Geller’s speech leaves Muslim community unsafe, and echoes era of anti-Semitism

Israel/Palestine

Below are three statements urging New York institutions not to host Pamela Geller, who seeks to demonize Islam. Geller was invited to speak at the Great Neck Synagogue today. The synagogue then cancelled her appearance. But other Jewish organizations have now offered her space.

First, from the Jews Against Islamophobia Coalition, released today:

Jewish Coalition Reaffirms Commitment to Challenging Islamophobia

Sunday, April 14, 2013  The Jews Against Islamophobia Coalition (JAIC) strongly reaffirms its commitment to challenging Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism and calls on the rest of the Jewish community to do the same. While the Great Neck Synagogue has decided not to host Pamela Geller, JAIC is outraged by those synagogues and Jewish institutions that are now offering platforms for Geller’s hate speech. JAIC also condemns those who have been targeting individuals speaking out against hate speech.

“The kind of hate speech we see regularly in New York, coupled with government violations of the rights of the Muslim community, makes it a very unsafe environment for the Muslim community,” said Rebecca Vilkomerson, executive director of Jewish Voice for Peace and member of JAIC.  “We need to continue to speak out unequivocally against it.  Our community needs to take seriously the need to continue to challenge the systems and practices that enable Islamophobia to flourish.”  

“As a Jew, when I hear about the NYPD surveillance program against the Muslim community and other ways the Muslim community has been targeted, I am reminded of the state-sponsored anti-Semitism that we endured at different times in our history,” said civil rights lawyer Alan Levine of JAIC. “It was intolerable then when it happened to the Jewish community. It’s intolerable now when it happens to the Muslim community.”

Marjorie Dove Kent, executive director of Jews for Racial & Economic Justice, another member organization of the Coalition, said, “Islamophobic rhetoric supports and facilitates programs such as NYPD’s surveillance of Muslim communities. As the recent Mapping Muslims report documents, this program and ones like it have very real harmful effects on individuals and a chilling effect on people’s right to practice their religion and participate in democratic life.”

JAIC joins the Muslim community as it organizes against Islamophobia and racism and for justice and dignity for all communities. 

The Jews Against Islamophobia Coalition is composed of Jewish Voice for Peace, Jews for Racial and Economic Justice and Jews Say No!.

At The American Muslim, Sheila Musaji writes (h/t CAIR) that allowing Geller’s speech would mean that other institutions would be justified in hosting anti-Semitic speakers:

As a Muslim, I find other aspects of this controversy more important.  Before the Geller talk at the Great Neck Synagogue was cancelled, the synagogue issued a statement: “We believe that it is important to hear what she has to say and we are confident that intelligent and fair minded individuals will consider her views in reaching their own conclusions…. We reject the categorizing of any religious majority based on the actions of a minority. …. We do, though, believe that it is appropriate to speak about the actions of that minority.”

So, according to the synagogue where Geller was invited to speak on Sharia – this is an issue of freedom of speech, and people can make up their own minds about the validity of the views of the speaker.  It is “appropriate” to discuss the actions of extremist Muslims in a synagogue.  And, the fact that the speaker has absolutely no qualifications or expertise on the subject doesn’t matter.

Following exactly the same logic.  There are some extremist and even terrorist Jews who justify their actions by their interpretations of halakha, Torah, Talmud, etc.  So, it should not be a problem for any mosque, or Muslim organization to have a program inviting an individual with no expertise at all in the subject matter (even one known for anti-Semitic views) to come and speak on the subject of Halakha or Talmud or any topic about Judaism.  Perhaps a mosque could invite a known anti-Semite from the Muslim lunatic fringe to speak on the dangers of Halakha to the American legal system, or perhaps the viciousness of kosher slaughter.  This should not be considered confrontational or hostile to Muslims as long as the group arranging the program publishes a statement saying:  “We reject the categorizing of any religious majority based on the actions of a minority. …. We do, though, believe that it is appropriate to speak about the actions of that minority.” Geller pretends not to realize the similarities between Kosher and Halal:  Halakha and Sharia Requirements or between Islamic Sharia and Jewish Halakha Arbitration Courts.  However, continuing to stir up a hornet’s nest of bigotry will sooner or later make this similarity noticed by the bigots she appeals to, and this will not be good for the Muslim or Jewish communities.

