Israeli government attempts to shut down Nakba film festival in Tel Aviv

Israel/Palestine
on 38 Comments

Imagine if in the U.S. it were illegal to teach about the genocide of the Native Americans or the violent and gruesome system of slavery in North America. Imagine if you could be punished for simply mentioning the suffering of the indigenous people on Thanksgiving, or for questioning the nobility of Columbus of Columbus Day.

In Israel, this reality is not far fetched. Any Israeli institution with public funding that mentions, teaches, or mourns the Nakba (Arabic for “catastrophe”) can be fined, and individuals can be sentenced to prison for their involvement.

Recently this law threatened to cause trouble for the Israeli non-profit organization Zochrot as they prepared for their second annual “48 mm—International Film Festival on Nakba and Return” in Tel Aviv.

This year’s festival, which was attended by hundreds of people, mostly Israeli, featured three film shorts made by Israeli directors specifically for the weekend, as well as longer films made in Palestine, Israel, and abroad on the subject of the Nakba and the right of return for Palestinian refugees. Highlights of the festival this year included Mahdi Fleifel’s A World Not Ours, which documented life inside a Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon including the residents’ hopes, dreams, and depressions; Fida Qishta’s Where Should the Birds Fly, a “visual documentation of the Goldstone Report,” that showed Israel’s horrific Operation Cast Lead of 2008-9 against the Gaza Strip and spent time with several young survivors of the attack; and the Israeli premier of the film A People Without a Land, Eliyahu Ungar-Sargon’s compelling documentary that takes a thorough look at both Israeli and Palestinian society before taking on the question of a solution to the “conflict.”

Reporting on the Ground

Zochrot (Remembering)

Zochrot, which means “remembering,” is an Israeli non-profit organization that seeks to raise public awareness of the Palestinian Nakba among Israelis, and advocates for the right of return of Palestinian refugees to Israel.

The group believes that the process of Israelis taking responsibility for the Nakba is necessary for any just and lasting solution and so works through different means to raise awareness about the Nakba in Israeli society.

While the group organizes several types of activities such as tours, protests, and forums, they see film and art as a unique way to reach a new audience that otherwise might choose to ignore what they have to say

“We think that through art or through film it’s easier for people to take in things and it’s a way to reach people that may not be reached in other way,” said Shira Hertzanu, the Public Engagement Director of Zochrot. Hertzanu added that though many people who came to the festival could be considered the “expected” crowd, many other people came not for the politics, but for the cinema. “So it’s a way of reaching new people,” she said.

The date of the yearly festival is chosen intentionally to mark the anniversary of the November 29th 1947 United Nations partition resolution, which set the legal basis for the creation of a Jewish state and an Arab state in Palestine. This year was the 67th anniversary of the plan, which, as Zochrot described in a statement, “fixated the idea of partition and separation between Jews and Arabs in historical Palestine and was a key milestone in the ongoing conflict and the uprooting of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians.”

“The festival seeks to creatively challenge the partition concept and suggest new pathways for just and equitable life for all of the country’s present inhabitants and refugees,” Zochrot said.

Israeli Government tries to censor the Nakba

This year however, and at a time when the country has experienced escalating tensions over the last couple months, the Israeli Ministry of Culture and Sport decided such a festival would be pushing things too far.

In the days leading up to the festival Limor Livnat, a member of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud party, tried to bully the Cinematheque for hosting such an event, demanding that funding provided to the theater by the government be stopped if it is going to host such subversive films.

“It is an unreasonable situation, in my view, when an entity that is supported by the State of Israel enables the holding on its premises of a festival devoted entirely to preaching that the day on which Israel was founded is a day of mourning,” Livnat said in the statement. “The state cannot bear the cost of funding of an entity that encourages debate over what the Palestinians call ‘the right of return.’”

Livnat cited the Israeli “Nakba Law,” an amendment to the Budgets Foundations Law (1985, PDF) which was passed in 2011 and essentially declares it illegal for any publicly funded entity to promote anything that “undermines the foundations of the state [of Israel] and/or contradicts its values“. Such contrary activities include “(1) Rejecting the existence of the State of Israel as a Jewish and democratic state; (2) Incitement to racism, violence or terrorism; (3) Support for an armed struggle or act of terror by an enemy state or a terrorist organization against the State of Israel; (4) Commemorating Independence Day or the day of the establishment of the state as a day of mourning; and (5) An act of vandalism or physical desecration that dishonors the state’s flag or symbol.”

