Monthly Archives:
April 2014

Very far from paradise: Palestinians from Fureidis protest ‘price tag’ attack

Ira Glunts on

If you want to see apartheid in Israel, go to Fureidis. This rural northern coastal town of 12,000 Palestinian citizens of Israel with not a single Jew, is surrounded by many all-Jewish settlements. Yesterday (April 29), Fureidis was the scene of a so-called “price tag attack,” by Jewish vandals. During the attack, dozens of vehicles had their tires slashed and graffiti were spray painted on numerous walls, including those of a mosque.

Defending Apartheid – From 1968 to the present

Peter Brannan on

The Daily newspaper at the University of Washington recently ran an editorial titled “Why Israel?: The problems with ASUW Resolution 20-39.” Author Nathan Taft uses a familiar “ends justify the means” argument has long been used to justify colonial and imperial projects, especially those of western powers. In fact, on April 4th, 1968 the Daily published an opinion piece co-authored by journalists Richard Sanders and Larry Parr with strikingly similar arguments attempting to justify South African Apartheid.

J Street woos the lobby as Israel considers annexing the West Bank

Marc H. Ellis on

This week there will be a vote on whether or not to admit J Street to the Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations. Meanwhile, political leaders in Israel are calling for unilateral measures against the Palestinians, including the possibility of annexing large parts of the West Bank.

3 weeks in Beirut, 5 days in jail and a 90 day travel ban: The saga of journalist Majd Kayyal

Alex Kane and Allison Deger on

“Beirut is the most important place for us as a Palestinian, more than Jerusalem,” Majd Kayyal says following his release from Israeli prison on April 17th for traveling to Lebanon to attend a writers’ conference. But he’s still under the thumb of the Israel’s security service, subject to four years imprisonment for visiting an “enemy” state. Alex Kane and Allison Deger interviewed Kayyal in his native Haifa, the first extended conversation with a foreign media outlet.

Boycott on the horizon if Starbucks buys stake in SodaStream

Annie Robbins on

SodaStream stocks have been jumping around this week after a Globes report surfaced out of Israel that claimed “sources” alleged corporate coffee giant Starbucks, “arguably the first international symbol of globalized consumerism”, might buy a 10% stake in the home seltzer product located in an illegal Israeli settlement inside the occupied Palestinian territories.

Guess who else fears that Israel will be labeled an Apartheid state?

Arnon Degani on

With all the ruckus around Kerry’s Apartheid gaffe and his pathetic apology, one would think that his statement attests to radical anti-Semitism or at least an anti-Zionist sentiment. As a matter of fact, the logic and vocabulary of Kerry’s statement is shared by no other than Naftali Bennett – head of Israel’s religious and far right-winged party.

Intra-Palestinian Reconciliation: Time for accountability

Alaa Tartir on

The al-Shati’ refugee camp reconciliation agreement signed in Gaza on April 23, 2014 between Fatah and Hamas is the most recent chapter in the intra-Palestinian reconciliation saga. While it is promising news for the Palestinian people, the obvious challenge is whether it will be implemented. It seems that both parties are underestimating the extent of the damage that such a long conflict has caused to the Palestinian political and social landscape. The division has become entrenched in every single aspect of Palestinian life.

Apartheid label will stick

Ahmed Moor on

Why were talking points distributed so rapidly among the Zionist strongholds in the U.S.? Because they fear the real danger of John Kerry’s use of the word “apartheid” — it’s going to stick

Welcome to the post-peace process era: A review of Ali Abunimah’s ‘The Battle for Justice in Palestine’

Josh Ruebner on

As Secretary of State John Kerry’s April 29 deadline looms for Israeli-Palestinian negotiations, it is clear the peace process is at a dead end. Ali Abunimah’s new book, The Battle for Justice in Palestine, has arrived at the most opportune time, offering readers compelling deconstructions of Israel’s claims to a “right” to maintain itself as an exclusivist, discriminatory state, in-depth reportage of the Israel lobby’s desperate, and often risible, efforts to prop up the country’s eroding image, and a reframing of the debate away from Palestinian sovereignty toward self-determination as the post-“peace process” paradigm to be embraced.

Jewish Voice for “Real” Peace

Marc H. Ellis on

Whether Jewishness can exist for long without justice at the center is uncertain. Whether Jewishness without justice can exist without devolving into apathy and cynicism is unknown. Does JVP – do Jews of Conscience – have another Jewish gear that can get us out of this dark place?

Kerry says that Israel could wind up being ‘an apartheid state’

Philip Weiss on

Speaking to world leaders, John Kerry said if there isn’t a two-state solution soon Israel could become “an apartheid state.” How long can world leaders continue to say that Israel risks an apartheid future when a system of two laws for two different ethnicities, with one on top, has been in place for 47 years of occupation?

Over 100 Palestinian prisoners begin hunger strike to protest Israeli administrative detention

Kate on

Ma‘an: Four Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jail began a hunger strike on Wednesday in protest against their detention without trial, a Palestinian prisoner advocacy group said on Sunday. News of the four hunger strikers follows reports that over 100 Palestinian prisoners began a mass, open-ended hunger strike in a number of Israeli jails on Thursday in protest against being held without charge or trial under a policy Israel calls “administrative detention.”

NBA owner Sterling reportedly sought to justify his racism by citing Israeli racism

Philip Weiss on

You surely know about the Donald Sterling story: even as his basketball team competes in the playoffs, the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers is the focus of national outrage for grotesquely racist statements he is said to have made to his former girlfriend. In one excerpt Sterling tries to justify his racism citing Israel: “It’s the world! You go to Israel, the blacks are just treated like dogs.”

From Sheffield to Palestine, by bicycle

Malaka Mohammed on

Sara Moon first went to Israel on a socialist Zionist trip and fell so in love with the place she almost didn’t go home to England. Then she went to university and met a Palestinian refugee and began to understand that her own right to return was at the cost of people who had been forced off the land. As Moon sets out on bicycle for Palestine, her friend Malaka Mohammed tells her story

Apartheid and hafrada, and the psychology of separation

K.N.I. Bell on

In South Africa, apartheid’s fall was eased by the fact that blacks and whites shared love of the land and had social connections stemming from whites’ dependence on blacks for domestic labors

Walter Benjamin’s theory of fascism

Marc H. Ellis on

A new biography of the philosopher Walter Benjamin, who died in 1940 escaping the Nazis, says that in 1929 he became a political writer, battening on to the radical right in Germany, which was given to “war mysticism,” contempt for international law, and nationalist idealism. Much of Benjamin’s critique of these fascists can be found in Max Blumenthal’s critique of the radical right in Israel, in his book “Goliath.”

Our eviction action at NYU created more dialogue than ever before

Kumars Salehi on

Countering the smears in the media, Kumars Salehi writes: Students for Justice in Palestine at NYU has many Jewish members, all of whom supported the mock-eviction-notice action. They reject the premise that criticism of Israeli policy is anti-Jewish.