Stateless and in Exile: One Palestinian family’s story of being expelled from their Jerusalem home

East Jerusalem, October 15, 2009 (Photo: Synne Tonidas. Flickr)

East Jerusalem, October 15, 2009 (Photo: Synne Tonidas/Flickr)

Far-fetched Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations began earlier this month. But in parallel process for my family, long-time residents of occupied East Jerusalem, we have been sent into exile by the same Israeli authorities that claim they want to establish peace.

Our infraction?  We had the temerity to live outside of our homeland for several years and the naivety to think we could return to Palestine for a summer vacation. Israel, however, allows such certainty only for Jewish residents of Jerusalem and not for the Palestinians whose land it occupied in 1967 – and certainly not for those Palestinians exiled in 1948.

It’s as though a Native American went to study in Europe and was expelled if she returned for a visit or to re-establish her life in the United States.  Imagine your agony if you traveled abroad for several years and then were told by an (occupying) government that your right to return home had been forfeited while people of a different religion were allowed to make similar long-term trips or immigrate after never living there at all.

The double standard is obvious and should be addressed by Secretary of State John Kerry. Instead, Prime Minister Netanyahu inveighs against alleged Palestinian incitement when Mohammed Assaf sings of the Palestinian desire to return to homes and land from which over 700,000 Palestinians were expelled in 1948.

My family’s personal experience with this miscarriage of justice came in July.  Just days into our vacation, the Israeli Ministry of Interior (MoI) presented us documents expelling us from our country, leaving us to face statelessness and exile. We are now in France, appealing our case, still in sharp pain, indignant about this injustice, and fearful for our future.

Our attorney hopes to convince MoI to reverse its decision on revoking our “permanent resident” status in East Jerusalem, where my husband was raised and my children were born.  Should the MoI insist on its decision, two of our three children would end up stateless and passport-less. This will also mean that our family will not be able to live in, or possibly visit, our homeland again.

Israel imposed the “permanent resident” status on the Palestinians in East Jerusalem when it occupied and illegally, unilaterally annexed the city in June 1967 – thus not observing its obligations as an occupying power with regards to the provisions of international law, according to which Palestinian East Jerusalemites are not merely “residents” but are also “protected persons” who are entitled to continue living in their country.  Over 14,000 Palestinians have been expelled since 1967.

Suheir Azzouni and her family. (Photo: Suheir Azzouni)

Lour, Layan, Suheir, Khalil and Saji Mahshi (Photo: Mahshi Family)

My husband’s roots run deep in Jerusalem. His ancestral family (Mahshi) has lived in the city for centuries. It is still recognized by the Greek Orthodox Church as one of 13 prominent families within its congregation in Jerusalem. On important occasions, like Holy Fire Saturday, the family is called upon to carry a banner in front of the Patriarch in processions through the city streets.

My husband grew up in the Old City and was living there when Israel occupied it. Until 1994, he was involved in joint Israeli-Palestinian activities to realize a two-state solution and a just and lasting peace based on UN resolutions. He contributed to Palestinian statehood through the development of educational institutions and was a member of the team which established the first Palestinian Ministry of Education. His work was recognized by many, including France, which decorated him with the “Palmes Academiques” in 1993 and granted him French nationality in 2010. In 2001, he was offered a job at UNESCO where he presently holds a senior management position.

In 2001, our three children and I joined my husband in Paris, where we still reside. Triggered by the fact that my husband was granted French nationality, Israel expelled our family based on its policy of “center of life,” which it consistently applies to Palestinian Jerusalemites living and working outside the city, thus rendering them stateless. Israel thereby denies us our human right to travel, pursue our professional development and careers, and return to our country. Needless to say, Jerusalem’s Jewish residents have no such fears. It’s discrimination at its clearest.

My own roots also run deep in Jerusalem. The families of my paternal and maternal grandmothers are two of the 13 Greek Orthodox families mentioned previously.  Many of my years were spent struggling for gender equality in Palestinian society.  In 1994, I established the executive offices of the Women’s Affairs Technical Committee, a coalition of women’s organizations which was effective in reversing a number of discriminatory regulations against women.

How ironic it is that despite my life’s work on women’s and human rights, I am presently subjected to the violation of my basic rights as a person and a woman: my human right to leave and return to my country, a right secured by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 13.2) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which Israel has signed (Articles 12.2 and 12.4). This covenant also stipulates that all persons lawfully within the territory of a State shall have the right to liberty of movement and freedom to choose their place of residence.  My children, who are pursuing their studies, are also denied their human right to a nationality and the choice to return to their country.

We hope that Israel will demonstrate its seriousness in the ongoing negotiations through halting its inhumane policies which threaten Palestinians’ existence and enjoyment of basic human rights. Like all the peoples of the world, we have the right to go back to our home and country. We yearn to continue to work for peace, to live in our homeland and retire in peace. But Israel’s willingness to talk peace while at the same time exiling vulnerable Palestinians speaks volumes about Prime Minister Netanyahu’s intention to secure as much land with as few Palestinians as possible.