While the law was mainly designed to target Palestinian municipalities rather than Israeli NGOs, many people see it as a blatant form of silencing and a de jure form of the erasure of Palestinian history that has been central to the state of Israel since it was founded.

In their statement Zochrot described the silencing attempt as “another expression of an extreme and dangerous policy [similar to the] censorship common to dark regimes.”

On Wednesday, November 26, the day before the festival was to begin, MKs in the Knesset Finance Committee held an emergency debate over funding for the Tel-Aviv Cinematheque due to its hosting of the Festival.

MK Alex Miller of the Yisrael Beitenu Party who called the meeting described the festival as “a pathetic attempt by the Cinematheque to take advantage of its stage to support Israel’s enemies who look for every way to undermine our sovereignty.” Miller also said he supported Livnat’s call to withdraw the state’s yearly NIS 250,000 budgetary allocation for the Cinematheque.

The attack on the cinema comes in the context of heated discussion around the proposed Jewish State bill in Israel, a law that would potentially enshrine Israel’s Jewish character to take precedence above its status as a democracy.

Yet despite the government’s threat to cut funding, Cinematheque director Alon Garbuz refused to be intimidated.

“It’s not a matter of money,” Garbuz explained, when asked why he decided to stand strong despite the Minister’s threats. “If they cut the budget we would find another source of funding. But it’s the principle of trying to stop a cultural event that I find intolerable.”

Garbuz was quick to add that he thought the Minister’s fuss over the festival had actually helped more than harmed, due to the amount of publicity they received in the newspaper, on television, and on social media.

“So really I have to thank them [the Ministry],” said Garbuz. “It’s been a full house, packed all the time.”

He added: “However, I think I would like to have more people come see the films who are against this festival, those are the ones who really need to see these films.”

Reactions to the Festival

But even for many in the crowd with awareness of the Nakba, the films provided much to learn.

Hertzanu explained how for an Israeli audience, seeing such human stories in the films was important and very powerful.

“It’s very rare to, for example, have such wonderful insights into a refugee camp in Lebanon, or to go inside of Gaza and to see something different from what’s just delivered through the news,” she said.

She described the moment in A World Not Ours when director Mahdi Fleifel’s friend who lives in the refugee camp of Ein el-Helweh comes to him and says, “I don’t want this [how we’re confined as refugees]. I just want to live my life.”

“People in Israel sometimes forget,” said Hertzanu, “because they tend to talk about ‘the Palestinians’ as a whole, so they forget that they’re just like any of us, that they’re individuals and people who just want to live their lives.”

“Or the children in Flying Paper [about youth in Gaza who aim to set the Guinness World Record for most kites ever simultaneously flown]—you could see how they just want to be children. They just want to fly their kites. They talk about the attacks and it’s a part of their lives, but it doesn’t take away their joy and wanting just to fly their kites.

“It’s really hard not to connect,” she said.

Hertzanu added that for many the films also provided a reminder of the need to act.

“The Gaza films really showed how Gaza is forgotten,” Hertzanu added. “There is an attack and all eyes are on Gaza, and afterwards it’s completely forgotten. We can’t forget Gaza. We can’t forget the Palestinian refugees there (and elsewhere) who are being displaced again and again.

“I think there’s something so depressing about it, but it’s also encouragement to keep on doing what Zochrot is doing,” she said.

The festival itself also highlighted the need for more conversation around the Nakba in Israeli society, and the difficulty even for Israelis who want to talk about it to get the words out.

In a panel discussion the first night of the festival, following three film shorts made by Israeli directors specifically for the festival, director Laila Bettermann noted how while there were words in the shorts none of the three films featured people actually speaking on film.

“I think it shows our uneasiness of how to speak about the issue, and even if to speak,” she said. “Our need to deal with [the Nakba] is coming from this sort of non-ripeness. We must speak because we are not yet ready or able to.”

Hertzanu said that she thinks the most important thing to keep in mind is that the Nakba is not just something that was and that happened, but that it’s ongoing.

“Because there is still displacement, it’s ongoing. Because there is still silencing, it’s ongoing. Because there is still discrimination, it’s ongoing.”

