White House says US can’t stop ‘tsunami’ of boycott and isolation if Israel won’t end ‘occupations’

Israel/Palestine
on 90 Comments
Philip Gordon, from Asbarez

Philip Gordon, from Asbarez

The press is expressing marvel/shock at a speech by Philip Gordon, a White House adviser, saying that Israel’s ongoing “occupations” and settlements are driving its international isolation and the boycott movement.

“Philip Gordon blasted Israel,” says PowerLine.  “[H]is oration read as though Gordon is a recent arrival from Planet Zog who has mistaken the Middle East for Finland,” says David Horovitz. His paper captures the story:

“Top Obama official blasts Israel for denying Palestinians sovereignty, security, dignity.

“‘How can Israel have peace if it’s unwilling to delineate a border, end the occupation?’ asks White House Mideast chief, Phillip Gordon, in blistering Tel Aviv speech”

Talk about the changing narrative.

Gordon’s full speech is up at the White House site. Gordon is White House Coordinator for the Middle East, North Africa, and the Gulf Region, and he spoke at Haaretz’s international conference. Here are key excerpts, including the inability of the U.S. to defend Israel against international “pressure… building” because of Israel’s failure to define its borders and end the “occupations.” The plural is Gordon’s.

It is true that the last round of negotiations did not succeed and we find ourselves in an uneasy pause.  We have not hidden our disappointment that the parties could not bridge the gaps that divide them.  At the same time, we have no interest in a blame game.  The unfortunate reality is that neither side prepared their publics or proved ready to make the difficult decisions required for an agreement.  Trust has been eroded on both sides.  Until it is restored, neither side will likely be ready to take risks for peace – even as they live with the dire consequences that result from its absence.

We understand that.  But the United States did not invest so much effort into brokering peace talks because we believed it would be easy, or even that the gaps between the parties are narrow.  It isn’t, and they’re not.  The reason we have pursued this relentlessly – the reason Secretary Kerry devoted so much of his precious time and unparalleled energy to the pursuit of peace — is because of our firm belief that as hard as it is, peace is the only path to security for Israel and self-determination and dignity for the Palestinians.  We have pursued it because all the alternatives, for Israel and the Palestinians, are worse.  We have pursued it because time is on nobody’s side….

Peace will also mean finally having Israel be broadly and universally accepted among the community of nations, reversing the growing international frustration about this conflict and undercutting the risk of Israel’s isolation.

Israel confronts an undeniable reality:  it cannot maintain military control of another people indefinitely.  Doing so is not only wrong but a recipe for resentment and recurring instability.  It will embolden extremists on both sides, tear at Israel’s democratic fabric, and feed mutual dehumanization.

As the President has said, neither occupation nor expulsion is the answer.  Just as Israelis built a state in their homeland, Palestinians have a right to be a sovereign, free, and secure people in their own land.  Or to quote one of your own leaders, Ariel Sharon: “It is impossible to have a Jewish democratic state, at the same time to control all of Eretz Israel.  If we insist on fulfilling the dream in its entirety, we are liable to lose it all.”

Reaching a peace agreement with the Palestinians would help turn the tide of international sentiment and sideline violent extremists, further bolstering Israel’s security.  We know all too well the troubles that can arise for Israel internationally when there is no movement on the political track, especially when settlement activity continues to make the potential peace map more difficult and to undermine international support for Israel.  On this, I should also be clear of the United States’ longstanding position: we consider settlements illegitimate and an impediment to progress on peace negotiations. Settlement announcements would be a counter-productive reaction to the kidnapping and murder of the three Israeli teenagers.

Ehud Barak once warned of a ‘tsunami’ [of international sanctions] in New York, and as we speak here today, we’re seeing signs already that pressure may be building.  Progress on peace holds international challenges at bay.  But it also opens up new possibilities for Israeli participation across the international system, particularly with Israel’s Arab neighbors, who face common threats.

In contrast, if we fail to come back to peace talks, renewed efforts to isolate Israel internationally and legitimize Palestinian statehood unilaterally are all but certain.  The United States will do all it can to fight boycotts and other delegitimization efforts.  But in many of these realms, particularly outside the Security Council, our ability to contain the damage is limited, and becoming more and more challenging.  This is what American friends of Israel mean when they express concerns about the potential for Israeli isolation if peace talks do not succeed.  Let me be absolutely clear that these are not threats.  The United States will always have Israel’s back.  That’s why we fight for it every day at the United Nations, where we have worked diligently to ensure Israel is treated fairly and on par with all other states.

But as Israel’s greatest defender and closest friend we owe it to you to ask fundamental questions—which in fact many Israelis are asking themselves: how will Israel remain democratic and Jewish if it attempts to govern the millions of Palestinian Arabs who live in the West Bank?  How will it have peace if it is unwilling to delineate a border, end the occupations and allow for Palestinian sovereignty, security, and dignity?  How will we prevent other states from isolating Israel or supporting Palestinian efforts in international bodies if Israel is not seen as committed to peace?

We also believe that the growing turbulence in the wider Middle East is not a reason to downgrade the priority of peace with the Palestinians, but quite the opposite.  Not only would a viable peace agreement boost Israel’s standing internationally, it would provide the platform for Israel to be an integral and active part of a regional strategy and solution.  It would boost trade and expand business and investment opportunities with Arab states…

Given where we find ourselves, it is understandable that some on both sides are looking at other options, some of which were presented at this conference today.  But most of these are stop-gaps at best.  At worst, they are a recipe for continued or increased conflict or isolation.  A “one-state solution” is implausible, and would effectively mean an end to the Jewish and democratic nature of your state.  Unilateral annexation of West Bank territories populated by Israelis is wrong, illegal, and a recipe for Israel’s isolation.  The United States could never support it, and I doubt any of Israel’s other friends would.  Other unilateral or interim measures may appear tempting alternatives, but they do not solve Israel’s and the Palestinians’ long-term problems.  In fact, they could deepen them.  The fact remains, only a negotiated solution – two states for two peoples – can give Israelis and Palestinians the futures they need and deserve.

Israel should not take for granted the opportunity to negotiate that peace with President Abbas, who has shown time and again that he is committed to nonviolence and coexistence with Israel.

90 Responses

  1. Sumud
    July 9, 2014, 1:40 pm

    They’re laying the groundwork for dumping Israel. It’s inevitable – won’t happen during Obama’s presidency, but it will happen.

    • seafoid
      July 9, 2014, 1:45 pm

      It is inevitable. Israel made a deal with the devil and it is failing and flailing now.

      link to 972mag.com

      “The major problem right now is that an inherently immoral order represents the most desirable political option for Israelis. All the left’s effort to demonstrate the problems the occupation creates – like the burden on the state budget – won’t help, since political choices are made based on alternative options, and right now the alternatives are more expensive, more painful, and more dangerous.”

