In Photos: Gaza protest commemorates second intifada

ActivismIsrael/Palestine
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On September 28, 2000 Israel’s then defense minister Ariel Sharon made a historic visit along with armed guards to the Nobel Sanctuary in Jerusalem’s Old City, the holy sites complex that houses the al-Aqsa mosque and the Temple Mount. Sharon entered and exited the area amid protests from Palestinians, which continued into the following day with violent clashes between Palestinian youngsters and the Israeli military. 

That day, the 29th of September, is marked as the first official day of the second Intifada. 

The 2000 uprising began in Gaza a day after clashes broke out in Jerusalem. On September 30th Mohammed al-Dura slid under the protective grip of his father during a heated confrontation between Israelis and Palestinians. A journalist from France 2 recorded Mohammed’s father waving to soldiers as if to signal they were trapped civilians. Then a burst of dust clouded the frame and when the scene cleared, Mohammed lay dead on his father’s lap.

That image has become one of the most powerful memories in the Palestinian collective narrative of the losses, injuries, and deaths suffered during the years of the second Intifada. Every year, Palestinians in Gaza march to protest the Israeli shooting.

Last September, photographer Mohammed Asad captured young protesters as they entered the buffer zone with Israel near al-Bureij refugee camp. Demonstrators waved Palestinian flags, burned tires threw rocks in the direction of the Israeli army, and attempted to scale the wire military fence. Israeli soldiers responded with tear gas and live-fire, wounding six. 

“We came here to prove to the Israeli occupying forces that the memory of the uprising is unforgettable,” said demonstrator Abu Falasteen, 23, while standing near the army fence cordoning off an eastern sliver of Gaza into a de-militarized zone. He said he was there in part to remember the killing of Mohammed al-Dura, and in part, to protest against the Israeli occupation of the territory. 

“This wire is barbed wire. Does it mark a border?—Yes, but what we see is an imaginary line and it is fleeting with each passing day,” Abu Falasteen said.

Young demonstrators burn tires on the barbed wire and throw stones on Israeli soldiers near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Young demonstrators burn tires on the barbed wire and throw stones on Israeli soldiers near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protester near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protester near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Injured protester near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Injured protester near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protesters take cover from Israeli fire near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protesters take cover from Israeli fire near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protesters near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protesters near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protester near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protester near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protesters dodge Israeli tear gas canisters near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protesters dodge Israeli tear gas canisters near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protesters climb the Gaza barrier near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

Protesters climb the Gaza barrier near Nahal Oz, east of the al-Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza Strip, September 30, 2016. (Photo: Mohammed Asad)

About Mohammed Asad

Mohammad Asad is a photo journalist based in the Gaza Strip where he has covered three wars, and nearly a decade of blockade. He is the 2015 winner of the United Nations World Humanitarian Summit photography “Spirit of Humanity” award, and the 2014 winner of the Abdel Razzaq Badran Photography Award, among other accolades

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About Allison Deger

Allison Deger is the Assistant Editor of Mondoweiss.net. Follow her on twitter at @allissoncd.

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One Response

  1. gamal
    December 23, 2016, 6:42 pm

    understand when you see resistance what an astonishing achievement you are witnessing, in sustained resistance

    “A Dialectical Pedagogy of Revolt: Gramsci, Vygotsky, and the Egyptian Revolution”

    By Brecht De Smet

    “In A Dialectical Pedagogy of Revolt Brecht De Smet integrates the political thought of Antonio Gramsci with the cultural psychology of Lev Vygotsky into an original perspective on revolutionary subjectivity that is deployed to understand the Egyptian “Tahrir” Revolution.”

    it may also help with the Arab induced depression from which some of your writers are suffering

    if you take a brief look at page… well why not read on from at least chpt 26 on P.335, there is a great deal here that a “supporter” of Palestine might learn if they were open to it, the lessons may even apply where ever you may be.

    https://books.google.ie/books?id=OtYuBgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

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