My congressman, Ted Lieu, supports human rights everywhere but Palestine

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on 42 Comments

Shortly after the election of Donald Trump, my congressman Ted Lieu (CA-33) emerged on the national stage as a leading critic of the president’s policy on health care, the environment, and the budget, as well as his alleged Russia connection.  Unlike many other Democrats, he criticized Trump’s bombing of Syria on the grounds that the president acted without any congressional approval. He additionally opposed arms sales to Saudi Arabia due to that country’s war crimes in Yemen– something few other politicians have the courage to even mention. My congressman seemed anti-war, pro human rights, and driven by principle rather than political expediency.

Thus, I was disappointed when, in April 2017, he signed on as a co-sponsor of H.R. 1697, the Israel Anti-Boycott bill. Its provisions clash with the strong support for human rights he otherwise espouses. And although the congressman is a constitutional lawyer, he backs this legislation even though it threatens free speech rights guaranteed by the First Amendment.

The bill is a response to the U.N. Human Rights Council (UNHRC) call for a database (termed “a blacklist”) of companies operating beyond, in the law’s whitewashed language, “Israel’s 1949 Armistice lines”–more commonly known as the Occupied Territories. HR 1697 (and its companion Senate Bill, S 720) explicitly mentions and targets the Boycott, Divest, Sanctions (BDS) movement. It bans U.S. persons and businesses from taking “certain actions” to support boycotts “fostered by international governmental organizations”– specifically the UN and the European Union–against Israel.  It also prohibits requesting information about whether an entity is doing business in Israel, if such a request is intended to support such a boycott. Penalties range up to a $1 million fine and 20 years in prison.  The Israel lobby, including the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), is strongly pushing the legislation.

Based on the letter of the law, a social media post expressing “support” for BDS in solidarity with the UN and its member nations could expose one to liability.  And a person who requests information about whether an Israeli business operates in the Occupied Territories could be charged—even if that person ultimately decides not to boycott the business. For these reasons among others, The ACLU and other legal analysts object to the law on First Amendment grounds.

According to a member of Congressman Lieu’s staff with whom I spoke, my representative interprets the law much more narrowly.  Lieu asserts that the prohibitions only apply to transactions between a US and an international business entity where the former agrees to participate in the boycott as a condition imposed by the latter.  This argument ignores the wording of the law, including its specific reference to the United Nations and its prohibitions around requesting information. However, the staff member assured me that the law does not ban constitutionally protected speech and assured me that, regardless of how it is worded, no one would ever be prosecuted for a social media post.

Maybe or maybe not–the Department of Justice can choose to enforce the law as it sees fit. But the law would clearly discourage public support for BDS.  Anyone who reads it could reasonably conclude that is trying to ban BDS outright—its preface states explicitly that the U.S. opposes “actions to boycott, divest from, or sanction Israel.”  And rightly so, most people would not trust the Israel-lobby friendly U.S. government to enforce the law leniently.  Therein in my opinion lies the major purpose of the law: its sponsors intend to frighten activists and chill dissent.

Alarmingly, the law also fails to distinguish between the state of Israel proper and the occupied Palestinian Territories The law criticizes UNHRC for considering a resolution to withhold assistance from and prevent trade with “territories occupied since 1967” – quotations in the original, as if it were a demented anti-Semitic notion, rather than settled international law, that the West Bank and East Jerusalem are occupied. And the bill’s penalties apply to equally to boycotts of business in the Occupied Territories and Israel proper.

From a free speech perspective, any boycott ban is wrong.  However, by treating the Israel and the territories as equivalent, the law implicitly validates the Occupation. Multiple U.N. resolutions and the international community’s consensus call for the return of occupied territories, and Israel continually expands its settlements in violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention. Congressman Lieu’ s representative, despite his patron’s principled stand on international law applied elsewhere, had no response to my objections on these grounds.

