Election Day in Jerusalem: Deciding to vote, boycott or rebel

Israel/Palestine
on 38 Comments
zion square
Israeli shoppers in Zion Square enjoying a day off of work on Israel’s Election Day. (Photo: Allison Deger/Mondoweiss)

Tuesday’s election tumble for Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud-Yisrael Beitenu bloc has been regarded as a last ditch effort by the forces of Israeli secularism to halt the country’s dive into religious orthodoxy. The second place winner Yair Lapid, leader of the Yesh Atid party, won a surprise 14% of the overall vote, which was credited to his broad appeal—similar to an all-American football star. The former journalist campaigned on pulling the plug on heavy subsidies to religious sects, while staying tough on demographics.

But secularism does not have much sway in Jerusalem, the heart and soul of the Haredim political movement that yearns to erase the distinction between Torah and the state. On election day I met what is considered the Left in the city—from Meretz voters, to boycott activists, to Palestinians holding East Jerusalem IDs, who are not permitted to cast ballots in national elections. For all of them secularism was secondary; the most salient issue from their perspectives was settlement expansion and the rights of Palestinians.

“What do you think will happen if Netanyahu wins?” I asked a 53-year-old man who owns a store off of Zion Square in Jerusalem. “He’s going to eat a lot of shit,” said the shopkeeper who wished to not be identified by name. “People will know who I am.” Quickly he identified himself as Meretz voter. The man considered himself one of a few liberals in a sea of West Jerusalem’s religious. Why Meretz? The shop-owner said because “what state has 400,000 people living over the border.”

 Election Day was unseasonably warm. Combined with pop music blaring in Zion Square (including “Gangnam Style”), the day had the feeling of a holiday rather than a battle for the country’s future. In fact Election Day is a work holiday for most Israelis. But kilometers away in East Jerusalem the mood was hardly jovial.

I started the day at Damascus Gate where Palestinians had announced a protest against the elections. One indication of the conflicted opinions over voter participation was the fact the demonstration never happened. Only one Palestinian showed up and the Israelis that came decided after waiting an hour to leave the Old City and head to Sheikh Jarrah to the home of a family about five weeks away from an eviction.

shamasneh elie
Shamasneh and Derbarabdiker on Election Day, Sheikh Jarrah.

Mahmoud Shamasneh and his family have lived in their house since 1964 as renters from the state, yet quietly at some point the house was sold to settler leader Aryeh King. King scours East Jerusalem for properties once inhabited by Jews and uses unscrupulous methods force Palestinian families out. The unfairness intrinsic to the system is what kept some election boycotters from the polls. Elifelet Derbarabdiker, 29, one of the Israelis who went to Sheikh Jarrah on Election Day said, “This is my vote. To be here with this person [Shamasneh].” She continued, “What’s democratic about taking a man’s right and dignity. I don’t want to live in a country that takes people’s property.” For Derbarabdiker, even the most “left” parties are incapable of challenging fundamental issues such as why someone like King has more political rights than Shamasneh. She pointed out that Shamasneh’s East Jerusalem ID bars him from voting for the government that on March 1st will force him and nine family members out of the only home they have ever known.

To some voting is viewed a normalization of the lack of rights for non-Jews. Since the second Intifada, many Palestinian citizens of Israel have boycotted the elections. This year close to 50% voted as compared to the national rate of 67%. Hanin Zoabi, Balad, exceeded the 2% threshold needed to maintain her seat. Haaretz even plugged the member of Knesset by printing an editorial in Arabic calling on Palestinian citizens of Israel to go and vote. But East Jerusalem Palestinian ID holders do not have a voice in the elections. Although they live within what Israel considers part of the Jewish state, as a group they are not allowed to participate.

Still some voted.

This year for the first time Israelis in large numbers gave their right to vote to a Palestinian that is not eligable. The Real Democracy campaign matched around 2,000 Israelis with Palestinians. The Palestinians told the Israelis the candidate they wanted and the Israelis voted as their proxy.  After leaving the polls, +972 Magazine‘s Mairav Zonszein wrote about why she “let a Palestinian woman from East Jerusalem decide my vote.” Here’s her take:

My voting experience today, however, wasn’t a private matter. And it wasn’t an enjoyable or empowering one either, because I decided to give up my right and privilege to vote in an act of protest, frustration and guilt. I let Riman Barakat, a Palestinian woman from East Jerusalem, decide who I should vote for. And she chose Balad, an Arab nationalist party, a party I would not have voted for and have no specific affinity to.