As David Ben Gurion once said, “One day the old will die and the young will forget.”

For its part, Zochrot is doing what they can to make sure this prophecy doesn’t become reality.

About Sarah Levy

Sarah Levy is an independent journalist living in the West Bank.

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38 Responses

  1. amigo
    December 11, 2014, 1:37 pm

    Zionism was built on a sand dune.Like a wall built without a solid foundation , it too will crumble.

  2. NormanF
    December 11, 2014, 2:34 pm

    Zochrot is NOT being censored. All the law says is Israeli taxpayers are not obligated to fund their subversive anti-Zionist and anti-Israel activities.

    If they want to pay for it themselves, that’s fine. But they should not expect Israel’s Zionist Jewish majority to underwrite their treasonous conduct.

    A democracy is not a suicide pact.

    • Annie Robbins
      December 11, 2014, 4:23 pm

      If they want to pay for it themselves, that’s fine. But they should not expect Israel’s Zionist Jewish majority to underwrite their treasonous conduct.

      and what of all the israelis who go to see the films, what of their taxes? certainly the amount of funds from the state supporting the cinema pales in comparison to the funds collected from the left in israel, no? why should all their taxes go to settlements and things they do not agree with? why do you think it’s the zionist jewish majority underwriting all the funds from the state? and what of the 20% of the population who are not even jewish? do they also have to pay taxes? do they get to pay a smaller percentage because the state doesn’t spend anywhere near the money on their schools or their art? why do they have to pay for memorials and parks that laud the very people who took over their land?

      your argument is less than weak, it’s broken.

      subversive anti-Zionist and anti-Israel activities.

      just like our history, your history is your history. and no, it doesn’t reflect well on zionism. so be it.

    • a blah chick
      December 11, 2014, 4:29 pm

      How is it suicidal for Jewish Israel to be exposed to the crimes committed in its name? This is HISTORY, Norm, whether you like it or not.

      Apparently the exposing of the crimes committed by Zionism is worse than the crimes themselves.

      • Mooser
        December 12, 2014, 11:07 am

        “This is HISTORY, Norm, whether you like it or not.”

        No! That is right-revisionist history! ‘History’ and the arts, must serve the Glorious People’s Revolution! Away with this bourgeois ‘entertainment’ and up with Soviet Realism, err, I mean down with “subversive anti-Zionist and anti-Israel activities”

        BTW, if anybody needs a more specific definition of “subversive anti-Zionist and anti-Israel activities”, see Article 58 (and subsequent clauses) of the Israel Criminal Code.

    • just
      December 11, 2014, 5:37 pm

      Go ahead NormanF, take it out of the $3+++ billion the US taxpayer gives you.

    • oldgeezer
      December 12, 2014, 1:29 am

      @NormanF “A democracy is not a suicide pact.”

      That’s an argument that is hard to argue against. Yet criminal zionists expect Palestinians to accept Israeli Jewish settlements in ther midst despite their immorality and the death and destruction that they cause.

      You need to talk to DoubleStandards. You two are made for each other.

      • Mooser
        December 12, 2014, 10:58 am

        “You two are made for each other.”

        No, no, one thing our Zio-bots never, ever do is talk to each other. Maybe an occasional “atta-boy” , but that’s it. If they ever talked to each other, they would be at each other’s throats in five-minutes.
        You haven’t seen fun until you see a hard-righter Zionist go after, get a choke-hold on, and (rhetorically) beat the crap out of a Lib-zio guy. They can’t chance a little spectacle like that here, so they stay well clear of each other.

    • eljay
      December 12, 2014, 8:36 am

      >> NormanFeee: A democracy is not a suicide pact.

      Nor is it or should it be any form of supremacist state.

    • Mooser
      December 12, 2014, 10:52 am

      “But they should not expect Israel’s Zionist Jewish majority to underwrite their treasonous conduct.”

      That’s right! Israeli artists must conform to the verities and unities of Zionist Realism! The political content of Art must not be neglected in the Zionist utopia!
      You sound like a Soviet Commissar, NormanF.

    • lonely rico
      December 12, 2014, 12:49 pm

      NormanF***
      A democracy is not a suicide pact.