Lieu supports this odious legislation because he is a PEP (Progressive Except on Palestine).   Many PEPs are Jews, who, due to their religious or romantic notions regarding Israel, ignore or rationalize the nation’s human rights and international law violations.  This stance, though wrongheaded, is at least more authentic than the congressman’s cynical calculations. Like many other left-of-center Democrats, he reasons that he can take a position contrary to his own values on this one issue, in exchange for the Israel lobby’s endorsement and financial support.  That way, voters whose choice is driven primarily or solely by this one issue will support him, while progressives, viewing Republican alternatives as far worse on all other issues, won’t abandon him. In sum, Congressman Lieu and others like him sell out their principles in exchange for their political ambitions.

Of course, I don’t know exactly what the congressman thinks, but he has previously demonstrated that AIPAC can reliably depend on him.  Recently, he declined to sign a letter from 32 congressional colleagues (including many who support his stance on Yemen) objecting to trumped-up charges against Issa Amro, a Palestinian rights activist and nonviolent resistance leader who is known worldwide as the “Palestinian Gandhi.”  Additionally, in his first term, shortly after returning from an AIPAC sponsored trip to Israel, he became one of 25 Democratic Congressmen out of 187 to vote against the Iranian nuclear deal (I wonder if he would travel to the Occupied Territories as a guest of an Israeli-based pro-Palestinian human rights organization such as B’tselem).  And according to the website maplight.org, pro-Israel interest groups donated over $56,000 to his 2016 congressional campaign.

As Congressman Lieu is a constitutional lawyer, I am sure he’s aware that no action challenging the legality of boycotts has ever succeeded in the United States. Since he strongly values individual freedom, he must recognize that protecting this legitimate, non-violent tool of protest—even when employed in support of a cause he might not endorse–is vital to the health of a democracy. As a human rights advocate, he must know that boycotts like the Boston Tea Party, Montgomery, and South Africa directly contributed to ending injustice and oppression. And as a spokesman for many national and international causes that concern people well beyond the borders of California’s 33rd, he seemingly understands that people around the world look to strong, principled international leaders for inspiration and guidance.

Thus, I urge Congressman Lieu him to withdraw his support for this poorly conceived and written bill. I respect much of his work and many of his courageous stances in support of progressive causes. But if he will not consistently live up to the principles he espouses, I will not support or endorse him as my representative in Washington.

About Charlie Zimmerman

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42 Responses

  1. rensanceman
    October 2, 2017, 1:37 pm

    I share the author’s frustrations and am a frequent caller to Lieu’s office to express displeasure with his blind obedience the Zionist agenda. One would assume that his profile would offer a clue to his voting record, but this is not so: an immigrant who should empathize with the oppressed Palestinians, a constitutional lawyer who should be appalled by the free-speech restrictions contained in the anti-BDS legislation proposed by AIPAC, his vote on the Iran/nuclear issue, and attending the Israel junket for newly elected Congressmen.
    We should not give up on Politicians like Lieu but should assume that beneath the surface, that they are rational and intelligent and will respond to reason. I urge the reader to call their representatives in Congress to let them know that their constituents are concerned about the Palestinian issue, and the many abuses of the Israeli government.

    • RoHa
      October 2, 2017, 8:28 pm

      “We should not give up on Politicians like Lieu but should assume that beneath the surface, that they are rational and intelligent and will respond to reason.”

      Naive optimism.

      • Elizabeth Block
        October 3, 2017, 9:55 am

        They won’t respond to reason. They will respond to votes – especially Jewish votes.

        Yeah, peppies are very common. I know lots of them. We all do.

      • genesto
        October 3, 2017, 11:58 am

        Right. We should ALWAYS assume that politicians will respond in the most politically expedient way. On rare occasion, one will place principle over political ambition. But don’t hold your breathe, especially when it comes to I/P.

  2. JeffB
    October 2, 2017, 1:46 pm

    I am sure he’s aware that no action challenging the legality of boycotts has ever succeeded in the United States

    This is a weird recent claim of the BDS movement that is obvious false.

    First off there is a standing government agency that monitors foreign boycott law compliance: https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/enforcement/oac . This particularly applied to boycotts of Israel which were defined as firms with Jewish employees and firms that shipped using cargo ships that also made call on Israeli ports.