Following exactly the same logic, there should not be a problem with Muslim groups running an ad series countering each ad in the ad series being run by Pamela Geller & Robert Spencer of the hate groups AFDI/SIOA.  And, as long as the group running these ads says, we are not anti-Jewish, only anti-Judaism, or anti-Halakha, or anti-Talmud – or, we are not anti-Christian, only anti-Christianity, then any objection from the Jewish community or the Christian community would just be an attempt to shut down freedom of speech.

Also, here is a statement in the Jewish Week from Rabbi Michael White and Rabbi Jerome Davidson, Long Island rabbis, saying that “Hate Speech Has No Place in a Synagogue” and citing their work with the Muslim community on Long Island:

Both the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League have  designated Geller’s “Stop Islamization of America” organization as a hate group. As was recently reported in the Jewish Week, Etzion Neuer, director of community service and policy for the ADL’s New York region, said that Geller “under the guise of fighting radical Islam, absolutely demonizes an entire religion. In directing her rhetoric at the entire Islamic faith, she fuels anti-Islamic bigotry. Geller doesn’t do us any favors,” he continued. “She muddies the waters because she hands the platform to the extremists in our midst. Instead of thoughtful, fact-based dialogue on the issues, we get incendiary rhetoric and xenophobia.”

We cherish our relationships and friendships within the local Muslim community. Both Temple Beth El of Great Neck and Temple Sinai of Roslyn share deep and abiding connections with the Islamic Center of Long Island. Our communities have broken bread together, studied together, engaged in social action projects together, and our children have learned from each other as well.  The local Muslim community adds immeasurably to Long Island’s vitality, and we are blessed by their commitment to the betterment of our society. Their presence among us affirms the essence of America’s greatness, a nation founded on the principles of democratic pluralism.

We state unequivocally that Geller’s inflammatory rhetoric does not represent us or the great majority of Jews in Great Neck and on Long Island. Hate speech has no place in synagogues. Synagogues should be places for worship, positive dialogue and reasoned political debate. The right of free speech is vitally important, but Geller crosses the line from political to hate speech. In sharp contrast, Judaism teaches us to respect the traditions and values of other faiths.

Last fall the group T’ruah: The Rabbinic Call for Human Rights (formerly Rabbis For Human Rights-North America) echoed that sentiment with its effective New York City subway ad campaign that countered Geller’s offensive anti-Muslim subway posters.  T’ruah’s message challenged: “In the choice between love and hate, choose love. Help stop bigotry against our Muslim neighbors.”

We share T’ruah’s vision, reflecting our faith’s mandate to work for understanding, unity and peace among all humanity. Geller’s messages seek to divide peoples, and fail to acknowledge that even with significant political differences, Jews and Muslims are working to build the world of justice and compassion that both faiths demand. Rather than trying to denigrate a diverse community and rich tradition, we must find ways of respecting one another and working together on shared concerns. 

 
 
 

FYI, The Jewish Week provided space to Geller to respond: “Ultimately, these rabbis will answer to a higher authority.” She evidently knows the word of god.

31 Responses

  1. pabelmont
    April 14, 2013, 11:18 am

    Amen.

  2. Stephen Shenfield
    April 14, 2013, 11:22 am

    Unless the category of “hate speech” is given a very clear and narrow definition, delegitimizing it poses a real danger to civil liberties. I suggest limiting it to refer only to speech that arouses hatred for some group of people as such. Such speech has to be prohibited because it easily leads to violence against people in that group. However, “hate speech” should not be understood to encompass even harsh and biased attacks against any system, practice or doctrine associated with one or another group of people. Here the appropriate response is to argue back and expose the bias, not suppress the opponent’s views. In particular, speaking as an anti-religious person who is convinced that religions do great harm to humanity, I insist on the right to criticize Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, or any other religion without being libeled as a purveyor of hatred.

    • hophmi
      April 15, 2013, 10:51 am

      ” I insist on the right to criticize Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, or any other religion without being libeled as a purveyor of hatred.”

      LOL. So what you want is the right to speak while denying that right to others who want to criticize what you say.

      People are forever mischaracterizing what free speech is when their opinion is not as widely accepted as they would like it to be. Free speech allows you to say what you want without facing government sanction. It does not entitle you to an invitation to say it from a private institution and it does not entitle you to demand other stop speaking in response to what you say. That is why Pamela Geller has no right to speak at the Great Neck Synagogue, and Rebecca Vilkomerson has no right to speak at Congregation Anshe Chesed.

