A majority of Palestinians support armed intifada as means of self-defense

US Politics
on 51 Comments

The latest Palestinian uprising was sparked by the Duma murders of last summer, when Palestinians saw that Jewish settlers faced no accountability for murdering Palestinians in the occupied territories. And no amount of Israeli violence can turn off this uprising; the young are demanding their freedom, according to two prominent Palestinians speaking on a Wilson Center conference call last week.

Khalil Shikaki, the Palestinian pollster, said there was popular support for the violence because of Palestinians’ feeling that no one is defending them. He cited two factors: Palestinians have the “overwhelming” perception that Israel intends to undertake “dramatic and drastic change” to the status quo on the Haram al-Sharif, or the site of the Muslim holy sites in Jerusalem. And the other factor is settler violence. Shikaki said:

The event in Duma where Palestinian family was attacked and burned, and the fact that no one has yet been arrested, even though the defense minister at one point indicated that Israel might know who the attackers are– I think is making Palestinians believe that settler violence is state violence, that there is no difference between the IDF and the settlers and that Palestinians need to take matters into their own hands if they want to defend themselves.

“Driven by this desire to defend oneself,” Shikaki continued, “we have seen a dramatic increase in support for violence and armed intifada.” For the first time during a relatively peaceful period, polls show that a majority of Palestinians support “a return to an armed intifada among the youth.” The figure is most marked among Palestinian men, aged 18 to 22: the level of support for armed resistance has recently jumped from 49 to 71 percent.

His views were echoed by Hanan Ashrawi, the legislator and longtime activist. Speaking on the same conference call, she termed the settler violence the “reign of terror”: settlers are terrorizing wide rural areas and villages.

People are literally getting away with murder, like the Dawabshe family [in Duma], like Mohammed Abu Khdeir [in East Jerusalem in July 2014].

Ashrawi also cited Israel’s destruction of the two state solution–and the hypocrisy of maintaining that a Palestinian state is still possible– as a cause of desperation among young people. “The two state solution is no longer possible though people repeat the mantra of the two state solution,” she said. Palestine’s “geriatric” and unelected leaders also bear responsibility for the spontaneous violence among the desperate young.

“[The rebellion] can’t be stopped,” she said. “Because it has not been engineered or in a sense organized from above. It has its own dynamic. It can’t be stopped by escalation, by more violence from Israel, by shoot to kill orders, by siege or more stringent measures from Israel, that will lead to greater violence.”

She said that Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s crackdown on East Jerusalem has demonstrated that East Jerusalem is just as occupied as the West Bank, with the same army and checkpoints; and that only a political solution forced from outside Israel and Palestine will bring change.

People have to deal with the grievances of the young, both internally and with their aspirations for freedom and dignity. We can’t go back to business as usual. Business as usual is lethal. It Has created the situation that is so dangerous. Things will not quiet down. There is no one state solution available, there is no automatic solution available. We need intervention.

Ashrawi and Yossi Alpher, an analyst associated with Peace Now, agreed that the current situation has become a single-state apartheid reality with no political solution in sight.

Alpher described the political situation as an “ugly, violent… tribal and religious reality”.  And while Israeli president Reuven Rivlin would be for granting citizenship to all Palestinians, Alpher said, Likud leaders have no problem with “something that in one form or another looks like some sort of variation on apartheid.” He urged the world to start facing up to this “very sad reality.”

Former congresswoman Jane Harman, a strong Israel supporter who heads the Wilson Center, then interjected that the “whole Middle East has changed.” She used to think that Israel and Palestine were an island and things would work out while there was a “mess” around them.

“Well guess what, they’re in the mess too,” she said. “Tribal issues and religious issues and all the crosscurrents of the Middle East are part of this problem too. That depresses the heck out of me.