    Ribicoff Amendment (Tax Reform Act of 1976) forbid US companies and their subsidiaries from complying with or supporting a foreign country’s boycott of another country unless the US also approves of the boycott. Export Administration Act of 1979 creates powers of enforcement for the US Department of Commerce to the Ribicoff Amendment.

    https://www.nlrb.gov/rights-we-protect/whats-law/unions/secondary-boycotts-section-8b4
    Enforces anti-secondary boycott laws (especially the Labor-Management Relations Act of 1947 (29 U.S.C.A. § 141 et seq.)) This would be organizing boycotts of agencies that do business with a business one hates. The most obvious example is the Teamsters not delivering goods to a company that sells products to a company whose workers are striking. Boycotting G4S, Motorolla… for refusing to boycott Israel would be a crime under the secondary boycott provisions.

    For a recent case with a finding of guilt: , 520 S. Michigan Ave. Associates, Ltd. v. Unite Here Local 1, 13-1938, 2014 WL 3720253 (7th Cir. July 29, 2014).

    A slightly older example is Yale University which prohibiting military recruiting as part of a boycott against discrimination against homosexuals. They lost. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/06/politics/supreme-court-upholds-law-on-college-military-recruiting.html

    And of course the most famous example is federal government repeatedly fined banks in the south that refused to extend credit (asn individual boycott) to blacks involved in the civil rights movement.

    Boycotting is a regulated activity in the United States.

    • amigo
      October 2, 2017, 3:54 pm

      “Boycotting is a regulated activity in the United States.” Jeff B (Northridge)

      Sure it is but you have your zio-rant-aloons in a twist as usual.

      “Israel’s New Boycott Law and U.S. Law: Like Apples and Orangutans”Huff Post

      “U.S. law (found in the Export Administration Act — EAA; the official reference is: 48 C.F.R. 652.225-71) “prohibits compliance by U.S. persons with any boycott fostered by a foreign country against a country which is friendly to the United States and which is not itself the object of any form of boycott pursuant to United States law or regulation,” and imposes criminal penalties on those who do comply with such boycotts.

      U.S. law (found in the Tax Reform Act — TRA), penalizes those who participate in such boycotts (as defined under the EAA) by denying them certain tax benefits.

      The key words in all of this are “by a foreign country.” The objective behind these laws is clearly spelled out on this webpage (which is helpfully being circulated by the defenders of the new boycott law, but apparently not being read). That objective is: “preventing U.S. firms from being used to implement foreign policies of other nations which run counter to U.S. policy…” The key words here, again, are: “other nations.”

      There’s nothing ambiguous here. U.S. law doesn’t bar U.S. citizens from organizing boycotts of anything or any country, or participating in boycotts of anything or any country, that are organized by domestic or foreign individuals or organizations. What U.S. law bars is participation in unsanctioned boycotts and embargoes imposed by other countries that conflict with U.S. policies — including but not limited to the (effectively moribund) Arab League boycott of Israel.

      So what does this mean in practice? It means that a group of angry Americans can organize a boycott of France and French products to protest France’s perceived non-support of the US in the Iraq war, notwithstanding the fact that France is a country that is “friendly to the United States.” And Americans are free to organize a boycott against Canada, a close friend of the U.S., to protest seal hunting or to organize a boycott against Mexico, simply because they don’t like it. And any American can organize a boycott of Arizona to protest its outrageous racial profiling policy. And a food co-op in Olympia, Oregon can legally boycott Israeli products.

      And in practice, even if opponents of a boycott of settlement products could somehow make the case that such a boycott was being fostered by a foreign government, U.S. anti-boycott law would not apply. Israel has never annexed the West Bank, and settlements are not legally part of Israel, even under Israeli law. So such a boycott could not fairly be characterized as targeting “a country which is friendly to the United States.” Moreover, U.S. anti-boycott law stipulates that compliance with foreign boycotts is prohibited if they reflect “foreign policies of other nations which run counter to U.S. policy” — but U.S. policy has long opposed settlements.

      Welcome to democracy, under which citizens can peacefully protest whatever they want, foreign or domestic, including through boycotts. ”

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lara-friedman/israel-boycott-law_b_898317.html

      • JeffB
        October 3, 2017, 9:04 am

        @Amigo

        The boycott applies to East Jerusalem. It should be the policy of the United States to recognize Jerusalem as the undivided capital of the State of Israel, both de jure and de facto.
        (https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/11/text)

        That is USA law. Presidents have been breaking it which has created confusion on this issue.

