Why I removed my synagogue’s Zionist prayers on Yom Kippur

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on 40 Comments

A year ago, I joined my synagogue’s Yom Kippur service and looked over a prayer they had distributed. Titled “Prayer for the Soldiers of the Israeli Defense Forces,” it called for Israel’s opponents to be “struck down”. It thanked Israel’s soldiers for standing “guard over our land” and clarified that this land included the occupied West Bank and Gaza. It was published by “the official fund of the Israeli Defense Forces.” Although I’d had my disagreements with this synagogue in the past, I decided to attend the service in honor of my grandma who passed away a few months earlier. Seeing this prayer, I realized my participation was no honor to her.

I walked out. On my way, I grabbed the entire stack of prayers.

I posted a photo of the stack on Facebook, along with an admittedly boisterous caption. [1] Some friends replied with strong disapproval. A former classmate even threatened, “One of these days you’re going to get beaten to within an inch of your life by someone, and you’re going to deserve it. That’s all I have to say.”

Initially, I planned to shred the despicable prayers. A Chabad rabbi, a longtime friend, wrote to me that they have God’s name on them and, “As Jews we bury not shred G-d’s name.” Fine with me. I announced I would give them a burial.

With Yom Kippur here once again, it is customary for Jews to reflect on the past year and repent for the wrongs they have committed. Some will think I should begin by apologizing for stealing from and publicly shaming my synagogue. Instead, I will explain why I did it and why I would do it again.

Their prayers answered

It matters a great deal what synagogues include in their Yom Kippur service, on the holiest holiday of the year. These prayers help shape many Jews’ very conception of what it means to be Jewish. They set an example for the congregation’s children. Zionist prayer reinforces the militarist mindset that so many young Jews learn on Birthright and March of the Living, in campus Hillel chapters, and in Hebrew School classes. As long as advocacy for occupation and warfare proliferate Jewish culture, it is impossible to see the Jewish mainstream playing anything but a destructive role in the struggle for justice and peace.

The prayer asked, “May the Lord cause the enemies who rise up against us to be struck down.” A year has gone by, and the congregants got what they prayed for. The Israeli military “struck down” some 2,188 Gazans this summer, at least three-quarters of them civilians. Israel “struck down” Gaza despite the offer Hamas made on July 16 for a decade-long truce in return for ending the blockade (which, as a form of collective punishment, is illegal anyway under the Fourth Geneva Convention). Israel “struck down” Gaza despite Human Rights Watch calling for Israel to be investigated for war crimes. Israel “struck down” Gaza despite the clear lesson from history that war will not extinguish Palestinian resistance. The assault “left 373,000 children in need of direct and specialised psychosocial support,” according to the Russell Tribunal on Palestine.

As if answering the prayer, Israeli soldiers and police continue to occupy “our land” from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea. Over the summer, Prime Minister Netanyahu once again promised never to withdraw Israeli troops from the West Bank’s Jordan Valley. This week, Israel finalized its approval for 2,610 housing units to be built in occupied East Jerusalem.

What would Rabbi Hillel do

I explained to my family the day after Yom Kippur that I had simply tried to follow the words of the first-century BCE rabbi Hillel: “What is hateful to you, do not do unto your fellow man. This is the whole Torah; the rest is mere commentary.” Hillel’s prescription resembles the well-known Golden Rule (Treat others as you would like them to treat you under similar circumstances) that Charles Darwin and later Peter Kropotkin considered an approximation of human beings’ innate moral instinct.

If someone saw a prayer for anti-Jewish violence in their church or their mosque, I would not want them to recite it. In fact, I would want them to remove it and to explain to their fellow congregants why they did so. This is how I would want to be treated. I am sure the members of my synagogue would agree. Following Hillel’s words, when I saw a prayer for anti-Palestinian violence, I tried to respond with the same respect toward Palestinians that I would want directed toward me. I also tried to treat my fellow Jewish congregants how I would want to be treated; if you ever catch me praying for a military occupation of someone else’s land and the striking down the oppressed, I want you to interrupt and challenge me.

