A letter to the Methodists in support of divestment

ActivismIsrael/Palestine
on 34 Comments
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Jewish & Christian advocates for peace and divestment from Israeli Occupation at the Methodist General Conference, April 24, 2012 (Photo: JVPLive)

Today the United Methodist Church opens its global conference in Tampa, FL. Over the next 10 days, it will consider a resolution to divest from three companies profiting from the occupation. 

Dear brothers and sisters of the Methodist faith,

Recently a friend asked me if it was possible to sum up the Israel/Palestine situation in a nutshell. I had to think about it before I said:

“When I left Jerusalem in February, I said goodbye to a friend who works for the United Nations and told her how devastated I felt from traveling through the occupation. She said, ‘All my friends back home ask me, What is the peaceful resolution to the conflict?’ Then she got a sad look.

“‘When you’ve been here, you understand, There is no peaceful outcome.’”

That is the situation in a nutshell. A combination of endless Israeli expansionism and unwavering American support for that expansion and the refusal of Palestinians to accept the dispossession has created a powderkeg. It resembles other historic land struggles that involved imbalances of power and human rights violations, from the England-Ireland conflict to the French colonization of Algeria to South African apartheid. Diplomatic solutions have come and gone. One side is oppressed, and sees no light at the tunnel for its children’s future. The other side feels defensive, militaristic, and obstinate. When Americans entered a similar phase in our own history, people described the battle between the slavery south and the anti-slavery north as an “irrepressible conflict.” The same is true for Israel and Palestine.

And that is why I am for boycott, divestment and sanctions. Given the utter failure of other countries to bring any pressure to bear on the dominant power in the conflict– Israel– boycott and divestment are the only program that holds out hope of a way out without significant bloodshed.

Palestinians are asking us to do this, not on some whim, not out of any feeling of arrogance. No, leading figures and a broad segment of civil society have settled on this strategy as the most effective one. Let us not forget: Palestinians were promised an Arab state in Palestine 65 years ago and they have never gotten it, even as countless other peoples have gotten states recognized by the U.N. They have tried everything over the last 90 years to achieve independence—uprising, revolt, militias, armies, rejection of international measures, terrorism, compromise and peace process. All these approaches have failed to produce anything except more chopped down olive trees that their grandfathers planted, more bulldozed cisterns they store water in through the long dry months,  more settlers taking their village’s only spring.

And when the people have undertaken violent resistance to military occupation – a right guaranteed under international law— they have been met by overwhelming violence. They have lost even more.

Their lack of firepower is only rivaled by their lack of political power. The peace process has produced 20 years of endlessly similar proposals with America acting as Israel’s lawyer even as the Israelis colonize more and more Palestinian land.

As Hillary Clinton says, The status quo is unsustainable.

When people suggest that we should continue on the peace process path, or that “peace is hard work,” or that we just need to give it more time, they are showing incredible contempt for the real life situation of Palestinians. I have spent enough time inside the occupation to see how desperate and angry Palestinians are. They lack virtually all rights. They have no power to vote for the government that pushes them out of their houses, arrests their sons, and gives their water to settlers.

I’ve met a sheep farmer whose pen was destroyed by marauding soldiers who even crushed a lamb. I’ve met a tomato farmer whose water lines were cut by religious zealot settlers who’ve seized the hilltop across the way. I’ve met parents whose 12-year-old child was detained and pressured to squeal on family members who were guilty of organizing nonviolent resistance. I’ve met a brilliant student who leaves his computer programming classes at Bir Zeit University to risk being shot at a border crossing because he can see the Mediterranean from his rooftop but is barred by law from going there. I’ve met a young feminist who cannot travel to Jerusalem, without going through a bureaucratic maze of paperwork and military checkpoints that always produce fear and humiliation.

For many years, Palestinians have looked to the United States to put a brake on Israel’s settlement activities. But no one can have any doubt at this point– the United States is incapable of supplying that check. Because of the power of the Israel lobby in our politics, presidents have again and again gone back on U.S. policy, that the settlements are illegal and that Palestinians have a right to self-determination. In Cairo three years ago, Obama said The settlements must end and Palestinians must have a state. At the U.N. two years later he cast a veto of a resolution the world backed, calling for an end to settlements. And then he worked hard to derail a Palestinian statehood initiative at the U.N. So much for his bold promises.

This is a familiar story. For decades U.S. presidents said that the Palestinian refugees had a right to return. But they could do nothing to make our closest ally honor that right.