Jodi Rudoren of the New York Times was also on the call. She said the problem was that two narratives, Palestinian and Israeli, are “dueling” and irreconcilable. And she said she could imagine 10,000 Palestinians undertaking nonviolent resistance at the entrance of Armon HaNetziv, a settlement in East Jerusalem, but she hasn’t seen “mass demonstrations by Palestinians,” with two exceptions (Bab El Shams in 2013 and a West Bank demonstration against the Gaza war in 2014). “I’ve seen little nonviolent popular resistance in my time here,” Rudoren said. The statement was further evidence of how culturally bound Rudoren is inside the Israeli Jewish experience: she gives no credit to the long tradition of nonviolent demonstrations against land confiscation in Bil’in and Nabi Saleh among other West Bank communities. Let alone the BDS call, or boycott, divestment, and sanctions, which is a form of nonviolent resistance.

 

About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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51 Responses

  1. hophmi
    October 29, 2015, 4:08 pm

    When BDS supports an armed Intifada, how is it a nonviolent movement?

    • tree
      October 29, 2015, 4:48 pm

      Do you consider your support for Israel violent because you support an armed and violent Israel, hophmi?

      • hophmi
        October 30, 2015, 9:04 am

        I never suggested that supporting Israel was an act of non-violence. You guys take great pains to present BDS as a non-violent movement at the same time you’re chanting support for an Intifada. That would suggest that your non-violent is nonsense. Look, as I’ve said before, just be honest. You’re partisans for the Palestinian nationalist cause.

      • talknic
        October 30, 2015, 10:27 am

        hophmi ” You guys take great pains to present BDS as a non-violent movement at the same time you’re chanting support for an Intifada.”

        BDS has nothing to do with the Intifada. International Law allows violent resistance to an Occupying Power BTW

        “That would suggest that your non-violent is nonsense”

        No it suggests you can’t distinguish sh*t from clay

        “Look, as I’ve said before, just be honest”

        When are you gonna start

        ” You’re partisans for the Palestinian nationalist cause”

        So what? It’s their right under International Law.

      • Mooser
        October 30, 2015, 11:22 am

        “I never suggested that supporting Israel was an act of non-violence.”

        Good old “Hophmi” the macher! He’ll fight all day about Zionism/racism, but when it comes to Zionism embracing violence, he’s got no qualms whatsoever.

        Ah, I see, a couple million Jews have the right to violence to fight the rest of the world, or a very significant portion of it? You like those odds?

        It was one of the very first things which disturbed me about Zionism; they always want to start a fight they can’t win. And wanted us, of course to do the fighting.

        That’s it “Hophmi”, you just stand on the exclusive Jewish right to violence, you can’t possibly lose on that basis. But if I were you I’d get back in bed.

    • talknic
      October 29, 2015, 5:57 pm

      @ hophmi

      Until the BDS movement takes up arms itself or supplies arms, it’s non-violent.

      Meanwhile it’s quite normal to support the law. International Law supports the occupied resisting occupation, protecting themselves, their property and their territory via the use of arms.

      • hophmi
        October 30, 2015, 9:04 am

        International law does not support stabbing innocent civilians, talknic.

      • oldgeezer
        October 30, 2015, 9:24 am

        @hophmi

        I agree hophmi. It also doesn’t support shooting, bombarding and bombing them which is something you regularly support, excuse and justify.

      • eljay
        October 30, 2015, 9:53 am

        || oldgeezer: … I agree hophmi. It also doesn’t support shooting, bombarding and bombing them which is something you regularly support, excuse and justify. ||

        A hateful and immoral Zio-supremacist hypocrite, he regularly supports, excuses and justifies the shooting and bombardment of innocent civilians because Jews are doing it to non-Jews. If non-Jews were doing it to Jews, he wouldn’t waste a moment condemning the actions and, for good measure, screaming “Anti-Semitism!”.

      • talknic
        October 30, 2015, 10:14 am

        @ hophmi “International law does not support stabbing innocent civilians”

        That’s right and I would never say it does. So did you have a point?