The Chabad rabbi sent me another message, insisting that I had censored my synagogue’s prayer and violated the congregation’s freedom of speech. He is mistaken. I had neither the intent nor the effect of censoring the prayer. I removed the stack during the middle of the service, after most congregants had already seen and taken a copy. Far from censoring it, I even posted a copy online for educational purposes. I cannot and would not stop my synagogue from printing or ordering more of these prayers in the future. Needless to say, I would oppose any attempt by the State to stop a house of worship from reciting a prayer like this one.

So what message did I hope to send? I wanted to show that from time to time we ordinary Jews can throw a wrench in the Zionist propaganda machine and challenge its hijacking of Jewish culture. As the Israeli historian Ilan Pappe writes, “We need to reclaim Judaism and extract it from the hands of the ‘Jewish State’”. I want to emphasize the “we”. This time, there will be no Abraham smashing the idols for us, no Moses burning the golden calf, and no Elijah calling fire from the sky to expose the wayward Israeli king. This time, the work of decolonizing Jewishness will be up to all of us rank and filers.

Notes

[1] Here’s the caption:

On my way out of synagogue, I ‘borrowed’ the whole stack of Zionist prayers being handed out. Does anyone have a good shredder?

Bless the Israeli Occupation Forces for standing ‘guard over *our* land’? Pray for Israeli ‘victory’? Wish for all those who ‘rise up’ against colonialism to be ‘struck down’? Really, Beth El?

Happy new year, everyone! This year, may we overcome racism and free Palestine!

About Dan Fischer

Dan Fischer is a community organizer, substitute teacher and math tutor living in New Haven, Connecticut. He is a member of Capitalism vs. the Climate and the Middle East Crisis Committee. Dan can be reached at [email protected]

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40 Responses

  1. W.Jones
    October 3, 2014, 5:02 pm

  2. NormanF
    October 3, 2014, 7:14 pm

    Not a word in his entire article about three Jewish kids murdered. Apparently, Dan Fischer doesn’t think they deserve to be remembered.

    And he won’t express gratitude for 64 Israeli soldiers who gave their lives to protect the world’s only Jewish State.

    He has plenty of sympathy for Israel’s enemies bent upon the country’s destruction but sympathy for Israel’s people is in short supply.

    I guess being in the synagogue on Yom Kippur means never having to atone for one’s hate of the Jewish State and commiseration on behalf of its enemies.

    That’s hypocritical, insincere, deceitful, offensive and inexcusable.

    • Dan Fischer
      October 4, 2014, 5:06 pm

      Norman, it’s very interesting how you claim to know my opinions based on whatever I don’t happen to mention in a single article. Far from lacking sympathy for Israelis, I believe Zionism–especially in its hyper-millitarist Revisionist/Likudnik form–needlessly risks Israeli soldiers’ lives in preventable wars and often leads to increased popular support for extreme groups that endanger Israeli civilians. For example, the New York Times reported on July 24 that Hamas had already gained many new enthusiasts as a result of Israel’s attack on Gaza (“Spectators to War, West Bank Residents Hail the Hamas Fight Against Israel”). Furthermore, lsrael’s military expenditures take resources away from social programs like housing, health care, and education that would be far more beneficial than war is to Israelis. Hence, I believe Zionism goes against the enlightened self-interest of Israelis, as many pieces by Boycott from Within, Anarchists Against the Wall, and Matzpen argue compellingly.

      • Horizontal
        October 4, 2014, 8:33 pm

        “And he won’t express gratitude for 64 Israeli soldiers who gave their lives to protect the world’s only Jewish State.”

        It’s my experience that once you start trotting out “the troops” as your moral justification for whatever it is that your country is doing, you’ve pretty much shut down any serious discussion of the morality or advisability of said policies. It’s an old canard that transcends time and culture. Because who, after all, could be against “the troops?” And questioning the mission is to question “the troops.” End of story.