Edo Konrad, also from +972 Magazine, decided to vote–for himself and did not participate with his colleague in the Real Democracy campaign. Konrad is a editor by trade, but to his friends he is known for his Facebook statuses. His posts in the weeks leading up to the elections are snapshots into the aggravation of voting in the absence of a meaningful left:

omg you hate bibi too? omg you’re so progressiiiiiive

omg you went on birthright but then stayed another week to volunteer in an arab village? omg you’re so liberaaaal

The day after Election Day I followed up with Konrad. “I flipped a coin,” he said describing his process of elimination, “between Balad and Hadash. Ended up the latter.”

“It matters,” he continued,” inasmuch as I believe in some of the MKs and their ability to fight against the most fascist tendencies in the Knesset. But they will forever remain in the opposition.” Thoughtfully Konrad concluded, “I believe in supporting the non-Zionist parties.”

About Allison Deger

Allison Deger is the Assistant Editor of Mondoweiss.net. Follow her on twitter at @allissoncd.

Other posts by .


Posted In:

38 Responses

  1. pabelmont
    January 26, 2013, 10:17 am

    ” She continued, “What’s democratic about taking a man’s right and dignity. I don’t want to live in a country that takes people’s property.””

    OK, noble sentiment. What about living in a place that has recently taken people’s property? And is constantly taking the rights and dignity of people in West Bank and denying it to the exiles of 1948 and 1967 (including the Golanis, seldom spoken of)?

    I guess that ethical feeling is always relative, always incomplete (from someone’s perspective), etc. I suppose I shouldn’t carp.

    • Allison Deger
      January 26, 2013, 10:43 am

      Derbarabdiker wasn’t qualifying which actions of the state she is against, and which ones she’s fine with. At the time she was speaking specifically about Shamasneh because he was seated next to her and we had just been to his house; just because she was talking about evictions at that moment it does not mean she was giving an ethical pass on the occupation. #context

  2. yourstruly
    January 26, 2013, 11:00 am

    boycott or rebel?

    something about changing the world?

    change it not?

    is to lose it?

    whereas, change it?

    life goes on?

  3. Newclench
    January 26, 2013, 2:31 pm

    Nice to see Hadash recognized as a non-Zionist party on Mondoweiss!
    and
    It is true that East Jerusalem Palestinians mostly occupy a strange limbo where they are residents of Israel but not citizens. But – legally speaking, they can ask for citizenship at any time and become voters. Thousands have done so. I think – does anyone have more info? that it was once easier to do than it is today.

    It’s worth noting that East Jerusalem Palestinians, for the most part, decline to pursue citizenship for political reasons, despite the obvious legal benefits. So are they not voting by conscious political choice, or because Israel is discriminating against them in this matter?

    • Annie Robbins
      January 26, 2013, 4:42 pm

      clench, i do not think palestinian east jerusalemites get to vote in national elections, even with citizenship. i think they can only vote in municiple elections.

      • mondonut
        January 26, 2013, 10:54 pm

        Annie Robbins says:clench, i do not think palestinian east jerusalemites get to vote in national elections, even with citizenship. i think they can only vote in municiple elections.
        =================================
        Palestinian East Jerusalemites? With citizenship they would be Israelis, and as Israelis they would vote in national elections.

      • Cliff
        January 27, 2013, 1:08 am

        They would be PALESTINIAN citizens of Israel.

        The Palestinians of Israel are not immigrants like Zionist Jewry.

        They are the indigenous population. Moreover, the Palestinians of Israel are simply the Palestinian population that Israel didn’t ethnically cleanse in 48′.

    • jon s
      January 26, 2013, 4:59 pm

      Newclench,
      I think it’s actually easier for East Jerusalemites to obtain citizenship.
      Last month I posted this link:
      link to haaretz.com

    • talknic
      January 27, 2013, 2:59 am

      Newclench “It is true that East Jerusalem Palestinians mostly occupy a strange limbo where they are residents of Israel but not citizens.”

      Well, no. It isn’t completely true. East Jerusalem is quite simply not Israeli.