        BTW Since when has an illegal settler been innocent? Go whine to the Israeli Government

        In fact International Law demands that the Occupying Power keep its civilians OUT of Occupied Territories lest they become embroiled in the violence sure to ensue when a state invades and occupies another people and their territory. Go whine to the Israeli Government

        The occupied are however allowed to kill any armed foreigner in the Occupied Territory and; once a war has started they’re allowed to kill military personnel of the Occupying regime where ever they are. Israel started the war at precisely 00:01 May 15th 1948 when it had forces in non-Israeli territory. Go whine to the Israeli Government

        BTW International Law does not allow the illegal acquisition of territory by any coercive measure. It does not allow dispossession. It does not allow illegal settlers. It does not allow the killing of innocent occupied civilians. It does not allow the incarceration of children. It does not allow the things you support!

      • oldgeezer
        October 30, 2015, 11:06 am

        @hophmi

        btw hophmi…. Can you show me where anyone is cheering on the violence?

      • Mooser
        October 30, 2015, 11:31 am

        “International law does not support stabbing innocent civilians, talknic. “

        “Talknic” I looked at the relevant documents and “Hophmi” is absolutely right. In all the stuff about the “right to resistance” there is no specific endorsement of stabbing as resistance.

        In fact, the “right to resistance” does no more than guarantee access to potentiometers, trimmers and rheostats, in times of occupation, when used exclusively for civilian purposes.

      • hophmi
        October 30, 2015, 1:21 pm

        “That’s right and I would never say it does. So did you have a point?”

        No, instead you say armed resistance, which Palestinians, and, let’s face it, most Muslims in the Middle East, interpret as the right to murder innocent Israelis. The polling shows that in the Middle East, most Muslims do not consider attacks on innocent Israelis to be terrorism.

      • Annie Robbins
        October 30, 2015, 3:00 pm

        because hops know all about what “Palestinians and most Muslims in the Middle East” think. this is like your favorite crutch hops. not satisfied speaking for yourself your hasbara adoption of the ‘everybody agrees’ with my definition stance — even my enemies who i can speak for. yada yada

      • Mooser
        October 30, 2015, 3:10 pm

        because hops know all about what “Palestinians and most Muslims in the Middle East” think. –

        Of course he does, they tell him at the JMVA dinners.

      • Kris
        October 30, 2015, 3:15 pm

        @hophmi: “The polling shows that in the Middle East, most Muslims do not consider attacks on innocent Israelis to be terrorism.”

        And the polling shows that in Israel, most Jews do not consider attacks on innocent Palestinans to be terrorism, either. In fact, they consider these attacks to be entertainment!

        As when Israeli Jews sat outside in lawn chairs to enjoy watching the bombs fall on the trapped Palestinian families of Gaza.

      • Kris
        October 30, 2015, 3:50 pm

        @hophmi: “The polling shows that in the Middle East, most Muslims do not consider attacks on innocent Israelis to be terrorism.”

        Just for fun, please share the links to this information. What “polling” and what “innocent” Israelis?

      • MaxNarr
        November 1, 2015, 12:16 am

        Calling moderator on this justification of murdering Jews. In fact we have not only a justification for the current murders, we have people saying it is REQUIRED to do so. For Shame! Where are the moderators? Where are those people of conscious that will reign in the current support for this bloodlust and stabbing?!

      • talknic
        November 5, 2015, 7:09 am

        @ hophmi /// “That’s right and I would never say it does. So did you have a point?” ///

        “No, instead you say armed resistance, which Palestinians, and, let’s face it, most Muslims in the Middle East, interpret as the right to murder innocent Israelis”

        WOW! I wish someone had told me earlier I am the Palestinians and most Muslims in the Middle East who you claim interpret “armed resistance” as the right to murder innocent Israelis.

        Unfortunately for you I am not the figment of your imagination and do not support the killing of any innocents or civilians.

        ” The polling shows that in the Middle East, most Muslims do not consider attacks on innocent Israelis to be terrorism”

        What polling ?

        —-

        @ MaxNarr “Calling moderator on this justification of murdering Jews. In fact we have not only a justification for the current murders, we have people saying it is REQUIRED to do so.”

        Quotes please Max. Otherwise we might think you’re making false accusations, which are against the basic tenets of Judaism

    • diasp0ra
      October 29, 2015, 6:26 pm

      Please explain how BDS supports anything.