        The horror of it is, those 64 individuals died needlessly propping up a political lie unworthy of their sacrifice. We had Vietnam; same thing.

        And why did the world’s only Jewish State have to be created out of such lies, injustice and misery?

      • hophmi
        October 5, 2014, 6:21 am

        It’s the standard translation of the prayer for IDF soldiers. I’m sure you feel what you did was righteous; censors usually do. I’m sure it will be a big hit with your friends in the BDS movement, although it won’t be with anyone else, so I’m not sure what you think you accomplished.

        Just don’t complain if someone decides that the best way to deal with the hateful literature the BDS movement distributes is to seize and destroy it. It works both ways.

      • Mooser
        October 5, 2014, 1:59 pm

        “It’s the standard translation of the prayer for IDF soldiers.”

        That prayer, I’ll have you know, the “standard” prayer for the IDF goes back to the 8th century!

        It is one of, if not the, central prayers in Judaism!! As long as Jews have been Jews they have prayed for the IDF!! It’s “standard”, you know.

    • Talkback
      October 4, 2014, 11:01 pm

      NormanF. That’s hypocritical, insincere, deceitful, offensive and inexcusable.

      Like nearly all of your comments, including this one.

      • Dan Fischer
        October 5, 2014, 7:25 am

        Hophmi, removing leftover prayers and posting them online for all to see is not censorship. Who did I censor? As I make clear in my article’s 2nd-to-last paragraph and in my comment below to Piotr, I didn’t directly interfere with anyone saying the prayer.
        You mention hateful literature in the BDS monvement. I am not aware of the movement calling for human beings to be “struck down,” as this Zionist prayer does. That being said, I am aware of anti-semitic literature in the fringes of the BDS movement (for example, in the work of Gilad Atzmon) and I would certainly support someone removing such literature from a BDS demonstration in a similar way to how I removed Zionist prayers from a Yom Kippur service.

      • hophmi
        October 5, 2014, 10:45 am

        The prayer calls for enemies who rise against us to be struck down, not human beings.

        In any event, people can certainly make their own decision about whether they want to pick up a copy of a prayer, and it is not your place to make that decision for them. Most would define your act as a form of censorship, however benign the effect. I’ve had the same inclination with right wing literature sometimes distributed in my shul. But I don’t feel it’s the right thing to do.

        You just as easily could have left your own stack of literature, and then, if the shul removed it, you would have the censorship claim, rather than them.

      • Mooser
        October 5, 2014, 2:02 pm

        “The prayer calls for enemies who rise against us to be struck down, not human beings”

        Ah, so the enemies of the “Jewish State” are not human beings? Interesting problems you have there in the ME. Are they zombies, or Sasquatches, or blobs or Godzillas?

      • Mooser
        October 5, 2014, 2:16 pm

        “You just as easily could have left your own stack of literature”

        I’ve noticed you’ve been leaving fewer stacks of your own around here, Hophmi. Not getting enough to eat?

      • eljay
        October 6, 2014, 8:10 am

        >> hophmeee: The prayer calls for enemies who rise against us to be struck down, not human beings.

        So…as long as a prayer calls for “enemies” but not “human beings” to be struck down, you’re OK with that, yes? Even if the “enemies” happen to be Jews, yes?

        Just to be clear: You’re not going to hypocritically condemn as anti-Semitic or genocidal any prayer that calls for “enemies” (not “human beings”) who happen to be Jews to be struck down, yes?

      • Mooser
        October 6, 2014, 10:48 am

        ” You’re not going to hypocritically condemn as anti-Semitic or genocidal any prayer that calls for “enemies” (not “human beings”) who happen to be Jews to be struck down, yes?”

        Jews, get “struck down”? When has that ever happened? Don’t be absurd. Nobody strikes Jews down! We do the striking around here, and don’t you forget it none!

      • eljay
        October 6, 2014, 11:32 am

        >> Mooser: Jews, get “struck down”? When has that ever happened? Don’t be absurd. Nobody strikes Jews down! We do the striking around here, and don’t you forget it none!

