desalination would render most fo the Israeli coastline unahabitable for sea life.

        Desalination also requires a vast amounts of energy, which Israel doesn’t have. Mind you they are doing their best to steal that too.

        link to arstechnica.com

      • Annie Robbins
        January 18, 2012, 5:53 pm

        of course i did. this is the part that cracked me up:

        The Israeli Embassy in Paris had no foreknowledge of the report and thus did not refute it or work to moderate it. Foreign Ministry officials called the incident “a serious diplomatic mishap.”

        of course the israeli embassy should have the opportunity to intercept any report about israel!!!!

        a mistake like that would never happen in the US of course.

      • Winnica
        January 19, 2012, 1:03 am

        So what am I supposed to do, Shingo: accept the logic of your statements, or the reality I can see with my own eyes. The reality is that back in 2002 (I think it was) Israel porposefully set itself the goal of supplying all its private consumption (not including industry and agriculture) via desalination installations, and then started building them. Some of them are already there, and others will be completed, if I’m not mistaken, before the end of this decade. All the websites in the world won’t change this – though of course the website I linked to above explains the opposite: how the project is progressing.

        As for energy, Israel will be energy-independant by about 2014; someday, when the scientists figure out how to create electricity efficiently from sunlight, it will be ensured eternal independence on account of the Negev.

        As for the one about Israel stealing water, I”m reminded of how the media used to claim that Israeli settlements stole 25% of the water in Gaza; then, in 2005, Israel left Gaza and the critics never said a word about how the evacuated water sources werre now serving the Palestinians because the whole story had always been a fabrication. The reality had been that in the 1993 Oslo agreements, Israel had agreed to supply the PA with water, but the PA never got around to building the pipelines to receive the water in. Unlike the Jordanians, who made a similar agreement with Israel in 1994, then built the connecting pipelines, and have been receiving water from Israel ever since.

      • Winnica
        January 19, 2012, 1:08 am

        See my response to Shingo below, Annie. Also, please pardon me when I state that Mondoweiss is an interesting source for understanding the thought processes of a certain type of critics of Israel (and America), but is not a reliable source for getting at the facts of the region. I know you and your fellow readers think otherwise, but I must regrettably be adamant on this. The entire Internet isn’t much of a source, come to think of it, but Mondoweiss is weaker than usual in the factual reliabilty section.

        I do hope this comment gets published.

      • Chaos4700
        January 19, 2012, 1:17 am

        Eee just ADMITTED that he’s stealing water from neighboring countries!

      • Winnica
        January 19, 2012, 1:17 am

        Annie, here’s the bottom section of the item in Haaretz:
        “These unacceptable remarks surprised his colleagues in the working group, who were shocked to find them in the final version after it was published, after Israeli diplomats called their attention to them,” Palmor said.

        The report, he continued, “was loaded with the language of vicious propaganda, far removed from any professional criticism with which one could argue intelligently.” Moreover, the report’s author omitted numerous facts and acted “with blatant tendentiousness.”

        “After embassy staffers pointed out the exceptional seriousness of the wording … all the working group members disassociated themselves from [the report], including the chairman, who sent an official letter to the ambassador renouncing responsibility for the report’s anti-Israel expressions,” Palmor added.

        Now we’ve got an interesting case. According to Haaretz, there exists a letter from the group of French investigators disassociating themselves from the report they themselves worked on, because it’s not true. Haaretz doesn’t show us this letter, and no-one claims it’s to be found online. So the Internet may not be a good tool to test the veracity of the statement. Yet clearly, there is a true version and a false version of the story. Either such a letter exists, which means the entire French report castigating Israel is either false or very seriously flawed; or such a letter doesn’t exist, and Haaretz has been reporting untruths.

        One way or the other, trumpeting the item as proof of some Israeli crime seems to me rather problematic, which is the reason you introduced it to the discussion.

      • Shingo
        January 19, 2012, 1:22 am

        ?See my response to Shingo

        And they are grossly inadequate. You really are goi g to have to try a lot harder.