    • Mooser
      October 29, 2015, 7:20 pm

      “When BDS supports an armed Intifada, how is it a nonviolent movement?”

      Of course, Zionism has never even flirted with being a “nonviolent movement” and was glorifying arms and violence from the beginning (a culture of violence, you might say) and resorting to arms as soon as it felt like it, whenever it felt like it. Why is the word “nonviolent” even coming out of your [..], Hophmi?

    • eljay
      October 30, 2015, 9:49 am

      || hophmi: When BDS supports an armed Intifada … ||

      Please indicate where the article states that “BDS supports an armed Intifada”.

      If the article doesn’t state it, please provide a link to an official statement made by the BDS movement in support of “an armed Intifada”.

      Thanks.

      • hophmi
        October 30, 2015, 1:19 pm

        What were supporting at Berkeley a couple of weeks ago when they were chanting “Intifada, Intifada, we support the Intifada”?

      • Annie Robbins
        October 30, 2015, 3:25 pm

        hops, a simple ‘no, eljay. i have no evidence BDS supports an armed Intifada’ will do.

      • eljay
        October 30, 2015, 3:58 pm

        || hophmi: What were supporting at Berkeley a couple of weeks ago when they were chanting “Intifada, Intifada, we support the Intifada”? ||

        I don’t know what were supporting at Berkeley, but I asked the following:

        Please indicate where the article states that “BDS supports an armed Intifada”.

        If the article doesn’t state it, please provide a link to an official statement made by the BDS movement in support of “an armed Intifada”.

      • MaxNarr
        November 2, 2015, 4:14 pm

        Annie, I am curious, you have failed to moderate comments where @talknic said specifically it was the duty of Palestinians to “resist” occupation with violence. Is this something you personally agree with?

    • Emory Riddle
      October 30, 2015, 2:50 pm

      Of course BDS is non-violent.

      You can have boycotts, sanctions, and divestment as a non-violent way to end the occupation of Palestine (and Washington DC for that matter); or you can fight BDS until you get the other form of resistance, violence.

      Just how dishonest is this hophmi character?

      Or is he just dumb?

      Or maybe of near normal intellect and blinded by the racism implanted into him by a lifetime of conditioning?

      • Annie Robbins
        October 30, 2015, 4:07 pm

        he’s not stupid. he’s a hasbara professional. propaganda is not an honest calling.

      • tree
        October 30, 2015, 4:44 pm

        I agree with Annie. Hophmi’s not dumb, although he’s not the brightest bulb on the tree either.

        He’s purposely conflating non-violence, which is a tactic, with pacifism, which is a belief system, in order to attack BDS, which is not even mentioned in this article except in Phil’s last sentence.

        I participated in demonstrations against the Vietnam War, the Iraq War and against Israel’s numerous incursions. All were non-violent and I only participated in them because they were intended to be non-violent. That has nothing to do with the fact that I am not a pacifist and believe that the Vietnamese, the Iraqis, the Palestinians, the Lebanese, and even the US and Israel have a right to defend themselves violently from a violent attack. (Although the US and Israel’s concept of “defense” is highly problematic to say the least.) People can be non-violent and yet not pacifistic, despite Hophmi’s implication otherwise, and I’m sure he knows that, but won’t admit it in the case of Palestinians.

        I’m sure that Hophmi has attended demonstrations supporting Israel. Maybe he’s even done so as a member of his “outreach group”. He supports Israeli violence against Palestinians. He wouldn’t be so silly as to claim that he or his outreach group wasn’t non-violent because of that. That kind of silliness he reserves for his arguments against anyone who opposes the crap that Israel does, in the hopes of convincing susceptable people with false equivalences and strawman arguments.

        Hophmi’s a lawyer. Whether he does this stuff here because he’s paid or because he’s so rapped up in his own Jewish brand of prejudice that he can’t see straight and does it out of a perverted sense that he is defending something other than bald-faced institutional racism, who knows. He’s been doing this for years here.

    • DavidDaoud
      October 30, 2015, 4:33 pm

      Hophmi, do you realistically expect non-violence after the murders of Mohammed abu Khdeir and little Ali Dawabshe? A simple yes or no.

