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Minnesota Congresswoman demands accountability for Nakba Day killings

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A month before an Israeli border police officer is set to go on trial in Israel for the killing of Palestinian teenager Nadeem Nawara, Minnesota Congressperson Rep. Betty McCollum has requested the State Department to investigate whether the killings of Nawara and a second teen, Mohammad Mahmoud Odeh Abu Daher, both killed during a Nakba Day protest in the occupied West Bank in 2014, constitute a violation of the Leahy Law on aid to human rights violators.

McCollum’s forthright letter on the two killings now known as the Nakba Day killings, asked that a U.S. State Department official be present at the trial “to observe the conduct … to ensure appropriate standards of justice are achieved.” The Leahy Law prohibits the U. S. from providing military assistance “to any unit of the security forces of a foreign country if the Secretary of State has credible information that such unit has committed a gross violation of human rights.” The exception to this prohibition is if “the government of such country is taking effective steps to bring responsible members to justice.”

McCollum, a St.Paul Democrat, references the “brutal system of occupation that devalues and dehumanizes Palestinian children” and characterized Nawara’s death as appearing to be “a blatant example of unlawful killing.” She requested the U.S. impress upon Israeli officials that our government expects a transparent and credible trial;  “The person(s) responsible for the murder of this Palestinian youth must be held accountable.”

The Israeli military and their colleagues in the Israeli government have operated in all forms of denial in the face of Palestinian and international outrage over the Nakba Day killings since the day they took place, May 15th, 2014. Although initial medical reports concluded the teens were killed by live fire, the Israeli military denied this, saying that military and border police could not be responsible since only non lethal rubber bullet ammunitions were used that day. When video emerged to confirm live fire, they spun the killings of Nawara and Daher to such an extraordinary extent as to suggest that Palestinians fired the shots, not Israeli soldiers, and claimed the video was “likely forged”.

Israeli military investigators even chose to investigate “the Palestinian side,” based, among other things, on the angle of the fall of one of the boys. Human rights advocates pushed back, questioning the government’s ability to conduct an honest investigation. The US and United Nations called on Israel to investigate after another video emerged further undermining Israel’s version of the story.

A week after the killings former Israeli ambassador Michael Oren went into high gear hasbara mode appearing on CNN’s Wolf Blitzer show and dared to suggest the event had been staged; and perhaps no one had even died that day. This has been one long nightmare of denial.

In cooperation with the families of the deceased, in stepped the groups Defense for Children International-Palestine and Forensic Architecture. Their extensive investigation, including video, weapons, and sound analysis disclosed a preponderance of evidence that a gross violation of human rights had been committed.

In Nakba Day denial, Forensic Architecture researchers stressed that denial has become “a constant and almost instinctual official reaction to any accusation of wrongdoing” amounting to “an offense against truth” which enables the ongoing perpetration of crimes. Their report’s conclusion states that the cases of Nadeem Nawara and Mohammad Mahmoud Odeh Abu Daher present a unique opportunity to change the pattern in which innocent Palestinian children are killed and there are no consequence. “Thanks to the wealth of video cameras rolling on site at the time of their shootings, there is an opportunity to hold those responsible accountable for their actions, and to use this case to show the brutal nature of Israel’s domination of Palestinians and their propensity to deny their actions.”

Forensic Architecture concludes:

On November 23, 2014, the Israeli military indicted the border policeman they took into custody earlier that month for the manslaughter of Nadeem Nawara. One of the principal distinctions between manslaughter and murder is whether the killing was premeditated or not. Our report demonstrated that the border policeman involved was conscious of the fact that he was firing live fire when he pulled the trigger and fired the bullet that killed Nadeem Nawara.

The sound analysis connected the killing of Nawara and that of Abu Daher. The same method – firing live rounds through a rubber coated bullet extension was used in both killings. We believe Abu Daher was killed by the same border policeman or one of his colleagues operating in a similar manner.

Given that the defendant is only charged with manslaughter, it begs the question of how accountability, or “appropriate standards of justice”, can even be approached as an outcome of this trial. If Israel is not taking effective steps to bring responsible members to justice, it would therefore nullify the only exception to the Leahy Law.

Speaking of accountability, Brad Parker, an International Advocacy Officer & Attorney for Defense for Children International Palestine states:

Without accountability, Palestinian children like Nadeem and Mohammad will continue to experience systematic and widespread human rights violations as a result of Israel’s prolonged military occupation of Palestinians. The status quo of systemic impunity is not sustainable. Rep. McCollum’s letter and leadership is a strong challenge to the impunity enjoyed by Israeli forces, and we hope it will lead to increased pressure from US lawmakers to ensure that Israeli authorities hold perpetrators accountable.