      “The essence of dramatic tragedy is not unhappiness. It resides in the solemnity of the remorseless working of things.” Alfred North Whitehead

      • MRW
        July 9, 2014, 8:48 pm

        The essence of dramatic tragedy is self-realization and awareness of the role and decision you played in what happened to you.

        (The essence of dramatic melodrama is always blaming the Other, while you remain whole and blameless. Also how comedy works, chiefly.)

      • Sumud
        July 10, 2014, 9:38 am

        Wonderful quote about dramatic tragedy seafoid, so applicable to Israel.

        I oscillate between feeling sorry for them (all the propagandised ziobots) and then something quite opposite, when you witness the daily vicious cruelty of the occupation and the sheer terror Israel inflicts on innocent people at times such as these.

        And then you just end of feeling a little philosophical, since it’s all about to go tits up anyway – that is punishment enough.

    • CloakAndDagger
      July 9, 2014, 2:02 pm

      @ Sumud

      It has clearly struck a nerve (maybe more than one) in the pro-Israel camp. The amount of vitriol evident in the Times Of Israel comments section and elsewhere is quite remarkable. Phillip Gordon is persona non grata in zionist circles now. I hope that his tenure is not short-lived.

      A word of caution to all who may prematurely rejoice – whenever we have seen a major shift of negative opinion towards Israel in the past, it has often been followed by some catastrophic event. I recall the growing anti-Israel sentiments in the months prior to 9/11 – all of which disappeared when those planes struck the towers. MW policy prevents me from discussing why I believe that was an Israeli false-flag event, but readers can ask themselves ‘cui bono’ and a google search will provide them the necessary supportive information.

      So, stand by for a barrage of false flag events to unfold in the days ahead. Things are going to get a lot worse before they get any better, but there is reason for hope.

      Oh, and one more observation: Mr. Gordon did not say what he did without the president’s blessings, FWIW.

      • Pixel
        July 10, 2014, 9:09 am

        +1

      • Talkback
        July 10, 2014, 2:28 pm

        MW policy prevents me from discussing why I believe that was an Israeli false-flag event, …

        You are only allowed to accuse Gentiles on MW. Otherwise it’s hate speech.

    • Kay24
      July 9, 2014, 2:10 pm

      I think the fact that they hate Obama shows he is doing the right thing, and that these sudden statements, leaks about that “poof” and Israel was to be blamed for the derailment of peace talks, and now the fact that the US is giving Israel some kind of warning, and backlash would be BDS, shows Obama is indeed at least laying the groundwork for cutting this cancer off, and this parasitic nation will be isolated with no allies, unless you count Micronesia of course.
      Things do not look good for the apartheid nation, and BDS seems the only way to go.

    • W.Jones
      July 9, 2014, 2:28 pm

      He is basically making a realistic speech. If you want to succeed and be healthy instead of fail, you have to make peace. It’s like a coach or counselor. It’s not antagonistic, but telling people to lose addictions to conquest, etc.

      Thus he says “Let me be absolutely clear that these are not threats. The United States will always have Israel’s back.”

      Do you think Gordon and Martin Indyk are going to impose sanctions? No. But they are expressing disagreement in a friendly, realistic way.

      • Philip Weiss
        July 9, 2014, 2:54 pm

        Paving way for US not to veto settlements resolution in UNSC

      • just
        July 9, 2014, 3:22 pm

        I hope and pray for that moment of justice.

      • seafoid
        July 9, 2014, 3:23 pm

        Even if they don’t veto settlement resolutions who is going to send the settlers home? It is far too late for the US to start acting responsibly.

      • Mooser
        July 9, 2014, 3:57 pm

        “Even if they don’t veto settlement resolutions who is going to send the settlers home?”

        But Gee, they are home, aren’t they? Where else do they have to go? How can we dispossess our fellow Jews! And after all they’ve done for us?

      • marc b.
        July 9, 2014, 4:38 pm

        who is going to send the settlers home?

        By ‘home’, I hope you don’t mean Brooklyn.

      • W.Jones
        July 9, 2014, 3:53 pm

        Phil.

        Perhaps. He says:
        “How will we prevent other states from isolating Israel or supporting Palestinian efforts in international bodies if Israel is not seen as committed to peace?”
        A settlement resolution would be “isolating Israel” and he is rhetorically asking how he can prevent that if Israel is not seen as committed to peace. How can the US keep vetoing resolutions against settlements when the Israeli state doesnt care about peace? How does it feel in the UN, to have all the countries around and cast the almost lone vote in favor of Apartheid?

        There are strategic issues behind this too. Even from a cynic’s viewpoint, how can the US get Muslim groups to focus on fighting against Syria if the Israeli State decides to have another go at Gaza?

        So, you can be right about that, Phil. On the other hand, he talks about always having the state’s “back”. So it s hard to say.

        It would be nice if Israelis would become more liberal over time and basically heal themselves. But if you check generational attitudes, that is not what is happening, unfortunately. (link to jcjcr.org)
        So it is a situation that is running into a “loggerhead” between slowly rising human rights awareness abroad and an entrenchment of “facts on the ground” as well as right wing attitudes.

        The main “problem” though that they really face is a moral one. I don’t see anyone forcing them to respect human rights in the short term. Palestinians are quite weak and conquered, but their position is not as helpless as were the Armenians or Amerindians, or else they would already have been treated as brutally.

        Basically what they got with the conflict is not the proud “light unto the nations”, sadly. It’s not like someone can pop in at a global human rights organization and talk about their society’s wonderful achievements- not like that was necessarily really in the cards from the get-go, based on the reality of the “demographic problem”, a phrase which is itself inhumane.

        Jeff Halper’s fear is that the Pal.s will be cleansed like the Amerindians and then people will look back and just say “Wasn’t that bad?” But even so, with the huge Separation Wall, they have basically scarred their national history and land, even should they achieve full “Transfer”.

        They have nukes and a huge army, and even North Korea has lasted. In the worst case scenario, they are not really faced with defeat or what Chomsky calls “destruction”, just moral issues.

        They have lots of potential to do good and prosper, and Gordon is talking about how to start to do that. But that is another conversation.

      • seafoid
        July 9, 2014, 5:01 pm

        Israel is deliberalising. The population is less tolerant and more extremist than it was 14 years ago. Bibi’s husbandry. Meretz lost.

      • MRW
        July 9, 2014, 8:50 pm

        Paving way for US not to veto settlements resolution in UNSC

        Then cutting the dough next January.

      • Talkback
        July 10, 2014, 2:30 pm

        The US didn’t veto a lot of settlements resolutions in UNSC decades ago. What it shouldn’t veto is sanctions or even interventions.

      • talknic
        July 10, 2014, 3:08 pm

        @ Talkback “The US didn’t veto a lot of settlements resolutions in UNSC decades ago”

        UNSC Chapt VI resolutions: UNSC Members can not veto resolutions re-affirming and/or emphasizing the pre-existing binding UN Charter and/or International Law & Conventions. They can only abstain or vote for. Such resolutions are adopted unanimously (exclusive of those who abstain/chose not to be involved)

        To veto or vote against the existing UN Charter, International Law & Conventions would be the same as saying the UN and its charter are irrelevant.