  2. gracie fr
    October 29, 2015, 4:36 pm

    “And so it’s because of this complicity, this failure to hold Israel accountable, this willful participation in its crimes by the so-called international community, that Palestinians are once again rising up and taking matters into their own hands with the very limited means that they have. Sacrificing their lives to make the statement that we desire to be free. We desire to be free. We desire to be liberated from this ugly colonial apartheid regime. That’s what Palestinians are saying……..”

    Instead, EU representative Ms. Mogherini has called fo resumption of 3The Peace Process” with emphasis on “deliverables”….

    Everybody knows that Israeli occupation, colonization, war crimes, apartheid, are the problem. But they’re not willing to confront it. And so they talk about resuming negotiations and process because they don’t want to say it. Why couldn’t Ms. Mogherini say, end the occupation? Give the Palestinians their rights. Stop stealing their land. Stop killing their children. Stop imprisoning them. She would never dare to use that kind of plain language.

    http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=15000

    • JWalters
      October 29, 2015, 8:04 pm

      Everybody knows, but everybody is currently being strangled by Zionist money. That money must be recognized for the evil that it is. The people doling it out must be put in prison.

  3. DaBakr
    October 29, 2015, 6:06 pm

    @g

    “everybody knows that Israeli occupation, colonization, war crimes, apartheid, are the problem.”

    Well–it would seem like the above is actually the “problem” unless you are writing about the limited audience here on Zionist/Israel hating blogs and in left-wing EU and US academia circles and also, in general, the pan-Arab nations. Maybe it is a lot of peoples. But in reality not even close to “everybody”. There are many millions who believe the opposite.

    • talknic
      October 29, 2015, 7:19 pm

      @ DaBakr ” the limited audience here on Zionist/Israel hating blogs”

      Calling for the law to be upheld by one’s Jewish homeland state is hateful? Amazing!

    • Mooser
      October 30, 2015, 5:32 pm

      “There are many millions who believe the opposite”

      Right you are, a few millions. In a world of billions. You like those odds?

  4. diasp0ra
    October 29, 2015, 6:27 pm

    Al-Shikaki is a smart man, and is incredibly good at what he does. I trust his numbers on anything Palestine related.

  5. pabelmont
    October 29, 2015, 6:29 pm

    Rudoren calls for massive demonstrations? Has she any idea of the difficulty Palesinians have in travelling within the West Bank or into Jerusalem at all?

    Does Rudoren know about the weekly (small) non-violent demonstrations against the WALL and the violent (tear-gas, skunk-spray, bullets) Israeli army put-downs of them?

    Some Palestinian should write an op-ed for NYT in something of an answer to Rudoren (and to NYT) describing the entire non-violent demonstration “scene” and arguing that it has lasted long enough to show that Israel doesn’t answer to non-violence from Palestinians any better than it is expected to answer to the present violence.

    And the writer should of course call for outside intervention, because the Palestinian violence though understandable will be met with terrible responses, and will not stop the Israeli violence (army, police, settlers, courts).

    Decent people who watch crimes-in-action lose their decency, and Americans must be made to see that we are complicit due to our inaction (to say nothing of our UNSC vetoes, $3B/yr gifts, etc.)

    • JWalters
      October 29, 2015, 8:08 pm

      Excellent points. An international peacekeeping force is obviously needed.

  6. Another Dave
    October 29, 2015, 7:22 pm

    What did President Kennedy say about those who make peaceful change impossible?

    I hope the violent change isn’t too violent, but that’s because I’m a squish from Canada.

    • MaxNarr
      October 30, 2015, 4:07 pm

      Calling moderator on this justification for violence

      • Mooser
        October 30, 2015, 5:28 pm

        “Calling moderator on this justification for violence”

        Complaints about other posters or the moderation should be made in an e-mail to the Editors. I’m pretty sure that’s what they said.
        So you hunt through those archives, collect your evidence, write your e-mail and let fly.
        Why the last time somebody did that, they opened Mondo up to a lot more “Zionist voices”. In fact, it looks like the Mods lost all pity on them after that.

