Monthly Archives:
August 2014

Countdown to the next round in Gaza

Alex Kane on

The cease-fire that ended seven weeks of hell in Gaza is only two days old. But the countdown to the next round began as soon as the ink dried on the agreement between Israel and the Palestinian armed factions. The deep-rooted problems bedeviling the Palestinian people and Israel have not gone away. The only question is when that next spasm of violence breaks out.

Occupied Religion

Marc H. Ellis on

Using post excerpt, type your SEO meta description here.

This war was not a war, it was a massacre

Mohammad J. Abulriban and Justin Randle on

Mohammed Abulriban describes living in Gaza during the recent fighting: “Words are not enough to express what goes here in Gaza. Nothing is more expensive than losing your family, your friends, your neighbors or anyone you used to be with. My friend’s house and my father’s farm have been destroyed with no reason. Our neighbours have been killed for nothing. The mosque I used to pray in has been destroyed.”

The Palestinian message to Israel: Deal with us justly. Or disappear

Jeff Halper on

The Gaza onslaught represents the end of the Israeli rationale for violence. 110 years of ethnic cleansing and assassinations and Palestinian resistance will not disappear. Israel must come to terms with its indigenous population, or it will itself disappear, Jeff Halper writes at Mondo

Yale Protestant chaplain says Americans must curb Israel so as to curb anti-Semitism

Philip Weiss on
Bruce Shipman, Chaplain - Episcopal Church at Yale

Bruce Shipman, a Yale chaplain, says that anti-Semitism is fed by Israel’s “carnage” against Gaza and American Jews ought to pressure Netanyahu to stop such behavior. There has been a backlash against him for the comments, but they demonstrate that US non-Jews are taking a more active role in the discourse since the Gaza atrocities.

‘Get me out of the rubble, please, I’m alive’

Ishraq Othman on

Talal Alhelo describes the destruction of his and his brothers’ houses in Sheja’iyeh, and the killing of his brother Gehad’s family. His niece was caught beneath the rubble, crying for help. Now her eyes are the only ones Talal can see. Ishraq Othman tells the haunting story at Mondo.

‘New Yorker’ limits its expose of Israel lobby to AIPAC

Philip Weiss on

Connie Bruck says AIPAC’s power is fading, in the New Yorker, but her piece misleads on two fronts: conflating “the Israel lobby” entirely with AIPAC and making J Street a white knight; and saying that the movement inside American Jewish life that is critical of Israel is still devoted to the state, thereby writing off a burgeoning group of non- and anti-Zionists

Israel’s information iron dome

Yarden Katz on

The Israeli press acted as Iron Dome to protect Israeli readers from the truth of the Gaza operation. The gravest images of Palestinian suffering will not be shown in the most popular newspapers in Israel. The stories of loss and devastation, of individuals and families, will not be told. The press most resembles American media in the initial period following 9/11, where a wave of nationalism swept coverage and silenced dissenting voices.

Ceasefire deal after weeks of fighting in Gaza promises easing of blockade

Alex Kane on

Israel and the Palestinian armed groups waging war in Gaza for the past seven weeks have inked a cease-fire deal that promises an end to the fighting. The reported terms of the deal include an easing of the blockade of Gaza and the halting of attacks from both sides–a similar agreement reached in 2012 during the last round of fighting. Representatives of Palestinian parties are celebrating the deal as a victory, and people in Gaza have also taken to the streets in celebration. But in Israel, the reaction to the cease-fire was much more dour.

Gaza goyim jailbreak

Philip Weiss on

Non-Jewish Americans have been loath to criticize Israel because you don’t comment on someone else’s family and you can be accused of anti-Semitism. Gaza has changed that. Phil Weiss reports from a lakeside cabin on non-Jewish attitudes.