        Hold on there, big fella! I’m not suggesting anyone does or could possibly ever strike down Jews, especially not in Fortress “Jewish State” Israel, defended as it is by Captain Israel, the IDF and, of course, King Bibi.

        But some people might recite prayers for their enemies be struck down, and those enemies might be Jews, and I just want to make sure that hophmeee is as cool with those prayers as he is with prayers that call for the striking down of enemies who might be non-Jews.

    • Marnie
      October 4, 2014, 11:51 pm

      “And he won’t express gratitude for 64 Israeli soldiers who gave their lives to protect the world’s only Jewish State. ”

      Because he appears not to be kowtowing to the israeli state, you’re upset. Get over it. You and all the other whiners hear this – zionism should be buried, not just these ridiculous prayers. If all judaism means to you is having a “jewish state”, the shame is on you. You’re no better, if not worse, than the israelites who worshipped the golden calf, and that is inexcusable.

    • Marnie
      October 5, 2014, 12:07 am

      After you’re through feeling sorry for yourself, the 3 dead teenagers and the 64 israeli soldiers, do you have anything left for Mohammed Abu Kdeir – the boy who was burned alive by the best of israel’s settlers – what brave men! Any sorrow or shame for almost 2200 dead palestinians, 75% of them noncombatants? You do realize, don’t you, that the dead israelis would probably be very much alive today were it not for the murderous, bloody heart of the zionist enterprise? And the future holds in store, if the state of israel is allowed to continue on this suicidal path, many more dead israelis, if they are your only concern. You’d do yourself and your soul a great service to watch the videos from the Russell Tribunal. It may help you to understand what the rest of the world feels regarding the zionism, which by its very nature is evil, racist and with extermination as its ultimate goal.

      • Marnie
        October 5, 2014, 8:21 am

        Typo – did not mean “the zionism”, just “zionism”. Sheesh.

    • Mooser
      October 5, 2014, 2:12 pm

      “I guess being in the synagogue on Yom Kippur means never having to atone for one’s hate of the Jewish State and commiseration on behalf of its enemies.”

      Yes, isn’t there a lot in the Yom Kippur Service about atoning for “commiseration”?
      Gosh darn it, if there’s one thing “standard” Judaism won’t have, it’s that awful “commiseration”. It just ain’t Kosher!

    • eljay
      October 6, 2014, 8:00 am

      >> NormanFeee: … And he won’t express gratitude for 64 Israeli soldiers who gave their lives to protect the world’s only Jewish State.

      Those soldiers gave their lives to protect the world’s only oppressive, colonialist, expansionist and supremacist “Jewish State”, a state:
      – born of Jewish terrorism and the ethnic cleansing of Palestinians from their homes and lands;
      – engaged in a 60+ years, ON-GOING and offensive (i.e., not defensive) campaign of aggression, oppression, theft, colonization, destruction, torture and murder;
      – that refuses to honour its obligations under international law;
      – that refuses to accept responsibility for its past and ON-GOING (war) crimes; and
      – that refuses to enter into sincere negotiations for a just and mutually-beneficial peace.

      Israel has no right to exist as a supremacist “Jewish State”. No state has a right to exist as a supremacist state.

  3. Horizontal
    October 3, 2014, 8:50 pm

    Damn, I just realized that my version of justice (I was loosely raised Methodist, but it didn’t take) is exactly the same as Rabbi Hillel’s: “What is hateful to you, do not do unto your fellow man. This is the whole Torah; the rest is mere commentary.” Basically, why would you ask others to live under conditions that you yourself would find intolerable? Seems like a pretty good measure to me as well as a very accurate and reliable “bullshit meter” for judging various politicians’ platforms. This also just happens to apply nicely to Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians as well.

    I guess my idea of religion has never involved being part of a group — the closest I feel to God is when I’m alone with my thoughts staring at the Milky Way on some warm clear night — so I can only imagine the struggles that you are going through within your group; I admire and applaud your attempts to be a moral compass to yourself and those around you. That’s how morality is supposed to work after all; by example.