      • ryan-o
        April 15, 2013, 3:26 pm

        I don’t think that’s what Stephen is saying. Defamation and criticism are two different things. In a society with freedom of speech, criticism of a religious beliefs of course can be countered with criticism from adherents to that religion. From there it can be argued back and forth until a stalemate is reached (it’s rare for anybody to ‘win’ such an argument since both sides whether right or wrong will often be unwilling to concede ‘defeat’).

        The problem is when criticism is libel and the critics try to frame it as “hate speech”. It doesn’t matter if they are in the wrong or being deliberately dishonest and it doesn’t matter if there is further counter-criticism. People will pay attention and get confused, then it enters the legal arena where it could very well die eventually due to being a baseless accusation. At that point the damage is done, it’s like when a convicted criminal is later proven innocent and the masses still believe they are guilty.

        There should be no limitations of any kind to free speech, otherwise it isn’t free. Even if somebody wants to say the most vile and hateful things and gathers a following. Words are only a problem when translated to actions. Words can be countered, especially when those words are baseless.

  3. sardelapasti
    April 14, 2013, 1:06 pm

    “…surveillance program against the Muslim community and other ways the Muslim community has been targeted, I am reminded of the state-sponsored anti-Semitism that we endured at different times..”

    “Antisemitism”, for those who accept such a category, targets not a religion but a birth characteristic (a fictitious one of course, but racial anyway in the eye of the discriminator.) Moslem/Muslim is strictly religious as an adjective, nothing to do with birth accident, at least not for thinking people.

    In summary, “Anti-Arab etc.” is obviously racism. “Anti-Islamic/Islamophobic” is not. “Islamophobia” is as much a right of everyone as the enmity against any other religion, Christianism, Shintoism, Judaism, you name it.

    However well-meaning in its intent, these campaigns are well on their way to silencing all critics of religion. Can’t these guys think for a fraction of a second and realize that not everyone is religious, and not everyone necessarily subscribes to the same? They are both negating the right to freedom from religion and committing the same crime/error as the Zionists, viz. malignantly lumping together religion and supposed biologic origin. For all I know, they may well be either Zionists or religious fanatics.

    • Bumblebye
      April 14, 2013, 3:12 pm

      But Gellar does not ‘critique’ a religion, she demonizes one religion and all its followers without distinction. If one has a ‘right’ to be Islamophobic, does one similarly have the ‘right’ to be antisemitic or Judeophobic? And not only that, but to have or to expect the right to platforms to disseminate and spread that stupid hatred?

    • bintbiba
      April 14, 2013, 3:39 pm

      very well put, sar.

      • seafoid
        April 15, 2013, 1:45 am

        Geller is a useful idiot for the security complex in the US. She whips up the hate and the FBI and Homeland Security target Arab Americans and Muslims. The war on terror goes on, ever pointless. Closing gitmo is politically impossible. I imagine the GOP loves her. She says what no moderate right winger will say. So many fortune 500 companies are still feeding from the WoT teat. It all comes back to money and influence.

    • Donald
      April 14, 2013, 4:52 pm

      “However well-meaning in its intent, these campaigns are well on their way to silencing all critics of religion.”

      Fat chance. People have been criticizing fundamentalist Christianity for decades.

      The problem here is not that someone is engaged in the perennial argument about whether or not belief in God is stupid, or whether this or that religion contains some beliefs that justify bad behavior. The problem is that Islamophobes single out Muslims in particular and talk about this group of 1 billion people as though they are all terrorists or potential terrorists.

      It’s simply a fact that people who are religious and claim to have certain beliefs in common often take very different ethical stands and behave in very different ways–some Christians, for instance, persecuted Jews while others would risk their lives to save them from their persecutors. Same religion, very different behavior. So if someone wanted to attack Christianity, as a matter of fairness he or she should acknowledge that Christians don’t all behave the same and interpret their beliefs in very different ways. The same would apply to any other religion.

      The problem I have with some of the self-styled rationalist attackers of religion is that they don’t make these obvious distinctions. Fine, it’s not racism. But it is bigotry and it can be every bit as dangerous as any other form of bigotry if taken to extremes. I wouldn’t trust a nuclear armed nation of Sam Harris types any more than I would trust a nuclear armed nation of religious fanatics.