        Also, please pardon me when I state that Mondoweiss is an interesting source for understanding the thought processes of a certain type of critics of Israel (and America), but is not a reliable source for getting at the facts of the region.

        That’s not a serious argument. Mondoweiss doesn’t claim to be a source of facts form the region. The facts are sourced from new reports (including those from the region), historical data and reports from human rights groups.

        I know you and your fellow readers think otherwise, but I must regrettably be adamant on this.

        Feel free to be as regrettable and adamant as you wish, but you are wrong.

        The entire Internet isn’t much of a source, come to think of it, but Mondoweiss is weaker than usual in the factual reliabilty section.

        Thst’s funny seeing as you’ve become something of a object of ridicule on this blog for your grossly false or mistaken clams, predictions and statements.

        In fact, you haven’t produced any reliably factual information since I’ve read you.

      • Hostage
        January 19, 2012, 1:27 am

        Evidence about the water?

        Sure Ben White has up a translation of the applicable portion from the French government’s report:

        Box No. 3: Water, evidence of a new apartheid in the Middle East

        Apartheid, which was introduced by Prime Minister Daniel F. Malan in 1948, ensured the differentiated development of ethnic groups in South Africa for half a century. It was a policy involving both racial and spatial segregation (enclosure of black and “coloured” communities within confined areas known as bantustans) but also segregation of the country’s citizens, since the freedoms of one sector of the population were flouted (by restrictions on the right to freedom of movement and the right of assembly in public places, and exposure to violent police action). The odious apartheid regime in South Africa ended in the early 1990s with the release of Nelson Mandela and political prisoners, the courageous compromise reached between Mr. de Klerk and Mandela, and the first free elections in 1994, which resulted in a massive transfer of power to the African National Congress (ANC), Mandela’s party.

        Of course, comparisons are not always accurate: Palestine is not South Africa, and the opening years of the current decade differ from those prior to 1990. However, there are words and symbols which, by virtue of their inherent force, may serve pedagogical aims.

        It is thus crystal clear, despite the fact that those who dare to use the word are few and far between, that the Middle East is the scene of a new form of apartheid.

        The segregation is racial but, since no one dares to say so, it is described chastely as “religious”. But can the demand for a “Jewish” state really be described as purely religious?

        Segregation is also spatial, a fact best symbolised by the wall built to separate the two communities. It is further illustrated by the division of the West Bank into three zones: A, B and C.

        The Israeli army has transferred responsibility for civil affairs, i.e. for the provision of community services, to the Palestinian Authority in zones A et B. These two zones, which contain almost 95% of the Palestinian population of the West Bank, represent only 40% of the territory. Zone C remains entirely under the authority of the Israeli army. It constitutes 60% of the territory of the West Bank, comprising land resources, access to aquifers and all the main highways.

        The segregation is also haughty and contemptuous (“those people are irresponsible” … is an oft repeated mantra of some Israeli authorities), harassing and humiliating (the passage of checkpoints is rendered more stringent or more relaxed without warning) or even violent (the suppression of demonstrations regularly results in fatalities …).

        Hence it definitely constitutes a “new apartheid”.

        Water plays a special role in the conflict between Palestinians and Israelis; indeed it may be said to constitute the “5th component” of the Oslo Accords. The Oslo Declaration of 13 September 1993 recognises the Palestinians’ rights to water in the West Bank. The Taba Interim Agreement of 28 September 1995 provides for the sharing of water pending the signing of a permanent agreement. However, the sharing is incomplete: it is applicable only to the aquifers; the Jordan River is excluded, since the Palestinians no longer have access to it. Moreover, the Agreement freezes the previous usage situation and distributes only the quantity of water that remains available, i.e. 78 cubic metres of the Eastern Aquifer. It is therefore highly unfavourable to the Palestinians, who exploit only 18% of the aquifers, i.e. 10% of the water available within the territory.

        It is therefore difficult to see how what has become a fully fledged “water conflict” can be resolved in the absence of a global political settlement.

