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‘Our Liberation Will Not Be Complete Until Everyone’s Is’: A report from the American Anthropological Association boycott debate

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In Washington, DC on Friday, the American Anthropological Association’s annual business meeting was packed with more members than any other time in recent memory – over 700. The meeting room was so crowded that hotel staff had to take down a wall with the adjoining room to accommodate everyone.

"Hands down the most well attended business meeting ever!" (Photo: Arlene Davila)

“Hands down the most well attended business meeting ever!” (Photo: Arlene Davila)

On the agenda was a proposed resolution against boycotting Israeli academic institutions. This effort to shut down the boycott discussion backfired spectacularly: members present overwhelmingly voted down the measure, which mustered a mere 52 supporters.

The atmosphere in the room was electric, as anthropologists from across the profession discussed the boycott and the ongoing violations of Palestinian academic freedom and human rights. Of the 24 members who spoke, three-quarters opposed the resolution, arguing that it was an attempt to shut down a crucial debate.

In recent months, over 1,000 anthropologists have signed a boycott pledge to protest Israel’s ongoing, systematic, and widespread violations of Palestinian academic freedom and human rights. Anthropologists campaigning for the boycott elected not to pursue a resolution at this year’s AAA meeting in favor of building the broadest possible support among members over the coming months. They sponsored a series of panels at the conference to raise awareness about the boycott and about human rights violations in Palestine. Despite this, opponents of the boycott sought to short-circuit the debate by forcing the AAA to take an anti-boycott position now.

After the resolution was presented, Lisa Rofel of UC Santa Cruz reminded members that the discussion about boycotting Israeli academic institutions within AAA has only just begun and should not be shut down.

Rofel also criticized the resolution’s false claim that the boycott seeks to harm Israeli scholars. She reminded colleagues that the boycott does not apply to individuals and pointed to the model of the ongoing boycott against the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign for the firing of Steven Salaita. Rofel explained, “scholars who were invited to give talks [at UIUC] have canceled talks and will not do business with the institution. However we have all been encouraged to invite faculty from UIUC to our own campus. That’s what a boycott looks like.”

Under the boycott, Israelis would still be permitted to participate in AAA meetings and publish in its journals. Zareena Grewal of Yale University reminded the audience that the American Studies Association’s support for the boycott did not prevent numerous Israelis from attending that group’s recent annual meeting.

Anthropologists specializing in Israel/Palestine who spoke at the meeting overwhelmingly endorsed the boycott and opposed the resolution. Ilana Feldman of George Washington University said that 25 years of working in Israel/Palestine “gives me the information I need to know that boycott is the right action we need to take to stand in support of Palestinians.”

Several members debunked the myth that a boycott would undermine efforts to change Israel from within. Nancy Scheper-Hughes of UC Berkeley cited recent conversations with Israeli dissidents that persuaded her to reject the resolution. An Israeli graduate student also took to the microphone, arguing that “conversations do not take place in a void, but are embroiled in power structures. Boycott is not ending the conversation but changing the terms of it.”

Other graduate students also spoke out against the resolution, reflecting the widespread support for the boycott in AAA’s newer generation. One said: “I oppose this resolution as a Jew and because during my Passovers growing up, we used to say that our liberation will not be complete until everyone’s is.”

Rema Hammami from Bir Zeit University in Palestine announced that she was “thrilled to finally be at an academic conference where the problems faced by Palestinians have been centrally discussed.” Hammami reminded her American colleagues that the United States is “deeply implicated in enabling Israel’s actions” through military, diplomatic, and financial aid. Hammami also expressed regret that aside from the actions of a few courageous individuals, Israeli academic institutions had shown no solidarity with Palestinian colleagues, even when universities like Bir Zeit were effectively strangled by Israeli army checkpoints.

About a quarter of the speakers at the meeting supported the resolution, often repeating its false claim that the boycott applies to Israeli scholars as individuals. Sergei Kan of Dartmouth College insinuated that support for the boycott is anti-semitic because it “suggests that AAA has a Jewish problem” – drawing groans from the audience.