      • Bumblebye
        October 3, 2017, 2:29 pm

        B/S Jeff B.

        status of the bill is ‘introduced’. It has moved no further since then – beginning of March. It is most assuredly not law.

      • amigo
        October 3, 2017, 2:42 pm

        “That is USA law. Presidents have been breaking it which has created confusion on this issue.”jeff B (Northridge)

        That,s odd –if you check your link , you will find that it was introduced early this year but has not made it to the Senate or the Congress so how could it be Law and how could the any POTUS be breaking it.

        You seem to treat stupidity as a virtue—is it intentional.

      • JeffB
        October 4, 2017, 6:39 pm

        @Bumblebye

        I think you lost the thread of discussion. The Jerusalem embassy act passed in 1995. The BDS related act is still being considered.

    • Mooser
      October 2, 2017, 3:59 pm

      “Boycotting is a regulated activity in the United States.”

      That was pathetic “Jeff B’. Now I’ve got one for you. What’s grey, and always carries a trunk?

  3. amigo
    October 2, 2017, 4:31 pm

    Ted Lieu should see this .

    Video: Everyday Israelis express support for genocide.

    ““I don’t think there’s any answer to it, there’s only one way, I would carpet bomb them,” a young man offers as a solution for Israel’s conflict with the Palestinians.

    “The Jews should have the right to hate [Arabs],” the man adds. “I think we have the right to hate them.”

    He’s one of a number of everyday Israelis in the streets of Jerusalem interviewed in the video above by Abby Martin, for TeleSUR’s The Empire Files.

    Many of them are immigrants, or the children of immigrants, from the United States.

    “I think that we need to … kick out the Arabs,” says a young woman who, struggling to express her genocidal thoughts in English, turns to a friend for help.

    “We need to kill Arabs,” she manages to say in English, as she and her friend giggle.

    “Islam is a very bad disease, not just for Israel, all around the world,” says one man, who later boasts about Israel’s “gentle” treatment of Palestinians and its respect for human rights.
    No mixed marriages

    Martin interviews a youth from Lehava, an extremist religious organization whose members act as vigilantes against miscegenation, and rampage through Jerusalem harassing Palestinians.

    Lehava’s leader has called for the burning of churches and mosques.

    The youth explains why the group is opposed to mixed marriages: “Jews is a special nation and we don’t want Jews to get mixed up with a different nation.”

    https://electronicintifada.net/blogs/ali-abunimah/video-everyday-israelis-express-support-genocide

    This is Jeff B,s beautiful haven of peace and love and tolerance.

    Why don,t you get on a plane and grace the Land of Israel with your presence Jeffy Boy.You might have some credibility , if you proved your adoration for Israel by planting your butt there , permanently.

    • Kay24
      October 2, 2017, 5:42 pm

      Interesting video. It shows that the men and women on the street of Israel are racist, ignorant, and arrogant. The one that stood out was the man saying they are entitled to hate Arabs.
      We have been told countless times by hasbara that all Arabs hate the Jews, and yet it is no different in zionist land. They are not as intelligent as I thought they were. They seems to be regurgitating propaganda that was fed to them. They are also very blood thirsty, no wonder they camped on hills and picnicked when Gaza was being bombed to rubble.
      The bottom line is, the want it all, and if they have to kill or chase the Palestinians away, so be it.
      Oy vey!

      • Kay24
        October 2, 2017, 5:44 pm

        Sorry my comment was in response to Just.

  4. just
    October 2, 2017, 4:44 pm

    Thanks for the pathetic news, Charlie.

    Perhaps you can share this with your Rep and ask him why he supports this:

    “Video: Everyday Israelis express support for genocide

    “I don’t think there’s any answer to it, there’s only one way, I would carpet bomb them,” a young man offers as a solution for Israel’s conflict with the Palestinians.

    “The Jews should have the right to hate [Arabs],” the man adds. “I think we have the right to hate them.”