They said they didn’t want a nuclear Middle East. But did nothing as Israel armed itself with nuclear weapons. The U.S. is something that can be easily moved, Benjamin Netanyahu said some years ago, and he has followed through.

My first boycott was when my parents joined the lettuce boycott to help migrant workers in California. Well there is far more violence in the occupation than there was in the agricultural industry. On average a Palestinian is killed every other day by the Israelis. Israel has cracked down hard on Palestinian nonviolent resistance in the West Bank. It has cordoned off Gaza as an open air prison. It perpetuates a regime of separate roadways and colonization that is suffocating Palestinian culture. Its politicians talk about pushing Palestinians into Jordan.

And all this as the Arab Spring is filling young Palestinians with the belief that the oppression in Palestine will end.

Israel may hope that the Palestinians will simply leave, but some will inevitably turn to violent resistance. I can imagine that I would myself if I were in that situation– just as some Americans turned to violent resistance when the British taxed us without giving us a vote, or when the south tried to expand slavery into northern territories in the 1850s.

And this is why boycott is so essential. It takes a hugely-imbalanced situation in which Palestinians have lost again and again and again, and gives them some power at last. This is why a broad segment of Palestinian society has asked us to do this, so they can try and even the playing field.

They have asked us because the situation is so desperate, because their children want to leave and pursue careers in the Gulf, or because their children are throwing rocks from slingshots. They have come to realize that in the absence of American fairness or U.N. effectiveness, international pressure brought by the likes of you and me is the most powerful tool these people have to give themselves any bargaining power.

As someone who has had the privilege of bearing witness to their oppression over six trips to the occupation in the last six years, I have no choice but to honor their request.

Now let me address four important objections to boycott and divestment: it won’t work, it will inflict suffering on Israelis, it will destroy the Israeli state, the American Jewish community regards it as anti-Semitic.

It won’t work? The Palestinians say this is the only option now. And it worked in South Africa. So let us try it.

As to the pain it will inflict–this is true. Boycott is not painless. But what we are visiting on Israel is a tiny measure of the pain that Palestinians have been made to experience for generations, and the pain we are bringing is economic, nonviolent pressure. The force of the divestment measure before the Methodist conference is largely symbolic: a targeting of three companies that do business in the occupation as a means of trying to force governments to honor human rights.

As for dismantling Israel, I can tell you that there are many things that as an American Jew I love about Israel. I love the Sabbath in Jerusalem that makes me feel like I am in turn-of-the-century Europe, I love the journalistic culture and the freedom Jews experience, I love the physical culture that Jews have created on farms and beaches. None of these things would be destroyed by boycott. In fact, Israel is doing such an effective job of undermining its achievements by anti-Palestinian measures, through anti-Arab legislation and the maintenance of apartheid in the West Bank and the siege of Gaza, that I believe the only way Israeli achievements can be preserved is through some transformation akin to the civil rights movement in the United States. Israel has shown itself to be incapable of attaining any awareness of its own dissolution. It has become ever more militaristic and defensive, and its political discourse ever more pugnacious. Again: The potential for violence here is so high that the only alternative is steady and concerted pressure from outside. We must all hope that Israeli leaders have a DeKlerk moment like the one that helped transform South Africa. But DeKlerk only had his epiphany when international pressure isolated South Africa.

The fourth charge is most important: that divestment somehow threatens Jews, that it makes Jews a “pariah” group as we have been historically. But the divestment is aimed at the Israeli occupation, it is not aimed at Jews. It is aimed at exclusivity and apartheid. In fact, many Jews support divestment and boycott– and activist Jews have used boycott and divestment again and again as an effective measure to end human rights abuses, from pogroms in Russia to inhumane conditions in the garment business on the Lower East Side of New York.

Yes, but mine is undoubtedly a minority position inside the Jewish community. More than 1200 rabbis have gathered to tell you not to do this, it will damage Christian-Jewish relations, and who are you Methodists to contradict the request of that Jewish establishment? In voting for divestment, there is no doubt you would be choosing the Palestinian civil society’s requests over the request of the Jewish organizational leadership.

I would tell you that it is always the right thing to honor human rights. And the powerful will always find a voice; they always have.

Yet still the question nags. The Jewish community is one that has faced many historical persecutions over the last 1000 years, culminating in the extermination of two-thirds of our people in the Holocaust. Who are you to take a stand that so many leaders in my community regard as another stage of that persecution?