 

Siam Nawarah

Siam Nowarah, father of 17-year-old Nadeem Nowarah, who made the long journey to Washington to pursue justice for Israel’s killing of his son on May 15, 2014, pictured here with his younger son Daniel (Photo Credit: Orlando Crowcroft for The National)

 

About Annie Robbins

Annie Robbins is Editor at Large for Mondoweiss, a mother, a human rights activist and a ceramic artist. She lives in the SF bay area. Follow her on Twitter @anniefofani

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79 Responses

  1. Citizen
    August 28, 2015, 12:17 pm

    Any US rep who may appear at any Israeli investigation or trial of the Israeli cops in question and their marching orders will likely be cuckolded, eh? Strings will be pulled to send what will amount to be a parrot for another case of Israeli justice in action.

    • Annie Robbins
      August 28, 2015, 1:06 pm

      oh i’m fairly certain the state dept can and will send a rep to the trial. i’d actually be surprised if they didn’t given they already called for a transparent investigation. mostly i’d expect them to show up because of the unprecedented and copious evidence that one assumes will be presented at the trial. i bet there will be international lawyers their too given the implications of these murders.

      of course, i could be wrong.

      • biggerjake
        September 2, 2015, 4:04 pm

        Annie,

        I don’t understand why only these two deaths are being used to make the case that Israel is committing gross violations of human rights. There are thousands of examples…verifiable proof that this is happening every day.

        In Max Blumenthal’s book The 51 Day War, he documents the willful murder of dozens of Palestinians as well as the capricious destruction of hundreds of homes, apartment buildings and businesses. Isn’t all of that a violation of human rights?

      • Annie Robbins
        September 3, 2015, 8:48 pm

        biggerjake, did you open any of the embeds in the article above, specifically:

        Forensic Architecture. Their extensive investigation, including video, weapons, and sound analysis disclosed a preponderance of evidence that a gross violation of human rights had been committed.

        the leahy law stipulates “credible information” vs he said, she said, defense, posing a threat, lots of things that can make this challenging. because of the videos available and the extensive investigation of forensic architecture, makes these murders stand out as a means to an end.

    • JWalters
      August 28, 2015, 7:55 pm

      Last night I watched “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”, an inspiring masterpiece about America’s government of the people, by the billionaires, for the billionaires.

      It’s about “graft, greed, lies, and the compromise of human liberties”, says Senator Smith.

      It shows bluntly how the iron-fisted control of Congress and the media works, and the blanket of lies money can buy.

      And it’s about about the occasional power of shaming graft-riddled men with the truth.

      It’s deeply relevant to our situation to today. I’d have every American student watch this informative, inspiring movie.

      And to connect the movie with today, I’d have them also watch the video linked below of Senator Chuck Schumer speaking to an Orthodox Union audience. He says Palestinians deserve to be economically strangled because “they don’t believe in the Torah, in David”. This theocracy thinking exemplifies the thoroughly corrupt insanity which he would let direct America’s foreign policy.
      http://thinkprogress.org/2010/06/11/schumer-strangle-gaza-economically/

      • RockyMissouri
        August 29, 2015, 11:11 am

        It’s a very timely, as well as timeless movie. Inspiring.

      • Jasonius Maximus
        August 29, 2015, 5:57 pm

        Regarding Sen. Chuck Schumer’s speech to the Orthodox Union: it sickens me to my stomach that such a high ranking US Official, a Senator none-the-less, sees no problem justifying, encouraging and practicing the collective punishment of otherwise innocent civilians, which, need I remind everyone (including this sorry excuse for a Senator) is a violation of the laws of war and the Geneva Conventions!

    • Retired Catholic
      August 30, 2015, 2:07 am

      Why does everyone seem to forget the USS Liberty, deliberately attacked by the Israeli ADF and NDF in 1967, because they were monitoring plain language transmissions that showed Israeli forces were murdering Egyptian military personnel and civilians that fell behind their lines. I was aboard a sub that was quite close to the Liberty. The Israelis have always had more than their share of homicidal sociopaths in their military.

      • JWalters
        August 30, 2015, 8:48 pm

        Yup, amazing that an American ship would be intentionally attacked full-throttle, many of the crew massacred, and it would go missing in the public’s knowledge, just like so many of Israel’s attacks on Muslims. And it was also an Israeli attack … hmmm.

        Thanks for your testimony.

      • RoHa
        August 30, 2015, 9:33 pm

        “because they were monitoring plain language transmissions that showed Israeli forces were murdering Egyptian military personnel and civilians that fell behind their lines. ”

        I have never really accepted that explanation. No-one would care enough about a few Egyptians to make the attack worthwhile

  2. ckg
    August 28, 2015, 1:08 pm

    McCollum’s letter came up in yesterday’s daily press briefing at the State Department, hosted by spokesman John Kirby:

    QUESTION: And let me ask you another question on Congresswoman Betty McCollough – McCollum of Minnesota. She sent a letter to the State Department last week asking that all shipments of arms be stopped to Israel until an investigation is completed in the killing of two Palestinian kids back on May 15th, 2014. The father of one of the children came and met with you guys a couple weeks ago. Do you have anything to share with us on that?

    MR KIRBY: No, I don’t.

    QUESTION: Could you please find out?