      “It’s worth noting that East Jerusalem Palestinians, for the most part, decline to pursue citizenship..” … because Israel has no right to offer Israeli citizenship in territory outside of the State of Israel.

      “So are they not voting by conscious political choice, or because Israel is discriminating against them in this matter?”

      Try … because Israel has no right to offer Israeli citizenship in territory outside of the State of Israel.

      • Newclench
        January 27, 2013, 10:46 am

        Talknic, being a ‘resident of Israel’ is a legal status AND a reference to where someone lives. I was using that phrase in the legal sense, as ‘registered as a resident of Israel.’ This is a status enjoyed by many folks inside and outside of the Green Line, and includes both citizens and non-citizens.
        Regarding what Israel has the right to offer…. are you seriously suggesting that states do not have the ‘right’ to determine who gets to be a citizen? As pointed out numerous times, many states routinely offer citizenship to folks who are not resident in their own territory. It goes back a long time. If you weren’t aware of this before – now you are!

        Finally, I may disapprove of Israel’s annexation of East Jerusalem (and other parts of the WB nearby) but that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen. The denial of rights to Palestinians living in the annexed parts is a serious human rights violation; the position of Palestinian and Israeli hr orgs is to demand the fulfillment of those rights, as opposed to denying that an annexation has occurred. (cf, HaMoked)

      • Annie Robbins
        January 27, 2013, 11:23 am

        Regarding what Israel has the right to offer…. are you seriously suggesting that states do not have the ‘right’ to determine who gets to be a citizen?

        clench, are you seriously suggesting israel’s model of ‘tiered citizenship’ (as opposed to equal rights and opportunity) is shared in other modern democracies?

      • Newclench
        January 27, 2013, 11:32 am

        If Israel did not have the right and the power to change it’s laws of citizenship, what would be the point of applying pressure to rectify the legal injustices?
        You’ll find nothing I’ve written ever defending the state of Israel’s discriminatory policies against Palestinian citizens. Implying that I think so suggests a lack of understanding.
        Every so often (well every day) there are some staggering lapses in logic here. Everyone who thinks states aren’t in charge of citizenship laws, raise your hand, and state for the record the name of the alternative legal structure that is in charge.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 27, 2013, 12:00 pm

        sorry for the frustration clench. i think we’re just addressing this on different wave lengths. i will try to demonstrate:

        This is a status enjoyed by many folks inside and outside of the Green Line, and includes both citizens and non-citizens.
        Regarding what Israel has the right to offer…. are you seriously suggesting that states do not have the ‘right’ to determine who gets to be a citizen?

        your first sentence here is approaching this as if a vast bulk of jewish israeli citizens afforded israeli citizenship outside the greenline are not also complicit is colonizing palestinian land, for the benefit of the state. obviously israel considers east jerusalem part of that state. i understand how you’d like to reduce this to simply a matter of ‘what all states have a right to do’, however all states do not have a system of tiered citizenship based on ethnicity/apartheid. all states are not in the process of stealing sovereignty over their neighbors land, all states are not in a permanent brutal occupation. so it’s not simply a matter of ‘states in charge of their citizenship’.

        now you can grab your smelling salts and feign exasperation at our ‘staggering lapses in logic’ all you want, you can hypothesize someone is implying you’re defending the state of Israel’s discriminatory policies. or you can just ‘get it’ we are not going to be pretending israel is acting like other states regarding the way it treats citizenship in jerusalem, the most contested real estate on the planet.

        so how it reads to me clench, regarding the second sentence of yours in the blockquote…is you are evading talknic’s main point. so if you want to understand why palestinians in east jerusalem are not jumping for israeli citizenship, you might want to incorporate the fact israel is trying to establish permanent sovereignty over east jerusalem and their ‘offer’ is tangled up in spades with their sovereign intentions. every year they push more and more palestinians out of jerusalem. thousands have been expelled. and some palestinians might not want to be complicit in the intended goal here . iow, you hammering on your point really seems like an evasion and a diversion. staggeringly so actually.

      • Newclench
        January 27, 2013, 3:17 pm

        Annie – I have nothing but respect for the political choices of Palestinians in East Jerusalem. They are choosing not to integrate into the Israeli polity. This desire to not be part of Israel…. makes perfect sense.
        Inshallah, some day the occupation will end and Palestinians in Jerusalem will be citizens in a Palestinian state, free of Zionist control and equal in every way to Israel in matters of sovereignty.