AAA members present rejected the resolution by acclamation, with only 52 of the over 700 present voting in support. The room erupted into applause and cheers.

“Our Liberation Will Not Be Complete Until Everyone’s Is” (photo: Satyel Larson)

“Our Liberation Will Not Be Complete Until Everyone’s Is” (photo: Satyel Larson)

Immediately after the resolution was defeated, AAA members unanimously approved a statement composed by members of the Association of Black Anthropologists on racialized police violence in the United States. The statement is here:

B4LRO1EIIAARQ-BThe staggering defeat of the anti-boycott resolution has helped create a new reality within AAA, one in which boycotting Israeli academic institutions has become a plausible and ever more likely course of action.

Meanwhile, boycott opponents began blaming each other for their defeat almost immediately. One blog claimed that anthropologists in Israel foresaw the disastrous outcome and tried unsuccessfully to persuade its author, Columbia University’s Paula Rubel, to withdraw it.

[To view a compilation of livetweets and photos from this event, click here]

(Hat tip Betsy Taylor)

About Anthropologists for the Boycott of Israeli Academic Institutions

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61 Responses

  1. just
    December 9, 2014, 11:45 am

    “The room erupted into applause and cheers.”

    Add my applause and cheers! Thank you!

  2. seafoid
    December 9, 2014, 12:09 pm

    Great stuff from the AAA.

    I can’t say it enough but the memes of hasbara are dead in the water.
    Either Judaism believes in justice or it doesn’t and kneejerk support for Israel says it doesn’t.
    People of conscience can’t be expected to support Israel, not even morons.

    A big thank you to the AAA- this means so much to the people of Gaza

    • just
      December 9, 2014, 12:16 pm

      It certainly means very much.

      From AAA’s website:

      Anthropology is the study of humans, past and present. To understand the full sweep and complexity of cultures across all of human history, anthropology draws and builds upon knowledge from the social and biological sciences as well as the humanities and physical sciences. A central concern of anthropologists is the application of knowledge to the solution of human problems. Historically, anthropologists in the United States have been trained in one of four areas: sociocultural anthropology, biological/physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics. Anthropologists often integrate the perspectives of several of these areas into their research, teaching, and professional lives.

      • just
        December 9, 2014, 12:19 pm

        (%^$#@!) Sorry about the missing quotation marks in the above!

        Continued:

        “Addressing complex questions, such as human origins, the past and contemporary spread and treatment of infectious disease, or globalization, requires synthesizing information from all four subfields. Anthropologists are highly specialized in our research interests, yet we remain generalists in our observations of the human condition and we advocate for a public anthropology that is committed to bringing knowledge to broad audiences. Anthropologists collaborate closely with people whose cultural patterns and processes we seek to understand or whose living conditions require amelioration. Collaboration helps bridge social distances and gives greater voice to the people whose cultures and behaviors anthropologists study, enabling them to represent themselves in their own words. An engaged anthropology is committed to supporting social change efforts that arise from the interaction between community goals and anthropological research. Because the study of people, past and present, requires respect for the diversity of individuals, cultures, societies, and knowledge systems, anthropologists are expected to adhere to a strong code of professional ethics.”

        http://www.aaanet.org/about/WhatisAnthropology.cfm

      • Mooser
        December 9, 2014, 1:37 pm

        “Because the study of people, past and present, requires respect for the diversity of individuals, cultures, societies, and knowledge systems, anthropologists are expected to adhere to a strong code of professional ethics.””

        That’s right! You need a lot of degrees of you’re going to “interrogate the Native”! Especially with the view of lessening its “oppositional content”

      • seafoid
        December 9, 2014, 1:50 pm

        “anthropology draws and builds upon knowledge from the social and biological sciences as well as the humanities and physical sciences. A central concern of anthropologists is the application of knowledge to the solution of human problems -”

        they can’t be brainwashed like Israeli Jews can.
        they wouldn’t accept hasbara, because they are trained to THINK

      • tokyobk
        December 10, 2014, 3:48 am

        “That’s right! You need a lot of degrees of you’re going to “interrogate the Native”! Especially with the view of lessening its “oppositional content” ”

        Mooser — So weird near creepy you feel the need to snark something I said in a different thread about a different subject. Do you know why my comments occupy such a swath of your mind? I have no clue.