    He’s one of a number of everyday Israelis in the streets of Jerusalem interviewed in the video above by Abby Martin, for TeleSUR’s The Empire Files.

    Many of them are immigrants, or the children of immigrants, from the United States.

    “I think that we need to … kick out the Arabs,” says a young woman who, struggling to express her genocidal thoughts in English, turns to a friend for help.

    “We need to kill Arabs,” she manages to say in English, as she and her friend giggle.

    “Islam is a very bad disease, not just for Israel, all around the world,” says one man, who later boasts about Israel’s “gentle” treatment of Palestinians and its respect for human rights. …”

    more @ https://electronicintifada.net/blogs/ali-abunimah/video-everyday-israelis-express-support-genocide

    It does feature Ronnie Barkan as a very sane and honest voice, and Dan Cohen worked on the film.

    Here’s the video:

    • Kay24
      October 2, 2017, 5:45 pm

      See my response above.

      • Mooser
        October 3, 2017, 4:06 pm

        “Jeff b” I keep on trying to tell you. The arguments which so solidly convince other Zionists don’t necessarily work on other people, unless they share your bigotry.

        You sure are giving us a good tour of the parts of the Zionist mind somewhat smarter Zionists try to obfuscate!

        And always remember “Jeff b” ‘You gotta fight for your right to be whitey!’

      • JeffB
        October 3, 2017, 10:22 pm

        @Donald Johnson

        I can’t imagine what it would be like being Palestinian and having to live in a place where someone like you would be considered relatively liberal. And to be told constantly by such liberals to be more sensitive to the racists who had their boots on my neck.

        I agree with you that’s your problem in really understand Zionism. I have no trouble imaging it at all. We are bathed in that history from early childhood. That’s what the good times looked like. The bad times were much worse. And mostly that’s what Jews living in Muslim countries had. That’s what Palestine was like before 47-9. And that’s why you can’t win your debate with your friend. Because in the end, he might not have been honest enough to admit it possible not to himself: but if the cost of not going back to that is doing truly horrible things the Jews are going to do those horrible things. Israel is Judaism’s last stand. We become a normal country or at least we get to die like men and not cockroaches.

        Everything else is negotiable details.

        I think honest Jews can admit that one of Israel’s gifts was to see the world from Tzar’s point of view. Seeing it from the Palestinian’s point of view we could do for centuries. That’s why Jews had such a great reputation being the voice of the oppressed. That’s where that tradition came from. We weren’t faking it. And from the other side, the Jews are the voice of experience in handling situations like this for the Palestinians. This generation of Palestinians is the first that has a meaningful number who don’t speak Arabic. As the last of the people who remember a Palestine before there was an Israel die, they are starting to struggle with what it means to be a nation in the diaspora. There is a lot of that early struggle in the Mishnah.

        The American kids the same age as the kids as the kids in the video are the first generation of Jews who don’t personally have holes in their family tree because of antisemitism. Those Israeli kids aren’t there yet, but their children will be there.

        Ultimately though if you don’t think you can ever convince people like me to change policy then I’d ask you what is the point of the whole BDS movement again? How does this play out so you get the result you want?

        Ask yourself the question. If you can’t relate and I can. Why are you so sure I can’t teach them how to avoid our mistakes?

    • JeffB
      October 3, 2017, 8:48 am

      @Just

      This is what I talked about last time you were freaked out about the facebook posts. Denormalization has created a generation of young Israelis who have never in their lives had a positive experience from the Palestinians. They don’t know any as friends. They have however lived with the effects of conflict for life. They lost friends and family in the wave of suicide bombings. They constantly have to live with emergency protocols. They see rejectionism, and rightfully blame that on Palestinians. Young Israelis often hate Palestinians. What do you think happens in 25 years when that generation is the one in power in Israel? What happens when they are the ones deciding policy?

      When I talk about how diminishing hatred at an interpersonal level by creating more opportunities for cooperation is the most urgent issue to get addressed: I’m a racist, I’m a fascist….. No I’m a realist. Their elders remember the West Bank before the 1st intifada. They remember when the border was porous and they could go safely to the Arab parts of the West Bank. They remember cultural exchange. Many had Palestinians friends or if not friends at least coworkers. Their elders can imagine a peace. They might not have been willing to accept it on Abbas’ terms but they are capable of having the 2SS debate. The younger generation may not be.