      You’re right, unless of course it replaces an non-democracy
      such as … well, North Korea,
      or … euh, Kazakhstan,
      or perhaps um … ah …

    • Laurent Weppe
      December 13, 2014, 3:06 am

      If they want to pay for it themselves, that’s fine. But they should not expect Israel’s Zionist Jewish majority to underwrite their treasonous conduct.

      Because, as we all know, nothing spells patriotism more than lying about one’s country’s history by deliberately refusing to mention the notorious crimes committed in its name.

    • talknic
      December 13, 2014, 4:37 am

      @ NormanF

      Historical fact is now treason …. got ya …

    • talknic
      December 13, 2014, 4:45 am

      @ NormanF “A democracy is not a suicide pact”

      No mention of democracy in the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel. In fact it says: “The state of Israel ….will be based on freedom, justice and peace as envisaged by the prophets of Israel

      There is mention of a constitution tho. Under which a Government will be elected. Thus far Israel has not has a legally elected Govt, under the required and promised constitution.

    • bryan
      December 13, 2014, 4:50 am

      How can the showing of a few films about the history of the land possibly comprise “subversive anti-Zionist and anti-Israel activities” unless Zionism is some feeble alien import that needs to be mollycoddled by a regime of censorship and suppression. If the films were worthless works of propaganda that might be another matter but they were met with critical acclaim and seen by large and enthusiastic audiences. Your argument is analogous to saying that because football is the largest participation sport in the UK there should be no state funding for cricket or swimming or lacrosse or opera or libraries, but a liberal and pluralist democracy is composed of numerous minorities, all paying their taxes and pursuing their own leisure activities and all worthy of state support. Perhaps what you are saying is that Israel is not a democracy but a foolish exercise in social engineering that can only maintain itself by ruthless protection of ideological orthodoxy

    • Waterbuoy
      December 13, 2014, 12:45 pm

      Democracy?
      First: You may argue that taxpayers need not fund the showing of historical films. (your claim that it is ‘revisionist’ history: Yes. History was revised with the declassification of UK and Israeli documentation in the 80s. History is revised as new facts are revealed)
      Second: People found to be involved in commemorating the Nakbah may be fined or imprisoned. How nice…. and how unlike a western democracy.

  3. Giles
    December 11, 2014, 3:29 pm

    What does it say about a society that it is illegal to hear anything outside the official narrative.

    I mean actually illegal. Many societies have taboos.

    • oldgeezer
      December 12, 2014, 1:32 am

      I realize your question was rhetorical. The lack of responses shows that. Those societies have sunk pretty much as low as possible. In my opinion they can’t be redeemed. They are lost. t will take internal or external force to throw out the vile mindset that rules

  4. a blah chick
    December 11, 2014, 3:34 pm

    It’s great that they did not allow themselves to be intimidated. It’s also good that Livnat has since announced her retirement from public office.

    Definitely a win win all around.

  5. just
    December 11, 2014, 4:35 pm

    Thanks for this, Sarah.

    I’m very glad the audiences were packed. Terrific effort and success by Zochrot.

    “However, I think I would like to have more people come see the films who are against this festival, those are the ones who really need to see these films.”

    The ones who attended have friends and family…conversations will be had.

  6. Walid
    December 11, 2014, 10:44 pm

    Israel is built on a lie and the nakba is a reminder of this lie, but I don’t think that Zionists are as distressed with the memory of the nakba, since their memory of the holocaust overrides it, as they are of the associated word “return” that scares the hell out of them. Bravo and a big thank you to the Jewish guys at Zochrot for keeping both the memory of the nakba and the prospect of the return alive.

    • just
      December 11, 2014, 11:31 pm

      “Bravo and a big thank you to the Jewish guys at Zochrot for keeping both the memory of the nakba and the prospect of the return alive”

      ditto, with an amendment: the “guys” and women of Zochrot!!!

      End the Nakba. 1S1P1V (h/t Ramzi)

      • Mooser
        December 13, 2014, 5:17 pm

        “since their memory of the holocaust overrides it,”

        Well, let’s see, if this is the way they feel about seeing their own history (a la “NormanF”)
        how factual or useful do you think their “memory” of the Holocaust is?

      • Walid
        December 13, 2014, 6:01 pm

        how factual or useful do you think their “memory” of the Holocaust is?

        Of no consequence how factual, after over 300 movies and documentaries covering the subject and dozens of museums opened to commemorate it, it realy doesn’t matter. Despite all of these, the single word “nakba” remains a dirty one and dangerous too.