    MR KIRBY: I mean, I’ll —

    QUESTION: A letter —

    MR KIRBY: Well, if we’ve – if we received a letter from a member of Congress, we will, of course, reply and respond in the appropriate fashion, which is to say back to the member of Congress. And we don’t typically read those letters out publicly.

    But we’ve obviously expressed our concerns about this particular incident and made very clear where we stood on that kind of violence.

    QUESTION: Thank you.

    So the American people won’t hear the department’s response unless McCollum shares it.

    • Annie Robbins
      August 28, 2015, 1:35 pm

      that’s very interesting. i will review the letter (linked several times in this article). i don’t recall it “asking that all shipments of arms be stopped to Israel until an investigation is completed”. perhaps i misinterpreted, i assumed calling for an investigation wrt leahy law meant the beginning of the process. not the cart before the horse. i wonder who asked the question. thanks ckg.

      • Hostage
        August 28, 2015, 6:00 pm

        i will review the letter (linked several times in this article). i don’t recall it “asking that all shipments of arms be stopped to Israel until an investigation is completed”.

        22 USC § 2378d – “Limitation on assistance to security forces”, cuts off funding to units of the security forces of a foreign country if the Secretary of State has credible information in hand that the units have committed a gross violation of human rights:

        No assistance shall be furnished under this chapter or the Arms Export Control Act [22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.] to any unit of the security forces of a foreign country if the Secretary of State has credible information that such unit has committed a gross violation of human rights.

        The investigation is over and resulted in indictments. The trial is irrelevant, from the standpoint of the statute, unless the President submits a waiver certifying foreign assistance is in the national interest.

      • ckg
        August 28, 2015, 6:29 pm

        i wonder who asked the question.

        It is the correspondent named Said, who generally asks questions about I/P. I assume he works for a Arabic-language publication near Israel. I have tried many times over the years to figure out who he is, but “Said” is the most google-confounding name I know. He tends to be more focused on I/P and more polite and deferential to the the spokesperson than Matt. But of course no one is less deferential than Matt.

      • ckg
        August 28, 2015, 7:00 pm

        @Hostage. Thank you–as always–for weighing in. Can the State Department simply respond to McCollum that, while the two deaths are a criminal matter, they do not comprise a “gross violation of human rights”? No waiver needed?

      • PeaceThroughJustice
        August 28, 2015, 8:58 pm

        ckg: “It is the correspondent named Said.”

        Said Arikat, from the Jerusalem-based Al Quds Daily newspaper (Palestine’s largest Arabic language paper).

      • Hostage
        August 28, 2015, 10:42 pm

        @Hostage. Thank you–as always–for weighing in. Can the State Department simply respond to McCollum that, while the two deaths are a criminal matter, they do not comprise a “gross violation of human rights”? No waiver needed?

        Well, they can respond to the press any way they’d like. But being murdered by a member of the state security forces and having the crime covered-up by the unit commander and others in his chain of command is a de jure “gross violation of human rights”. The statute requires a waiver when that happens. The foreign relations, appropriations, and defense committee chairman in either house can put a congressional hold in place on any appropriated funds that haven’t been released. So it isn’t entirely up to the State Department to start the process.

        Let’s be clear, the Congressional Committees, State Department, and Defense Department have the best legal experts in the world on staff. Everyone knows that the IDF and Border Police are using live ammo to disperse demonstrators when they are not in any mortal danger, e.g. “Military continues to use live ammunition to quell demonstrations even when not in mortal danger” http://www.btselem.org/firearms/20150628_firing_live_ammunition_at_demonstrators

        Hell the Goldstone report explained that 19 persons had been killed in what were called anti-Aparthied Wall demonstrations, including six children. That happened within a matter of just a few months.

        The current story is that investigators traced the bullet found in the backpack of Nadim Nuwara to an “enlisted border policeman’s gun”. He was arrested on suspicion of murder and his unit commander was arrested on suspicion that he knew that the policeman had shot the boy and not reported it. That all happened after the official inquiry into the incident held by the IDF Central Command took place. It found that all of the troops fired rubber bullets and were from the border police. But that was after CNN had provided its footage of the shootings which should have proved otherwise.

        The video shot by CNN that was synced by the Forensic Architecture group to the surveillance footage shows two gunshots and one of those was taken by a soldier, from the IDF’s Spokesperson’s Unit, who handed his weapon-off to a border police officer on camera. He was also suspended from his duties for allegedly firing rubber bullets. http://www.i24news.tv/app.php/en/news/israel/diplomacy-defense/32379-140528

        So the IDF Central Command and IDF Spokesperson’s Office should have been aware of his involvement from the very outset. How high do the cover-ups have to go and how many demonstrators do you have to murder before you pull the plug on funding and find out who’s ultimately behind it all?

      • Jackdaw
        August 29, 2015, 12:27 pm

        How’s it a ‘gross violation of human rights’ when the State of Israel is prosecuting the soldier who shot the boys?

      • Hostage
        August 30, 2015, 10:25 am

        Re: How’s it a ‘gross violation of human rights’ when the State of Israel is prosecuting the soldier who shot the boys?