Please sign this petition supporting Suheir Azzouni’s family and their residency rights.

 

About Suheir Azzouni

Suheir Azzouni is a Palestinian women’s rights activist and gender specialist. She established the executive offices of the Palestinian Women’s Affairs Technical Committee (WATC) and acted as WATC’s General Director from 1994- 2001.
Posted in Israel/Palestine, Israeli Government, Occupation, On the ground reports | Tagged

{ 49 comments... read them below or add one }

  1. HarryLaw says:

    I am afraid all Palestinians have worse to come with such a pathetic leadership who show no signs of having any political common sense, how apolitical can Abbas be when he puts forward the notion that a group of prisoner releases [important as that is to the prisoners and their families] can be more important than securing their National status at the UN by applying to join all the Agencies and formally applying to join the ICC and set in train all the war crimes charges piling up everyday, these releases prove that Abbas can be easily be bought off. “In early September, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas told a meeting of the Fatah Revolutionary Council in Ramallah that his regime has agreed not to turn to international organizations during the negotiations in return for the release of the 104 prisoners, who were detained by Israel prior to the signing of the Oslo Accords.
    “I consider the issue of the UN to be very important, but the case of the prisoners is worthy of sacrifice,” he said. “We have prepared 63 requests to join 63 UN agencies and conventions, but I said the issue of the prisoners is now more significant.” link to ynetnews.com

    • Citizen says:

      Not to mention Israel has a history of rearresting released prisoners.
      Yet Abbas was likely threatened by US with stoppage of western aid if he did not put the UN gambit on hold. (Israel was of course not threatened with cut off of (way more) US aid if it did not put the expanding settlements on hold.)

      Let’s see if we get any hasbara bots commenting under this article. The Zionist press recently did a piece praising the diligent hordes of hasbara bots battling pro-Palestinian/human rights commenters online across the world: link to ynetnews.com

      • fnlevit says:

        Thank you for your link to ynet. Today I just had a conversation with one of my sons who mentioned it and promissed to find the reference. I was so glad to hear that I am not alone in this – “what I call fighting behind the enemy lines”. Actually I wanted to share the experience I am gaining on this blog. Even on a grander scale – to write a series of posts about the typical ways people on a vicious anti-Israeli page like this one try to delegitimize Israel with all the lies and half truths and other dirty tricks.

        But have you actually read the link you posted to ynet? Knowing the “habits” on this page I doubt. In any case let me quote one piece

        “The majority of the people writing pro-Israel talkbacks are not Jewish,” said Philip Fabian, a 32-year-old German from Berlin. “I never started to write pro-Israeli talkbacks consciously. I am a classic news-junkie, and the internet contributed a lot in developing my political conscience, starting in the post 9/11 world and the Intifada of the last decade. It made me realize the obvious shortcomings of mainstream media news outlets, especially when it comes to Israel.”

        Or another one “We got used to anti-Semitic remarks glorifying Hitler and denying the holocaust, but I’ll never forget seeing comment posters who justified the Fogel family massacre, who said that Palestinians experience that everyday. I was shocked, I couldn’t understand it.”

        I must say that I was shocked too on this page when I saw time and again people justifying Palestinian suicide bombings. One even went as far as saying “it is like many Americans justifing 9/11 because they understand (sic! UNDERSTAND) the terrorists – US has done such things, etc”. I still shudder recalling this.

        Or take this quote

        “Saudi Hussein, resident of Riyadh, is proud of his work. He started posting comments supporting Israel four years ago.

        “I admit that I used to hate Israel because of the propaganda in the Arab and Muslim world,” he said, “And I even thought any dialogue with Israelis is treason. But as time passed, my opinions changed, and the Israelis I talk to helped me see the facts.” Hussein saves Israel’s face on Arab websites and on Facebook. More than once, he said, he has received hateful comments from extreme Islamists, as he calls them, who were enraged about his support of Israel’s existence and about negative comments he made regarding Hamas and Hezbollah.”

        Sound like me on Mondoweiss.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “Sound like me on Mondoweiss.”

          Yes, you sound like a liar and a tool as much as these other guys who are lying for israel to cover up its crimes.

        • eljay says:

          >> “The majority of the people writing pro-Israel talkbacks are not Jewish,” said Philip Fabian, a 32-year-old German from Berlin. “I never started to write pro-Israeli talkbacks consciously. I am a classic news-junkie, and the internet contributed a lot in developing my political conscience, starting in the post 9/11 world and the Intifada of the last decade. It made me realize the obvious shortcomings of mainstream media news outlets, especially when it comes to Israel.”

          There’s nothing in that post that absolves supremacist “Jewish State” of any of its past or on-going (war) crimes.