        When you mentioned Norman, the first thing that popped into my head was Bates Motel.

      • Mooser
        December 13, 2014, 7:04 pm

        “When you mentioned Norman, the first thing that popped into my head was Bates Motel.”

        I know what you mean. When he first showed up, I wanted to replace my shower-curtain with bullet-proof glass.
        But, of course, there was no need to worry, NormanF is just another Zionist Commissar, always on the lookout for “anti-Zionist” or “anti-Israel activity”, right out of Article 58.

  7. Walid
    December 11, 2014, 11:54 pm

    Speaking of remembering, trouble coming up in amigo-land; from Rehmat’s Blog”

    “Ireland: Israel ban at Holocaust memorial
    Posted on December 12, 2014

    The organized Jewry in both Ireland and Britain is furious over the organizers’ ban on mentioning state of Israel by name during the upcoming annual Holocaust memorial ceremony in Dublin next month.

    The trustees of Holocaust Education Trust Ireland (HETI), host of the country’s main event has ordered the management not to refer to the Zionist entity by “Jewish or State of Israel”.

    Yanky Fachler, the organizer of the event objected to ban – and as result was fired by HETI management for the next 12 years.

    The Irish president, prime minister and other senior officials have attended and addressed the ceremony over the years, and this year Irish President Michael Higgins will be in attendance, as will the Israeli ambassador to Ireland. The event is held on the Sunday closest to United Nations International Holocaust Memorial Day.

    I must admit that HETI ruling crosses the “red line”, as what’s the use celebrating Holocaust memorial day without being used to propagate Israeli lies and self pity.

    Chief Rabbi of the Orthodox Jewish Community in Austria, Moishe Arye Friedman says that the “Zionist regime is using the Holocaust concept as a tool and weapon to silence people.”

    In September 2014, Art Spiegelman , the famous American Jewish comic book artist and promoter of Holocaust, agreed with Friedman and said: “Israel is like some badly battered child with PTSD who has grown up to batter others.”

    Ireland is home to 1,000 Jews. Israel’s sixth president Chaim Herzog, was son of Belfast’s chief rabbi Isaac Herzog, who acted as Ashkenazi chief rabbi of the Zionist entity until his death in 1959.”

    http://rehmat1.com/2014/12/12/ireland-israel-ban-at-holocaust-memorial/#respond

    • amigo
      December 12, 2014, 6:06 am

      “The Irish president, prime minister and other senior officials have attended and addressed the ceremony over the years, and this year Irish President Michael Higgins will be in attendance, as will the Israeli ambassador to Ireland. The event is held on the Sunday closest to United Nations International Holocaust Memorial Day.”

      I agree , that there is no connection between the Holocaust and the the Zionist entity and mention of Israel has no place at such an event –unless they are willing to discuss the Nakba.

      Our president will have a chill going up his spine having to shake hands with Modai Boaz.(Israeli amb) .I must check the IPSC (Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign) schedule .I assume they will have a very special ” welcome on the mat” for him and his Islamophobic wifi.

      • lysias
        December 12, 2014, 11:57 am

        Speaking of Ireland, I read this news from Iran’s PressTV in a comment on Craig Murray’s blog:

        Palestinian resistance movement Hamas has commended the Irish parliament for a vote in favor of recognizing a Palestinian state.

        Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum said on Thursday that the Irish parliament’s move is “an important step forward.”

        He also said that the recognition is a positive international and political development.

        This comes as Irish Foreign Minister Charlie Flanagan said on Wednesday that his country was considering an early recognition of Palestine as an independent state, despite opposition from Israel.

        The Irish foreign minister made the remarks in parliament in the capital, Dublin, after lawmakers approved a non-binding motion regarding Palestinian statehood.

        The motion agreed by Irish lawmakers called on the government to “officially recognize the State of Palestine, on the basis of the 1967 borders, with East Jerusalem as the capital, as established in United Nations resolutions.