        What are the characteristics of this “water conflict”? In “hydrological” terms, it concerns primarily the River Jordan, which combines all the components that are likely to trigger a “water crisis”. Since the beginning of the conflict, from war to war, Israel’s “territorial expansion” has been comparable, whether one likes it or not, to “water conquests” encompassing both rivers and aquifers.

        And the fact is that water in the Middle East has become more than a resource: it is now a weapon.

        To understand the nature of this “weapon” serving the “new apartheid”, it should be noted, for example, that the 450,000 Israeli settlers in the West Bank use more water than the 2.3 million Palestinians.

        The multiple manifestations of this phenomenon also include the following:

        when a drought occurs, priority is given to settlers in breach of international law;
        the wall makes is possible to control access to underground water sources and prevents Palestinians from drawing water in the “buffer zone” in order to facilitate the flow of water westwards;
        the “wells” dug spontaneously by Palestinians in the West Bank are systematically destroyed by the Israeli army;
        in Gaza water reservoirs were targeted by Israeli bombs in 2008-2009;
        and as zones A and B do not constitute a single whole but are broken up into enclaves surrounded by Israeli settlements, by roads reserved for settlers and by zone C, this state of affairs impedes the development of effective infrastructure for a reliable water supply and for the discharge of wastewater. Most Palestinians live in zones A and B, but the infrastructure on which they depend is located in or crosses through zone C. The movement of Palestinians within zone C is restricted or prohibited; the Israeli army rarely authorises construction or other development work. Several examples may be cited of water purification facilities planned by the Palestinian Water Ministry and “blocked” by the Israeli administration.

        The Israelis blame the Palestinians for the existence of uncontrolled wells that are responsible for excessive pumping and aquifer salinisation. They mention Gaza as an example, since the aquifer there is gradually being lost. They also complain about the lack of water treatment. Only 31% of Palestinians are connected to the system. But the Committee has approved only 50% of Palestinian projects, with enormous delays, and such authorisation must then be followed by administrative authorisation for zone C. The appropriation of resources by the settlements and by the route of the wall is another negative factor. The fact that the aquifers are overexploited is beyond doubt.

        The Israelis invoke the theory of prior appropriation in support of their rights and are totally opposed to joint water management, adopting a security-based approach. Israel proposes solutions, some of which have interesting dimensions, but it reserves water resource control for itself. The mission gained the impression that the country would prefer to abandon the aquifers, ceasing to develop desalination procedures, than to lay the basis for shared management. There will be no water sharing without a political settlement to the issue of land sharing.

        Yet a Joint Water Committee was established by the Oslo II Accords. Its competence with respect to all water-related issues relates only to Palestinians in the territory of the West Bank. Hence it is not a shared management body, still less one providing for a shared basin. Furthermore, it operates on the basis of consensus, which gives de facto veto power to Israel.

        link to electronicintifada.net

      • Winnica
        January 19, 2012, 3:15 am

        This is an example of how odd the discussions at Mondoweiss can be. eee, whoever she is, didn’t say that, but even if she did, what difference does it make? An unidentified blogger makes a statement in a discussion thread, and this is then taken to be proof of a policy of a sovereign government. Huh? Let’s say an identified Israeli, using their verifiable identity, comes out and says something about what their country does: does this make it true?

        Actions of states are documented by states, and verified by carefully reading the documentation. When the documentation isn’t available, a secondary method is to get the data directly from the authorities who have it. Historians use the first method, top-notch journalists use the second. Quality bloggers can do as well as journalists, if they’re well-informed, but in the long run the historians are more trustworthy than the journalists, if you can wait, because they’ve got better access and a more robust methodology.

        People chatting about matters they have no real information about are just that: people chatting.

      • Shingo
        January 19, 2012, 3:52 am

        So what am I supposed to do, Shingo:

        I don’t care what you do, but if you expect anyone to take you serious, you might start by making up yout mind whether the internet is a legitimate source of information or not. Debating you is like neiling jelly to a wall, so stop dimissing web links across the board if you are going to use web links to support your argument.

        The reality is that back in 2002 (I think it was) Israel porposefully set itself the goal of supplying all its private consumption (not including industry and agriculture) via desalination installations, and then started building them.