          >> Or another one “We got used to anti-Semitic remarks glorifying Hitler and denying the holocaust, but I’ll never forget seeing comment posters who justified the Fogel family massacre, who said that Palestinians experience that everyday. I was shocked, I couldn’t understand it.”

          Justifying a massacre is shameful. But there’s nothing in that post that absolves supremacist “Jewish State” of any of its past or on-going (war) crimes.

          >> I must say that I was shocked too on this page when I saw time and again people justifying Palestinian suicide bombings.

          Palestinian suicide bombings of civilians are acts of terrorism that should be condemned. I condemn them. But there’s nothing in that post that absolves supremacist “Jewish State” of any of its past or on-going (war) crimes.

          >> “Saudi Hussein, resident of Riyadh, is proud of his work. He started posting comments supporting Israel four years ago.
          >> “I admit that I used to hate Israel because of the propaganda in the Arab and Muslim world,” he said, “And I even thought any dialogue with Israelis is treason. But as time passed, my opinions changed, and the Israelis I talk to helped me see the facts.”

          Good for Saudi (can I call him Saddam?) Hussein. But there’s nothing in that post that absolves supremacist “Jewish State” of any of its past or on-going (war) crimes.

          >> It is with great hesitation that I write this comment.

          It’s a pity you didn’t hesitate more and not write the comment.

        • Donald says:

          Here’s more from comments from the Ynet article. These are from “Saudi Hussein” that fnlevit quoted–

          ” To those who call Israel a criminal I explain that Arabs in Israel live a much better life than Arabs in Egypt, Lebanon, Syria or Jordan, and that Israel is a democratic country that doesn’t discriminate. I emphasize that Israel must blockade Gaza to protect itself from terror organizations, and that food and medicine are always being sent to the Gaza Strip.”

          A truly pathetic individual. The rest of the article is either unintentionally funny, in a sick sort of way, or deeply depressing, depending on one’s mood. It’s like having the internet back in the days of Jim Crow. Imagine all the earnest white Southerners and their sympathizers elsewhere explaining how blacks in the South never had it so good.

          “Sound like me on Mondoweiss.” Can’t argue with that.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “Here’s more from comments from the Ynet article. These are from ‘Saudi Hussein’ that fnlevit quoted–”

          LMAO. They sound like a zionist versions of a Penthouse letter:

          Dear ynet:
          I am a young Arab guy and long-time reader of yours. I always thought those letters you publish about Israel were just made up fantasies. Then, one day, I was approached by a hot, sexy, Jewish State and, BOY were my doubts proven WRONG!!!…”

        • American says:

          @fnlevit

          Total Fail.
          Do you know why?
          Because the hasbara bots in that article are going on and on *about what anti Israel people are saying”.
          Pay attention, 99% of people here are talking about what *Israel is doing*.
          Do you get the difference?

          “What You Do Speaks So Loud That I Cannot Hear What You Say.”

        • tree says:

          fnlevit , do you have any comment on the article at hand, i.e. the exiling of a Palestinian family from their home? Or are you so obsessed with other”s comments that you can’t actually recognize real injustice when it rears its head in Israel/Palestine?

          Or was your comment just intended as another threadjack?

        • just says:

          Well put, tree.

          This sad and illegal theft and story of the dispossession of a family with REAL roots in Jerusalem should be spread far and wide. Meanwhile, how many Jewish Israelis are allowed to come and go as they please, and even allowed (encouraged) to settle on another family’s land and with their resources?????

          Puts to rest all of the lies that the hasbararists put out on a daily basis that the Zionist Israelis are “oh so good” to Christians, and that the Muslims are the “meanies”.

          (what a beautiful and gifted family…)

        • talknic says:

          @fnlevit the typical Hasbarrister tactic of attempting to change the topic doesn’t absolve Israel from it’s crimes under the Laws, UN Charter and conventions contained in the hundreds of UNSC resolutions Israel has ignored.

          Lying Hasbarristers are par for the course…

          “I must say that I was shocked too on this page when I saw time and again people justifying Palestinian suicide bombings. One even went as far as saying “it is like many Americans justifing 9/11 because they understand (sic! UNDERSTAND) the terrorists – US has done such things, etc”. I still shudder recalling this. “

          link to google.com.au leads us to YOUR comment only

        • fnlevit says:

          Here is the quote I was talking about. It was in response to my post with the list of the suicide bombings and awful numbers of civilian casualties

          American says:

          September 14, 2013 at 5:56 pm

          ”How could this happened? Well all you have to do is to look at the list of suicide bombings – see the list copied below and in awful details in”..fnlevit

          Read my lips……..Get Off Their Land.
          Are Israelis so retarded they cant add 2+2 — that ‘stealing land and resources + ‘occupation =’s bombings and retaliations?
          Who do you think you are to believe that other people must lay down and let you roll over them without striking back?
          Even in the USA after 911 there was a huge portion of the population that understood the US’s own actions and policies had provoked that attack on civilians, even as we condemned the attack, we understood the reasons behind it.