And yet you should do so, and you must do so. And here is why.

My community is deeply wounded. The Holocaust produced in many of us a feeling that we could only rely on ourselves to survive. Today despite all our success in the U.S., that feeling of aloneness has only been amplified by Israel’s many wars. They have produced in many Jews a belief that the world will not protect us when the chips are down, and that our only protection is militant nationalism. So Israel today has nuclear arms and the fourth or fifth largest army in the world, and it detains Palestinian children without charges for participating in nonviolent resistance.

My community is deeply wounded because we fail to perceive that unbalanced reality, because our collective memory is so filled with tragedy that we cannot see the present time. This damage may be inevitable, but it imprisons us. As Peter Beinart says in his new book on Zionism, the Jewish leadership has felt “forever persecuted and licensed by their fears to worry only about themselves.”

When 4 million Palestinians are without any real rights, this self-concern is a blot on our history.

My community cannot escape from this prison of self-concern on its own. No, leading Jewish councils see the problem from too narrow a perspective; a religious nationalist movement has taken precedence inside Jewish life.

And today the Jews who are fighting to restore their community’s attention to compassion for the oppressed work across traditional lines, as the Palestinians do, to seek help from outside. We need the assistance of compassionate people devoted to human rights to break the hold of Jewish nationalist feeling.

Voting for divestment is a way not only to help Palestinians but a way to help Jews. It is a way to bring an oppressor to its senses, it is a way to empower a progressive movement in Palestine that is the only alternative to violence, and it is a way to empower the progressive movement inside Jewish life that can turn the tide against militant nationalism. I urge you to pass the divestment resolution.

About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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34 Responses

  1. Dan Crowther
    April 24, 2012, 12:07 pm

    Fuckin’ A Phil!

    Seconded

  2. Boycott Israel on Campus
    April 24, 2012, 12:23 pm

    Divestment at U.Mass.:

    http://www.bdsmovement.net/2012/umass-boston-student-senate-passes-resolution-calling-for-divestment-from-boeing-8954#.T5bTE7NYsfU

    –Hopefully much stronger resolutions, to clearly divest from Israel, are coming.

  3. Mooser
    April 24, 2012, 12:30 pm

    “As for dismantling Israel, I can tell you that there are many things that as an American Jew I love about Israel. I love the Sabbath in Jerusalem that makes me feel like I am in turn-of-the-century Europe, I love the journalistic culture and the freedom Jews experience, I love the physical culture that Jews have created on farms and beaches. “

    Jeez, I know that “damning with faint praise” is an effective technique, but did you have to pour it on like that. One or two examples would have been enough to disgust anyone. What a picture! Friday and Saturday, a policed Sabbath, and Sunday spent coated with Dead Sea tanning oil stripped down to as little as the traffic will bear, looking for illicit sex in the ‘personals’ of an inflammatory press.

    • marc b.
      April 24, 2012, 1:57 pm

      thank you for being the burr in the saddle, mooser. phil’s writing is at its best when he sticks closer to home. this feels forced. the passage you cite, for example, is pure schmaltz. (‘as for dismantling the 5th republic, there are many things i love about france; the crusty bread, postcards on the seine, its post-modernist criticique jerry lewis’ genius, and *sniff* the freedom that french christians enjoy’) more importantly, phil explaining phil’s analysis of I/P again isn’t groundbreaking. are the author’s observations news to anyone who has been paying the least attention, which i presume include these methodist types? or is this a pre-game psychotherapeutic pep talk, i.e. we need a liberal jewish personality to assure us that it’s okay to suggest, possibly, or at least bring up for discussion, maybe, BDS as a tactic? (hypothetically, mind you, to be used only in extremely limited circumstances.) frankly i’d prefer to see a real live methodist declare that the self-styled adults have had their crack at it, and have failed miserably, and what’s more, we couldn’t give a dried fig if calls for BDS offend your tender sensibilities. despite phil’s near-hourly, breathless ‘headlines’ about this or that watershed moment in zionist auto-analysis, this is moving at a glacier’s pace. in fact, it seems to be moving backwards in some ways, an apocalypse of sorts fast becoming the most likely outcome.

      • Dan Crowther
        April 24, 2012, 2:17 pm

        frankly i’d prefer to see a real live methodist declare that the self-styled adults have had their crack at it, and have failed miserably, and what’s more, we couldn’t give a dried fig if calls for BDS offend your tender sensibilities.