      • eljay
        January 27, 2013, 3:26 pm

        >> … some day the occupation will end and Palestinians in Jerusalem will be citizens in a Palestinian state, free of Zionist control and equal in every way to Israel in matters of sovereignty.

        One can also hope that, one day, supremacist “Jewish State” will end and all non-Jewish Israelis – including Palestinian Israelis – will one day be free of Zionist control and equal in every way to Jewish Israelis.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 27, 2013, 3:27 pm

        thanks clench. i think someday with palestine’s capitol is in east jerusalem the opportunities for integration will multiply. someday the occupation will end and the people will live in peace together. Inshallah.

      • MHughes976
        January 27, 2013, 4:03 pm

        ‘ I will see him but not yet. I sense him though he is not near – a star shall rise from Jacob’ (Balaam in Numbers 24) – you’re in honourable company, annie.

      • talknic
        January 27, 2013, 4:50 pm

        Newclench “being a ‘resident of Israel’ is a legal status AND a reference to where someone lives” NONE of the territory acquired by war since the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel came into effect at 00:01 May 15 1948 (Palestine time), has ever been legally annexed to the State of Israel. A point you must of course ignore in order to continue stomping around in elephant sh*te

        “I was using that phrase in the legal sense, as ‘registered as a resident of Israel.’ “ The actual legality of the situation is: the territory is not legally in Israel.

        “This is a status enjoyed by many folks inside and outside of the Green Line, and includes both citizens and non-citizens” Where Israeli civil jurisdiction does not legally apply, it is an ILLEGAL status.

        “are you seriously suggesting that states do not have the ‘right’ to determine who gets to be a citizen?” All states have the right WITHIN their actual legal jurisdiction. You ARE claiming states have a right to determine who gets to be a citizen in someone elses territory.

        “… many states routinely offer citizenship to folks who are not resident in their own territory” If only you could give a valid example

        “I may disapprove of Israel’s annexation of East Jerusalem (and other parts of the WB nearby) but that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen” Uh huh. Missing word there. Israel’s ILLEGAL annexation of East Jerusalem.

        Brain washing works…

        BTW when was West Jerusalem legally annexed to Israel or in fact any of the territory acquired by war by Israel by 1949/50?

      • MHughes976
        January 27, 2013, 5:31 pm

        If it is a human right, subject to a few well-known exceptions, to be enfranchised in the place where you live and to whose laws you are subject – and I think that Locke established that it is – were it not reasonably obvious to common sense anyway – then governments have only limited discretion about who should form the citizen body.

      • RoHa
        January 27, 2013, 9:02 pm

        Annie,
        “however all states do not have a system of tiered citizenship based on ethnicity/apartheid. all states are not in the process of stealing sovereignty over their neighbors land, all states are not in a permanent brutal occupation.”

        This is simply not true. Israel is a state, and it has all these features.

        But perhaps you mean:

        “However, not all states have a system of tiered citizenship based on ethnicity/apartheid. Not all states are in the process of stealing sovereignty over their neighbors land. Not all states are in a permanent brutal occupation.”

        If so, you are right.

        I notice a number of Zionists appeal to the idea that Israel is a state like any other when they want to, but then refuse to accept the implications of that position when it works against them.

      • Newclench
        January 27, 2013, 9:21 pm

        Talknic, just to correct one major error you are making…
        Many countries, including the US, grant citizenship to the children of citizens born overseas, even if they do not return to the US to claim it.
        Germany offered (maybe still does) citizenship automatically to Germans from other states (Russia, Croatia) and has done so for a long time. Germany, Poland and a few other countries give citizenship to the children of folks affected by the Holocaust whose ancestors were from there (and possibly others – not sure.) I know quite a few holders of European passports who never lived there and don’t speak the right language.

        But never mind the recent stuff. Consider how European countries granted citizenship rights to religious minorities in the Middle East. This is how generations of Russians, Greeks, French and others were born and died in cosmopolitan parts of the Ottoman Empire without ever even visiting the country of formal citizenship.