      • CloakAndDagger
        April 14, 2013, 8:00 pm

        @ Donald

        Well said. It is assumed that *all* arabs and *all* persians are muslims, not to mention Pakistanis, Indonesians, and other brown-skinned members of the populace. In fact, anyone wearing a turban, including sikhs, can be shot as a muslim terrorist, as we have seen.

        It is not as if these hate-mongers are engaging in academic debate about the fine-points of Islamic faith. It is a clear (and reasonably successful) effort to demonize an entire people that is viewed as enemies of Israel, and thus, should be enemies of the US.

      • American
        April 15, 2013, 2:17 pm

        @Donald

        humm…wonder what Israel would do if Palestine was to become populated with Christians?…what would the Christ-zios do then?

    • Joe Ed
      April 14, 2013, 5:40 pm

      All these attacks on Islam are a smoke screen for the true anti arab agenda.

      Many of the Palestinians, Lebanese, etc. who have been oppressed and killed by the Zionists are in fact not Muslim. Many are Christians. But the Zionist propagandist knows that it is much smarter to attack Islam and get the Christian Fundies on their side than to attack arabs in general and run the risk it will diminish their backing by the Fundies

      • sardelapasti
        April 14, 2013, 8:41 pm

        Joe Ed – “But the Zionist propagandist knows that it is much smarter to attack Islam and get the Christian Fundies on their side than to attack arabs in general and run the risk it will diminish their backing by the Fundies”
        Bingo!
        So why would anyone supposed to fight that propagandist follow her without nary a peep in this malignant confusion?

      • ryan-o
        April 15, 2013, 3:37 pm

        It really is a smokescreen and a distraction. I remember the perpetrator for at least one of the “suicide” bombings years back being both a woman and an atheist. Yet these bombings were blamed on religious extremism, so how could this be? Was she that frustrated with the occupation? Or did she have no idea she was carrying an explosive device?

        Regardless, it is true there are many non-Muslims who have been oppressed and killed by the Zionists. When 60 minutes ran their special about how Christians are oppressed in Bethlehem, I thought it would raise awareness among American Christians (and maybe it helped). Yet a conservative website’s response from the evangelical members went from anti-Islam to anti-Arab racism i.e. “So what if they’re Christians? They are still Arab terrorists”

    • hophmi
      April 15, 2013, 10:55 am

      “‘Antisemitism’, for those who accept such a category, targets not a religion but a birth characteristic (a fictitious one of course, but racial anyway in the eye of the discriminator.) Moslem/Muslim is strictly religious as an adjective, nothing to do with birth accident, at least not for thinking people.

      Care to flesh that out a bit? If you’re anti a religion, you’re anti a religion, whether it’s Judaism or Islam.

      ‘However well-meaning in its intent, these campaigns are well on their way to silencing all critics of religion.”

      Nonsense. Geller has a blog that is following by hundreds of thousands of people. How on earth is she being silenced?

      “They are both negating the right to freedom from religion”

      How? Did anybody knock on your door today and tell you not to be not religious or else you’ll go to jail?

  4. DICKERSON3870
    April 14, 2013, 1:08 pm

    ● RE: The Jews Against Islamophobia Coalition (JAIC) strongly reaffirms its commitment to challenging Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism and calls on the rest of the Jewish community to do the same. ~ Weiss

    ● MY COMMENT: They had better be very, very careful. Pamela Geller’s personal attorney is (surprise, surprise) the notorious white supremacist David Yerushalmi; and, as a general rule, white supremacists know how to play rough.

    ● SEE: “DAVID YERUSHALMI: ‘THE MAN BEHIND THE ANTI-SHARIAH MOVEMENT'”, By Pamela Geller, Atlas’ Stench, 7/31/2011

    [EXCERPTS] The ‘New York Times’ has a lengthy piece on a man I consider a national treasure, and I am not just saying that becuase he is my lawyer, representing me in numerous cases (i.e., the $10,000,000 lawsuit brought by Rifqa Bary’s parents; the violation of free speech in the banning of my freedom buses; the NYC transit ban on my Ground Zero mosque buses, etc.).
    The Times gets it wrong, of course. It woud be kind of wonderful for the likes of Andrea Elliot to practice her craft in a sharia-compliant country and spare us her smears and deceptive whitewash of the most brutal ideology on the face of the earth.
    It’s a smear piece, and a heads up to Ms. Elliot, America is behind the anti-shariah movement.
    “The Man Behind the Anti-Shariah Movement” ~ Andrea Elliot, ‘NY Times’