        As Dex says: BAZINGA!!!!!!!!!!!!

  4. Mooser
    April 24, 2012, 12:35 pm

    Anyway, I would take this letter with a grain of salt. A lot of people, on this very website, have said that Phil is not Jewish.

  5. Chu
    April 24, 2012, 12:42 pm

    Effective letter.

    (was it 1/3 or 2/3?)

  6. DICKERSON3870
    April 24, 2012, 1:15 pm

    RE: “Today the United Methodist Church opens its global conference in Tampa, FL. Over the next 10 days, it will consider a resolution to divest from three companies profiting from the occupation.”

    ~ ~ ~ UNITED METHODIST KAIROS RESPONSE ~ ~ ~
    Endorse the Resolution
    Aligning United Methodist Investments with Resolutions
    on Israel/Palestine

    • Read the resolution here. https://www.kairosresponse.org/The_Resolution.html
    This is a endorsement form for individuals, both United Methodists and all others. We welcome endorsements by everyone who would like to support this action for justice and peace in the Holy Land.
    • ENDORSE THE RESOLUTION HERE.

  7. libra
    April 24, 2012, 1:48 pm

    “My community is deeply wounded.”

    Weiss plays the victim card here but just two days ago regarding the media response to Beinart says:

    “I believe the New York Times and Washington Post’s eager participation in this rightwing frenzy can be explained by two trends: the large Jewish presence in the establishment, and the rightwing Zionist character of the Jewish establishment. C.f., the Iraq wardrums in the media. Some day, Jewish and American historians will marvel at this. The Zionist Captivity.”

    Are we really expected to believe this rightwing Zionist character is a product of deep wounds? To believe that you’d have to believe Lt. Col. Eisner’s recent public behaviour was similarly the result of deep wounds.

    I’m left wondering whether Weiss is completely at sea intellectually or just trying to have it both ways?

    • marc b.
      April 24, 2012, 2:07 pm

      “My community is deeply wounded.”

      yes, you have a point libra. perhaps phil could define (and use a big, red crayon so that there is no room for misinterpretation) what his ‘community’ is, and what wounds are they suffering. unless his community includes israelis who are victims of the civil war, i assume that these wounds are metaphorical. deeply, painfully metaphorical.

      • Citizen
        April 24, 2012, 3:40 pm

        Phil did suggest what he meant by his reference to 1,000 years of Jewish victimization cumulating in the Shoah–the wound he refers to is psychologically real to those members of his community who never personally actually suffered from the Other for self-identifying as Jewish. Atzmon would say he has a Pre-Traumatic Stress Disorder/Syndrome. Bibi told us, in contrast, it’s a matter of (long-term) thinking, probability forecasting as anti-semites bloom in every generation of humans, and always will–hence Jews need a place where they will always be in charge as they cannot rely on the Gentiles to save them.

      • marc b.
        April 24, 2012, 4:28 pm

        that may be his theoretical community, citizen, but i think the people he communes with in real life are a much narrower group.

      • Citizen
        April 26, 2012, 8:20 am

        marc b, methinks you are correct.

  8. Chu
    April 24, 2012, 2:27 pm

    I believe a full boycott is going to be the effective act to shame this country into their decades of war crimes. A country, the size of New Jersey, and the boycotting is aimed at a portion of that ? Come on…half of the people in the US don’t even know what Ahava is.
    The occupation is wholy embraced by the state, its govt, the military and most of the people.

  9. Annie Robbins
    April 24, 2012, 2:29 pm

    excellent letter phil, i hope someone reads it for attendees at the conference.

    for anyone who did not see the ‘extra’ short posted on the 60 minutes website, a part that was cut from the interview, where palestinian christians called for bds i recommend the very short 1 minute video:

    Pushing for a boycott of Israel
    April 22, 2012 4:00 PM
    Nora Kort discusses the Kairos Palestine Document, a political treatise she co-authored, and explains why she and other Christian Palestinians are calling for a boycott of Israel and Israeli goods.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7406236n&tag=contentBody;storyMediaBox

    funny, i just went to the link and there doesn’t seem to be a way to play the video anymore. odd.

    edit, here it is on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PRxAMw65PA

  10. Rusty Pipes
    April 24, 2012, 4:37 pm

    Thank you for this, Phil. The delegates to the UMC General Conference range from center-right to far-left in the spectrum of American Protestants. No doubt they have been bombarded from many sources on this issue (including the 1000-rabbi letter). For those Methodists who have been unfamiliar with the work of this site, your letter is an effective introduction. For those who have experienced various types of pressure from major Jewish organizations, your letter gives them an authentically Jewish voice, an informed conscientious voice, that supports their taking a stand for the human rights of Palestinians.