        Territory and citizenship are certainly linked, but you are clearly misguided about how the extent. And it’s a good thing! Once a Palestinian state becomes free of all Israeli control, one suspects that many Palestinians living around the world would want to become citizens of that country – even if they never move there. Even if they have another citizenship. Even if they are only one half, or one quarter Palestinians ancestry. And that would be a good thing.

        On a final, ludicrous note, are you truly suggesting that Israel’s 1948 borders are somehow in doubt with regards to international law and international recognition? What a laughable proposition. It reminds me of utterly strange Israeli twistings of international law, like when they claim settlements are legal. Settlements are indeed not legal according to international law. But the ’48 borders of Israel are indeed quite settled. Where that not the case, how could we possibly campaign for the labeling of goods from the Occupied Territories for boycott purposes, as many worthy folks have been doing in Europe and elsewhere for years?

      • eljay
        January 28, 2013, 3:01 pm

        >> I notice a number of Zionists appeal to the idea that Israel is a state like any other when they want to, but then refuse to accept the implications of that position when it works against them.

        I really like how Zio-supremacists routinely place Israel in the company of “Western-style democracies”…except when it comes to defending its criminal and immoral behaviour, at which time they argue that, hey, at least Israel is better than third-world dictatorships!

      • sardelapasti
        January 28, 2013, 4:15 pm

        “are you truly suggesting that Israel’s 1948 borders are somehow in doubt with regards to international law and international recognition?”

        Obviously these “borders” are illegal, as 1. The territory was not the UN’s or the Ottomans’ or the British Empire’s to give away, 2. The partition proposal was not accepted by the inhabitants (even if the invader “population” was counted, which it should not be, 3. The partition proposal was voided by the Zionist entity’s assault on the rest of the territory and its conquest, 4. The partition proposal was voided also by the Zionist refusal to abide by its own terms, 5) The Zionist entity is waging war against the owners of the land ininterrupedly since before that, has never obtained a treaty and there is no one who can grant it a legitimate treaty.

        “International recognition” is irrelevant. “Recognition”? What does it mean except that some colonial or imperialist whores voted to ratify an act of war and murder, violating the right of the peoples to self-determination? What price today’s votes by US territories like Micronesia and Marshall Islands? The only recognition that would count would be that of a Palestinian state, something that is defined as being autonomous, free from military occupation and pressure, sovereign, in possession of means of defense and means to enforce its laws.

  4. yonah fredman
    January 26, 2013, 7:27 pm

    East Jerusalem nonIsraeli Arab/Palestinians can apply for citizenship and become full citizens with the right to vote in any election. Even as noncitizens they have a right to vote in municipal elections. They choose not to vote in municipal elections as a protest and they choose not to apply for citizenship also as a form of protest. (voting or citizenship implies acceptance of the occupation.) Larry Derfner in a recent column advocated a hope that Palestinians in East Jerusalem would apply for citizenship and he wishes all Palestinians to apply for citizenship. He feels that only the Palestinians can put pressure to change the status quo in the short range.

    • amigo
      January 27, 2013, 8:41 am

      yonah wake up.

      East Jerusalem is not in Israel.

      Any discussion ignoring that fact is superfluous, not to mention tiresome.

      • yonah fredman
        January 27, 2013, 10:50 am

        amigo- let’s clarify. are you for a two state solution or a one state solution? clarity before fatigue.

      • talknic
        January 27, 2013, 4:59 pm

        LOL… yonah fredman attempts to change the argument rather than acknowledge the actual legal situation. Zionnutters are all so predictably the same.

      • yonah fredman
        January 27, 2013, 5:18 pm

        yes, talknic. East Jerusalem is not in Israel. satisfied now?

      • yonah fredman
        January 28, 2013, 12:49 pm

        and talknic- Your position is clear and has been made clear over time. If i misstate correct me. Israel has legal borders as in the 1947 borders are legal and everything else is illegal. It also has a duty to invite back any indigenous expelled from those territories. That is your position. Fine. I never engage you in argument. My position is Security council resolution 242 rather than general assembly 1947. and the only advantage i have to my argument is “realism” which can be dismissed as Israel has more power than the Palestinians, so therefore realism is dismissed as irrelevant to morality and legality. I understand your stance, talknic.

        I’ve never “met” amigo before, so I was asking him where he stands. Maybe your LOL encouraged him to leave the conversation before revealing who he is. I don’t feel it is useful to dismiss rather than to specify where one stands and where the other stands.