        The government of Israel lied about the murders and only belatedly took action after the international press and an international team of forensic investigators proved it had been lying all along.

        So, I assume you’re engaging in racial incitement here as usual. The relevant human rights mandate holders, treaty monitoring bodies, and even Israel’s own state commissions, e.g. the Karp Commission, the Or Commission, the Cave of the Patriarch’s Commission have repeatedly noted that the IDF and police investigations of murder, violent crimes, and the discharging of a weapon involving a Palestinian victim are often delayed by months and closed-out without any action or simply did not take place at all because the filing of official criminal complaints by Palestinians was discouraged, ignored, and even denied.

      • Annie Robbins
        August 30, 2015, 11:35 am

        thanks hostage, for clarifying my question.

        ckg, someone ask that question before – not sure if it was you. but i spent a bit of time doing a search and found a regular member of the d.c press covering the WH beat named “Said” and posted it w/a link. unfortunately i don’t have the time to check my archives today on a “said” search. although i went back 2 pages. it’s there tho if you care to try to find it.

        jack, the State of Israel prosecuting the soldier who shot the boys is not a ‘gross violation of human rights’. the act of willfully killing a civilian who poses no threat is. and since the exception to leahy is – if “the government of such country is taking effective steps to bring responsible members to justice.” i would imagine this trial would not be sufficient since the charges applied do not even address the willful killing of a person. how can you get justice for murder if the state’s prosecutor pre determines you didn’t murder someone before the trial?

      • Jackdaw
        August 30, 2015, 3:38 pm

        @Hostage

        Leahy Law exception.

        b) Exception
        The prohibition in subsection (a) shall not apply if the Secretary determines and reports to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the Committees on Appropriations that the government of such country is taking effective steps to bring the responsible members of the security forces unit to justice.

        I think those steps have already been take. Haven’t they?

        Oh. BTW. Is Congresswoman McCollum writing any letters asking the State Department to investigate the government of Egypt for it’s ‘gross violations of human rights’?

        I mean, she’s already writing letters. Right? Seems simple enough.

      • Annie Robbins
        August 30, 2015, 9:34 pm

        I think those steps have already been take. Haven’t they?

        no, you can’t get justice for murder from the charge of manslaughter.

      • Hostage
        August 30, 2015, 10:40 pm

        @Hostage

        Leahy Law exception.

        b) Exception
        The prohibition in subsection (a) shall not apply if the Secretary determines …that the government of such country is taking effective steps to bring the responsible members of the security forces unit to justice. …. I think those steps have already been take. Haven’t they?

        Not at all. Since no certification can be made by the Secretary of State, while the murderer of Mohammad Mahmoud Odeh Abu Daher is still at large and no one has been charged in connection with that crime. The trial of one border policeman would not satisfy the statutory requirement that he determine if both murders constitute Leahy Law violations and that all members of the unit involved be denied visas as stipulated by the statute.

        I would also suggest that you read the letter again, since the Congresswoman said these murders exemplify well-documented, and systemic physical and psychological abuse of Palestinian children held in Israeli custody. FYI the sham investigation, prosecution for manslaughter, and initial cover-up should trigger the jurisdiction of the ICC in accordance with Article 17 of the Rome Statute.

        Oh. BTW. Is Congresswoman McCollum writing any letters asking the State Department to investigate the government of Egypt for it’s ‘gross violations of human rights’?

        Military and Foreign assistance to Egypt was suspended in accordance with the statute and it was not restored until after a lengthy review. Even then, the United States no longer allows Egypt to purchase military equipment on credit and earmarks the aid for specific activities related to U.S. counterterrorism goals.

      • Hostage
        August 30, 2015, 5:50 pm

        Jack, the State of Israel prosecuting the soldier who shot the boys is not a ‘gross violation of human rights’. the act of willfully killing a civilian who poses no threat is. and since the exception to leahy is – if “the government of such country is taking effective steps to bring responsible members to justice.” i would imagine this trial would not be sufficient.

        Palestine has accused the government of Israel of committing the crime of apartheid in both the ICJ and ICC. These kids were murdered in cold blood, while they were taking part in a Nakba Day protest. Let’s remember that one of the constituent acts of the crime of apartheid is:

        “Persecution of organizations and persons, by depriving them of fundamental rights and freedoms, because they oppose apartheid.

        http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/instree/apartheid-supp.html

        In large part, “The Nakba” refers to the fact that the establishment and maintenance of the State of Israel itself was, and still is conjoined to “on-going” war crimes and crimes against humanity for which State responsibility arises under the “Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to a Remedy and Reparation for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law” and the “Articles on Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts”. http://legal.un.org/avl/ha/ga_60-147/ga_60-147.html

        The State of Israel and the IDF are still in grave breach of an erga omnes obligation, while respecting the United Nations Charter and international law, to permit the exercise of Palestinian self-determination; the right of refugees to return; to stop construction and dismantle the illegal wall and the associated illegal administrative regime that it employs to deny the Palestinian population adequate supplies of food and water; health; education; work; and freedom of movement and residence; to permit those who have been displaced in violation of international law to return and to pay them compensation for damages.