        But, in fact you only think you are ridiculing me. In fact, I was paraphrasing the important work of Mahmood Mamdani and also quoted an article from a, probably the, leading collective of Palestinian intellectuals, about Omar Barghouti’s concept of native and immigrant rights. So, why you hold those men in contempt I also don’t know and is there anything more important than working out a conceptual structure for One State?

        Apparently there is: Mooser’s reappointment as Roastmaster General of the Mondoweiss Comment section.

      • Mooser
        December 10, 2014, 6:16 pm

        “Do you know why my comments occupy such a swath of your mind? I have no clue.”

        I find them very interesting, sort of provocative, and very cryptic sometimes. They fascinate me, and seem to contain trails of hidden meaning I can’t follow. Do you have your own blog? Perhaps that would inform me, if such a thing is possible, to the point that I would understand them better.

    • just
      December 9, 2014, 12:36 pm

      Thanks for linking that great song, seafoid!

      • seafoid
        December 9, 2014, 1:47 pm

        Here’s another one for another defeat for the bots
        For when some more light breaks through

      • just
        December 9, 2014, 2:37 pm

        beautiful. ethereal.

        Can’t wait for more light to break through…but it IS getting brighter here.

  3. jaspeace2day
    December 9, 2014, 3:41 pm

    Great documentary entitled Palestine Remix out on AJ…really quite informative and full of irony’s…the most prominent being the first outlawed terrorists…can you guess who they were? Hint: they weren’t Palestinians or Arabs…watch to find out.

    http://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/PalestineRemix/al-nakba.html#/17

  4. DoubleStandard
    December 9, 2014, 4:54 pm

    1) Anthropologists boycotting Israel ain’t a surprise.
    2) Anthropology is barely — not even barely — a real subject.
    3) Israel doesn’t need to collaborate with anthropologists — it needs to collaborate in science and R&D.

    Check this out:

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/israel-signs-rd-deal-with-mexico/
    http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/indiaisrael-fta-talks-may-resume-soon/article6677458.ece

    I think it means just a bit more than a bunch of pseudo-intellectuals foaming at the mouth over Israel.

    It’s funny how someone at the WPost messed up the headline: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2014/12/09/israel-boycott-fails-at-american-anthropological-association/

    They reported it as if the AAA opposed the boycott, when it really cleared the way for the racist and double-standard riddled piece of legislation is slated to pass.

    • Annie Robbins
      December 9, 2014, 11:39 pm

      DS, speaking of science, recently several dozen faculty heads signed onto a letter to the admins at UI regarding Steven Salaita’s firing, a number of them were from the sciences (including physics or math or something). we published it here. i think you’d be misinformed to think this is not spreading. sorry, no time right now to do a search.

      • DoubleStandard
        December 10, 2014, 3:34 am

        That’s OK. I can look it up myself when I get a chance. To be honest, I’m not sure why they bothered holding this vote anyway. Asking anthropologists to prematurely foreclose the possibility of boycotting Israel is like asking a dog to ignore the bone sitting in front of it – – some things are so animalistic and natural that there is no avoiding them.

        And just because some science professors supported Mr Salaitas claim to his position doesn’t logically imply that they support academic boycotts of Israel.

        An academic Boycott is really the lowest and most pathetic form of Boycott there is.

        When they were circulating Boycott and anti Boycott petitions, I remember noticing how all the signatures on the Boycott petition were from professors of phoney subjects, while the anti Boycott petition had all the real professors. I’ll find the links in a bit!

        There are Stephen Hawkings for sure, but he’s been off his rocker in the political arena for a while. Too much involvement in the theoretical does that to you.

        If you keep up with the news instead of listening to the ravings of Mr. Barghouti, you’d know that there is plenty of foreign investment and foreign interest coming into israel.