        So what? The US has been setting a goal of energy independence for decades, but reality is a different beast. Desalination has inherent logistical and practical limitations which Israel has not overcome. The fact you see desalination plants popping up onnly proves that Israel is building them and no one has disputed that. Whether these will satisfy ISrael’s demand is an entirely different matter.

        All the websites in the world won’t change this – though of course the website I linked to above explains the opposite: how the project is progressing.

        Oh I see, so are web links to be trusted or not?

        The fact is that Israel will not acheve water independence by the end fo the decade. Haaretz has reported that Israel will have to invest NIS 200 billion over the next four decades to meet demand. These will have to include offshore desalination plants because there is insufficitn and for building such plants on the beaches.

        link to haaretz.com

        As for energy, Israel will be energy-independant by about 2014

        Rubbish. Israel is not even close to achieving energy independence.

        someday, when the scientists figure out how to create electricity efficiently from sunlight, it will be ensured eternal independence on account of the Negev

        That cerainly won’t happn by 2014. Solar has only been able to suplement domestic requirements and requires a huge capital outlay. Solar is not even close to being abole to meet the needs of industry.

        As for the one about Israel stealing water, Im reminded of how the media used to claim that Israeli settlements stole 25% of the water in Gaza; then, in 2005, Israel left Gaza and the critics never said a word about how the evacuated water sources werre now serving the Palestinians because the whole story had always been a fabrication.

        How does that prove it’s a fabrication? Look at this map. Gaza is sitting on top on an acquifer.

        link to passia.org

        All it means is that Israel stole 25% of the water Gaza produced, even if the water in Gaza is limited.

        The reality had been that in the 1993 Oslo agreements, Israel had agreed to supply the PA with water, but the PA never got around to building the pipelines to receive the water in.

        Absolute rubbish. Israel’s water has always been suplemented by the acquifers in the West Bank. All of the acquifers l;ie outside the Green Line. Seriously Winnica, are we to even believe you live in Israel or the occupied territories?

        Unlike the Jordanians, who made a similar agreement with Israel in 1994, then built the connecting pipelines, and have been receiving water from Israel ever since.

        What are you talking about? The water is not from Israel, it’s from the Jordan River, the Yarmouk River waters and Arabah (Arava) ground water. None of these are in Israel. The Jordan Riiver is shared between Palestine/Israel. Israel actualy directs water from the Yarmouk to lake Tiberias.

      • Shingo
        January 19, 2012, 4:08 am

        Actions of states are documented by states, and verified by carefully reading the documentation.

        If yhou believe that, then there’s a patch of desert in the Negev I want to sell you. The government documentation that is available is only the documentation the government is willing to allow you to read.

        Seriously Winnica, are you prepared to hear the truth about Santa Claus or should I say, Captain Israel?

        When the documentation isn’t available, a secondary method is to get the data directly from the authorities who have it Historians use the first method, top-notch journalists use the second.

        Not when the government has decided that they are to remain classified, as Netenyabhu recetly did with Israeli government documents from 1948 and 1967, that were due to be declassified, but which Netenyabhu decided would be a therat to Israel’s security if released to the public.

        link to google.com
        link to haaretz.co.il

      • Hostage
        January 19, 2012, 4:32 am

        As for the one about Israel stealing water, Im reminded of how the media used to claim that Israeli settlements stole 25% of the water in Gaza; then, in 2005, Israel left Gaza and the critics never said a word about how the evacuated water sources werre now serving the Palestinians because the whole story had always been a fabrication.

        It was more like the Israelis cut their losses and left and that there are too many inhabitants and refugees being confined in too little space. The Israeli disengagement occurred after UN scientists had already estimated that Gaza wouldn’t have drinkable water within fifteen years. They had noted that the population of Gaza relies on wells and that the aquifer was being infiltrated by salty sea water and nitrates because the Israels were pumping water faster than it could be recharged naturally by rainfall and movement of fresh groundwater.
        *http://www.ifamericansknew.org/cur_sit/water.html
        *http://www.passia.org/publications/bulletins/water-eng/pages/water07.pdf
        *http://unispal.un.org/UNISPAL.NSF/0/80E8238D765E5FB7852576B1004EC498

      • Winnica
        January 19, 2012, 5:18 am

        Shingo –

        You don’t have the faintest idea who I am: my gender, my nationality (or perhaps multiple nationalities), my domicile, education, age, profession, mother-tongue, and of course, my ability or non-ability to gather information. Nor do I know any of this about you.