        • talknic says:

          @ fnlevit “Here is the quote I was talking about”

          A) it wasn’t a “quote”

          B) Here’s your false accusation.. “.. I saw time and again people justifying Palestinian suicide bombings. ”

          What is it you didn’t understand about ” even as we condemned the attack” and what is it you don’t understand about ‘condemning’ and what is it you don’t understand about the difference between ‘justifying’ and ‘understanding’?

        • Citizen says:

          @ fnlevit
          “But have you actually read the link you posted to ynet? Knowing the “habits” on this page I doubt.”

          You must be projecting your own habits. I’ve never posted a link on MW that I had not read before posting. I’ve been a commenter on MW since 2007. As I mentioned in introducing the link here, it’s from the Zionist press.

          What would you know about the “habits” on this page? You’ve only been commenting here for about a month; in comparison, as I said, I’ve been posting here for six years. In my experience those who habitually post here without reading the link they post to first–are ziobots, such as yourself, “Professor.”

        • Citizen says:

          @ fnlevit

          The article you quote from is the one I linked to; I did so to juxtipose all the blatant Zionist lies in it with Suheir Azzouni’s very personal and factual article. You assumed I did not read the linked content before I posted it because you are oblivious to all the major lies said content contains.

          BTW, the US 9/11 Commission’s original report concluded as to motive that the USA’s foreign policy bias regarding Israel was the number one motive for the 9/11 terrorist attack, with secondary motive being US support of domestically oppressive Arab regimes. In the revision given to the public the specific motive found was given a generic spin, paraphrasing, “Of course US foreign policy always involves some blowback.” Even in the public version of the report US bias favoring Israel is specifically mentioned in the body of the report (as distinguished from the concluding section solely related to motive) as a big factor.

      • seafoid says:

        The total insanity of zionism. US jews fancy the notion of israel as insurance policy , a bolthole in case TSHTF. And Palestinians born and bred may be denied the right to ever return. L’Oreal. Because I’m jewish .

    • Walid says:

      “I am afraid all Palestinians have worse to come with such a pathetic leadership who show no signs of having any political common sense…” (HarryLaw)

      The Palestinian leadership is a good part of Suheir’s problem and as you said, there’s worse to come. Regrettably, the Avaaz petition will not get Suheir’s family back in Jerusalem. It was Abbas that signed the Oslo deal 20 years ago that made it possible for Israel to increase the number of its settlers from 200,000 to 600,000. It was that deal that put the Jerusalem issue and the return of the refugees on hold for the Palestinians until the final status talks that never came. With the signing of Oslo, the US argued at the UN that past UN resolutions on Palestine such as the 194 about refugees were “obsolete and anachronistic”. Now the same team of failures are back negotiating to get Israel to allow them to open an airport on the WB or some other insignifant issue. Israel toyed with Abbas, Arafat and Company 20 years ago and it’s still doing it today. Last year, Hasan Afif al-Hasan had an interesting essay on the subject in the Palestine Chronicle: the second excerpt perhaps explains why Abbas made the sort of constitutional change last year that was discussed by Hostage:

      Oslo gave Israel the power to divide the Palestinians into groups with different gradation of legal statuses and different security regimes depending on where they live. There are the Israeli Palestinians, Jerusalem Palestinians, Palestinians who reside between the apartheid wall and the green line, Palestinians in zone A or B or C, Gaza Strip Palestinians, the 1948 refugees, the 1967 refugees and the Palestinians who came with Arafat from Tunisia.

      … The Israeli architect of Oslo, Yossi Beilin, wrote a letter dated April 4, 2012 to his Palestinian Oslo partner, Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen), the president of the Palestinian Authority. The letter stated that the Oslo agreements were based on “the Beilin-Abu Mazen talks” and described the agreements as “a process that promised to lead to a partition of the land in a few years [not the withdrawal from the occupied lands] ……and a fitting symbolic and economic resolution to the problem of the Palestinian refugees [not according to the UN resolution 194].” Beilin reminded Abbas that the PA was an interim phase of the agreement and “One simply cannot continue with an interim agreement for more than 20 years.” Beilin’s letter suggests that if the PA is not dissolved after two decades of signing the Oslo agreements the territory administered by the PA will become the de facto Palestinian state.

      link to 72.29.89.109

    • Ruth Tenne says:

      I wholly agree with Harry law’s comments asking : ” how apolitical can Abbas be when he puts forward the notion that a group of prisoner releases [important as that is to the prisoners and their families] can be more important than securing their National status at the UN by applying to join all the Agencies and formally applying to join the ICC and set in train all the war crimes charges piling up everyday, these releases prove that Abbas can be easily be bought off “.