        UNSC Chapt VII resolutions: Steps that might be taken against regimes in breach of the UN Charter, International Law & Conventions re-affirmed and/or emphasized in Chapt VI resolutions, are on a case by case basis and don’t exist until adopted. I.e., they’re not pre-determined. UNSC Members can veto or vote against anything yet to be determined.

    • Bumblebye
      July 9, 2014, 3:20 pm

      Intriguing. If he co-ordinates for that region, would he be perhaps, co-ordinating various folk to be available to speak about the current events? I’ve noticed a few former ambassadors popping up during overnight interviews in the past few days, who are most definitely not ‘on message’ wrt Israel’s pov!

    • Bob_Salad
      July 9, 2014, 9:22 pm

      No. While it’s both unusual and refreshing to hear -albeit from a relatively low level ‘advisor’ – the White House finally acknowledge the plight of the Palestinians’, I fear it’s nothing more the political maneuvering on the part of the Obama administration and an attempt to preemptively dampen the international condemnation against Israel for the continued attacks on Gaza.

    • can of worms
      July 9, 2014, 11:55 pm

      They are not laying the ground for dumping israel, what they are doing is desperately and balefully trying to rescue the unviable ‘jewish state’ warehousing system.

      “time is on nobody’s side….”
      here is a secret: time is on the side of the democratic one-state. The self-destructive zio-neo-colonial-liberals in USA-Israel resort to more and more desperate and unthinkable operations to maintain the status quo

  2. Kathleen
    July 9, 2014, 1:52 pm

    Been watching MSNBC and other msm outlets for five days for coverage on the Israeli teens and Palestinian teen killed and Palestinian American teen beaten. Been way slanted of course. Will share those dates and observations in a minute. But in the last 45 minutes MSNBC’s Ronan Farrow had Aaron David Miller (he has been all over the place) up against human rights attorney Noura Erakat on his program. Quite the exchange. Miller tried to insult Erakat after she was the first on MSNBC in days to give the Palestinian’s experience views. Miller stated “back on planet earth” after Erakat talked about root causes, illegal confiscation of Palestinian land etc. You are going to want to watch and listen to that exchange.

    • Kay24
      July 9, 2014, 2:02 pm

      They are desperate now, and trying to stifle the truth from being spoken is all they have now. I did not watch this, but from what you write, seems the apologists are still rude, defensive, and try to blur the facts with insults.

      • Kathleen
        July 9, 2014, 2:14 pm

        A must watch and listen. Sorry unable to link. But you can go find

      • Annie Robbins
        July 9, 2014, 4:44 pm

        Sorry unable to link.

        what does that mean? did you not watch it online?

      • seafoid
        July 9, 2014, 5:21 pm

        Kathleen might have posted from a tablet.

      • Kathleen
        July 10, 2014, 9:48 am

        Watched live. You can easily go see it. Just giving you another lead. You are more than welcome

    • just
      July 9, 2014, 3:28 pm

      Did you hear the Diane Rehm show?

      link to thedianerehmshow.org

    • MRW
      July 9, 2014, 8:55 pm

      Hardtalk on BBC radio punched it to Dore Gold last night, who gave it his harbara best.

      Everyone I talk to is fed up with and tired of Israel. It’s Dennis The Menace of nations with guns and bombs.

      • Kathleen
        July 10, 2014, 9:50 am

        People are starting to get the facts on the ground. Been decades of a wall of silence. Wall coming down

  3. ckg
    July 9, 2014, 1:52 pm

    Unilateral annexation of West Bank territories populated by Israelis is wrong, illegal, and a recipe for Israel’s isolation. The United States could never support it, and I doubt any of Israel’s other friends would.

    If Huckabee, Bachmann, Perry, Gingrich, Santorum, Rand Paul (possibly), or any candidate backed by Adelson occupies the White House, the U.S. administration would support it, I think.

    • talknic
      July 9, 2014, 2:32 pm

      @ ckg

      The US can only abstain from voting on a Chapt VI resolution reaffirming and/or emphasizing existing Law. (UN Members cannot vote against ‘already determined’ ‘existing’ law)
      OR
      Veto any Chapt VII resolution calling for UN actions against Israel. (Actions are ‘to be determined’ i.e., ‘not yet existing’)

      However, the US UNSC veto can’t stop individuals, companies or other countries from boycotting, divesting or sanctioning Israel

  4. Citizen
    July 9, 2014, 1:59 pm

    Compare that speech with Obama’s most recent speech on the I-P conflict, which was boilerplate hasbara except he did mention a murder of a Palestinian by Jewish Israelism along with the murder of the 3 Jewish Israeli teens. Looks like US is now playing good cop versus semi-bad cop with Israel? I will leave it up to you to decide who is who.

    I don’t know if it’s a sea change, but it’s clear, as everyday Jewish Israeli knows (from watching the comments in the internet social platform arena), that when Jewish special forces brutally beat up a non-dual citizen American teen from Tampa, Fl ,with Palestinian roots, while he was on vacation visiting relatives in Israeli controlled land, a line has been stepped over. Even the US mainstream media realizes this.

  5. Citizen
    July 9, 2014, 2:04 pm

    I brought this up yesterday in another MW thread–I thought it important as it went way beyond Obama’s own latest speech on the I-P conflict, which was all hasbara except he at least mentioned the murder and/or beating by Israeli Jews. I’ve been looking for the US cable TV news to say something about Gordon’s speech to the Israelis–so far, no luck.

  6. Kathleen
    July 9, 2014, 2:13 pm

    This past Sunday MSNBC’s Melissa Harris Perry joined the better late than never crowd by focusing on this issue. She even had Hillary Mann Leverett on her program. A must watch. While Hillary was succinct and factual I was shocked when she went along with MHP’s and Colonel Jacobs take that this Palestinian teen beating by Israeli soldiers . Jacobs “we have seen these images before” Total bull shit. This is the very first time this image of a Palestinian/American or any Palestinian children being beaten, etc has been shown on any MSM cable outlet. No one is mentioning the history of Israeli violence against Palestinian children etc. No one is mentioning what the ratio of Palestinian deaths, injuries, imprisonment are over the decades. No one Was surprised Leverett did not take the clear opportunity to bring up the disproportionate deaths on the Palestinian side over the decades.

    No mention on MHP’s about root causes issues.
    No mention of Netanyahu calling for revenge before he started apologizing for death of Palestinian kid set on fire.

    Monday Jane Harman (who waddled on over to interfere in the Aipac espionage investigation and should be under more serious investigation in this interference) of Woodrow Wilson think tank held a panel discussion on the recent events in the conflict. Was aired on C-span on Monday. Aaron David Miller on the panel. All panelist said the one state solution is no solution.