    A confluence of factors has fueled the anti-Shariah movement, most notably the controversy over the proposed Islamic center near ground zero in New York, concerns about homegrown terrorism and the rise of the Tea Party. But the campaign’s air of grass-roots spontaneity, which has been carefully promoted by advocates, shrouds its more deliberate origins.
    In fact, it is the product of an orchestrated drive that began five years ago in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, in the office of a little-known lawyer, David Yerushalmi, a 56-year-old Hasidic Jew with a history of controversial statements about race, immigration and Islam.
    Despite his lack of formal training in Islamic law, Mr. Yerushalmi has come to exercise a striking influence over American public discourse about Shariah. . .

    SOURCE – link to atlasshrugs2000.typepad.com

    • DICKERSON3870
      April 14, 2013, 1:10 pm

      ● P.S. ALSO SEE: “David Yerushalmi, Islam-Hating White Supremacist Inspires Anti-Sharia Bills Sweeping Tea Party Nation”, by Richard Silverstein, Tikun Olam, 3/02/11

      [EXCERPTS] You’ve gotta hand it to David Yerushalmi. Until now, I can’t recall a Jew who’s ever been called a white supremacist before (actually now that I think of it, I called him a Jewish white supremacist way back in 2007). Thanks to him, we now can. . .
      . . . I’m referring to an eye-opening expose in Mother Jones about the inspiration the Jewish extremist is offering for the anti-Muslim legal initiatives that are sweeping the south after the victory of one such campaign in Oklahoma a few months ago. . .
      . . . One of the most delicious phrases used to describe the Jewish anti-jihadi is “white supremacist,” to which I say: if the shoe fits . . . I’ve also called him a Jewish fascist. But white supremacist will do just as well.
      As Murphy notes, this is a guy who endorses the principle that “Caucasians” are superior to blacks and that Jewish liberals are a cancer in the U.S. body politic. The nearest Jewish “intellectual” antecedent I can determine would be Meir Kahane. But Yerushalmi’s views are far more radical than Kahane’s. . .

      ENTIRE COMMENTARY – link to richardsilverstein.com

    • DICKERSON3870
      April 14, 2013, 1:15 pm

      ● P.P.S. RE: “[A]s a general rule, white supremacists know how to play rough.” – me (from above)

      ● FOR EXAMPLE, FROM WIKIPEDIA [J.B. Stoner]:

      (EXCERPTS) Jesse Benjamin “J.B.” Stoner (April 13, 1924 – April 23, 2005) was an American segregationist who was convicted in 1980 of the bombing in 1958 of the Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama.[1]
      He was a founder and long-time chairman of the National States’ Rights Party and publisher of its newsletter, “The Thunderbolt”. Stoner unsuccessfully attempted to run as a Democrat for several political offices in order to promote his white supremacist agenda. . .
      . . . Stoner earned a law degree, and served as the attorney for James Earl Ray . . .
      . . . Stoner once said that “being a Jew [should] be a crime punishable by death”.[1] He ran the National States’ Rights Party, which attracted such fringe political figures as A. Roswell Thompson, a perennial Democratic candidate for governor of Louisiana and mayor of New Orleans. . .
      . . . Stoner ran for governor of Georgia in 1970. During this campaign, where he called himself the “candidate of love”, he described Hitler as “too moderate,” black people as an extension of the ape family, and Jews as “vipers of hell.”[1] The primary was won by civil rights supporter and future President Jimmy Carter. Stoner then ran for the United States Senate in 1972, finishing fifth in the Democratic Party primary with just over 40,000 votes. The nomination and election went to Sam Nunn.
      During his Senate campaign, the FCC ruled that television stations had to play his ads due to the fairness doctrine.
      His ads included the word “ni**er.” . . .

      SOURCE – link to en.wikipedia.org

      ● P.P.P.S. PHOTOS OF J.B. STONER:
      • Stoner as chairman of the National States’ Rights Party - link to google.com
      • “Don’t Tread on Me”, St. Augustine, FL (1964) - link to google.com
      • “I thank God all the time for AIDS” - link to flickr.com

      ● P.P.P.P.S. THE WAY WE WERE (CIRCA 1939); LEST WE FORGET [SHORTNIN BREAD LYRICS]- link to mondoweiss.net
      • Nelson Eddy sings Shortnin Bread 13.09.1939.wmv [VIDEO, 02:39] – link to youtube.com

      • DICKERSON3870
        April 14, 2013, 1:47 pm

        ● P.P.P.P.P.S.