      This argument has been echoed by Amnesty International which has recently issued a petition asking members of civil society to put pressure on President Abbas to sign the Rome Statue which would let Palestine to accede to the International Criminal Court :
      “We urge you to ensure that Palestine accedes to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in 2013, thereby sending a strong message that crimes against civilians will never be committed with impunity on Palestinian territory, and that Palestinian leaders will not forget human rights and justice while pursuing negotiations.
      Acceding to the Rome Statute would mean that in the future, the ICC could investigate and prosecute crimes, if the national authorities are unable or unwilling to do so.
      In 2009, the Palestinian government declared that it recognized the jurisdiction of the ICC. Now is the time to make justice real by signing the Rome Statue”. link to amnesty.org

      Indeed in my article Palestinian Statehood: Myth or Reality? which was published by Middle East Online shortly before Abbas made his appeal for statehood to the UN General Assembly I argued that “an official recognition of a Palestinian state by the UN member-states will grant the new state an access to international organisations such as the IMF, the World Bank, the World Health Organisation, UNESCO, ICC, ICJ, UNICEF and dozens of other bodies associated to the UN. It could also facilitate the acceptance of the new state to the OECD, (of which Israel has been recently recognised as a full member), and to the EU (with which Israel enjoys close political, economic, and trade links). But above all it would place Palestine on the global map and give the State a direct voice and political clout in the UN assembly and associated international bodies. From this vantage point the Palestinian state will be able to negotiate the imperatives of the “right of return” by having direct access to international courts and UN bodies” link to middle-east-online.com

      Perhaps the tragic tale of Stateless and in Exile would have a different ending if President Abbas and his Government chose to pursue their case against Israel’s violation of international law though international courts rather than trying to re-generate the stalled negotiation with the Israeli government

      • Walid says:

        Ruth, Abbas agreed to keep away from both the UN and the ICC for the 9 months scheduled period of the current negotiations. That was the concession Abbas made to get Israel back to the table. The one that Israel threw in was the release of about 125 prisoners and nothing else. The Palestinian people that don’t have a say in any of these negotiations would have wanted in the least to have Israel accept to stop settlements expansions during the same period but it refused and Abbas folded.

        The last time there was a similarly dubious arrangement was when the UNHRC was scheduled to review Israel’s Cast Lead war crimes with all indications showing that Israel was going to get clobbered, and Abbas pulled the plug on the file and the story fizzed out. It happened at about the time Israel was considering granting licensing rights for a Palestinian cell phone operator.

    • Ruth Tenne says:

      I wholly agree with Harry law’s comments asking : ” how apolitical can Abbas be when he puts forward the notion that a group of prisoner releases [important as that is to the prisoners and their families] can be more important than securing their National status at the UN by applying to join all the Agencies and formally applying to join the ICC and set in train all the war crimes charges piling up everyday, these releases prove that Abbas can be easily be bought off “.

      This argument has been echoed by Amnesty International which has recently issued a petition asking members of civil society to put pressure on President Abbas to sign the Rome Statue which would let Palestine to accede to the International Criminal Court :
      “We urge you to ensure that Palestine accedes to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in 2013, thereby sending a strong message that crimes against civilians will never be committed with impunity on Palestinian territory, and that Palestinian leaders will not forget human rights and justice while pursuing negotiations.
      Acceding to the Rome Statute would mean that in the future, the ICC could investigate and prosecute crimes, if the national authorities are unable or unwilling to do so.
      In 2009, the Palestinian government declared that it recognized the jurisdiction of the ICC. Now is the time to make justice real by signing the Rome Statue”. link to amnesty.org

      Indeed in my article Palestinian Statehood: Myth or Reality? which was published by Middle East Online shortly before Abbas made his appeal for statehood to the UN General Assembly I argued that “an official recognition of a Palestinian state by the UN member-states will grant the new state an access to international organisations such as the IMF, the World Bank, the World Health Organisation, UNESCO, ICC, ICJ, UNICEF and dozens of other bodies associated to the UN. It could also facilitate the acceptance of the new state to the OECD, (of which Israel has been recently recognised as a full member), and to the EU (with which Israel enjoys close political, economic, and trade links). But above all it would place Palestine on the global map and give the State a direct voice and political clout in the UN assembly and associated international bodies. From this vantage point the Palestinian state will be able to negotiate the imperatives of the “right of return” by having direct access to international courts and UN bodies” link to middle-east-online.com

      Perhaps the tragic tale of Stateless and in Exile would have a different ending if President Abbas and his Government chose to pursue their case against Israel’s violation of international law though international courts rather than trying to re-generate the stalled negotiation with the Israeli government.

  2. eljay says:

    >> But Israel’s willingness to talk peace while at the same time exiling vulnerable Palestinians speaks volumes about Prime Minister Netanyahu’s intention to secure as much land with as few Palestinians as possible.