      • Sibiriak
        October 30, 2015, 8:53 pm

        MaxNarr: Calling moderator on this justification for violence.
        ———————

        What’s wrong with justifiable violence ?

      • echinococcus
        October 30, 2015, 11:47 pm

        Sometimes it is perfectly justified to laugh at a fool who proudly displays his own moniker as a program, and proceeds to provide irrefutable proof of it.

      • Another Dave
        October 31, 2015, 11:07 am

        Maybe I should turn on the email notes, nah.

        I’m sorry that you think I’ve justified violence, I haven’t. I’ve quoted a president of the USA, who was speaking at the time about the problem in dealing with the legacy of slavery and the US Civil War. IIRC

        At this point the violence is inevitable. On one hand there are children throwing stones, on the other there are soldiers threatening to execute those children in public.

        Who is justifying the violence? I hear tell that the Government of Israel is working very hard to arrest the stone throwers, and kill those whom they accuse of having knives. I don’t hear any condemnation of the torture and murder of children by the IDF, or the settlers.

        Point that finger, bud. There are three that point back.

  7. Dagon
    October 29, 2015, 7:42 pm

    Last month On the last day of a two weeks stay visiting nazareth I was supposed to meet my old friends for a goodby beer.I went to marys well plaza to find a space to park.I walked around the area for few minutes.It was getting dark about 8pm.Suddenly A couple of hundred young demonstrators walked up to the plaza singing ,chanting and carrying the beautiful palestinian flags .Ten minutes later somebody pointed to the north and at the top of the stairs i saw the menacing silhouette of the police decked in helmets,batons,shields ,guns and more.The crowd was really festive,singing dancing and chanting.I looked away and stayed away from the crowd about thirty yards trying to take some video.less than five minutes later the police charged,UNPROVOKED, and started to throw loud sound grenades.Ive never been to anything like that.the crowd were angry for the unprovoked attack.the crowd scattered and things calmed down.i was still standing apart with a couple of people who advised me not to film.suddenly out of no where a robotic monster looking thing charged me and the other couple .he threw one small fire cracker ,we ran and was followed with what looked like a sifi gizmo.A platter size thing was thrown at us ,started bouncing up and down spewing fire and sparks .it bounced on the back of a parked car into the air and exploded about five feet from my head. so loud my ears rang for thirty minutes.I turned around and screamed my favorite american words MFs.Funny I did not feel any fear just anger.two hours later and after few beers i found that the street were blocked with stones and fires.The police,soldiers can stay back and let the crowds let off steam.Oh no they have to respond to peaceful crowds.I can imagine what our people under occupation must be going through.

  8. JWalters
    October 29, 2015, 7:55 pm

    “[Rudoren] said the problem was that two narratives, Palestinian and Israeli, are ‘dueling’ and irreconcilable.”

    The facts and the lies are indeed irreconcilable. Pretending these two narratives are equivalent merely because they are both “narratives” is a part of the lying narrative.

    The problem is not that there are dueling narratives. The problem is that very wealthy, lying criminals are bankrolling lying fanatics and profiting from the lies and resulting violence.

  9. Irfan
    October 29, 2015, 10:13 pm

    Rudoren: “I’ve seen little nonviolent popular resistance in my time here.”

    Doesn’t that raise the obvious question–where, exactly, is “here”? Where does Rudoren spend most of her time, and with whom?

    Anyone who spends time in the Palestinian West Bank can, without any trouble, find nonviolent popular resistance. I did, and I joined it. When I was there in 2013, I joined Mahmoud Zwahre’s group in Ma’asara.

    https://alethonews.wordpress.com/2014/06/05/israel-begins-arrest-campaign-against-popular-resistance-activists/

    He’s not hard to find–except when he’s in an Israeli prison.

    Rudoren herself has written about this particular issue:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/10/world/middleeast/west-bank-compound-irving-moskowitz.html?_r=1&mtrref=undefined

    Go there on just about any Friday afternoon and you’ll find people from Al Arroub Refugee Camp protesting in front of the compound. Has she been there? Has she checked?