  11. Fredblogs
    April 24, 2012, 5:01 pm

    BDS will do nothing to stop Israel from doing what it is doing. Their choice as they see it is “would we rather lose some business or be expelled/exterminated”? Think losing a bit of business compares?

    • ritzl
      April 24, 2012, 9:06 pm

      NO. The choice, the rational choice (and that may be the hangup), that BDS presents is for Israel and Israelis to live and let live within the boundaries and moral constraints of the ’67 borders. Stop the expansion and occupation and killing in pursuit of both. Revisit the mythology. To actually become a normal 21. century democratic state among other 21. century democratic states (US aside). To realize that as BDS gains traction, the world is trying to send Israel a message/offer of acceptance, not one of “extermination.”

      But as you say, the chances of rationality entering into the picture are pretty slim. And as PW says in his letter, the violence in Israeli society is all queued up to avoid making that rational choice at all costs. I don’t know why. ’67 Israel exists. Accept that and move on to better things.

      • Fredblogs
        April 24, 2012, 10:43 pm

        Sorry, but after the Gaza withdrawal and the subsequent rain of missiles from Gaza, the idea that Israel can just withdraw to the 1967 borders and live in peace with the Palestinians outside those borders is not credible. Particularly since the Right of Return is one of the demands of the BDS movement. As for your last sentence, if the Palestinians would accept it and move on, instead of demanding the right of return, there would have been peace already.

        BDS isn’t gaining traction. A movement whose few victories are international news and so rare that they have to crow about cases where they lost in a landslide is not “gaining traction”. There will always be a few Israel haters who will boycott, there will always be far more people who either like Israel or don’t care. Which is why you BDSers try to get stores to boycott Israel rather than being satisfied with getting the public to do so. You know that when offered a choice of goods, most people will not boycott. So you try to take their choice away from them.

      • mig
        April 25, 2012, 1:25 pm

        Fred :

        Sorry, but after the Gaza withdrawal and the subsequent rain of missiles from Gaza, the idea that Israel can just withdraw to the 1967 borders and live in peace with the Palestinians outside those borders is not credible.

        After so called “withdrawal”, Israel could have acted better. Not to closing whole gaza from the world. Which was evidence that Israel doesnt seek a peaceful solution.

        Particularly since the Right of Return is one of the demands of the BDS movement.

        Right, so says the international law. Never heard such a thing ? Naah…get back to sleep.

        As for your last sentence, if the Palestinians would accept it and move on, instead of demanding the right of return, there would have been peace already.

        Not according to the Israeli leaders. They say that after palestinians give Israel definition as jewish state, all is just fine and beautiful. Birds & flowers + stuff all over the place. And after that they find new demand which must be fulfilled. They always do.

        There will always be a few Israel haters who will boycott, there will always be far more people who either like Israel or don’t care.

        Your ziobot mind cant figure any other idea that hate of something. Boring life with only two colors ?

        Which is why you BDSers try to get stores to boycott Israel rather than being satisfied with getting the public to do so.

        Bravo Professor, bravo. Thats one side of the BDS movement.

        You know that when offered a choice of goods, most people will not boycott.

        Surprise, when explained what they are buying => that they support apartheid. They skip those items pronto.

        So you try to take their choice away from them.

        Cry me a river. Even two.

      • ritzl
        April 25, 2012, 6:59 pm

        @Fredblogs

        What completely lazy, counter-factual, repetitious, and yet somehow expected, bs.

        “Withdrawal” from Gaza simply didn’t happen, and still hasn’t happened. Israel withdrew a few thousand illegal settlers. Once again, for the kazillionth time, Israel continues to occupy:

        1) 100% of the airspace.
        2) 80% of the fisheries/100% of the prime fisheries.
        3) 30% of the arable land.
        4) 100% of the natural gas deposits.

        In addition, Israel interdicts 50% of the fresh water/aquifer replenishment.

        In addition, Israel sends forces into Gaza, and/or “plinks” “Palis” (sorry, I know it’s a racist term, but how else can one explain the utter disdain that must be in place to shoot flechette tank rounds at, or snipe/kill Palestinian gleaners) at any time it deems fit.

        In addition, Israel blockades Gaza, and act of war. So if war it is, rockets are to be expected, no?