    And the eagerness of Zio-supremacists to defend supremacist “Jewish State” and its unjust and immoral actions speaks volumes about their hatefulness and immorality.

  3. Empiricon says:

    What a repulsive racist state. I would expect the Israeli Ministry of Interior documents were produced by a chain of actions by bureacrats, most if not all of whom would vociferously deny their racism. A textbook “banality-of-evil” action.

    And please don’t ascribe a level of blame to the PA. They’re powerless in this, like co-opted prison trustees who get extra privileges if they play the warden’s game. And their crime that put them in prison was – as with all Palestinians – being born in Palestine and not being Jewish.

  4. mondonut says:

    Israel, however, allows such certainty only for Jewish residents of Jerusalem and not for the Palestinians

    Not true. All Israeli citizens have the same certainty regardless of religion or background.

    • Empiricon says:

      I see what you did there. A clumsy lie — changing the subject from “residents of Jerusalem” to “Israeli citizens.” The Mahshi family aren’t Israeli citizens, but as the article points out, under “international law… Palestinian East Jerusalemites are not merely ‘residents’ but are also ‘protected persons’ who are entitled to continue living in their country.” But since when has international law mattered to Israelis.

      Second, Arab citizens of Jerusalem are denied citizenship part of the lie is the statement itself, that “All Israeli citizens have the same certainty regardless of religion or background.” See the treatment of the Bedouin as just one example.

      • mondonut says:

        Empiricon says: I see what you did there.
        ======================================
        No you didn’t. I corrected the racially based falsehood. And Arab residents of Jerusalem have access to Israeli citizenship.

        • “have access”, what a farce. you know the israeli government is stripping people of their citizenship all the time.
          Stateless and in Exile: One Palestinian family’s story of being expelled from their Jerusalem home

          link to mondoweiss.net

        • mondonut says:

          Annie Robbins: the israeli government is stripping people of their citizenship all the time.
          —————-
          That’s BS. Residency and citizenship are not the same thing.

        • talknic says:

          mondonut “I corrected the racially based falsehood.”

          Neither Jews or Palestinians are a race

          ” And Arab residents of Jerusalem have access to Israeli citizenship.”

          1) Israeli civil law has no jurisdiction in “territories occupied” 2) Neither Jewish or non-Jewish Israeli civilians have a right to be in “territories occupied” 3) Read UNSC res 476, just one of EIGHT reminders to Israel of the Laws it is breaking. 4) Stop LYING. It’s against the basic tenets of Judaism. That you’re willing to lie shows us you have no respect for Jewish values. That you do it in defense of illegal activities committed by the Jewish state is really quite bizarre.

        • mondonut says:

          talknic says:
          Neither Jews or Palestinians are a race
          Good for you. From now on I fully expect you to argue against the all too common characterization of anti-Islam as “racist”. But somehow I doubt it.

          Israeli civil law has no jurisdiction in “territories occupied”
          If this is meant to dispute that Arab residents of Jerusalem have access to Israeli citizenship then you are quite wrong. Israel can offer citizenship to whomever they please, regardless of where they live.

          Neither Jewish or non-Jewish Israeli civilians have a right to be in “territories occupied”
          Off topic and entirely wrong. One small example, Arab residents of Jerusalem who become Israeli citizens have no obligation to move.

          Read UNSC res 476, just one of EIGHT reminders to Israel of the Laws it is breaking. I know this is one of your favorites, but again entirely off topic.

          Stop LYING. Sorry Charlie, there are no lies here. If you do not like that I referred to it as racially based then fair enough – I will withdraw it. But that does not change the fact that a central claim of the essay is false. A statement which you made no effort to dispute.

          And BTW, unless you plan to tell me that you are Jewish, spare me your “concern” for Jewish values.

        • talknic says:

          mondonut “Good for you. From now on I fully expect you to argue against the all too common characterization of anti-Islam as “racist”. But somehow I doubt it.”

          Typical Hasbarrister. Point elsewhere. What I do and/or what other folk do doesn’t change the fact that neither Jews or Palestinians are a race. Your statement was wrong.

          “Israel can offer citizenship to whomever they please, regardless of where they live”

          Wrong. Israeli civil Law has no jurisdiction in non-Israeli territories. International Law does. Read UNSC res 476

          //Neither Jewish or non-Jewish Israeli civilians have a right to be in “territories occupied”//

          “Off topic and entirely wrong”

          The article is about an event in Jerusalem, not Israel. Jerusalem is in “territories occupied”. It has never been legally annexed to Israel, Israeli civilians have no right to be in “territories occupied”

          “One small example, Arab residents of Jerusalem who become Israeli citizens have no obligation to move”

          Israeli law has no jurisdiction in non-Israeli territories. International Law does. By becoming Israeli citizens Arab residents in non-Israeli territory automatically preclude themselves from having any right to be in territory under the occupation of Israel. Furthermore they’d lose any right to return to non-Israeli territories in the event that Israel is eventually rightfully evicted from non-Israeli territories.