        I assure you that I feel confident about what I know when I’m confident, and I try to recognize when I’m being fed questionable information, and the opinions of the readership at this website about my knowledge is a matter of no consequence. Given what I know and how I know it, you don’t come off as a well informed person, but perhaps that’s just me. Then again, perhaps it’s not just me. A possible reason this website is so far from mainstream is that its reporters and their readers are willing to accept as fact notions which most reasonable poeple would not be convinced by.

        Either that, or the Zionist lobby has most people hoodwinked. That’s the preferred explanation here when the Mondoweiss postion is demonstrably far from the mainstream one.

        Anway, Israel is on the road to energy independance because of the large gas fields off its coast. And no, I don’t mean the ones which are disputed by the Lebanese. I mean the larger ones which are undisputed. As for the water: read the data here:
        link to water.gov.il
        Unlike many websites, this one is run by the authority which is in charge of its topic, and thus has no need for speculation or media reports: it reports on its own actions, and offers transparency so that if you disagree, you know what to disagree about.

      • Shingo
        January 19, 2012, 5:56 am

        Winnica,

        You are right, I haven’t any idea WHO you are, though you;ve provided ample evidence as to what you are – an ignorant and uneducated individual who has an inate inability to contruct a logical argument.

        I realize the education system in Israel is in tatters, but surely, you should come better prepared.

        Given what I know and how I know it, you don’t come off as a well informed person, but perhaps that’s just me. Then again, perhaps it’s not just me. A possible reason this website is so far from mainstream is that its reporters and their readers are willing to accept as fact notions which most reasonable poeple would not be convinced by.

        Sirry, but what you continue to demonstrate with your bavue andand measdering comments is not only ignorance and a poor educatioon, but anti intellectualism across the boad. You’re rants about the web and it’s apparent limitations remind me of the tongue tied and torture diatribes sarah Palin was reeling off during he 2008 presidential race. You have provided no evidence to sugegst you have teh vagues idea of what you are talking about.

        That’s the preferred explanation here when the Mondoweiss postion is demonstrably far from the mainstream one.

        Again, your actions sugegst otherwise. If Mondoweiss was so far out of the mainstream and irrelevant ans you would have everyone believe, then why are you wastign so much time here? What do you hope to gain? You’ve already admitetd you have no intention of contributin any substantial argument and that you believe it would be overlooked even if you did.

        So why are you here?

        Anway, Israel is on the road to energy independance because of the large gas fields off its coast.

        Umm, no. The large gas fields off its coast do not beling to Israel.

        And no, I don’t mean the ones which are disputed by the Lebanese. I mean the larger ones which are undisputed.

        Wrong again. Those are also dispted by Gaza.

        As for the water: read the data here:

        again in Hebrew. Are you deliberately trying to look like a perrenial fool, or does it just come naturally?

      • Shmuel
        January 19, 2012, 6:12 am

        again in Hebrew

        Expect the ‘how can you possibly claim to know anything about the region if you don’t even read Hebrew’ speech.

        There are actually a couple of articles in English on the site (Israel Water Authority website), but they offer little more than government propaganda. It’s like citing the IDF Spokesman or Civil Administration for facts on the occupation.

      • richb
        January 19, 2012, 9:00 am

        With respect to water all you need is to use your own eyes. The Dead Sea split in half because it went down over 25m. The road next to it had to be moved because of all the sink holes. Our guide tried to explain them by earthquakes rather than the effects of the National Water Carrier and unsustainable water use. Diverting one billion cubic meters of water a year has its effects.