        There is a continued legal duty of the responsible State to perform the obligations breached by its wrongful acts and to cease those acts, if they are continuing. See Article 28, et seq of Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts http://legal.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/draft_articles/9_6_2001.pdf

  3. ckg
    August 28, 2015, 1:30 pm

    There are some dramatic photos coming out of a protest in the West Bank today:

    “Pictured: Terrified Palestinian boy’s look of horror as desperate family try to free him from Israeli soldier ” http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/pictured-terrified-palestinian-boys-look-6339538

    “Extraordinary moment that desperate Palestinian women fought and BIT an Israeli soldier after he put boy with a broken arm in a headlock at gunpoint” http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3214441/Remarkable-moment-young-girl-bites-Israeli-soldier-two-women-overpower-puts-Palestinian-boy-broken-arm-headlock-gunpoint-clashes-West-Bank.html

    • Bumblebye
      August 28, 2015, 2:57 pm

      The Mirror story goes on to say that since last year’s ceasefire 11 (e.l.e.v.e.n.) rockets from Gaza have landed in Israel. It fails entirely to mention the innumerable violations of the same ceasefire by Israel, which includes way more than 11 aerial bombing sorties.

    • mikeo
      August 28, 2015, 2:58 pm

      “Pictured: Terrified Palestinian boy’s look of horror as desperate family try to free him from Israeli soldier”

      Let’s face it – outside of America – this is how the world sees Israel.

      As an armed, masked-up soldier picking on a little boy and some women…

      Very brave!

    • Jim Holstun
      August 28, 2015, 3:00 pm

      The intrepid little blonde Palestinian girl in Nabi Saleh, with the fearless teeth, looks an awful lot like Ahed Tamimi, also of Nabi Saleh, who was featured in amazing photo essay by Ben Ehrenreich (Barbara’s son), a couple of years back:

      Ehrenreich’s article:
      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/magazine/is-this-where-the-third-intifada-will-start.html?ref=magazine&_r=2&pagewanted=all

      Ahed:
      http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/03/17/magazine/17theresisters_westbank.html?action=click&contentCollection=Magazine&module=RelatedCoverage&region=Marginalia&pgtype=article#7

      With teeth and guts like these, Palestine will be free.

      Props to Rep. McCollum. She will soon be needing serious campaign contributions.

      • bintbiba
        August 28, 2015, 3:59 pm

        @ Jim Holstun

        “The intrepid little blonde Palestinian girl in Nabi Saleh, with the fearless teeth, looks an awful lot like Ahed Tamimi, also of Nabi Saleh, who was featured in amazing photo essay by Ben Ehrenreich (Barbara’s son), a couple of years back:

        Ehrenreich’s article:
        link to nytimes.com”

        Yes, She’s two years older now… Ehad is the daughter of Narriman Tamimi , her mother , who was being arrested and shoved into the Jeep that moment . Little tiger, she was !
        Made us proud !!

        “With teeth and guts like these, Palestine will be free.”

      • ckg
        August 28, 2015, 5:03 pm

        Thanks Jim and bintbiba–I was wondering if that was young Ahed, but she looks older than the last photos I had seen of her. Her mother hasn’t aged, however. The Tamimi family has been covered quite a bit here at Mondoweiss. Ahed is fearless.

      • ckg
        August 28, 2015, 5:20 pm

        If you search images.google.com for “Ahed Tamimi”, you can see just how fearless this girl is.

    • Rodneywatts
      August 28, 2015, 3:10 pm

      Very significant ckg –I had to check the Mail to see if my eyes had deceived me, but indeed both left and right wing papers are running the same story –brilliant! Mind you I have noticed in the past that The Mail have run some justice type campaigns not usually associated with the concern of the right. So it would appear that both sides of the pond are getting more and more exposure to the truth of the Nakba starting with Deir Yassin and continuing to this day.

      Thank you Annie for this piece and bravo rep. Betty McCollum. Drip-drip -drip!

      • WH
        August 28, 2015, 4:49 pm

        Weirdly for sleazy right-wing papers, both the Mail and the Mirror have run quite a few pro-Palestinian articles, something I noticed especially during Protective Edge. Why is that?

      • ckg
        August 28, 2015, 7:10 pm

        Which paper is left and which is right?

      • John O
        August 28, 2015, 7:37 pm

        @ckg

        The Mirror has always been left-wing, supporting the Labour Party.

        The Mail is right-wing, notorious for its support of the the British Fascists, led by Oswald Mosley, in the 1930s. It is particularly nasty at present, but, as Rodneywatts said, has surprisingly run some justice campaigns, most notably that for murdered black teenager Stephen Lawrence. However, that campaign (I suspect) is largely down to the fact that Stephen’s father, Neville, is an interior decorator by trade and had done work for the Mail’s editor, Paul Dacre, so was known to him personally.

      • straightline
        August 28, 2015, 8:24 pm

        Mirror is supposedly left and Mail is definitely right.