    Keep shining on.

    • Mooser
      October 5, 2014, 2:07 pm

      “the closest I feel to God is when I’m alone with my thoughts staring at the Milky Way on some warm clear night”

      Me too! And that first bite? Divine!! Sacred, even.

  4. eljay
    October 4, 2014, 9:22 am

    >> The prayer asked, “May the Lord cause the enemies who rise up against us to be struck down.”

    This is what the prayer is really asking: May our Lord overpower their Lord and – in co-operation with the Lord of the Americans and staggering amounts of high-tech weaponry – cause the dirty Aye-rabs who continue to resist our righteous, 60+ years, on-going and offensive (i.e., not defensive) campaign of aggression, oppression, theft, colonization, destruction, torture and murder to be struck down. All hail the ‘Jewish State’ of (Greater) Israel.”

  5. piotr
    October 4, 2014, 2:41 pm

    I would have a minor objection that taking the prayers out of the Temple was pointless and perhaps unethical. Chabad rabbi may have a point here. Basically, if you wanted to distribute leaflets for a good cause in that way, you wouldn’t like the distribution to be sabotaged in that way, so Hillel (or Golden) rule is applicable. Chances are, if you witnessed your opponents doing it, you would chide their spitefulness. Doing bad things (here, not that bad, it is hard to see it as a theft because they were for everyone to take) to bad people is still bad.

    Clearly, ultra-pacifism is untenable, but if you violate Golden Rule you need a good justification. But all objectives were fulfilled by unquestionably correct actions, posting the prayer and the polemic reply. Israel is not just Jewish state as an ethnic state, it is religious Jewish state and the state variant of the religion glorifies Holy War, and this variant is imported to USA. And the prayer you have shown us is just a tip of an iceberg (or just an edge of a pile of something much less smell-neutral than ice).

    Top rabbis urge the state to use the military for the sake of vengeance (including colorful Biblical analogy to collecting Philistine foreskins) , top military cleric admonishes soldiers to offer no mercy to the enemy, our moderate American rabbis urging global merciless Holy War and so on. They are all the same, they are all Amalek, caedite eos (sorry, my Latin is bad but Hebrew is worse).

    • Dan Fischer
      October 4, 2014, 4:42 pm

      Pitor, thanks for sharing your thoughts. I do think there was some symbolic force in my act of removing hateful prayers from the year’s holiest holiday service. When writing the article, I thought of it as a kind of metaphor for the removal of Zionism from Jewish culture. In the last paragraph, I humbly tried placing it in a tradition of dramatic Jewish self-criticism that goes back to the Bible itself. I’ll leave it to you and other readers to judge whether or not I succeeded in leveraging my symbolic action in order to lend some rhetorical power to my piece examining a case of war-mongering in mainstream Jewish life.

      Being a basically symbolic action, the taking of leftover prayers had nothing to do with sabotaging speech. As I made clear, I waited until congregants had already seen and taken the prayers. In other words, I didn’t directly prevent anyone from reciting the prayers. I did, however, get at least some people to reflect critically afterwards on the prayer and the militarist mentality it exemplifies.

      Moreover, I didn’t remove the prayers merely because I disagreed with the cause they advanced. I removed them because the prayers advocate violence against Palestinians resisting an oppressive occupier. I argue in my article that my action adheres to Hillel’s rule: if in the future people catch me advocating violence to uphold oppression, then I want them to at least take a comparable symbolic action to call me out.

      As an aside, I disagree with the suggestion you may have been making that the Golden Rule requires pacifism. In my article, I link to the naturalist and social theorist Peter Kropotkin’s piece “Anarchist Morality,” which explains how the Golden Rule can sometimes justify violence against oppressors. Basically, he argues that reasonable people would admit they wish to be resisted if they ever start oppressing others and especially if they start harming people close to them.

      • Marnie
        October 5, 2014, 12:09 am

        Thank you for your actions and your words. You owe no one an apology.