      • talknic
        January 28, 2013, 6:04 pm

        yonah fredman “That is your position”

        It isn’t. It is however the legal position, which I emphasize to show who really ought be grateful, who has received the benefit of the doubt for 64 years, who the propagandists really are, who has been deceived by them and who is actually willing to sacrifice their rightful territory for peace.

        My position is: one of self determination by well informed citizens of Palestine and Israel, sans idiotic and mostly meaningless propaganda a la link to wp.me and link to wp.me or link to wp.me

        If the Palestinians chose to forgo 78% of their territory for peace, so be it. link to pages.citebite.com Israelis should then be eternally grateful for Palestinian forgiveness and generosity. It is after all Israel who was given, completely gratis, the territory for a state. It is Israel who is in breach of its legal obligations and who has for 64 years falsely accused, lied, stolen and deceived its citizens in order to justify its illegal actions.

        It will be by Palestinians generously sacrificing their rights that will allow Israel to get out of the awful illegal ‘facts on the ground’ mess it has created for itself and everyone around it, because Israel cannot afford the compensation bill or the civil war likely if it tries to move every Israeli citizen back to Israel’s actual territories.

        “My position is Security council resolution 242 rather than general assembly 1947.”

        UNSC resolutions in respect to Israel are based on the UNGA res 181 boundaries accepted, declared and recognized as Israeli, per statements to the UNSC by the Jewish Agency pre 00:01 May 15 1948 (Palestine time) link to wp.me and the Israeli Government post 00:01 May 15 1948 (Israeli time) link to wp.me

        UNSC res 242 was:
        A) Between pre-existing States all of which had pre-existing borders. Lebanon/Syria/Jordan/Egypt pre- Nov 1947, Israel post 00:01 May 15 1948;

        UNSC res 242 called for;
        B) “…respect for and acknowledgement of the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of every State in the area and their right to live in peace within secure and recognized boundaries free from threats or acts of force;”

        C) negotiate/negotiations are not mentioned in UNSC res 242, because there was nothing to negotiate, the conditions already existed and had been accepted by all the States involved. “fulfillment of Charter principles” was required in accordance with the “emphasised” pre-existing obligatory conditions, which would lead to;

        D) Peace treaties a la Egypt/Israel/Jordan ” in accordance with Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338″ link to wp.me

        ” the only advantage i have to my argument is “realism” “

        Realism changes. It changed between Egypt and Israel when Israel agreed to first withdraw from all of Egypt’s territories, before peaceful relations were assumed.

  5. yonah fredman
    January 26, 2013, 8:34 pm

    I think it is an unfair burden to ask the West Bank Palestinians to be the deciders for their nation, but that is in fact the case. Let Abbas stand up and say to the Jerusalem Palestinians, take citizenship and vote. Let Hamas say to the Jerusalem palestinians, take citizenship and vote.

    I understand why they (Abbas and Hamas) do not choose this direction. Some are good reasons (sumud, resistance rather than participation) and not so good reasons: power.

    • JeffB
      January 27, 2013, 7:26 am

      @yonah —

      Good point. But have to say I think resistance is a bad reason. When confronting a much more powerful enemy who is also determined creating a “win-lose” situation means you almost always lose. They need to create “win-win” situations.

      Non participation was effective when Palestinian labor was important and Israel had substantial economic ties to them. But Ariel Sharon ended those, now you have situations where large number of younger Israelis don’t know Palestinians at all. They are to them, just evil entities on the other side of the wall. Under those sorts of circumstances non-participation encourages dehumanization which is not at all to their advantage.

      IMHO the Palestinians need to think of a strategy they can live with that Israel can live with. For 70 years they believed the Arab armies in one form or another are going to change the balance of power away from what it is and get them a better deal they can get on their own. In such a circumstance resisting just a little longer and waiting makes sense. I assume they have been disabused of that notion by now.

    • talknic
      January 27, 2013, 5:22 pm

      yonah fredman

      Uh huh. Nice of you to attempt to put the onus on the Palestinians.

      How about this instead. Israel stops illegal settlements in territories illegally acquired by war and never legally annexed, ends the occupation, takes ALL its hundreds of thousands of illegal settlers (since 1949/50), relocates and houses them in Israel, pays rightful reparations for 64 years of belligerence as required by the Laws and UN Charter the Jewish state agreed to uphold.