      • patm
        January 19, 2012, 9:33 am

        You don’t have the faintest idea who I am: my gender, my nationality (or perhaps multiple nationalities), my domicile, education, age, profession, mother-tongue, and of course, my ability or non-ability to gather information.

        You sound like a British Zionist to me, winnica. Full of words but lacking substance or heart as only ‘educated’ Brits can sound. Retired, anxious to make a bit of money shilling for Israel on the Internet you so despise. How am I doing so far?

      • patm
        January 19, 2012, 10:18 am

        Israel just keeps getting stronger in absolute terms and relative to its neighbors.

        What absolute terms would these be, 3e?

      • patm
        January 19, 2012, 3:04 pm

        For example GDP and GDP per capita. Number of patents per capita. Innovation etc.

        You’re waffling, 3e. Lets see some statistics, urls, evidence.

      • Chaos4700
        January 19, 2012, 7:09 pm

        Eee admitted he was stealing water from his neighbors! Seriously. Go back and look, Winnica.

      • Jeffrey Blankfort
        January 19, 2012, 8:09 pm

        Whatever else it may do, the release of this document has certainly disturbed MW’s Israeli trolls enough for them to make a desperate effort to quickly turn the conversation elsewhere. Maaleh Adumim, Winnica was built as part of Israel’s plan to establish “facts on the ground,” to use the term made infamous by the late terrorist and war criminal, Menachem Begin, to make sure that the West Bank would never be taken from Jewish hands.

        Perhaps, Winnica (are you originally from California?) should write her comments to those journalists on Ha’aretz who have on occasion written about Israel’s theft of water from the OT which is one, among several reasons, that Israel will not allow the Palestinians to take control of the West Bank or its key aquifer.

        The notion that Israel will be energy independent in 2014 on the basis of its offshore natural gas claims must be pleasant to contemplate although the Lebanese claim some of that gas is below its waters. When it comes to the production of hot air, of course, the Lebanese will have to defer to their Southern neighbors who are, without question, full of it.

    • patm
      January 18, 2012, 9:45 pm

      Such a blatant effort to undermine my state and my economics, with smear campaign and overreaching generalization, will discredit the BDS as the same boycott attempted by the Arab League states.

      BDS worked in South Africa, Dimadok, and it will work in Palestine where the Apartheid is—according to SA campaigners—even worse than it was in South Africa.

      And btw what are you, Dimadok, doing to try to turn your state into a legitimate actor on the world stage? Israel is its own worst enemy.

  3. eljay
    January 18, 2012, 10:11 am

    >> … it seems that every aspect of Israel’s economics is viewed in the context of occupation and therefore has to be boycotted. Simple solution proposed-let’s cancel the state of Israel.

    You Zio-supremacists really need to stop using your bizarre version of “common sense” and start using the real thing. If “every aspect of Israel’s economics is viewed in the context of occupation”, the simple solution – are you ready for this? – is to halt the occupation. Right now, completely. Israel has the power to do it.

  4. Winnica
    January 18, 2012, 10:19 am

    Allison,

    A number of your fellow writers on this website, not to mention many commentors, are greatly in favor of BDS, but simultaneously attribute to Israel control over American foreign policy, American media, and much of America’s political discourse. A recent post even seemed to be saying that Israeli covert actions are thwarting Iranian efforts to talk with the US; previous posts have speculated the Israelis are pulling the strings in Egypt and elsewhere.

    In a way, your post also alludes to this subject.

    My question is how to reconcile this idea with that of BDS. If Israel is weak enough that public pressure of the BDS sort can bring it to its knees, surely it can’t simultaneously be powerful enough to manipulate the world’s most powerful nation according to whim? If Israel controls the media, clearly BDS will never gain any hearing there? Isn’t there a fundamental inconsistency here?

    • LeaNder
      January 18, 2012, 11:47 am

      In some cases it works to point out glaring contradictions, but I am afraid, Winnica, not in this one. It’s very a very forced comparison in this case.