      That’s what cultivating hatred does. You all work hard at encouraging the Palestinians to cultivate hatred. You justify it. You support it. You focus on unfixable problems. You want hatred to go further. I say aim for something like the Israel/Palestine of the 1970s because today the best the Palestinians can get. It is far better than what they have today. Worry about the future once you solve the rather serious problems of the present.

      What you saw in that video is the flip side and the effect of this:

      • just
        October 3, 2017, 6:52 pm

        “What you saw in that video is the flip side and the effect of this:”

        No, it most certainly is not. I heard no call for genocide/ethnic cleansing. Remi Kanazi is correct and only calls for justice and equality, but you apparently cannot hear him due to the blood and racism and hate pounding in your head.

        btw, Ben Norton has highlighted this film here:

        “When Empire Files host Abby Martin visited Jerusalem’s Zion Square, she met one Israeli after another who responded to her question about how best to end the conflict with the Palestinians with calls for extermination and ethnic cleansing.

        Ironically, the Jerusalem Municipality has dubbed Zion Square — the site of numerous brutal mob assaults on Palestinian workers and youth — a “square of tolerance.”

        “We need to kill Arabs,” declared one woman with a big laugh. She added that Israel must “kick out the Arabs.”‘

        “Israelis have to take over, and they have to kick them away,” an Israeli man said of Palestinians. He added, “Islam is a very bad disease. Not just for Israel, for all around the world.”

        Some Israelis suggested the genocidal extermination of Palestinians.

        “I dont think there’s any answer to it. There’s only one way: I would carpet bomb them. It’s the only way you can deal with it,” a young Israeli man insisted. “I don’t trust them; you can’t trust them,” he said of Palestinians. “The only way is just to stop it completely.”

        “The Jews should have rights to hate them,” he said of Arabs. “I think we have the right to hate them. I don’t see any reason why not. I wouldn’t trust any of them.”

        Many of the Israelis interviewed by Martin were Americans who were born in the U.S. and only moved to the Middle East later in life.

        “We know who the threat is, and it’s not coming from anyone random,” one young American woman said. “We know who our enemy is,” she added, condemning people for being “politically correct.”

        A young Israeli with an American accent angrily declared, “You can’t deal with these people; there’s no need to try; there’s no need to talk to them.” …”

        https://www.alternet.org/grayzone-project/empire-files-israelis-palestinians-ethnic-cleansing

        I really can’t remember being “freaked out by the facebook posts”… And, eternal shame on “young Israelis” for not bothering to “know” any Palestinians.

      • Donald Johnson
        October 3, 2017, 7:12 pm

        “They see rejectionism, and rightfully blame that on Palestinians. ”

        This and other statements, like your support for the Gaza War, are why I usually don’t bother engaging you. Others do and good for them, but life is short. I used to try to discuss things with and then argue with someone like you years ago ( he was eventually banned, I think because he was trying to dominate almost every thread, as you tend to do). At first he seemed like someone with good intentions, but eventually it became clear that his ideology came first.

        I can’t imagine what it would be like being Palestinian and having to live in a place where someone like you would be considered relatively liberal. And to be told constantly by such liberals to be more sensitive to the racists who had their boots on my neck.

      • JeffB
        October 3, 2017, 11:13 pm

        @just

        Ben Norton’s summary cuts out all the narrative elements and just includes quotes of anger. He would have done his readers a much better service by doing the exact opposite. Cut out all the anger and quote and explicate on the narrative. Abby Martin likely cut that video to include the shocking parts already, which is a pity.

        You in the end didn’t really respond to my point. If you don’t want to see the anger in that video become state policy as those kids grow into middle age what do you intend that’s constructive to try and head it off? Sure you can insult me. And that does what?

        Assume you are right about Remi Kanazi. Assume all he is asking for is a just and equal society that’s to everyone’s benefit. And the hatred and contempt distracted me. That in the end the tone was so off putting that when he got to the “I’m not the bad guy” I was like “well yeah you are” because of some defect in my listening skills. If it were just me, who cares? But it isn’t. Because no one on the Jewish side believes the Palestinians want a just and equal society. Have you ever considered why not? Could it be the tone really is a problem?