      • ckg
        August 29, 2015, 3:54 am

        So the Mirror is on the left? Its article has been revised to smear Ahed as a “Pallywood” star. Appalling.

      • ckg
        August 29, 2015, 3:58 am

        Oh, I was looking at the Daily Mail link.

      • RoHa
        August 29, 2015, 5:11 am

        I don’t think “left” and “right” have much to do with the I/P issue in Britain.

        And the pictures carry far more weight than the words of the story will. People will see a little girl, who could be their own daughter, fighting to protect her injured brother from an armed, masked, ruffian. Only a Zionist will sympathize with the soldier.

      • straightline
        August 29, 2015, 8:07 am

        I haven’t looked at either article but don’t expect the so-called left media in the UK to be pro-Palestinian. Look at the Guardian for example. The “New Labour” Party – faux lefties like Blair – is terrified of the real left like Corbyn and Galloway. The Mirror and Mail are both sleazy tabloids – both pushed even further down-market by the dreadful Murdoch “The Sun” and its “Page 3 Girls” in the 1970s and have never recovered. The Mirror was owned by Robert Maxwell before he met his watery end having stolen the pension fund of his employees, and Piers Morgan was its editor for a while.

      • bryan
        August 30, 2015, 7:46 am

        @RoHa: “I don’t think “left” and “right” have much to do with the I/P issue in Britain.” Granted the British press (as in all other western states) has a large number of pro-Israeli journalists, but still the left leaning press is far more honest that the right-wing press. For instance, today’s article from the Observer / Guardian stable would never see the light of day in the right-wing press: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/aug/30/israel-six-day-war-film-censored-voices

      • RoHa
        August 30, 2015, 9:00 pm

        Interesting article.

        Actually, I was thinking more of politicians than press. Both Labour and the Tories have “Friends of Isreal”. Both parties have a supply of pro-Palestinian MPs.

      • RoHa
        August 30, 2015, 11:05 pm

        Friends of Israel.

        You can see, tree, that the typo demons can pounce on any one of us.

      • straightline
        August 31, 2015, 12:25 am

        I posted about the Labour/Conservative Friends of Israel a few weeks ago. Unless figures have changed in the interim, about 80% of Conservative MPs are CFoI and less than 50% of Labour MPs are LFoI. I’d prefer to see 0% and 0%, but Labour is doing slightly better than the Tories. And under Jeremy ….

      • RoHa
        August 31, 2015, 9:11 am

        Jeremy is the reason I’ve been making a lot of typos recently. I’m typing with my fingers crossed.

    • Annie Robbins
      August 28, 2015, 3:39 pm

      wow, those are some brave kids

      • RoHa
        August 29, 2015, 5:13 am

        And this is clear proof that there are no limits to Palestinian terrorism. Even the little girls are armed with teeth.

    • Jackdaw
      August 30, 2015, 3:45 pm

      The blond girl is a repeat performer in this protest/theater.
      Please.

      http://www.israellycool.com/2015/06/03/shirley-temper-tries-getting-herself-red-carded/

      • Annie Robbins
        August 30, 2015, 9:43 pm

        The blond girl is a repeat performer

        actually the repeat performers are those soldiers who keep coming back to the same village. you know why? because the settlement next to it wants all their land and won’t get back what they’ve stolen and the apartheid state of israel has deemed their land (aside from the the settlement that’s already build on palestinian land) as an ‘antiquities site” the hitch is they(ministry concerned w/”antiquities”) don’t mind of jewish terrorists roam this hills and bath in nabi saleh’s spring. so, the villagers keep protesting, the army keep invading them at night and stealing their children and imprisoning the parents and the show stays on the road. that’s why so many videos exist of this town. btw, i know how to make the protests stop.

      • Kris
        August 30, 2015, 10:20 pm

        @Jackdaw: “The blond girl is a repeat performer in this protest/theater. Please.”

        Could you cite the rule that says how many protests a Palestinian may attend? Maybe it was derived from Third Reich jurisprudence?

        This brave girl was defending her brother, whose arm was broken, from a Jewish Israeli thug who was attacking him. The IDF thug actually used a chokehold on the boy.

        The purpose of a chokehold is to cut off air or blood, or both. This can cause permanent damage or death. It is horrifying, but not surprising, given Israeli Jewish racism, that the IDF thug would use such a technique on a child.

        This Palestinian girl’s courageous defense of her brother has touched hearts throughout the world.

      • echinococcus
        August 30, 2015, 10:31 pm

        Actually, she’s world-famous. She defied a company of Tsahal murderers; she intervened when her mother was being arrested for being in her own village. She then was awarded the Handhala prize in Istanbul and made a very stirring speech to children and grown-ups. She has a considerable following in Turkey and other places. In short, she is a resistance hero; messing with her is going to create a lot of additional trouble for the Zionist entity.

      • straightline
        August 31, 2015, 12:28 am

        Are you saying that the soldier wasn’t real, Jackdaw? If he wasn’t, then why is the IDF seeking to arrest the Tamimi family? If he was, then it is the IDF that is doing the repeat performance.