    Tuesday MSNBC’s Mika B kow towed to Israel sharing their views for them. Mark Halpern did ask “are there any indications that pressure is being put on Israel to restrain” Somehow the connection to the guest was cut off. That questioned never addressed

    Tuesday “waddling” Jane Harman was on Chuck Todd’s as a guest on his program about the latest violence. Why oh why would you have someone on who has actively undermined a very serious national security federal investigation on your program? Why even have Harman on?

    Tuesday Andrea Mitchell (who has been dipping her toes into asking a bit tougher questions) had State Dept Jan Psaki on to discuss the latest events. Psaki ” we are shocked by the report on the beating of the Palestinian American boy” As if the U.S. State Dept did not ignore the Furkan Dogan killing on the Mavi Marmara and has ignored the Palestinian children being abused, killed, incarcerated for decades.
    As if this was the first time.

    This morning (Wednesday) on MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough could not get his head up the ass of Israel far enough. He totally went along with everything Ido Aharoni had to say. “Hamas wants to wipe Israel off the map.” Then brown nose Joe went further and set Ido up “who is giving the rockets to Hamas’ Ido went on a rant about Iran and Syria

    No mention of illegal Israeli settlements etc until Ronan had the testicular fortitude to have Noura Erakat on.

    So over and over. No mention of Netanyahu’s calls for revenge. No mention of how these beatings of Palestinian children and others have gone on for decades. No mention of Israel’s illegal settlements being one of the root causes of all of this violence.

    Prayers for all of the Israeli teens and the Palestinian boy burnt to death. And all of the killing going on now.

    • Kay24
      July 9, 2014, 3:37 pm

      Brook Baldwin CNN just now had a very good speaker from the Palestinian side.
      I was sorry I missed his name, but he was amazingly very good in articulating the Palestinian side of things, and I was impressed when he was able to explain that the violence we see now stems from decades of collective punishment, and that non violent forms of protests have been met with Palestinians being shot and killed near the fence. He mentioned their fishermen being killed, and the suffering they have to endure. He also mentioned that Israel has this habit of saying one thing, but their actions do not line up with what they say. ALL true. I wish I could see that episode again and get his name. Must watch.

      • tree
        July 10, 2014, 1:15 am

        I think it was Yousef Munayyer. I didn’t see the program, but noticed on his twitter feed that he was scheduled to be on CNN this afternoon.

        link to thejerusalemfund.org

        BTW, I got pointed to this news article from the Washington Post via a tweet from Munayyer. Amazingly evenhanded with reportage direct from Gaza with some of the relatives of those killed. From the Washington Post no less.

        link to washingtonpost.com

      • Kay24
        July 10, 2014, 8:39 am

        Thanks for the links. The article in the WP describes must of the situation quite well – Israel is hell bent on killing Hamas (the only obstacle to getting rid of the Arabs, and whose rockets Israel cannot control) and weakening them, and if they keep massacring babies, women and children, who cares, after all their are “defending” precious Jewish lives, and will keep pounding homes where families live, and will claim it had some Hamas connection, which no one verifies anyway.
        At the end of all this, when more Palestinians have been butchered, and the death toll is high, those tough Israelis will pat each other on their murdering backs, and congratulate themselves for being so tough against unarmed civilians, who have no bomb shelters like their precious citizens do, to shield themselves from the FIsraeli F-16 fighter jets, Apache attack helicopters and armed drones. In fact they must be delusional in thinking it was a fair battle, and gosh, they decimated such a dangerous enemy.
        The US will then applaud them, and send them more aid and money to defend themselves from Goliath.

      • SQ Debris
        July 10, 2014, 7:22 pm

        “Israel is hell bent on killing Hamas” (??!)
        This isn’t about Hamas. This is all about revenge and harvesting the required zio-reprisal quota. Think a hundred for one. It wouldn’t be surprising if once the magic number of 300 dead Palestinians is reached we see a cease fire. Unless an Israeli dies. Then the number will climb (dis)proportionally. That was the math for Operation Molten Lead, and was pretty much the math for the numbers of Palestinian children murdered by the IDF during the first Intifadah. A historical referant: link to jta.org.

  7. lysias
    July 9, 2014, 2:15 pm

    In contrast, if we fail to come back to peace talks, renewed efforts to isolate Israel internationally and legitimize Palestinian statehood unilaterally are all but certain. The United States will do all it can to fight boycotts and other delegitimization efforts. But in many of these realms, particularly outside the Security Council, our ability to contain the damage is limited, and becoming more and more challenging. This is what American friends of Israel mean when they express concerns about the potential for Israeli isolation if peace talks do not succeed. Let me be absolutely clear that these are not threats. The United States will always have Israel’s back. That’s why we fight for it every day at the United Nations, where we have worked diligently to ensure Israel is treated fairly and on par with all other states.

    Why? Gordon doesn’t say.

  8. talknic
    July 9, 2014, 2:19 pm

    It falls short

    “The fact remains, only a negotiated solution – two states for two peoples – can give Israelis and Palestinians the futures they need and deserve”

    It’s not the only option. Israel could have been and still could be forced to adhere to the law by the USA. It could be made to withdraw from ALL non-Israeli territories taking all its illegal settlers, pay rightful reparations.

    Of course it would result in a bankrupt, failed, egg on the face, naked for all the world to see Jewish state with a huge question mark hanging over its ‘Jewish’ness, given that its crimes are as far away from the basic tenets of Judaism as it is possible to get!

    Unfortunately the deceitful greedy kid has been allowed to keep its fat fist in the cookie jar for far too long. A negotiated solution is the soft option Israel could take in order to circumvent its obligations to the law. Unfortunately the ghastly kid has and still is refusing, preferring to continue its arrogant and completely insane path to an illegal, inherently problematic, non-democratic, Greater Israel, which would require resorting to genocidal ethnic cleansing to maintain.

    To be precise, a negotiated solution is the only LEGAL way out for Israel in order to circumvent the law. It is entirely dependent on Palestinian generosity and they are under no legal obligation to forgo ANY of their legal rights even in negotiations with Israel.

    “Israel should not take for granted the opportunity to negotiate that peace with President Abbas, who has shown time and again that he is committed to nonviolence and coexistence with Israel.”

    Simple. Drop the US UNSC veto vote protecting Israel from the consequences of 66 yrs of illegal facts on the ground lawlessness.

    • pabelmont
      July 9, 2014, 4:30 pm

      I’ve been urging coordinated action by the nations to force Israel to withdraw all settelrs and demolish the wall and all the settlement buildings (as required ?? by law and suggested by UNSC 465 (1980), See link to 123pab.com

      • Mooser
        July 9, 2014, 9:17 pm

        “I’ve been urging coordinated action by the nations to force Israel to withdraw all settelrs”

        And where will these poor settlers be ‘removed’ too? (Not that I don’t think removing them is the least, the start of what Israel can do) Are they wanted in Israel? Will the non-settler population (we’ll make an artificial distinction for now) be willing to accept them?
        I’m pretty sure the settler movement is a plan which can’t be reversed, and is supposed to end in annexation. Or disaster.