        • ALSO SEE: “A young Israeli woman gets her picture taken with African ‘animals’”, by Philip Weiss, Mondoweiss, 11/22/12
        LINK – link to mondoweiss.net

        • AND SEE: “Israeli Interior Minister on African immigrants: ‘Most of those people arriving here are Muslims who think the country doesn’t belong to us, the white man’”, by Adam Horowitz, Mondoweiss, 6/03/12
        LINK – link to mondoweiss.net

        • FINALLY, SEE: “Israeli ambassador Michael Oren gets hero’s welcome in liberal enclave of Brooklyn”, by Alex Kane, Mondoweiss, 10/17/12

        [EXCERPT] . . . Oren claimed that only 2% of the Africans in Israel were refugees, with the rest looking for work. Oren also said that “about 40 percent of them are Muslim, which creates a security concern for us,” as The Daily Beast’s Open Zion blog reported. . .

        ENTIRE ARTICLE – link to mondoweiss.net

  5. Citizen
    April 14, 2013, 1:22 pm

    Just in case some newbies happen to chance on this blog, here’s some data from Wiki (you can check the footnoted sources there) about Geller’s POV: link to en.wikipedia.org
    One thing for sure, Pam has had a lot more access to the US mainstream media than, e.g., Phil Weiss and this blog, which has had none. Just so you keep this in perspective.

  6. Citizen
    April 14, 2013, 2:18 pm

    Geller acts and speaks as if there’s not a problem with what Dick and Jane support with their tax dollars: link to ifamericansknew.org

    Would Ayn Rand OK this tin cup charity to rogue Israel at American workers’ expense? I don’t think so. Rand stood for the proposition that you have to earn what you get. US financial aid to Israel is not exactly an example of bootstraps determinism.

  7. yourstruly
    April 14, 2013, 4:01 pm

    you of one religion who stereotype people of another religion

    when the screw turns

    and yours is the religion being attacked

    when you cry foul

    will anyone care?

  8. asherpat
    April 14, 2013, 4:09 pm

    I read the article above, but nowhere there was any explanation about what is it so offending and Islamophobic that Geller said. Sincerely, pls explain.

    • Cliff
      April 14, 2013, 4:49 pm

      Why does it have to be limited to the article. It is her entire catalog.

    • amigo
      April 14, 2013, 4:56 pm

      “Following exactly the same logic. There are some extremist and even terrorist Jews who justify their actions by their interpretations of halakha, Torah, Talmud, etc. So, it should not be a problem for any mosque, or Muslim organization to have a program inviting an individual with no expertise at all in the subject matter (even one known for anti-Semitic views) to come and speak on the subject of Halakha or Talmud or any topic about Judaism.”

      So you wont see anything wrong with this proposal either, Hmmm.

    • Talkback
      April 14, 2013, 6:00 pm

      She said that Jewish terrorists are practicing pure Judaism. She also had a drawing of Moses with the face of a pig superimposed over his own on her blog and called this having fun. And she had an ad running in New York subways that reads “In any war between the civilized man and the savage, support the civilized man. Support Palestine. Defeat Jewish militarism.”

      No, wait. Her racism targeted someone else …

    • Sumud
      April 14, 2013, 9:21 pm

      asherpat ~ spend some time at her faux-Objectivist blog. Read the comments:

      http://atlasshrugs2000.typepad.com

      Also check out some of her interviews with news organisations, this one is ‘classic’ Geller:

      Pamela Geller: ‘Hitler Inspired by Islam’

      She starts off with motherhood statements about “mutual respect” and “mutual tolerance” and it’s all downhill from there.

      See also Loonwatch, who have catalogued Geller’s more extreme antics. Their initial article on her:

      Pamela Geller: The Looniest Blogger Ever

      Their general archive on her:

      link to loonwatch.com

      Also of interest is what she was doing before her current schtick – writing regularly for the Israelis settler rag Arutz Sheva:

      link to israelnationalnews.com

      She is so out there she even hates Bush II. Not from the left, but from the far far right.