      • talknic
        August 31, 2015, 1:58 am

        @ Jackdaw“performer” ?

        She lives there, has a right to be there and has a right to confront the occupying military. What excuse do the IDF have for being in the area?

      • Jackdaw
        August 31, 2015, 5:21 am

        Yes. A performer.
        She has been at this a long time. She’s all over the internet. Once the cameraman shows up, she takes her cue, turns on the waterworks and throws tantrums.

        http://www.israellycool.com/2012/11/05/pallywood-blondie-and-friends-assaulting-idf-soldiers/

        She’s clearly being directed by adults and now her brother is being groomed as well.

        Sad way to spend a childhood.

      • Annie Robbins
        August 31, 2015, 5:39 am

        Sad way to spend a childhood.

        as opposed to what? being a blade of grass mowed down in gaza?

        her brother is being groomed as well.

        as opposed to what? being groomed to fear the soldier? to be submissive and stfu when you land is stolen? what options are there here?

        btw, your post that got dumped, try it again w/source links.

      • Annie Robbins
        August 31, 2015, 5:50 am

        Once the cameraman shows up, she takes her cue

        occupation would be so much easier is there were no cameras. did you ever think of that? it’s sort of the downside of being the oppressor. it doesn’t look so hot behind the lens. so, what is israel going to do about it? kill her? stop invading her village. stop shooting tear gas and bullets at her? should she roll over and play dead? put on a scarf on and act demure/submissive? do tell jack. look on the bright side. she doesn’t have a gun. she’s not blowing herself up on a bus. smile, think how lucky israel is only to have to deal with her non violent resistance.

      • straightline
        August 31, 2015, 6:47 am

        Is living under occupation anything other than a sad way to spend a childhood, Jackdaw?

        And if cameras are the only weapons in the hands of the Palestinians that won’t result in a “disproportionate response” from the IDF then so be it. The Palestinians are being occupied and are entitled to resist. What if the Israeli soldier is ridiculed? He has no right to be there.

      • Kay24
        August 31, 2015, 8:01 am

        “Sad way to spend a childhood.”

        How would you know Jackdaw? Nice of you to be concerned, but if I were you the concern would be that this poor child has been living under a brutal occupation for years, never known the freedom that children of the occupiers enjoy, living under the threat of guns aimed at them, the massacres of other children, the fear of arrests at night, and hundreds like her thrown into Israeli jails. She does not have the luxuries that the occupiers have, being deprived of basics, going through checkpoints, having their lands stolen, living in fear their homes will be destroyed, and knowing her family have been blockaded and under siege for generations.

        If by some remote chance you are right and that she is acting this role, she has every damn right to do so, and bring attention to the plight of her people. It is so hasbara of you to deflect from the crimes of your people, and blame the victim.

      • RoHa
        August 31, 2015, 9:21 am

        “Sad way to spend a childhood.”

        Sad that she has to, but resisting evil is not the worst way to spend a childhood.

      • echinococcus
        August 31, 2015, 10:46 am

        Just as a reminder to the murderers who send us Jack-whatever, that girl and her family are the owners of the country, they are invaded and occupied and have the right to resist by any means they see fit, including any violence on that soldier, who has no right to be anywhere in Palestine, no right to touch anyone, and no right at all “to defend himself” either.

      • Kris
        August 31, 2015, 11:26 am

        @Jackdaw: “Sad way to spend a childhood.”

        It is even sadder to spend your adult life carrying out or defending ethnic cleansing.

  4. italian ex-pat
    August 28, 2015, 5:06 pm

    Re: Nabka Day killings:

    I see no mention anywhere of the possible connection between the killing of the two Palestinian teenagers by Israeli snipers and the abduction and killing of the three Israeli teenagers a few days later, presumably by two Hebron Palestinians acting on behalf of Hamas. If I remember correctly, at the time there was talk that the murder of the three young settlers was in revenge for the Nabka Day killings, a distinct possibility. Not that one justifies the other, of course, but the Israeli media never even mentioned that possible connection, lending instead credence to the belief that the kidnappings/murders were totally unprovoked. And we all know how well Netanyahu manipulated that tragedy.

    BTW, regarding that case – and I hope I’m not getting O/T here – I’ve always believed, based on various accounts, that the kidnapping was supposed to be just that, a kidnapping, not murder. What possible benefit would Hamas hope to get from a dead body, when a live hostage could be traded for hundreds of Palestinian prisoners? And not just one, as they expected, but three! Two were in the shadows at the pick-up spot, and when the car stopped jumped in along with the first one. Imagine the thrill of the kidnappers, three hostages to trade! And that would have been the story if one of the kids hadn’t made a call on his cellphone, and the kidnappers, expecting the police to be on their tail within minutes, hadn’t panicked and shot the boys.
    I don’t know if this is exactly what happened, but to me it makes a lot more sense than the official version.

  5. amigo
    August 28, 2015, 5:30 pm

    Can someone find a link to a means to donate to the Father,s efforts to bring his child,s murderers to justice.