        It’s far from being brought to its knees because a few professors who see everything as “white people are evil”, “Brown people are good” call for its isolation.

      • Annie Robbins
        December 10, 2014, 6:15 am

        here: http://mondoweiss.net/2014/12/crippled-illinoiss-excellent

        That 34 heads of departments and units are now signed on in opposition to the university’s handling of the case is also a big development. Back in the summer, it seemed as if we were hovering at about 15 or so departments. Clearly, far from diminishing, the controversy on campus has only expanded.

        What’s even more amazing is where it has expanded: three of the signatories are chairs of the departments of chemistry, math, and statistics. The opposition has spilled beyond the walls of the humanities and social sciences

        doesn’t really fit your profile of “professors of phoney subjects”.

        doesn’t logically imply that they support academic boycotts of Israel.

        it doesn’t mean they would necessarily support academic boycotts of Israel. but it does “logically imply” they very well may.

      • DoubleStandard
        December 10, 2014, 7:14 am

        3/35 isn’t so bad ;) Israel has won 6 nobel prizes in chemistry, or something like that. There aren’t too many serious chemists who don’t want to collaborate with Israel.

        There are plenty of reasons why chairs might sign on to this list other than supporting an academic Boycott of Israel.

        For instance:
        1) it’s good policy to present a united front as a faculty
        2) they don’t like the salaita situation because it makes them feel more insecure

        They maybe very well support an academic boycott, but don’t make book on it.

      • just
        December 10, 2014, 8:25 am

        DS: “I remember noticing how all the signatures on the Boycott petition were from professors of phoney subjects, while the anti Boycott petition had all the real professors.”

        PHONEY? What a complete and total knucklehead you are.

      • Annie Robbins
        December 10, 2014, 1:35 pm

        3/35 isn’t so bad

        hmm, i am not sure that is an accurate assessment. if there are 35 science chairs then it would be 3/35. of the multiple science departments chairs at Urbana-Champaign , 3 of them, chemistry, math, and statistics is significant.

        There are 7 listed here, assuming these are the main ones. so 3/7 chairs of the science depts at the university is impressive. http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-science-schools/university-of-illinois-at-urbana-champaign-145637

        School of Integrative Biology
        Address: 286 Morrill Hall, Urbana, IL 61801
        Rankings
        #30 in Biological Sciences

        Department of Chemistry
        Address: 308 Noyes Lab, Box 57-1, Urbana, IL 61801
        Rankings
        #6 in Chemistry

        Thomas M. Siebel Center for Computer Science
        Address: 201 N. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801
        Rankings
        #5 in Computer Science

        Department of Geology
        Address: 1301 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801-2999
        Rankings
        #34 in Earth Sciences

        Department of Mathematics
        Address: 1409 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801
        #17 in Math

        Department of Physics
        Address: 1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801-3080
        Rankings
        #9 in Physics

        Department of Statistics
        Address: 725 S. Wright Street , Champaign, IL 61820

      • hophmi
        December 10, 2014, 1:38 pm

        Support for Salaita is NOT the same thing as support for a boycott.

      • Annie Robbins
        December 10, 2014, 2:17 pm

        i agree hops. i thought i made that clear when i stated it doesn’t mean they would necessarily support academic boycotts of Israel

        there’s a difference between supporting something and what that support implies regarding positions one may take on other related issues.

      • hophmi
        December 10, 2014, 2:25 pm

        “i agree hops. i thought i made that clear when i stated it doesn’t mean they would necessarily support academic boycotts of Israel”

        You said that it logically implied that they were likely to. In this case (I have spoken with a couple of these folks), I don’t think that’s true. I think the primary motivation of most who support Salaita is based on faculty and tenure issues, and not on the boycott, even if some of the movers behind Salaita’s cause are people who support BDS.

      • DoubleStandard
        December 10, 2014, 4:11 pm

        Alright, then we really aren’t arguing that much for a change.

        And like I said, there are a lot of reasons why department chairs might want to list themselves as supporting Salaita — it’s almost like a form of professional courtesy.