        The occupation of Gaza never ended, amigo.

        The BDS “movement” imo, is like the seven blind men describing the elephant. Each had different perceptions, but they were all still describing the elephant. BDS is only a power tool for Palestinians as a [democratically represented] group to use to whatever end. No more, no less. If it wasn’t having effect, the GoI wouldn’t be passing laws making it punishable to support (for Israeli and diaspora Jews). They’re (GoI) afraid. Very afraid. It’s a game changer. Increasingly so.

        And all because they (GoI and Israelis at large) refuse to consider the choice(s) I described to you.

        So you can go on believing (or proclaiming) that “extermination” is one pole of the choices presented, but it isn’t. It simply isn’t. It’s crazy-talk. Fewer and fewer people, even Jews, believe that. It’s an increasingly non-serious position, and will be reflected as such in the politics of those involved (i.e. everyone who wishes Israel well).

        I know that a lot of people who post here don’t like the 2SS outcome, but to me it’s the preferred outcome, assuming sovereignty and some nod (compensation+) to the RoR, and some actual observance of the ’67 borders as a limiting description of Israel. The 1SS is the default, do-nothing outcome. You are helping that happen with these inane [and repetitive/unoriginal] arguments. Your task, should you choose it, is to acknowledge that you are helping the 1SS to happen, or, STOP doing so.

        That’s your personal choice.

        (And thanks to mig…)

      • Citizen
        April 26, 2012, 8:25 am

        Fred: It took the US government 20 years to get behind the BDS movement against apartheid S Africa. In Tampa yesterday at the Methodist convention, they had expected only 70 delegates, but they drew 300; they were surprised and are now asking for donations to afford handling so many interested folks.

      • Citizen
        April 26, 2012, 8:56 am

        You can go here to make a donation via internet or snail mail: https://www.kairosresponse.org/Donate.html

        https://www.kairosresponse.org/Donate.html

      • ahhiyawa
        April 27, 2012, 11:03 pm

        >>>It took the US government 20 years to get behind the BDS movement against apartheid S Africa<<<

        Bingo! And once that was achieved in the mid 1980's it wasn't even half that time before Nelson Mandela was elected president. When the game goes, it goes fast with the Fred's of the world a day late and a dollar short.

        What zealous Zionists can't get through the immense densities between their ears is that the I/P conflict is morphing into an entirely different struggle than what had come before. Its all a downhill race for Israel and Phil comprehends where this is leading, though it could also have a Rhodesian end game as much as a S. African one.

  12. Kathleen
    April 24, 2012, 5:14 pm

    “Voting for divestment is a way not only to help Palestinians but a way to help Jews. It is a way to bring an oppressor to its senses, it is a way to empower a progressive movement in Palestine that is the only alternative to violence, and it is a way to empower the progressive movement inside Jewish life that can turn the tide against militant nationalism. I urge you to pass the divestment resolution.”

    Makes too much sense.

  13. ritzl
    April 24, 2012, 6:48 pm

    Brilliant letter. Thoughtful, genuine, contextual, urgent, and assertively inclusive. “Let’s solve this together. It’s time…” is more effective with people (let’s face it, 95% of Methodists, and, well, everybody) that may be new to the issue and are confronted with the seemingly 0-to-120, though actually long-festering, criticality that defines it, and which they are being asked to embrace in real time.

    Pitch perfect, imho. Thank you. I think it will help.

    • Sumud
      April 25, 2012, 10:06 am

      Pitch perfect, imho. Thank you. I think it will help.

      +1

  14. Oklahoma farmer
    April 25, 2012, 8:00 am

    It was well written and good, but too long.

  15. Citizen
    April 25, 2012, 5:10 pm

    Key Tampa Bay newspaper is running two opposing articles on the Methodist meeting here to decide BDS:
    Tampa Bay newspaper article favoring BDS re Methodist delegates’ discussion here: http://www.tampabay.com/opinion/columns/divestment-will-help-ease-palestinian-suffering/1226641

    Tampa Bay newspaper opposing BDS re Merhodist delegates’ discussion here:
    http://www.tampabay.com/opinion/columns/church-divestment-in-israel-wont-further-peace/1226635

    Please go to the newspaper web site as the comments are coming in under both articles. I already made comments under both articles. Thanks! PS: This is really rare to have this topic openly discussed in the MSM in the Tampa Area area.

    Pls comment under the line on both articles.

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