      It has become quite obvious Israel can not afford to adhere to the law. The illegal facts on the ground the Jewish state has created for itself supported by brainwashed sycophants, have become one gigantic, illegal, very putrid, sink hole. The only escape the Jewish state has is to plea bargain with the Palestinians who have no legal obligation to forgo any of their legal rights in negotiations.

      • yonah fredman
        January 27, 2013, 5:37 pm

        talknic- Larry Derfner expresses the point I wish to make more precisely. The fact is that people who are already opposed to Israel are opposed to Israel. The people who are not opposed to Israel might be slowly, one person at a time, one crisis at a time, one obnoxious Netanyahu speech at a time, turn away from Israel. But as Derfner points out, in the short run, this will not change anything. And certainly netanyahu will not change anything. And Obama until Nov 2014 will not attempt to change anything, and the only thing right now that would change something would be a campaign like the one I described. And like Larry Derfner describes.

        link to 972mag.com

      • JeffB
        January 27, 2013, 7:16 pm

        @yonah —

        That doesn’t work. Israel just divides the territory. They keep area C and Jerusalem and declare A, B and Gaza independent. Once Israel formally declares it makes no claim to those territories there is no possibility of a civil rights struggle.

        Obviously Jerusalem and Area C would be “disputed territory” between the two states but the people living in those territories would have de-jure equality in particular the right to vote, so the situation would be analogous to the Kurds not to South Africa.

      • eljay
        January 27, 2013, 7:39 pm

        Good article by Derfner. IMO, and rather unfortunately, no matter how the Palestinians “push” Israel, they will end up looking like the bad guys:
        – Go to the ICC? “The Palestinians are trying to destroy the Jewish State!”
        – Demand Israeli citizenship? “The Palestinians are trying to destroy the Jewish State!”
        – Advocate for a separate state on ’47 borders with some measure of RoR being honoured by Israel? “The Palestinians are trying to destroy the Jewish State!”
        – Throw rocks at armed Zio-supremacist colonists who – defended, if not supported and emboldened, by the Occupation Forces of the oppressive, colonialist, expansionist and supremacist “Jewish State” of Israel – steal land, kill livestock, destroy homes, poison fields, cut down trees, maim and kill farmers? “The Palestinians are trying to destroy the Jewish State!”

        The survival of the state of Israel isn’t really the issue. No matter how Zio-supremacists song-and-dance it, the fundamental problem has been, is and will continue to be supremacist “Jewish State”.

      • talknic
        January 29, 2013, 12:17 am

        The problem with both scenarios is they overlook what seems to be rather obvious … Israel displays all the symptoms of a psychopath. Complete denial, false accusations/blame shifting etc. Psychopaths don’t ‘scare’, they escalate, as Israel has done, until they’re either contained or blown away by someone bigger, stronger and more determined.

        Not given its way, the little red heifer armed with nukes and run by 3-4 generations raised on a diet of heifer sh*te saying they’re right and based on its past behaviour, will very likely kick the crap out of the china shop.

        That’s the threat Israel makes, directly or indirectly (having nukes is a threat to use them otherwise there is no point in having them). It’s the same threat it has been making and carrying out for 64 years link to wp.me

        On Iran, ‘if you don’t do something, Israel will’, so the US/EU et al concede to increasing sanctions on Iran to forgo its right to peaceful nuclear technology, because if Israel did attack Iran the rest of the world would be dragged into the quagmire, whether they like it or not. Who’s willing to pull the pin out of that grenade?

        I firmly believe the answer is in revealing the lies, spin & incessant fear mongering propaganda that pours out of Israel as it attempts to justify its illegal activities. Thousands of tiny pin holes are far better than an explosion.

  6. LanceThruster
    February 17, 2013, 5:21 pm

    I remember the feeling seeing an Iraqi man trying to hold back the tears after the Iraqi museums were looted of priceless treasures as US forces stood by. Dictators come and go, but one’s cultural artifacts are often irreplaceable.

    The Shoah Foundation catalogs stories of genocide lest they be forgotten. The Shoah mindset also includes making stories problematic to their own narrative disappear.

Leave a Reply