          // UNSC res 476, just one of EIGHT reminders to Israel of the Laws it is breaking//

          “I know this is one of your favorites, but again entirely off topic.”

          UNSC Res 476 is entirely on topic as to why one is an illegal settler.

          Sorry Charlie, there are no lies here.”

          Your whole premise is based on a series of lies.

          ” But that does not change the fact that a central claim of the essay is false. A statement which you made no effort to dispute”

          Your opinion is not fact. Why would I dispute something that International Law, the UN Charter and numerous UNSC resolutions shows to be correct

          ” unless you plan to tell me that you are Jewish, spare me your “concern” for Jewish values”

          Profiles are available link to mondoweiss.net You don’t seem to read much, check on any of your alleged facts or have the ability to think outside the lies you’ve been fed in order to justify the crimes of the Jewish state

      • Woody Tanaka says:

        “A clumsy lie”

        Of course it’s a lie.

  5. NickJOCW says:

    It must be Israeli policy to be deliberately Kafkaesque, to create confusion and uncertainty until normal human mental processes become completely passive.

    Against this family’s story we have an Israeli court standing up for African immigrants and overturning a law that allowed them to be held for three years:

    …But Chief Justice Asher Grunis, along with eight other justices on the panel, ruled that the law conflicted with Israel’s legal guarantees of basic “human dignity and freedom”, calling it “illegitimate constitutionally”.

    link to france24.com

  6. What has been done to your family is a cruel injustice. I ask myself what my reaction would be if I returned to Newark International with my family after doing 12 years of humanitarian work for the UN, and was told, “Oh, sorry, you are no longer U.S. citizens. Get back on that plane.” (I was born in France, so I would have been eligible to take French citizenship.)

    However, I think that your article should address the decision you made (no doubt justifiable), not to take Israeli citizenship, for which you are eligible.

    When the prominent families of Jerusalem abandon the road of the two-state solution and demand equal rights within Israeli society, as a million and a half Arabs already are doing, there will be a dramatic shift in the political landscape of the conflict. That will signal the death of the two-state strategy and the birth of a one-state solution.

  7. mondonut says:

    Stateless and in Exile: One Palestinian family’s story of being expelled from their Jerusalem home

    How does being a French national (citizen of France) qualify as “Stateless and in Exile”??

    • eljay says:

      >> How does being a French national (citizen of France) qualify as “Stateless and in Exile”??

      How does being a French or Italian or German or Australian or American or Canadian or Russian national qualify a person of the Jewish faith as an “exile”?

      • mondonut says:

        eljay says: … qualify a person of the Jewish faith as an “exile”?=======================================
        Do they claim to be stateless and without passport? A reasonable question as the central premise of this essay is demonstrably false.

        • eljay says:

          >> Do they claim to be stateless and without passport? A reasonable question as the central premise of this essay is demonstrably false.

          No, really, if the premise of this essay is demonstrably false, then explain how a Jewish person who is a French or Italian or German or Australian or American or Canadian or Russian national – that is to say, he is neither stateless nor without passport – qualifies as an “exile”.

        • mondonut says:

          eljay says: explain how a Jewish person who is a French or Italian or German or Australian or American or Canadian or Russian national – that is to say, he is neither stateless nor without passport – qualifies as an “exile”.
          ===========================================
          Try to stay on topic, your premise has nothing to do with anything. But as you chosen not to dispute I presume you would concede the essay is built on falsehoods.

        • eljay says:

          >> Try to stay on topic, your premise has nothing to do with anything. But as you chosen not to dispute I presume you would concede the essay is built on falsehoods.

          C’mon, mondonuteee, this is your time to shine! You are claiming that this article is misleading because a person who is a citizen of a country cannot be stateless or an exile.

          Yet Zio-supremacists like you frequently claim that the “Jewish people” are in “exile”.

          So, please, explain to me – in clear language – how a French or Italian or German or Australian or American or Canadian or Russian national – that is to say, a person who is neither stateless nor without passport – who happens to be Jewish qualifies as an “exile”.

    • talknic says:

      mondonut “How does being a French national (citizen of France) “

      What is it you didn’t understand about ” I would have been eligible “

      That ol’ ziocaine sure does rot the brain

      • mondonut says:

        talknic says:What is it you didn’t understand about ” I would have been eligible “ That ol’ ziocaine sure does rot the brain
        ===========================================
        Where in the essay by Suheir Azzouni do you find that statement?

        • talknic says:

          @mondonut “Where in the essay by Suheir Azzouni do you find that statement?”

          My error.. Your post came after this link to mondoweiss.net

          Never the less //”Should the MoI insist on its decision, two of our three children would end up stateless and passport-less”// Only the husband has been granted French nationality

  8. kma says:

    it’s called ethnic cleansing. the US is 100% responsible for it.