    Has she been to the Christian Peacemaker’s Offices in Hebron? I was there in August. It’s staffed by Palestinians.

    http://www.cpt.org/work/palestine

    The work they do is heroic, but I haven’t seen them mentioned in the New York Times. They speak perfect English, by the way. Conversations with them might have improved the superficial BS that passes for reporting in this article:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/30/world/middleeast/palestinian-uprising-shifts-to-west-bank-city-of-hebron.html

    I think she should also stop hiding behind the evasive dodge of not having seen “mass demonstrations.” Try to have a “mass demonstration” in front of, say, Ma’ale Adumim and see what happens to you. The only place to have it is about 100 yards from an Israeli military base. The IDF enters Area B towns on virtually no provocation–a fact that Rudoren has not bothered to report. I was in Abu Dis on August 1-2 of this year when the IDF came to town. No Rudoren, no NYT write-up. Evidently, there’s more in Palestine than is dreamt of by the New York Times.

    I spent two months this past summer at Al Quds University. The University is teeming with nonviolent activism, including its Human Rights Clinic and its entire social work apparatus. I lived in the building where the social workers’ offices sit, and I spent time with them, talking about their activism. I didn’t see Rudoren or anyone else from The New York Times there. Nor did anyone expect them to show up. In fact, I didn’t see any Americans there at all. The only foreigners who showed up were from Europe.

    Has Rudoren had a conversation with either Lucy or Sari Nusseibeh?

    https://www.inclusivesecurity.org/network-bio/lucy-nusseibeh/

    The last time the NYT mentioned Lucy Nusseibeh was in 2012, when it reported that the IDF had violently raided her non-violent TV station.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/01/world/middleeast/israeli-troops-raid-two-palestinian-tv-stations-in-ramallah.html

    Maybe it’s time to pay a call?

    Does Rudoren know who Nassar Ibrahim is in, Beit Sahur?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWBVTAMlayU

    Maazen Qumsiyeh in Bethlehem?

    http://qumsiyeh.org/

    Has she been to the Ar-Rowwad Community Center in Aida Refugee Camp? Or the Phoenix Community Center in Deheishe?

    http://www.alrowwadusa.org/home/about_alrowwad_centre

    How is it that I managed to visit all of these places during the 10 or so weeks I’ve spent in Israel/Palestine (while holding down teaching responsibilities), but Rudoren doesn’t seem to have heard of them at all?

    Though Gaza isn’t centrally at issue, does the work of Izzeldine Aboueilash or the Gaza Community Health Center not count as non-violent Palestinian activism? Were Khader Adnan and Muhammad Allan not nonviolent activists? If not, how is it that the Israeli authorities practically lost their minds over their hunger striking?

  10. RobinSMessing
    November 1, 2015, 2:19 pm

    While I do not support the violence, it is an almost inevitable outcome of the oppression the Palestinians are suffering. I would love to see the BDS movement change Israel’s behavior, but Israel and its supporters have done everything they can to delegitimize BDS and even make advocating BDS illegal. (They have succeeded in doing this in France.)

    Without hope for change for the Palestinians, what other means are available? John F. Kennedy once said, “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.”

  11. Dan Fleshler
    November 2, 2015, 11:53 am

    “Ashrawi and Yossi Alpher, an analyst associated with Peace Now, agreed that the current situation has become a single-state apartheid reality with no political solution in sight.”

    i listened to the same call and just checked the podcast. Phil left something out. Talking about Palestinian national leadership, Ashrawi acknowledged: ‘We promised since…1988; we talked about a 2-state solution and haven’t delivered anything.” A moment later, she said, “We can’t go back to business as usual. If we do not deal with the root causes, things will not quiet down…There is no 1-state solution available,. There is no automatic solution. We need intervention.”

    The current reality is indeed a “single-state reality.” She wasn’t saying that the ultimate solution should be based on that reality. I, at least, inferred that she thinks the opposite. Same with Alpher, whose exact quote was “We re seeing a station on the slippery slope to an ugly, violent, one-state entity of one sort or another….

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