    • Citizen
      July 9, 2014, 7:06 pm

      When the monkey sticks his hand in the gourd to get the shiny object, he’s trapped because he cannot get it out. He grabs the base of the gourd with his other hand and tries, and tries, but he’s stuck. Why? Greed. He can’t get his hand out because his fist is clenched–he never thinks to let go of the shiny object inside. Shaka (to colonial Brit Lieutenant).

      • SQ Debris
        July 10, 2014, 7:25 pm

        Stephen Langfur wrote an article titled “To Catch A Monkey” that was published in the Jerusalem post in 1988. The message didn’t take.

    • RoHa
      July 9, 2014, 7:12 pm

      “The fact remains, only a negotiated solution – two states for two peoples – can give Israelis and Palestinians the futures they need and deserve”

      Better to stop thinking in terms of “peoples” and simply live as people.

  9. lysias
    July 9, 2014, 2:20 pm

    Just as Israelis built a state in their homeland, Palestinians have a right to be a sovereign, free, and secure people in their own land.

    So why don’t they have as much of a right to defend themselves as the U.S. says Israel has?

  10. seafoid
    July 9, 2014, 2:26 pm

    I was talking to someone working in climate change today who said there are many sceptics in the house of representatives but very few in the military. I wonder if it is the same regarding Zionism.

  11. just
    July 9, 2014, 2:26 pm

    “Just as Israelis built a state in their homeland, Palestinians have a right to be a sovereign, free, and secure people in their own land.”

    Full stop.

    (one very screwed up sentence, indeed!)

    Israelis ‘built a state’ in the land of the Palestinians.

  12. W.Jones
    July 9, 2014, 2:43 pm

    This is interesting, by the way. In case one would think that the Israeli State is basically doing what the US wants it to do- one should notice what Gordon is now doing. Behind that idea is the concept that if the US tells the Israelis in a firm way to make peace, then the Israelis will do it. Of course, I would like that to happen.

    I think that Clinton was interested in bringing the parties together to make peace, even if the terms were not right. Gordon is giving the reasons why it is better from a practical business standpoint to have peace- because then there is more investment in Arab countries.

  13. eljay
    July 9, 2014, 2:56 pm

    >> Just as Israelis built a state in their homeland …

    No, they built a state in Palestine. Then they occupied and colonized – and continue to occupy and colonize – most of the rest of Palestine.

    >> “It is impossible to have a Jewish democratic state … ”

    A supremacist “Jewish State”.

    >> The United States will always have Israel’s back.

    It shouldn’t. No state, no group and no person deserves unconditional support.

    >> … how will Israel remain democratic and Jewish …

    Israel must be Israeli and democratic. “Jewish and … ” implies supremacist.

    >> How will it have peace if it is unwilling to delineate a border, end the occupations and allow for Palestinian sovereignty, security, and dignity?

    Here’s another guy who talks about peace, but not justice:
    – nothing about Israel honouring its obligations under international law (including RoR); and
    – nothing about Israel or Israelis being held accountable for past and ON-GOING (war) crimes.

    >> A “one-state solution” is implausible, and would effectively mean an end to the Jewish and democratic nature of your state.

    A one-state solution would mean an end to a supremacist “Jewish State”. Zio-supremacists hate the thought of that.

    >> The fact remains, only a negotiated solution – two states for two peoples – can give Israelis and Palestinians the futures they need and deserve.

    Right, two peoples: Israelis and Palestinians. Not “Jewish” and Palestinians.

  14. Kathleen
    July 9, 2014, 3:19 pm

    Go Phil Gordon. Not a whisper about this speech on MSNBC , Fox, Cnn. Will be watching and listening. Phil etc. you are going to be very interested in that exchange between Noura Erakat and Aaron David Miller. The first time in six days (or longer of course) that an MSNBC host has allowed a Palestinian perspective.

  15. Penfold
    July 9, 2014, 4:36 pm

    “The United States will always have Israel’s back. That’s why we fight for it every day at the United Nations, where we have worked diligently to ensure Israel is treated fairly and on par with all other states.”

    I am interested by this statement, surely at some point the USA would have to ask why it needs to defend this state every day at the UN surely somewhere someone is asking what it is about one particular state that requires so much effort to shelter it from the rest of the world.

    I certainly understand that not every nation is liked universally, everyone makes friends and enemies as they go through life but it is usually a balance yet in Israels case it is not and that alone should encourage people to look for answers.

    • RoHa
      July 9, 2014, 7:19 pm

      New Zealand’s got enemies?

      • Penfold
        July 10, 2014, 4:43 am

        Yeah we call them politicians.
        :)

  16. An American Critic
    July 9, 2014, 5:15 pm

    “A “one-state solution” is implausible, and would effectively mean an end to the Jewish and democratic nature of your state. ”

    Although I applaud much of Gordon’s speech, I can’t agree with his summary dismissal of a “one-state solution.” Yes, one democratic state would end the ethnocracy that privileges the jewish people over all others, but it would not have to mean the end of democracy (or, really, prevent the introduction of democracy). Recently, when Mondoweiss published a link to an article/essay on the New Voices: News and Views of Campus Jews website regarding the writer’s contemplation of one state (see: link to newvoices.org ), I wrote the following in response, which seems just as applicable here in the face of Gordon’s comments:

    Jonathan- Like your piece very much, except for one thing. When you said: “Of course my ideal situation would have two states. I want that just as much as everyone else” it moved me to respond to say why I don’t and can’t agree. I USED to think that a two-state solution was preferable and, even now, would grudgingly support it if brought peace and was agreed to by a majority of all concerned parties (the Israelis, the Israeli- citizen palestinians, the occupants of the Occupied Territories and the refugees who remain stateless and, largely, homeless). But my problem with that “solution” is that it would necessarily be based on the ethnocratic assumption that lies at the very heart of the conflict – that it is somehow morally justifiable or acceptabe to base a modern nation state on a single ethnicity, religion, or racial background, which is INESCAPABLE once you declare a state to be a Jewish state, or an Islamic state, or a Christian state etc.

    Once, here in the US, some parties wanted to solve the “problem” of racist oppression and discrimination against African Americans by declaring a separate state (e.g., the Black Muslims wanted Montana), or deporting them (the consideration or suggestion of a “Back to Africa” or Liberia resettlement movement by many “good hearted” whites who deplored slavery and discrimination, but were not prepared to live along side of black people as social equals). Similarly, Apartheid South Africa proposed and tried to establish the “bantustans,” based on the argument that black/white equality would destroy the South African state (as they knew it – a state based on ethnic privilige (a very similar argument to those that say (remarkably, without blushing) that arab/jewish equality in Israel would “destroy the Jewish nature of the State”) ). In retrospect, perhaps it is easier to see why such proposals are and were ethically bankrupt.