      • Annie Robbins
        December 10, 2014, 5:12 pm

        hops, what something means and what it implies are two different things. what you initially addressed (“NOT the same thing as”) was a point i had already made. what something implies is judged subjectively. in that we disagree. telling me you have “spoken with a couple of these folks”/not convincing at all. i know some folks too doncha know.

      • hophmi
        December 11, 2014, 11:04 am

        OK. It’s better for Salaita if the main issue is faculty governance. I had long proceeded from that POV until fairly recently., since there are many outspoken pro-Palestinian profs who manage not to be antisemitic and not to get non-hired.

      • Annie Robbins
        December 11, 2014, 11:16 am

        since there are many outspoken pro-Palestinian profs who manage not to be antisemitic and not to get non-hired

        what is “not to get non-hired”? you mean who do not get fired? last i heard firing tenured professors was not that easy. on the other hand, outspoken pro-Palestinian profs have a more difficult time finding employment, hence it’s a safe bet some are less outspoken unless they already have tenure.

      • hophmi
        December 11, 2014, 11:45 am

        I disagree. I don’t think they have any trouble, as evidenced by these academic association votes.

      • Annie Robbins
        December 11, 2014, 2:25 pm

        they already have jobs. every person knows they place their reputations and future job prospects at risk by joining or promoting the boycott. right now that fascist law firm is going after the presbyterian church due to their choice to divest. there are lots of nutcases with time on their hands to target individuals like this http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/How-to-fight-the-academic-boycott-more-effectively-383362

        i think you know this hops.

      • hophmi
        December 11, 2014, 2:38 pm

        I don’t think that’s the reality. There are plenty of non-tenured faculty who have expressed their views on this issue. Your assertion would have validity if pro-Palestinian faculty were few and far between. But they are not, including in areas like Middle East Studies, where their academic work focused on Palestine issues before they became tenured. You can point to an instance here and there where someone had an issue. The Peterson case at Brooklyn College is the only one I know of where a graduate student faced trouble, largely because the school’s in Brooklyn, and it didn’t hurt his career at all. But the only logical conclusion, given how common pro-Palestinian faculty are in the humanities, is that pro-Palestinian politics helps professors get hired, not the other way around.

        Salaita’s case is one of those exceptions that proves the rule. Salaita was hired by another pro-Palestinian faculty member, Robert Warrior. Salaita’s pro-Palestinian politics was not in any way a secret. His hire fell apart when he made the choice to make inflammatory comments that many read, with justification, as antisemitic. Those who opposed his hiring have not argued that pro-Palestinian professors should not be hired. Cary Nelson certainly has not made that argument.

        And it’s crucial to point out that Salaita’s entire argument is unsupported. There is no evidence that Salaita’s non-hiring was because of donors, and every member of the BoT at UIUC, including James Montgomery, who voted for Salaita, has refuted that claim. Salaita made his choice. He’s unrepentant. He should live with the consequences.

      • Annie Robbins
        December 11, 2014, 2:48 pm

        hops there was just a case this year we covered. http://mondoweiss.net/2014/03/chicago-schools-cancellation

        There is no evidence that Salaita’s non-hiring was because of donors

        you’re out of your mind. i suppose you know there is a lawsuit right now because the admin is refusing to hand over docs and records. i’m not really into rehashing this today. you’re full of crap tho.

      • hophmi
        December 11, 2014, 3:03 pm

        The case you wrote about was a case in which Columbia College dropped one of two sections of a class a part-timer was teaching because of enrollment issues. Other than that, I see no consequence that the guy suffered, and it’s hard to argue that the reason was political if the guy is still teaching the same class. In any event, they restored the class to him after some protesting. Again, it’s an exception, not a rule. Just check through course catalogues. See who’s teaching what in political science and history on this issue.

        “you’re out of your mind. i suppose you know there is a lawsuit right now because the admon is refusing to hand over docs and records. i’m not really into rehashing this today. you’re full of crap tho. ”

        You’re not real good with hard evidence, Annie. All there is is a couple of emails between the Chancellor and one large donor. That’s not evidence that Salaita’s non-hiring was donor based. It’s evidence that the Chancellor met with a donor to discuss a matter of interest, which college admins do all the time.