    • Robert
      January 18, 2012, 12:18 pm

      Winnica,

      The answer to your question is in how social/political movements operate. The Israel Lobby power is there principly because the issue of extreme injustice to the Palestinians is not on Americans radar, and is even a low priority in Europe. Mondoweiss is a resource for clearly explaining the issue to people who otherwise would not know what is going on, due to hasbara or outright ignorance. The Palestinian story is slowly breaking into the mainstream, including amongst Jews, and will reach critical mass in the years to come.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 18, 2012, 1:49 pm

        riiiiight eee, we’re in no growth mode. uh huh. anymore brilliant predictions?

      • Shingo
        January 18, 2012, 3:55 pm

        Israeli exports are growing all the time and so is tourism to Israel. So yes you are right, we are in growth mode.

        So why th draconian lawson against BDS in Israel if it’s no big deal eee?

        In fact, it appears that BDS is being extremely effective.
        link to richardsilverstein.com

      • Annie Robbins
        January 18, 2012, 5:35 pm

        Because it is high time you understand that the Israeli right uses BDS to score points against the little that is left of the Israeli left.

        i’m still not getting your pt. are you suggesting we support ending a global movement to prop up the israeli left? where are the calls from the israeli left begging us to stop?

      • Shingo
        January 18, 2012, 6:02 pm

        . They attack BDS to attack the left, not because BDS is significant in any way.

        Much like the way they attack Palestinians, not because they ate a threat, but because they like the sport.

        Say eee, I take it that the right  includes you?

         A group of people worried that it might hurt in the future is proof that it is not working now. They have nothing to worry about.

        What an incredibly stupid argument!  When cancer first occurs in your body, it doesn’t noticeably affect your health. That doesn’t  mean you don’t have it or that it won’t kill you in the future.

        Any Israeli high tech company can be founded as a subsidiary of a US holding company and will not even be theoretically targeted by BDS.

        On the contrary. As Israeli tech companies start doing this, the patten will become obvious and those companies will be readily identified.

        Strange though that they would need to do so if BDS is not an issue.

        I guess it must be after all.

      • Shingo
        January 19, 2012, 6:46 am

        Show me ONE Israeli startup that is hampered by BDS

        Startup’s don’t usually turn a profit for the first few years, so that would be meaningless.

        Intel, Microsoft, Oracle, Google, Apple etc. etc. have subsidiaries in Israel.

        They are US companies not Israeli. They could end their ties with Israel overnight with little consequence.

        As I explained many times before, BDS will hurt Palestinians more than it will hurt Israel, if is ever effective.

        BDS is a Palestinian initiave, so they are better judges of that than you. Besides, it seems whatever they do, Israel will always punich them for it anyway.

        Just like violence, it will backfire on the Palestinians.

        Which proves that non violence is just as intolerable to ISrael as violence.

        Violence has never backfired on the Isralis. Oh wait, yes it has. In Lebanon both times, so I guess you have a point.

    • richb
      January 18, 2012, 3:12 pm

      I’m generally on the empire side of the empire vs. lobby debate. That being said, the most strident proponent of the lobby understands that the power of the lobby is almost all in the U.S. Since BDS is an international movement even if the lobby is successful to stymy BDS in the U.S., it’s still not stopped. Furthermore, BDS is also a movement in civil society and does not require government support. Again, the most strident proponent of the lobby notes it’s the American government more than the American people who are under the influence of the lobby. Finally, the Internet allows a diverse and international population to have solidarity with each other. This means that BDS when applied to Israel will be more successful than when it was applied to South Africa without the Internet.

    • Shingo
      January 18, 2012, 3:51 pm

      If Israel is weak enough that public pressure of the BDS sort can bring it to its knees, surely it can’t simultaneously be powerful enough to manipulate the world’s most powerful nation according to whim?

      That’s where the Zionist community in the US comes into play. If Israel were left alone to fend for itself, it wouldn’t be the 4th most powerful military in the world, it wouldn’t be the beneficiary of an extraordinarily favorable trade agreement with the US, it wouldn’t enjoy an automatic veto at the UN, and it wouldn’t be able to steal land and build illegal settlements with such impunity.

      As the saying goes, it’s much cheaper to bribe a congressman tha purchase an F16.