  8. talknic
    December 12, 2014, 1:18 am

    Livnat said in the statement. “The state cannot bear the cost of funding of an entity that encourages debate over what the Palestinians call ‘the right of return.’ ”

    Livnat should read the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel. It gives non-Jews the right of return, as Israelis, not Palestinians! http://pages.citebite.com/b3n4r7v9f8xit

  9. Walid
    December 12, 2014, 8:22 am

    Bad news coming out of the West Bank this afternoon. It was reported that a Palestinian hitch-hiker that had been given a ride by an Israeli family threw something at them possibly acid injuring lightly the parents and the 4 kids. The Palestinian was shot in the leg while trying to run away at a checkpoint. If true, that would be a very ugly incident by a Palestinian.

    • eljay
      December 12, 2014, 8:41 am

      >> Walid: If true, that would be a very ugly incident by a Palestinian.

      I agree, and if true the Palestinian must be held accountable for his crime.

      But whether true or not, his action must not be used by Zio-supremacists or the supremacist “Jewish State” as justification for acts of injustice and immorality (e.g., demolition of family’s home, torture, retaliatory murders, etc.) by them.

    • just
      December 12, 2014, 9:00 am

      Terrible, awful if true.

      I read this as well:

      “Another Israeli civilian shot the suspect in the leg as he fled, the Israeli spokeswoman added.”

      http://www.maannews.net/eng/ViewDetails.aspx?ID=746750

      • talknic
        December 13, 2014, 4:34 am

        “Another Israeli civilian shot…..”

        Civilians are prohibited from bearing arms in Occupied Territories!

      • Walid
        December 13, 2014, 7:03 am

        In an update to the Maan News article, it now seems that the hitchhiker is not the guilty one but another Palestinian man standing next to him as the car with the Israeli family stopped to pick them up. That’s when the new guy in the story threw something at the family members and on the hitchhiker before he was shot. The assailant supposedly has a record of mental illness:

        “… A Palestinian man standing next to the hitchhiker threw acid at both him and the family when the car stopped, it said.

        Initially the army said the attacker was a hitchhiker but later revised its statement.

        Israeli news site Ynet said three young children aged 8-10 suffered light burn wounds and a 40-year-old man suffered burns to his face and eyes.

        Another Israeli civilian shot the suspect in the leg as he fled, the Israeli spokeswoman added.

        The suspect was identified as Jamal Abd al-Majid Ghayatha, 45, from the village of Nahalin.

        Palestinian residents said he was mentally unstable and had received treatment at a mental health clinic in Bethlehem. He had been arrested before, they added.”

        http://www.maannews.net/eng/ViewDetails.aspx?ID=746750

    • amigo
      December 12, 2014, 9:25 am

      Yes , it is bad news but what had this Palestinian experienced in his life.How many beatings or how many of his siblings were tortured or imprisoned or was his house demolished.

      Everyone has their breaking point and the Israeli gov relies on this to allow them to keep up the fake victim hood status.

      Needless to say , this horrific act will go global.

      • Mooser
        December 13, 2014, 5:21 pm

        “Israeli news site Ynet said three young children aged 8-10 suffered light burn wounds and a 40-year-old man suffered burns to his face and eyes.”

        I would guess, battery acid. Not good to get on you, but it’s not vitriol. Hopefully, they will be fine, and recover completely.

  10. just
    December 12, 2014, 5:13 pm

    “Palestinian director Annemarie Jacir’s film When I Saw You has received two awards at the Olympia International Film Festival For Children and Young People in Greece.

    The film, which was the Palestinian Oscar entry in 2013, had already won the “best Asian film” and “best Arab film” awards at festivals in Berlin and Abu Dhabi.

    Now it adds to those a UNICEF Award from the Olympia Festival, recognizing its role in highlighting social and political issues which affect young people. The festival’s “best actor” award went to Mahmoud Asfa, the child actor who gave such a stunning performance in the film’s central role of Tarek.

    When I Saw You, set in a Palestinian refugee camp in Jordan in 1967, tells the story of 11-year-old Tarek and his mother, Ghaydaa, as they try to adapt to loss and dislocation in the wake of the Israeli occupation of their West Bank home and the disappearance of Ghaydaa’s husband, Tarek’s father.”

    http://electronicintifada.net/blogs/sarah-irving/palestinian-film-when-i-saw-you-wins-two-awards-greek-festival

    Bravo!

  11. Pamela Olson
    December 14, 2014, 11:27 am

    “(5) An act of vandalism or physical desecration that dishonors the state’s flag or symbol.”

    Then why aren’t settlers arrested every time they spraypaint stars of David all over Palestinian property?

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