    Why then is such a solution so uncritically embraced by so many with respect to the Israel/Palestinian conflict? Like you, I’m an American jew (although not religious) who deplores the unjust and endless discrimination against, and oppression of, the Palestinain people, which is especially loathsome when we consider that (i) we as Americans, fund it and politically protect it in our national discourse, international fora, and in the media and (ii) as jews, it is especially ironic and unacceptable that this oppression and injustice is maintained in our names, by so many jews who, as victims throughout history, ought to be the last people to ethnically, religiously, or racially discriminate against and subjugate another people. So, no, I cant agree that a two state solution is “ideal.” We, as Americans, generally subscribe to the notion that political and civil rights should not be based on a person’s ethnic, religious or racial background. A two-state solution would unavoidably be based on just such calculations. So, I’m afraid, the ONLY just and acceptable solution is a single state, with strong strong protections against majority discrimination or oppression of any minority. no matter which people(s) is/are determined to be in that majority or minority.

  17. Eva Smagacz
    July 9, 2014, 5:22 pm

    I am pretty sure that before they gave Philip Gordon the speech to make Administration, and he, knew that he’s in for some heavy long term punishment on the career front. I wonder what made him accept the assignment. Is he Jewish? “Liberal” Zionist? That would explain the emotional commitment needed to make such potentially self-sacrificing speech.

  18. American
    July 9, 2014, 6:11 pm

    I am not impressed with this speech. Its been said before.
    And its for consumption by the US zionist and Pro Israel Jews.

    ” I should also be clear of the United States’ longstanding position: we consider settlements illegitimate and an impediment to progress on peace negotiations. ‘

    BUT….

    ”The United States will always have Israel’s back.”

    Translated…..Israel is being bad but we luv Israel the mostest in the world and we just trying to do the right thing for Israel so you I-Firsters keep that money coming to the Dems while we beg yur mommy state to go to rehab to dry out and then send them cases of white lightening as a ‘forgive us for presuming to suggest’ gift.

  19. American
    July 9, 2014, 6:21 pm

    I am sure these speeches are a great comfort to the families of the burned to death Palestine boy, the 3 dead jewish boys, the 7 more Gaza children killed today in Isr bombings.

    If the balless, gutless, pond scum populated US government wont use its power to stop this from going on…Again!……then they should just shut up, not utter a word…. it just makes it all that much more obscene.

  20. biorabbi
    July 9, 2014, 6:27 pm

    Looks like Israel is degrading Hamas’ long term arsenal of rockets with higher success than cast lead; the intel is better. God bless.

    • Annie Robbins
      July 10, 2014, 2:01 am

      Looks like Israel is degrading Hamas’ long term arsenal of rockets with higher success than cast lead; the intel is better.

      is that a hunch or did you read that somewhere? and are you talking about the iron dome taking out rockets before they land or weapons depots on the ground? and while there is lots of news about israel hitting homes, where’s the evidence they have located their weapon facilities? and if they were finding them, why the focus on homes with such high civilian casualties?

      and where did you hear better intel? if that’s the case why are the missiles coming as a surprise to israel? the distances they are reaching? i think what could be the case is israel doesn’t really know what hamas has. please provide some links backing your statement, unless of course it’s just a hunch.

      • DKWilson
        July 11, 2014, 11:43 am

        Why would Israel, by anyone’s measure, a surveillance state, NOT know exactly where weapons caches are, or not know exactly where missiles are stored? So, quite obviously, it is in their best interest to eschew taking out any weapon that can garner sympathy from other countries, since bombing homes is, quite obviously, condoned by the remainder of the Western world.

  21. crone
    July 9, 2014, 7:00 pm

    I just discovered that the percentage of Jews in the State Department is 52%… and the White House about 82%…

    There is really no need to question why the USG supports Israel unconditionally… is there?

    • Annie Robbins
      July 10, 2014, 12:27 am

      I just discovered that the percentage of Jews in the State Department is 52%

      where? do you have a source link for that?

    • MahaneYehude1
      July 10, 2014, 3:33 am

      @Crone:

      I just discovered that the percentage of Jews in the State Department is 52%…

      …So I ran down the street naked and shouted “Eureka” “Eureka”!!!

  22. American
    July 9, 2014, 7:07 pm

    Here is picture of Max speaking at protest rally today

    link to twitter.com

    I love this guy he has balls….he is a ‘warrior’ ……not those IDF wimps who beat children.

  23. James Canning
    July 9, 2014, 7:22 pm

    I think Obama can see the need to get Israel out of the West Bank, one way or another.

  24. Citizen
    July 9, 2014, 7:56 pm

    Gordon’s expertise is not in the Middle East but Abrams says Obama appointed him because he was a really good administrator.
    While most of his scholarship has focused elsewhere, Gordon has over the years penned op-eds on Israeli and Palestinian issues. During the Israel-Lebanon war in 2006, Gordon wrote in the Washington Post and the Financial Times that Israel’s bombing campaign was ill advised, as was the United States’ backing for it.
    “Washington’s support of this war and tolerance for the way it was fought have been a disaster,” he wrote in a 2006 Financial Times piece with co-author Jeremy Shapiro, who advised him at the State Department and was a fellow at Brookings during Gordon’s time there. “America’s stance on the Lebanon war has had a wide range of negative consequences for America.” –Daily Beast

    Gordon’s speech is annoying some people at State. Israeli’s are saying it was ill-timed, being spoken to Israelis when they are looking for solidarity from US in their current crisis. One former Israeli diplomat says Gordon’s speech was unscripted.
    link to freebeacon.com

  25. Citizen
    July 9, 2014, 8:11 pm

    Hear’s Gordon’t entire prepared speech transcript–interesting to read it in its entirety: link to israelforeignaffairs.com

  26. Misterioso
    July 9, 2014, 8:11 pm

    Regarding the “special relationship” between Israel and the U.S., the winds of change have been blowing for some time.

    To wit:

    “Preparing For A Post Israel Middle East,” is an 82 page analysis that argues America’s national interest is fundamentally at odds with that of Israel. The authors conclude that Israel is currently the greatest threat to US national interests because its nature and actions prevent normal US relations with Arab and Muslim countries and, to a growing degree, the wider international community.

    The study was commissioned by the US Intelligence Community comprising 16 American intelligence agencies with an annual budget of more than $ 70 billion. The IC includes the Departments of the Navy, Army, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Defense Intelligence Agency, Departments of Energy, Homeland Security, State, Treasury, Drug Enforcement Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Security Agency, National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, National Reconnaissance Agency and the Central Intelligence Agency commissioned the study.