  5. Les
    January 18, 2012, 10:52 am

    (London) Independent

    Letters: Museum must drop West Bank link

    Tuesday 17 January 2012

    It is extraordinary, but true, that one of our great national museums is co-ordinating an activity that breaks international law. That museum is the Natural History Museum, which is collaborating in research with an Israeli commercial firm located in an illegal settlement in the Palestinian West Bank.

    The firm is Ahava/Dead Sea Laboratories, whose business is manufacturing cosmetics out of mud, which it excavates from the banks of the Dead Sea. Ahava/DSL is located at Mitzpe Shalem, a settlement 10km beyond the Green Line. The collaboration with the Museum is through an EU-funded project called Nanoretox, in which Kings College London, Imperial College and a number of foreign institutions are also involved. The museum is the coordinating partner for this project.

    Ahava/DSL is based on occupied territory. It extracts, processes and exports Palestinian resources to generate profits that fund an illegal settlement. Israel’s settlement project has been held by the International Court of Justice to break international law. Organisations which aid and abet this process may well themselves be found to be in violation. We find it almost inconceivable that a national institution of the status of the Natural History Museum should have put itself in this position.

    We call on the museum to take immediate steps to terminate its involvement in Nanoretox and to establish safeguards that protect against any comparable entanglement.

    Professor Sir Patrick Bateson FRS
    University of Cambridge

    Professor Malcolm Levitt FRS
    University of Southampton

    Professor Tim Shallice FRS
    SISSA, Trieste

    Mike Leigh

    Ken Loach

    Jonathan Miller

    Victoria Brittain

    Baroness Tonge

    Dr Gillian Yudkin

    Professor Laurence Dreyfus FBA
    University of Oxford

    Professor Jacqueline Rose FBA
    Queen Mary University of London

    Professor Jonathan Rosenhead
    London School of Economics

    Professor John Armitage
    University of Bristol

    Professor Haim Bresheeth
    University of East London

    Professor Barry Fuller
    University College London

    Professor Colin Green
    University College, London

    Dr Ghada Karmi
    University of Exeter

    Professor Adah Kay
    City University

    Professor David Pegg
    University of York

    Professor Steven Rose
    Open University

    Professor Lynne Segal
    Birkbeck College

    link to independent.co.uk

    • patm
      January 18, 2012, 9:29 pm

      Thanks Les. Let us know if there is a letter campaign or petition we can sign.

      The London BDS.org website is all over this outrage.

      link to londonbds.org

  6. Kathleen
    January 18, 2012, 11:24 am

    Thanks.

  7. regev
    January 19, 2012, 12:52 pm

    @eee

    “As I explained many times before, BDS will hurt Palestinians more than it will hurt Israel, if is ever effective. Just like violence, it will backfire on the Palestinians”

    Precisely, but do you think they even care? The people who wrote this handbook don’t give a damn about the Palestinians. For them, the Mondoweiss crowd and most of the other people who couch their vitriol in humanitarian and democratic pro-Palestinian Arab terms, it is really all about being anti Israel and not pro Palestine

    • patm
      January 19, 2012, 3:15 pm

      The people who wrote this handbook don’t give a damn about the Palestinians.

      And you and your pal 3e do care about the Palestinians, regev?

      Allison, thanks for this article. The 368 page downloadable Targeting Israeli Apartheid seems to have struck a nerve at Hasbara Central. And so it should.

      BDS is getting stronger and the Zionists are losing ground.

    • Shingo
      January 19, 2012, 5:54 pm

      For them, the Mondoweiss crowd and most of the other people who couch their vitriol in humanitarian and democratic pro-Palestinian Arab terms, it is really all about being anti Israel and not pro Palestine

      Wow, talk about infantile! Shall we say that you two don’t really give a damn about Jews but support ISrael because you get a kick out of watching Palestinians being shot?

      Stay classy Regev.

      • Chaos4700
        January 19, 2012, 7:10 pm

        Wonder if he’s related to Mark Regev. This guy’s just about as poor at PR.

Leave a Reply