        And yes, I know all about the lawsuit. Perhaps you know that lawsuit is a lawsuit, not a finding of fact. It’s a common tactic to make baseless innuendo about missing documents. They’re “missing”, so you fill in the blank with what you wish to be true.

      • Mooser
        December 10, 2014, 6:36 pm

        “some things are so animalistic and natural that there is no avoiding them.”

        Now we know for sure what happened to the dinosaurs, it was that age-old, animalistic and natural process, an economic boycott by primitive mammals.

      • DoubleStandard
        December 12, 2014, 7:57 am

        Annie, that Jerusalem post article was fantastic. It’s honestly sad when that becomes necessary, but the pro Israel crowd doesn’t want this whole thing. If academics choose to use their positions inappropriately, they can’t complain if we play dirty back.

      • Annie Robbins
        December 12, 2014, 12:59 pm

        doublestandard , glad you liked the jpost article, i liked it too.

        the pro Israel crowd doesn’t want this whole thing. If academics choose to use their positions inappropriately, they can’t complain if we play dirty back.

        yes we know the pro israel crowd would prefer this all just be swept under the rug but that’s not going to happen. we’re used to the dirty tricks, that’s part of what’s precipitated this whole mess (as opposed to your ‘reaction’ framing). backstage backstabbing and under the table shenanigans, phone calls threatening to pull funding of public institutions is all par for the course.

        the point of our little back n forth here was not to complain, it was a minor disagreement/distinction (you seemed to agree “we really aren’t arguing that much for a change”) over whether support for salaita implied support for the boycott. i think it does, you don’t.

        but i appreciate your framing here because it acknowledges you know your ‘team’ is playing dirty. and the longer you play dirty the dirtier you appear to the public. and this serves us. flushing it all out. and as you say, for your side it has “become necessary” because the cards are stacked in our favor. in numbers we can win. in numbers bds can win. just like this vote, it’s easy to assess the cards are way stacked against israeli apartheid. it’s game on, you guys play filthy and bds will just keep marching along exposing you for what you are. so let those lawsuits fly. it’s all just grist for the mill. unlike hops, at least you can see it for what it is.

        and no, the academics are not using their positions inappropriately, they are taking a moral stand and are on the right side of history too. time will tell.

  5. Walid
    December 10, 2014, 6:29 am

    PA Minister without portfolio, Ziad Abou Ein at a demostration this morning to plant olive trees was beaten over the chest with rifle buts by the Israeli soldiers just died on his way to hospital.

    Abbas back to making speeches this morning about what happening an still refusing to take this or anything else to the ICC

    • Walid
      December 10, 2014, 6:30 am

      The man was killed for wanting to plant olive trees. This is Israel.

      • Walid
        December 10, 2014, 6:46 am

        Things are starting to boil on the WB and in Gaza. This is a first for Palestinians to have one of their ministers killed in broad daylight. The Palestinian National Council is demanding this be taken to the UN and to the ICC today. Abbas is saying he will not remain quiet about this, whatever that means. Hamas is asking for all security cooperation with the Israelis to stop.

      • Walid
        December 10, 2014, 7:11 am

        Video in Arabic from RT about the event that started out as the peaceful and simple planting of olive saplings:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUaw_AlPZvY

        Palestinians are being asked to demonstrate in the streets.

      • just
        December 10, 2014, 7:13 am

        OMG!

        They beat him to death with their helmets and rifle butts.

        omg. Oh, Walid.

      • Walid
        December 10, 2014, 7:39 am

        Palestinians are all talking about the ICC. Abbas can no longer stall. There are hints about an intifada. Kerry’s Sunday remarks about Arab states willing to work with Israel against terrorism worked against the Palestinians.

      • seafoid
        December 10, 2014, 10:07 am

        That’s Hebrew logic, Walid.
        There is no space for Palestinians in Erez Israel.
        there is no law there either.
        And this is why 70% of American Jews intermarry – would you want to be identified with these sociopaths ?