    According to a high official with Israel’s coalition government, the Obama administration “no longer seems to see Israel as a ‘special’ or ‘extraordinary’ state in the Middle East, with which the U.S. must maintain a different dialogue than with other states. ‘The feeling is that the dialogue and coordination with the Arab states and with Europe is today no less important to the U.S. and perhaps more so than with Israel,’ the official said.” (Ha’aretz, 8 May 2009)

    “‘Israel is supposed to be working with us, not against us,’ ” Foreign Policy quoted an [American] intelligence officer as saying. ‘If they want to shed blood, it would help a lot if it was their blood and not ours. You know, they’re supposed to be a strategic asset. Well, guess what? There are a lot of people now, important people, who just don’t think that’s true.’” (Ha’aretz, January 13, 2012)

    YNet News.com Sept. 3, 2012: EXCERPT: “The United States has indirectly informed Iran, via two European nations, that it would not back an Israeli strike against the country’s nuclear facilities, as long as Tehran refrains from attacking American interests in the Persian Gulf, Yedioth Ahronoth reported Monday.” (YNet News.com., Sept. 3,2012 link to ynetnews.com)

    Israel losing America, YNet, June 9, 2013:
    Op-ed: As US map of interests in Middle East changes, White House getting increasingly tired of our conduct
    By Eitan Haber
    Excerpt:
    “In recent years, the US map of interests in the Middle East is changing. The American interest in our region is decreasing, not to mention the fact that the US is getting rid of the dependence on Middle Eastern oil. We are losing the special status of the eldest and spoilt child in the eyes of the White House. To put it explicitly, the current president (and the next president, whoever that may be) no longer “works for us” and is increasingly returning to the format of the “problem child.” To put it in our words, it seems that we have burnt our dish in the kitchens of the White House and Capitol Hill. They are getting increasingly tired of our conduct.

    “We always have good answers to the American conduct: Look, listen, they’re unfazed. What can you do, that’s how our friends overseas are: Unfazed. But we receive the small answers from Washington both in leaks from the White House, including the president’s statements, and in appointments of senior officials who directly influence the US policy.

    “Many of those recent appointments are not fond of us, to put it mildly. Even US Jews, especially the young ones, no longer obey every single command coming from Jerusalem. And so we are slowly losing hold of the source of our life, thousands of miles from home. That may not be so crucial at the moment, but if and when it becomes crucial, it will be too late to wake up.” (link to ynetnews.com)

    In 2010, Join Chiefs of Staff Chairman Admiral Michael Mullen received a bombshell briefing from senior military officers. The team was dispatched by Commander General David Petraeus to brief the Pentagon on intelligence that Israeli intransigence in the peace process was jeopardizing American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan and America was perceived as weak, ineffectual, and unable to stand up to Israel. (link to mideast.foreignpolicy.com)

    In its 2004 report, the U.S. Senate 9/11 Commission declared that “mastermind of the 9/11 attacks,” Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s “animus toward the United States stemmed not from his experiences there as a student, but rather from his violent disagreement with U.S. foreign policy favoring Israel.”

    In its analysis of terrorism, the Pentagon’s Defense Science Board concluded that “Muslims do not hate our freedom,…they hate our policies. The overwhelming majority [object] to what they see as one-sided support in favour of Israel and against Palestinian rights….”

    Ha’aretz, July 28, 2012:
    “Former U.S. officials say CIA considers Israel to be Mideast’s biggest spy threat”
    EXCERPT:
    “…despite statements from U.S. politicians trumpeting the friendship, U.S. national security officials consider Israel to be, at times, a frustrating ally and a genuine counterintelligence threat.

    “In addition to what the former U.S. officials described to AP as intrusions in homes in the past decade, Israel has been implicated in U.S. criminal espionage cases and disciplinary proceedings against CIA officers and blamed in the presumed death of an important spy in Syria for the CIA during the administration of President George W. Bush.

    “The CIA considers Israel its No. 1 counterintelligence threat in the agency’s Near East Division, the group that oversees spying across the Middle East, according to current and former officials.” (link to haaretz.com

  27. chuckcarlos
    July 9, 2014, 8:31 pm

    yep, “we’ve always got Israel’s back”…

    shit that has to be funniest damn thing I have ever heard…

    you’ve never seen Americans beat a retreat faster than when they smell a real fascist loser…and brother…you’ve got a real fascist loser in Israel…

    link to youtube.com

  28. Kay24
    July 9, 2014, 8:52 pm

    The Israelis are terrorizing the Palestinian people. EIGHT from a single family killed and Israel as usual says “oops”. I hope what goes around will come around to hit Israel, tenfold. Zio terrorists have no regard for non Jewish lives. Now we can understand why they are hated by their neighbors.

    “Israeli army says the killing of 8 Gazan family members was in error
    According to the military relatives of Odeh Kaware were warned of air strike and left the home but returned too soon; pilot was unable to divert the bomb.”
    Read more:
    link to haaretz.com

    • Mooser
      July 9, 2014, 9:29 pm

      “Zio terrorists have no regard for non Jewish lives.”

      Oh, I think the Zionists mostly have no regard for non-Zionist lives. I’m not so sure religion matters that much. I have no doubt at all the near future will show this more clearly than ever. You haven’t noticed that the first, the very first thing a Zionist does when he meets a Jew who is critical of Zionism, let alone anti-Zionist, is start shouting “you’re no Jew” or “self-hating” and all the rest of that rot.
      Doesn’t matter what religion you are. If you are Jewish, you get excommunicated, pronto. And even among Jewish Israelis being Jewish is no guarantee of equality at all, something quite plain.

    • seafoid
      July 10, 2014, 3:30 am

      And 3 dead Israeli teenagers are far more important than 8 dead Gazans. Because killing Gazans is normal and Jews expect security.

      • Kay24
        July 10, 2014, 8:56 am

        Yeah they act like they are God’s chosen…more like a curse in the neighborhood.

  29. RoHa
    July 9, 2014, 9:09 pm

    ” mistaken the Middle East for Finland,”

    What is this supposed to mean? Do they think of Finland as continually peaceful and inoffensive? If so, they know nothing of Finnish nationalism, the civil war, the Winter War, the Continuation War, the Lapland War, and the territorial claims of Finnish irredentists.

  30. Basilio
    July 9, 2014, 9:14 pm

    It is a warning to Israel. Essentially, they’re saying “We can protect you at the U.N. to some extent, but not in the General Assembly, and the PA can potentially join organizations, and many private firms and organizations and people are choosing to boycott the state, and the US has no control over that, and Israel would feel the pinch if that happened. Israeli lobbyists can’t stop people from choosing to boycott the state. They can’t buy everybody. Some people aren’t for sale, especially when they realize it means selling the lives and human rights of Palestinians.

  31. rensanceman
    July 9, 2014, 10:46 pm

    It is surprising that there has not been an effort yet, to my knowledge to delist/cancel/kick out Israel from the United Nations whose by-laws and Charter have been abrogated consistently and regularly with impunity by this pariah state. If Israel would only heed the Resolutions condemning its behavior and those which require its compliance (e.g. Resolution 194) then the basis for a settlement could begin to take shape. As the Likkud has no interest in such a draconian move, it is up to our sycophantic Administration-present or force a showdown.