  6. Pixel
    October 4, 2014, 4:46 pm

    .

    Priceless!

  7. Mooser
    October 5, 2014, 2:21 pm

    Gee, I have a funny idea! Why don’t we start a non-Zionist Jewish denomination? Then we can see how Zionists defend our freedom to worship as Jews differently from them. Why, I can’t even imagine any friction.

    • eljay
      October 6, 2014, 7:51 am

      >> Mooser: Why, I can’t even imagine any friction.

      Anti-Zionist Orthodox Jews … were attacked and brutally beaten by private security guards hired by the Ministry of Transportation.

      The group, known for being outspokenly critical of the State of Israel and its very existence …

      Why do they hate Jews so much?

      • Mooser
        October 6, 2014, 10:53 am

        A group of guys, dressed in those funny clothes (and that hair!!) and singing old Beach Boys songs? Who can dislike them? Seem harmless enough to me.

        Maybe they were planning a “little Jewish coup” (You don’t know what they’ve got!)

  8. ron.was
    October 5, 2014, 11:32 pm

    Let me start by stating that Ilan Peppe is an atheist. He does not attend services in any synagogue, he does not read Kadish on dead relatives, nor he fast in Yom Kippur (by the way, none of the above is mandatory to be considered a Jew). Does it make him less of a Jew? I’m not sure and it is not for me to decide. What I’m sure of, is that Mr. Peppe can’t reclaim something that he does not believe in or feel belong too. And he does not feel belong to the Jewish people in any form. There is a movement by some atheist Israelis scholars to proclaim that they are not Jews, (which makes same sense). Mr. Peppe only motive is to sell books, otherwise it is hard to explain some of his ideology.
    Back to you, stealing holy papers (yes, Holy) from synagogue. It was wrong, and you know that it was wrong. Otherwise, you will not bother with lame excuse that “do not do unto your fellow man…”
    It is wrong as much as stealing a Quran books. Book that calls to all believers to “harm” all infidels (And I’m 100% sure that you will never do that, stealing Quran from a Mosque). It is wrong as much as someone breaking into your house and stealing your laptop because they disagree with your ideology.
    If you don’t like what the synagogue selling, don’t buy it. Find a synagogue support your ideology.
    Finally, learning to respect other people opinion and scriptures is the first step for understanding freedom of speech. I hate to bring the Nazis element (and I’m not insinuating anything) into the discussion, but the first thing they did was to burn books. They saw the books and freedom of speech as an enemy for their ideology.
    In a free society, we need to know our boundaries. As you are, I’m against many things that the Israeli gov does, but I’m not against the people and I know my boundaries.
    My suggestion to you is to take the papers back to the synagogue and apology. Otherwise, this act will hunt you for the rest of your life.
    Sorry for the inarticulate language, English is my third language.

    • Dan Fischer
      October 6, 2014, 7:01 am

      I am sorry that you consider the Golden Rule a “lame excuse”. This part of your reaction speaks volumes to the ethical corruption of mainstream Jewish life that inspired me to write this article.

      I have already explained in the article and in the comments section that I did not censor anything or anyone. I symbolically removed leftover prayers and then posted them publicly online. I did not stop anyone from seeing the prayer or from reciting it. Instead, I tried to make a dramatic gesture to spark discussion and reflection.

      You compare what I did to removing a Quran from a mosque, but I would like to point out two major differences. First, I chose to intervene in my own community rather than in someone else’s. I had some ownership over this service, and the prayers used my culture’s symbols and literature. Second, there is a qualitative difference in the content of the texts. The Zionist prayer directly calls for violence against opponents of Israel. It is distributed by “the official fund of the” IDF, and it has no peaceful interpretation. Although I have yet to read the Quran, I hear it is, like the Torah, a complicated literary work that can have all kinds of peaceful and violent interpretations.
      It doesn’t make the slightest difference that Ilan Pappe is an atheist. I myself am a cultural
      Jew, even an atheist Jew. I’m far from alone. Some 23 percent of Jews in the US do not believe in God, according to last year’s Pew survey. I don’t see why that should matter. I care very much about my culture and community, and I immensely value the songs, the stories, the holidays and the family gatherings. Please do not ruin all this for me and many other younger Jews by trying to make Zionism into some kind of core Jewish value.