      • Walid
        December 10, 2014, 10:52 am

        Seafoid, I’m just as distressed by Kerry’s comment as by the death of Abou Ein; I’ve had a suspicion from way back that it would be only a question of time before the bretheren would sell the Palestinians down the river.

      • Walid
        December 10, 2014, 11:26 am

        Kerry’s been busy on the phone all afternoon starting with a call to Abbas to not do anything rash and then to other foreign ministers of Arab states to ask them to lean on Abbas to prevent him from doing anything.

      • CigarGod
        December 10, 2014, 11:44 am

        Almost. Teresa is leaning on kerry who is on the phone…who is leaning on…who is calling…who is leaning on…
        All being run from…

      • ziusudra
        December 11, 2014, 4:46 am

        Greetings seafoid,
        …70% of US Jews intermarry….
        I have to chuckle on that one:
        100% of World Jewry are of 70% Euro. DNA.
        100% of World Jewry are or have family members that have a Euro mentality.
        My Grandson of my Catholic Family is Italo-Greco-German-Hungarian & Scot., Thank God me daughter is raising him w/o a Religion. What would he have to do to intermarry? I think, we should not apply religion as intermarriage these days in time. We were all the process of total misegenation before we left Africa ca 90K yrs. ago.
        ziusudra

  6. just
    December 10, 2014, 8:05 am

    Of course there is no report on the American MSM, but here is the report with video of him post- assault & pre-mortem by RT with a report.

    http://rt.com/news/213059-palestinian-minister-israel-protest/

    • SQ Debris
      December 10, 2014, 1:13 pm

      Just, CNN is running a story in their crawl that says he was killed by a high velocity teargas grenade. We’ll see how long that holds up. We should be mindful that Ein did break the Basic Law: Be a Jew.

  7. just
    December 10, 2014, 8:13 am

    “Palestinian minister dies at West Bank protest

    Witnesses say Zaid Abu Ein was hit by Border Police troops; IDF says he died of heart attack, is still investigating the incident.

    The Palestinian minister in charge of the Settlements and Annexation Wall portfolio died Wednesday shortly after being hit and shoved by Israeli soldiers during a protest near Ramallah, witnesses and officials in the Palestinian Authority said.

    A Palestinian witness at the protest told Haaretz that he saw an officer from the Border Police hit Minister Ziad Abu Ein with the butt of his gun and kick him. Eyewitness reports that Abu Ein died after being hit by policeman have been disputed, including by Israeli journalists present at the scene.

    Channel 10 correspondent Roy Sharon tweeted on Wednesday, “If I’m not blind, then there was no rifle-butt strike, certainly not a significant or intentional one. I was standing next to him.”

    According to reports in Israeli media, the army believes Abu Ein suffered a heart attack, but is continuing to investigate.

    Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas announced three days of mourning and halted all contacts and security coordination with Israel. Abu Ein will be buried Thursday, and an autopsy is being conducted.”

    http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/1.630951

    Video @ link. (Amazing that the IOF are able to diagnose ‘heart attacks’ as well as murder folks with abandon. That’s somethin’!)

    • just
      December 10, 2014, 8:23 am

      screenshot of Abu Ein (RIP) with IOF goon’s hand on his throat:

      https://twitter.com/maxblumenthal

    • CigarGod
      December 10, 2014, 11:11 am

      “Died of heart attack”. Hearts do tend to die after being beaten to death. Yes, i meant it that way. Ill be thinking of this person all day…and the beasts that did it.

  8. hophmi
    December 10, 2014, 1:12 pm

    Still with this “boycotting institutions and not people” nonsense.

    It’s like the Nazis saying that they’re just boycotting Jewish stores, not Jewish people. Kristallnacht: We’re just destroying Jewish houses of worship, not actual Jewish people.

    And of course, the resolution is absolutely correct. The precedent of boycotting universities because they’re state sponsored is a ridiculous slippery slope. Will we be doing this with China? With the United States?