    Also , or alternatively , a link to donate to the Congresswoman,s fund. As this is the only way I can get at these swine , then so let it be.Giving up a couple of dinners at a restaurant seems a small price to pay.

    • traintosiberia
      August 28, 2015, 9:24 pm

      Yes I would like to help her reelection I am out of state
      How do I o it?

      • amigo
        August 29, 2015, 6:41 am

        traintosiberia , I E,mailed the Congress Woman at the following link and offered to make a donation .I am posting from Ireland so will see what they say.

        You might find it easier as you are , (I assume ) within the US .I am still trying to find a link to the Father so I can provide some financial aid to his legal efforts.I will get back to you if I succeed .

        https://mccollum.house.gov/htbin/formproc/email-me.txt&display=/contact-me/email-me-thankyou&nobase&fpGetVer=2

      • ckg
        August 29, 2015, 8:13 am

        I believe that U.S. elected officials and candidates can only accept donations from U.S. citizens, but their place of residence does matter. Last week Mike Huckabee went to a fundraising event in a West Bank settlement knowing that he would find plenty of U.S. citizens there.

      • ckg
        August 29, 2015, 8:29 am

        Edit: their place of residence does *not* matter.

      • amigo
        August 29, 2015, 11:00 am

        ckg , thanks for the reply.I will let you know if and how they respond to my E,mail.

      • ckg
        August 29, 2015, 11:39 am

        Amigo, I do not wish to know what her office does with your contribution if you happen to give one. :)

      • amigo
        August 29, 2015, 12:36 pm

        “Amigo, I do not wish to know what her office does with your contribution if you happen to give one. :) – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/08/minnesota-congresswoman-accountability#sthash.PvZvo40d.dpuf“ckg

        Already understood. I only intended to clarify if non citizens could contribute.My main reason for contacting her office was to thank her for her efforts on behalf of the Palestinian kids murdered by the idf. I think she deserves that .

  6. ckg
    August 28, 2015, 5:45 pm

    In April 2006 the House International Relations Committee passed 36-2 H.R. 4681, the “Palestinian Anti-Terrorism Act of 2006”. McCollum was one of the two nays–she preferred the Senate’s alternative version of the bill. When an AIPAC rep declared “Congresswoman McCollum’s support for terrorists will not be tolerated,” McCollum wrote a letter to AIPAC ending with this:

    I am a supporter of a strong US–Israeli relationship and my voting record speaks for itself. This will not change. But until I receive a formal, written apology from your organization I must inform you that AIPAC representatives are not welcome in my offices or for meetings with my staff.

    I wonder if she ever received an apology.

  7. Kathleen
    August 28, 2015, 6:44 pm

    Demonstrating some real backbone she is.

  8. oldgeezer
    August 29, 2015, 1:59 am

    Bravo to her for the courage to even broach the topic. No doubt she will be in the top 10 antisemite lists for the audacity of even raising Israeli crimes against humanity.

    Now if only some elected officials were brave enough to question why we give unfiltered communications data to a vile rogue state which is continuing to prove it’s racist, anti human rights operations against the citizens of the group referred to as the five eyes.

    It’s bad enough that they capture the data but a crime that they pass the data onto a country which refuses to even accord minimal human rights and which also shows no hesitation to murder innocents that it deems to be in it’s way

    http://www.jpost.com/International/INTELLIGENCE-FILE-Monitoring-the-boycotters-413523

  9. Marnie
    August 29, 2015, 7:35 am

    Love this! Stay strong Betty!

  10. pabelmont
    August 29, 2015, 9:57 am

    On the subject of premeditation. Use of “live ammo” ups the ante on premeditation.

    If border police were supposed to be using “rubber bullets” (indeed, ordered to be doing that) and instead were using “live ammo” [I have no idea what these terms mean except that there seems to be a detectable difference], then that speaks premeditation to do such grave (and graver than by “rubber bullets”) harm as “live ammo” can cause on the part of the border policemen using the “live ammo”. In that case, by some USA law, the firing of a “live bullet” with intent to do great harm [even if not killing] looks like a felony and any killing resulting would be “felony murder” (killing done in the course of committing a felony) even if killing had not itself been premeditated.

  11. ejran
    August 30, 2015, 5:22 pm

    “Michael Oren went into high gear hasbara mode appearing on CNN’s Wolf Blitzer show and dared to suggest the event had been staged; and perhaps no one had even died that day.”

    I think this statement is very revealing and should be taken very seriously. The only thing that makes it possible to suggest this is experience in doing the same thing. We’re only capable of accusing others of what we are guilty of.

  12. traintosiberia
    August 31, 2015, 11:45 pm

    “US Court: Palestinians Must Pay $10m to Americans Killed in Israel”
    Can the American charity organization settling the settlers and Amerucan government supplying deadly weapons to IDF and the Zionist lobby supporting and enforcing only certain discussion and attitudes that empower IDF ,provide moral support to settlers,and to Israeli government be charged with terrorism,providing material supports to terrorism,violating international laws , be held accountable for ignoring American policies and treaties ?

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