  9. Daniel Rich
    April 14, 2013, 7:23 pm

    I’m sorry, why can’t the hate of Muslims stand on its own two feet? Why does it have to be connected to anti-semitism [as many Muslims are semites as well]? Copyright infringement?

  10. shablon
    April 14, 2013, 8:28 pm

    Letter by Prophet Muhammad (Pbuh) to the
    Monks of the Greek Orthodox Church in Mount Sinai

    The Greek Orthodox monks living in the monastery at the foothills of Mount Sinai have in their possession many precious documents going back many centuries. Their library is one of the finest in the world for ancient manuscripts. One of the most precious documents of all is the copy of a letter by Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) to the monks in the year 628.

    Its content might come as a surprise to many, today, since in this precious manuscript Muslims are exhorted to protect the Christians living within their midst. The words are so beautiful that we repeat them in full here (from the original Arabic hand-written signed version):

    “This is a message from Mohamed Ibn Abdullah, as a covenant to those who adopt Christianity, near and far, we are with them. Verily, the servants, the helpers, and my followers defend them, because Christians are my citizens; and by Allah! I hold out against anything that displeases them. No compulsion is to be on them. Neither are their judges to be removed from their jobs nor their monks from their monasteries. No one is to destroy a house of their religion, to damage it, or to carry anything from it to Muslims’ houses. Should anyone take any of these, he would spoil God’s covenant and disobey His Prophet. Verily, they are my allies and have my secure charter against all that they hate. No one is to force them to travel or to oblige them to fight. The Muslims are to fight for them. If a female Christian is married to a Muslim, it is not to take place without her approval. She is not to be prevented from visiting her church to pray. Their churches are to be respected. They are neither to be prevented from repairing them nor the sacredness of their covenants. No one of the nation (Muslims) is to disobey the covenant till the Last Day (end of the world).”

    It should be quite clear from this that, far from being a threat, Islam is actually the guardian of the Christian presence in the Middle East. These words of Prophet Mohamed (pbuh) should be made known to Muslims and non-Muslims throughout the world.

    Those same instructions would naturally be embedded in Islamic Sharia Laws.

  11. MK_Ultra
    April 15, 2013, 10:36 am

    Here’s an e-mail I received from Jewish Voices For Peace today. JVFP was the group that initiated the opposition to Geller’s speech at the Great Neck, NY Synagogue:

    Dear Friends,

    As you may have heard, the Great Neck Synagogue cancelled the speaking engagement, citing “security concerns” due to the public outcry and attention, but continued to publicly state support for Geller as a “potentially important voice in this ongoing debate.”

    These types of incidents make me feel so angry, disillusioned and sometimes hopeless; yet this time I was so inspired. The emails we received were the voices of community leaders, determined to seek and pursue justice. You have inspired me, and I would love to continue working with you. Send me an email, and let’s talk about what a Jewish Voice for Peace chapter could look like in Long Island.

    When you petitioned the Great Neck Synagogue (GNS) to cancel their invitation to host Pamela Geller and her racist hate-speech, you took a much needed moral and political stand. By speaking out in response to local public sponsorship of anti-Muslim bigotry, together we stood up to the Islamophobic climate, both beyond and within the Jewish community. We know that this climate makes Muslims and South Asians the targets of physical and verbal attacks and state sponsored violations of civil rights, such as NYPD surveillance.

    We know that this incident is not isolated. That it’s just one example of the many institutions which reinforce the type of racism, Islamophobia and systemic injustices which exist both here in NYC, as well as in Israel/Palestine.

    The outpouring of commitment from Long Island to taking action on this issue has been truly moving, and I would love to talk with you all about Jewish Voice for Peace, and the potential of forming a Long Island Chapter, separate from our New York City chapter. If you are interested in taking ongoing action, leadership, and building together, please be in touch with me, at [email protected].

    By taking action against Islamophobia and the targeting of our neighbors, and instead speaking up to embody the Jewish values of justice, human rights, and truth telling, we are building the movements and communities that represent our values, here in the United States, and in Israel and Palestine.

    Onward,
    Alana, Jewish Voice For Peace

    Alana Krivo-Kaufman | Jewish Voice for Peace | [email protected] | NE Field Organizing Fellow
    147 Prince St, Suite 17 | Brooklyn, NY 11201| http://www.jvp.org

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