    • talknic
      July 10, 2014, 3:26 pm

      @ rensanceman “It is surprising that there has not been an effort yet, to my knowledge to delist/cancel/kick out Israel from the United Nations ..

      No point, the US UNSC veto vote would prevent it.

      “If Israel would only heed the Resolutions condemning its behavior and those which require its compliance (e.g. Resolution 194) then the basis for a settlement could begin to take shape.”

      Israel has never been able to financially afford the rightful reparations to those dispossessed and continues to dispossess. At the outset (1948) the Jewish state was already begging for loans to keep afloat!

      66 years on and 66 years of illegal facts on the ground have seen the cost of complying with the law become astronomical, far beyond the resources of the Jewish state, all its financial supporters and investors, who’d quickly pull out taking the carpet with them.

  32. DICKERSON3870
    July 9, 2014, 10:54 pm

    RE: “White House says US can’t stop ‘tsunami’ of boycott and isolation if Israel won’t end ‘occupations’ ~ Weiss

    MY COMMENT: Likudnik Israel is hellbent on going down “whistling Dixie“, and their enablers in the US are determined to help them do it. And, in the final analysis, domestic politics and a broken, dysfunctional, political system ensure that the the codependent US will not intervene to save Israel from its own excesses.
    CONSEQUENTLY:

    In DixieIsrael-land they’ll take their stand, to live or die with apartheid!
    Look away! Look away! Look away! Apartheid Israel!
    Dar’s buck-wheat cakes an ‘Ingen’ batter,
    Makes ’em fat or a little fatter;
    Look away! Look away! Look away! Apartheid Israel!
    Den hoe it down an scratch your grabble,
    To apartheid Israel we’re bound to trabble.
    Look away! Look away! Look away! Apartheid Israel!

    BLACKFACE MINSTREL CHORUS:
    I wish I was in Canaan
    Oaber dar—Oaber dar,
    In Canaan’s lann de color’d man
    Can lib an die in cloaber
    Oaber dar—Oaber dar,
    Oaber dar in de lann ob Canaan.

    SOURCE FOR “DIXIE” LRICS – link to en.wikipedia.org

    P.S. Southern American English – link to en.wikipedia.org

  33. Basilio
    July 9, 2014, 11:55 pm

    The soldiers didn’t know that the youth was a Palestinian-American. I’m not sure if it made a difference or not. He was said to be in his uncle’s garden. He stated he was not protesting. Even if that was the case, it wouldn’t justify the horrible beating when he was restrained. Anyway, Israel recently killed two youths and not much was done or said. Why does someone have to have a US passport for their death to be significant? I think your death is more likely to be treated as significant if you have either an Israeli or American passport, but not if you’re a Palestinians. You’re just a statistic, at best.

  34. Shingo
    July 10, 2014, 12:25 am

    The timing of this article is priceless, seeing as Dabakar was insisting yesterday that Israel’s standing in the world is awesome and improving.

    • Kay24
      July 10, 2014, 8:59 am

      I wish a credible source would take a poll right now around the world, I bet Dabakar’s bubble would be shattered! In fact right now in the US after the nation saw for themselves how compassion Israelis can be, when some of them beat up unmercifully, a young American boy, taking a poll will be interesting. Obviously it should be from a credible source, and not from the zio infected think tank or corporation.

    • Talkback
      July 10, 2014, 2:41 pm

      DaBakr believes that something is not a lie, if at least one person can be fooled. Most times he himself is the proof.

  35. iResistDe4iAm
    July 10, 2014, 6:55 am

    A “one-state solution” is implausible, and would effectively mean an end to the Jewish and democratic nature of your state.

    A one-state “solution” is the final and only remaining destination on the one-way Zionist journey that Israel has chosen to travel over the last 66 years.

    At the end of their journey, Zionists are expecting one state, an enlarged “Jewish State” that has rid itself of its so-called “demographic problem”.
    What they are likely to get is one state akin to either Algeria or South Africa.

  36. Boomer
    July 10, 2014, 7:03 am

    Obama’s policy seems contradictory, saying, in effect, “we are with you, right or wrong.” I haven’t seen anything about this in the MSM, but I agree with Steve Zunes, who says,

    “Unless and until the Obama administration decides to end its unconditional backing for Israel’s right-wing government and instead support Israeli and Palestinian moderates, there will be no hope for peace.”
    link to original.antiwar.com

    Actually, I think Israel can continue to beat the Palestinians into something close enough to peace to keep Israel happy. But it won’t be a just or moral peace. And the U.S. is culpable for making that oppression possible.

  37. rosross
    January 13, 2016, 7:36 pm

    For the sake of most, and that includes Israelis and Palestinians, the sooner a one-state solution is forced on Israel the better.

    Yes, there are religious zealots on both sides but they are a minority and on the Palestinian side, we have yet to assess how much the radicalism is sourced in subjugation and occupation and given the nature and history of the Palestinians, it is fair to guess, that is the major factor.

    Most Jewish Israelis are not really Jewish anyway or are so lapsed and non-practising that the relevance of a theocratic, religious state of Israel is not that important.

    Anyone who spends time in Israel and Occupied Palestine or time even with Jewish Israelis knows that Israel is a Middle Eastern culture and society and that Israelis have more in common with Palestinians than anyone else.

    The new state, whatever it might be called, will become I am sure, a thriving democracy and that is something everyone deserves, Israelis and Palestinians alike.

    This occupation, colonisation and apartheid debases and destroys Israeli culture and strengthens the indigenous Palestinians who have and have always had, justice, time and numbers on their side.

    • echinococcus
      January 13, 2016, 10:31 pm

      What is “not that important”, instead, is religion. The colonial, genocidal nationalist ideology of Zionism came about and did its major damage as a godless 19th Century monster; the current religious nonsense is only a result of the mobilization, propaganda and revival to recruit cannon fodder. It does not change the character of the freak state; more importantly, even if the younger Herrenvolk generation had less of religious fanatics, which I’d need proof for, religion is not why the Herrenvolk citizens are Zionists (and declare themselves openly murderous in proportions over 90%.)

      Anyone who spends time in Israel and Occupied Palestine or time even with Jewish Israelis knows that Israel is a Middle Eastern culture and society and that Israelis have more in common with Palestinians than anyone else.

      To a Martian they both look human. Otherwise there must be a very severe problem with the eyes of whoever reported to you about “culture and society”.

      The new state, whatever it might be called, will become I am sure, a thriving democracy and that is something everyone deserves, Israelis and Palestinians alike.

      Once you seem to value democracy, how about leaving to the Palestinian people, all of it, the decision not only about the name but also the nature, composition, thriving, etc. of Palestine, over which it has the exclusive right of sovereignty? It is not “Israelis and Palestinians alike”, and including the invaders by default, without proper plebiscite, is called colonialism.

      This occupation, colonisation and apartheid debases and destroys Israeli culture…

      No need to speak of Zionist occupation as if it had such good results.

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