      • Mooser
        October 6, 2014, 11:00 am

        “First, I chose to intervene in my own community rather than in someone else’s. I had some ownership over this service, and the prayers used my culture’s symbols and literature”

        Look, do you own a piece of that building, or don’t you? Of course, if it’s your intent to validate the idea that Jewish religion can only operate out of the established buildings, and those in charge of those buil;dings are the true authorities of Judaism, just keep up what you are doing.
        Plus, you will probably get one hell of a beating,(see my link) or maybe even a little gift from the sicarii!

      • Mooser
        October 6, 2014, 11:06 am

        “I care very much about my culture and community, and I immensely value the songs, the stories, the holidays and the family gatherings.”

        My brother! I greet you with open arms! I’m a big Slavophile myself. Can’t get enough of it.

    • Mooser
      October 6, 2014, 10:55 am

      “If you don’t like what the synagogue selling, don’t buy it. Find a synagogue support your ideology.”

      Thank you! First truthful person here. Thanks so much for being frank!
      So a Temple functions to support Zionist “ideology” (your word, pal) and if you don’t like the “ideology on offer, get out!

      • ron.was
        October 6, 2014, 4:12 pm

        The incitement for destruction “just keeps up what you are doing…” may be accepted in your world but not in mine nor in Mr. Fischer world. The Jewish communities, like many others around the world, are divers with many customs and traditions. Some communities/synagogues are based on Ashkenazi traditions and culture format and some of Sephardic. Some are more Zionist and some less. If Dan does not agree with the culture of the community, he can move to another one or try to change the existing. The third option of destruction, changing the community by force, does not exist in civilized world. This is a slippery slope option that ultimately leads to Sunnis blowing Shiites mosques and vs. Thanks and no thanks Mr. Mooser, keep this option to your community.
        No one claims that the template function is to support Zionism. Part of a temple function is to gather people with the same Ideology and to exchange ideas and traditions. In some communities, the Zionist ideology is stronger than other.

      • Mooser
        October 7, 2014, 1:21 pm

        ” The Jewish communities, like many others around the world, are divers with many customs and traditions.”

        Mostly didvided into three denominations: The “hard-hats” the SCUBA guys, and the good old Orthodox “free divers”. There is of course, no muff diving in Judaism. Go ahead, check the Song of Solomon, doesn’t even mention it.

      • Mooser
        October 7, 2014, 1:25 pm

        “The third option of destruction, changing the community by force, does not exist in civilized world. This is a slippery slope option that ultimately leads to Sunnis blowing Shiites mosques and vs. Thanks and no thanks Mr. Mooser, keep this option to your community. “

        I see you keep the option of being a goddam liar always open for yourself. Would you like to quote where I advocated the destruction of Jews by force?

      • eljay
        October 11, 2014, 1:27 pm

        >> ron.was: The incitement for destruction … may be accepted in your world but not in mine nor in Mr. Fischer world.

        Incitement for destruction is accepted, encouraged, defended, excused and justified in the Zio-supremacist world.

        (Those who can’t stomach the really dirty work are permitted to “hold their noses” and cheer on their hardier co-collectivists.)

    • Mooser
      October 7, 2014, 1:19 pm

      “Back to you, stealing holy papers (yes, Holy) from synagogue. “

      So that’s what the “HP” on the printer at schul stands for! Holy Papers! And I thought it was Hewlett-Packard. How could I be so dumb?

    • Mooser
      October 7, 2014, 1:29 pm

      “Back to you, stealing holy papers (yes, Holy) from synagogue.”

      “ron.was”, are you aware that most printer ink-cartridges use inks partly made from animal fats, in particular pork-fat? You might want to look into that.

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