        As for the Facebook question. It was a series of flirty pictures by Israeli underage teens during the Gaza war. The juxtaposition of flirty images and hardcore anti-Palestinian sentiment had a similar effect on you and we talked about the fact that the attitude in the young has me worried. Couldn’t remember enough key words to find a 3 year old article to job your memory beyond that.

      • Mooser
        October 4, 2017, 11:37 am

        ” I used to try to discuss things with and then argue with someone like you years ago “

        “Jeff b” arrived in 2913. He commented until late 2015 and then took all of 2016 off.
        In Feb. of 2017 he returned, in the Ziocaine Syndrome Amnesia phase and started repeating his entire archive almost word for word.

        So it may very well have been him.

    • Mooser
      October 3, 2017, 11:43 am

      “Jews shouldn’t marry Arabs”

      You could lose a few pounds, and maybe it wouldn’t be such a problem.

    • Kay24
      October 3, 2017, 6:58 pm

      If these were Palestinians, the outrage would have been loud, and the cries of anti-semitism, louder. It also shows that just like they accuse the Palestinians, they teach their children to hate too. The hypocrisy is crystal clear.

      • Mooser
        October 4, 2017, 11:40 am

        ,” they teach their children to hate too”

        And the easiest and surest way to teach a child to hate is to hate the child.

  5. JosephA
    October 2, 2017, 11:20 pm

    It’s sad that Congressman Ted Lieu is PEP.

    That video of average hateful, racist, genocidal Israelis was quite disturbing! It reminded me of the book Goliath by Max Blumenthal.

    I was just thinking as I watched that video, what incredible steadfastness the 20% Palestinian citizens of Israel must have, living among such rabid, hateful neighbors.

    Your average Palestinian in Israel today probably has it much worse than the average Black person (or other minority) in the USA did around the 1940s.

    • JeffB
      October 3, 2017, 9:01 am

      @JosephA

      The average Israeli doesn’t accept your narrative that Israeli-Arabs are Palestinians. They put them into a different mental category. You all think it is a good idea to change that. You all work hard to change that. Not IMHO a good idea. A much better idea is to convince Israelis that the people living in the West Bank are Israeli-Arabs.

      • JosephA
        October 3, 2017, 10:24 am

        It’s not MY narrative, JeffB! There are Palestinian families that have been on that land for 20+ generations. Who in their right mind disputes this fact and expects to be taken seriously?

      • CigarGod
        October 3, 2017, 12:11 pm

        Convince?
        How do you change them from reactive parrots?

      • Marnie
        October 3, 2017, 1:08 pm

        RIP Tom Petty. Rot in hell JeffB.

        Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers – Don’t Come Around Here No More …

      • Misterioso
        October 3, 2017, 3:35 pm

        Israel differentiates between citizenship and nationality, i.e., “Israeli” nationality does not exist, only Jews and non-Jews, and each citizen carries an appropriate identity card. While the implications of this absurdity for discrimination and racism against non-Jews are obvious, it has been upheld by Israel’s Supreme Court.

        “Former Foreign Ministry director-general invokes South Africa comparisons. ‘Joint Israel-West Bank’ reality is an apartheid state”
        EXCERPT: “Similarities between the ‘original apartheid’ as it was practiced in South Africa and the situation in ISRAEL [my emphasis] and the West Bank today ‘scream to the heavens,’ added [Alon] Liel, who was Israel’s ambassador in Pretoria from 1992 to 1994. There can be little doubt that the suffering of Palestinians is not less intense than that of blacks during apartheid-era South Africa, he asserted.” (Times of Israel, February 21, 2013)

        Video: Israeli TV Host Implores Israelis: Wake Up and Smell the Apartheid
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyyUvxHLYr4

        In its 2015 Country Report on Human Rights Practices for Israel and the occupied Palestinian territories, the U.S. Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor acknowledges the “institutional and societal discrimination against Arab citizens of Israel.” (U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor)