  9. Dear Suheir Azzouni, Marhaba!

    I read your story and learn about you and your family. Honestly, I want you and your lovely family to be my neighbors in our city, Jerusalem.

    I am not a lawyer and have minimal knowledge about the Israeli court system and how it works. But reading your story I had in my mind several things:

    No governmental body can expel people only after it asks permission from the Israeli court. The later gives chance to the deportee to defend him self.

    In case a governmental body deny your rights, you can appeal to the Bagatz in order to protect your rights. Your attorney shouldn’t “convince the MoI to reverse its decision on revoking our “permanent resident” status in East Jerusalem” but to appeal to the Bagatz and ask protection.

    There are many NGO in Israel that voluntary help people in such cases. I think you should try and ask them for help in your case. I am sure your attorney knows several of them.

    Wish you success.

    • Woody Tanaka says:

      “No governmental body can expel people only after it asks permission from the Israeli court. The later gives chance to the deportee to defend him self. ”

      LMAO. Yeah, like a zio court is going to stand in the way of the zio conspiracy to steal the Palestinians’ land.

      • @Woody: In Israel, as a democratic state, there is a complete separation between the three authorities: The legislature authority, the executive authority and the judiciary authority. The Israeli court cancelled many governmental decisions. Several days ago, the Israeli court cancelled the Israeli decision to keep illegal immigrants under arrest and ordered to release them all. And yes, any deportee has the right to defend him self in the court, even Palestinian.

  10. Shmuel says:

    any deportee has the right to defend him self in the court, even Palestinian.

    The “revocation of residency” of East Jerusalem Palestinians after periods of absence is entirely legal according to Israeli law, and is in fact sanctioned by a Supreme Court ruling from 1988.

    Despite repeated appeals on behalf of East Jerusalem Palestinians whose residency has been revoked, the High Court of Justice has been virtually useless. Are you really that naive (תמים), or simply pretending (מיתמם)?

    It is a mockery to say that Palestinians can always “appeal to the HCJ”. There is no justice for Palestinians in the OPT. It is also a mockery to tell them that they can always apply for citizenship of the occupying state if they want to continue to live in the city where they were born and where their families have lived for generations.

    B’tselem:

    Since 1967, more than 14,000 Palestinians in East Jerusalem have had their status as permanent residents of Israel revoked by the state. The revocation is part of Israel’s overall policy in East Jerusalem, which is geared towards the political goal of maintaining a “demographic balance” in Jerusalem, i.e., of ensuring a 70% Jewish majority in the city. To that end, ongoing efforts are made to expand the Jewish population in the city and reduce its Palestinian population.

    Ever since Israel annexed East Jerusalem and its environs in 1967, it has applied a discriminatory and restrictive policy there. This includes an absence of proper planning for Palestinian neighborhoods, which was attended by prohibitions on construction; the refusal of applications for family unification with Palestinians from other parts of the West Bank; and the denial of many basic services to the community. Over the years, the resulting harsh reality caused tens of thousands of Palestinian residents of East Jerusalem to leave the city. Many of them relocated to nearby suburbs in the West Bank or to Jordan. Israel’s Ministry of the Interior did not warn that by leaving, these people were risking loss of their status as permanent residents of Israel. Many only learned after the fact that their right to return to their homes in East Jerusalem had been revoked.

    In 1988, Israel’s Supreme Court ruled that the status of East Jerusalem Palestinians is that of holders of permanent residency license under the “Entry into Israel Law”. This status is accorded to foreign nationals who move to Israel of their own free will and wish to reside there. By according East Jerusalem Palestinians this status, Israel treats them as immigrants without the basic right to live in their homes. Rather, they are endowed with this privilege by the state – a privilege that can be revoked at any time. This attitude does not take into account that many of these Palestinians were born in Jerusalem, have lived there for years, and have no home or legal status elsewhere. Unlike foreign nationals who choose to live in Israel, it is the State of Israel that entered East Jerusalem and applied its law there. In contrast, Jewish residents of Jerusalem, who are virtually all Israeli citizens, are in no danger of having their civil status changed, regardless of where they live in the West Bank or within Israel.

    • Shmuel says:

      More on the systematic policy of ethnic cleansing in Jerusalem and its semblance of legality: link to jfjfp.com

      • eljay says:

        >> More on the systematic policy of ethnic cleansing in Jerusalem and its semblance of legality: link to jfjfp.com

        Oh, Mister Shmuel! I’m just an uncomplicated tomato vendor – I don’t know about systematics and semblancing. My country is clean and joyful place, and I just want everyone here to live in peace!

        Everyone who buy my tomatoes tell me the same things: Let us keep this country clean and joyful, and let us all live in peace!

        Happy and blessed Festivus to you, sir! :-)