    Another ridiculousness: passing an anti-boycott resolution “shuts down debate” (but boycotting Israeli “institutions” does not).

    • Annie Robbins
      December 10, 2014, 2:56 pm

      It’s like the Nazis saying that they’re just boycotting Jewish stores, not Jewish people.

      It’s like the Jews saying that they’re just boycotting German business, not German people.

      • hophmi
        December 10, 2014, 3:13 pm

        Yes Annie; both statements sound ridiculous. You can’t artificially separate institutions and people, because people make up institutions. And the only reason it’s being done here is probably to avoid civil rights lawsuits, since it’s against the law to discriminate based on national origin.

        You can’t say that you’re boycotting everything Israeli, and then say that it doesn’t mean you’re boycotting people. Institutions are comprised of people. It’s a distinction without a difference.

      • Mooser
        December 10, 2014, 6:32 pm

        “It’s like the Jews saying that they’re just boycotting German business, not German people.”

        Certainly Hophmi can find that an apt comparison!

      • Annie Robbins
        December 11, 2014, 10:52 am

        Institutions are comprised of people. It’s a distinction without a difference.

        right, and those people acting independently outside the institution are not being boycotted.

        let me give you an example. if i, as a person representing myself, go to a conference and make a speech or an endorsement or give a lecture/participate in research that is me acting as a person. if a state or a state institution or an org funded by the state pays my way, i am representing that state.

        You can’t artificially separate institutions and people

        i agree. but you can separate a person from an institution. institutions do it all the time when they fire people.

        there’s nothing artificial about the boycott.

    • ziusudra
      December 11, 2014, 5:06 am

      Greetings hophmi,
      ….shuts down debate……
      Oh, yes debate.
      Lead us around the barn till the cows come home.
      Zios charm one into a debate to stop him, hook or by crook, with Anti-Semite!
      What you & your kind do is to solicit to soliloquy phoney psalms since 536BC!
      That’s a long time to be fantazing fairy tales for your convenience only. One doesn’t
      debate with your kind, one listens to your weepings.
      ziusudra

      • Mooser
        December 11, 2014, 8:34 pm

        ” phoney psalms since 536BC!”

        In case anybody is in the market for phoney psalms.

    • MHughes976
      December 11, 2014, 12:31 pm

      I fully understand why the anthropologists want not to make it personal. Mind you, I’d have thought that if the 1,000 anthropologists are right and that certain institutions are deeply complicit in oppression – they mean persistent, vicious oppression – then those who make their living from these institutions and draw respect from their membership of it deserve at least to be made uncomfortable and to sense that something is going wrong with their own plans and prospects – that might impel them both to examine their consciences and to press their institutions, hence their societies, for change. If they are personally opposed to the oppressive policy they should not say ‘Change things by all means but not at the expense of my career’.
      An accusation against an institution is an accusation against some persons, including all those to whom the institution gives an honoured place. I know how difficult and unnatural it is to meet someone whose activities seem to be the same as mine and to make that person logically my companion yet to say that to some extent at least I do not want his company. Yet if there is this ongoing, terrible oppression what choice in the end do I have?

  9. just
    December 10, 2014, 6:14 pm

    Ha!!!

    “Despite pressure exerted by the United States and Israel, the Swiss government has decided to convene on December 17 the states that are party to the Fourth Geneva Convention to discuss the situation on the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and East Jerusalem.

    A senior official in Jerusalem said that Israel is expected to boycott the conference, and apparently the United States, Canada, and Australia will, as well. In the days left until the conference, Israel will try to lobby EU states to get as many as possible to boycott the conference.

    The Swiss plan to conduct a relatively short, three-hour conference, at the ambassadorial level, with few speeches and without the presence of journalists or any media coverage other than a communiqué to be issued at the end. In addition, the draft of the summary resolution has been softened and will not include a decision to establish an international mechanism to monitor implementation of the Geneva Convention in the occupied territories.”

    http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/.premium-1.631082?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

    Time to lobby our government……

  10. JLewisDickerson
    December 15, 2014, 10:06 pm

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