        “Construction, Not Destruction”
        “While Israeli Arabs constitute 20 percent of the population, Arab communities’ jurisdictions occupy just 2.5 percent of the state’s land area, and the process of approving new construction in Arab towns takes decades.” (Haaretz Editorial, April 4, 2017)

        “Jewish town won’t let Arab build home on his own land ”
        Excerpt: “Aadel Suad first came to the planning and construction committee of the Misgav Local Council in 1997. uad, an educator, was seeking a construction permit to build a home on a plot of land he owns in the community of Mitzpeh Kamon. The reply he got, from a senior official on the committee, was a memorable one. ‘Don’t waste your time,’ he reportedly told Suad. ‘We’ll keep you waiting for 30 years.’” (Haaretz, 14 December 2009)

        Adi Ophir, professor of philosophy, Tel Aviv University: “…the adoption of the political forms of an ethnocentric and racist nation-state in general, are turning Israel into the most dangerous place in the world for the humanity and morality of the Jewish community, for the continuity of Jewish cultures and perhaps for Jewish existence itself.” (1998 issue of “Theory and Criticism,” published in Israel)

        The effect of Israel’s blatantly racist “Citizenship Law” and more than fifty other restrictions Arab citizens have to endure is well expressed by writer and Knesset member, Ahmed Tibi, “…dutifully defining the state [of Israel] as ‘Jewish and democratic,’ ignores the fact that in practice ‘democratic’ refers to Jews, and the Arabs are nothing more than citizens without citizenship.” (Ma’ariv, 1.6.2005)

      • JeffB
        October 3, 2017, 10:36 pm

        @JosephA

        Who in their right mind disputes this fact and expects to be taken seriously?

        And if you phrase the question that way then the answer should be no one. Except that’s clearly not the case. You gotta ask yourself what assumptions are you making that someone else might reject. Try it out. Make a mental list of the assumptions in this one sentence: There are Palestinian families that have been on that land for 20+ generations. when you get over 3 you are starting to see the problem.

        Otherwise you are stuck with the problem that israelis must not be in their right mind.

      • Mooser
        October 4, 2017, 12:45 pm

        “Otherwise you are stuck with the problem that israelis must not be in their right mind.”

        They’re not. Do you think people haven’t noticed?

  6. RayJosephCormier
    October 3, 2017, 8:13 am

    This explains his vote. Money talks!

    Additionally, in his first term, shortly after returning from an AIPAC sponsored trip to Israel, he became one of 25 Democratic Congressmen out of 187 to vote against the Iranian nuclear deal (I wonder if he would travel to the Occupied Territories as a guest of an Israeli-based pro-Palestinian human rights organization such as B’tselem). And according to the website maplight.org, pro-Israel interest groups donated over $56,000 to his 2016 congressional campaign.

  7. CigarGod
    October 3, 2017, 10:53 am

    Good work, Charlie.
    As I read the congressmans reps answers to your questions, it reminded me of how things work.

    1. There’s some sort of issue that needs a response.
    2. Certain congressmen are designated to be spokesmen.
    3. Congressmen go into meeting and get short, punchy talking points from leadership/lobbyists.
    4. They practice the TP’s in front of a mirror for a few minutes.
    5. They get in front of the cameras that they ordered, preen their feathers and then parrot their lines.
    6. Congressmen then look to their handlers for the treats they have been promised.
    7. The congressmen arrange the feathers in their rear area and pretend nothing happened.

  8. wfleitz
    October 3, 2017, 3:13 pm

    The headline should honestly read: “My congressman Ted Lieu, supports Apartheid, Ethnic Cleansing and Genocide.”

  9. Nathan
    October 3, 2017, 7:56 pm

    News flash for Misterioso: All citizens of Israel carry the exact same identity card. This news flash is not about a change from three days ago; rather, it refers to a change that occurred more that twelve years ago. You can remove from the list of grievances the issue of identity cards.

  10. RobertB
    October 7, 2017, 3:39 pm

    @ Author of this article

    It seems that your congressman, Ted Lieu, and many other US Congress people know where their funding and support fodder $$$ comes from; they are on their hands and knees with their heads down in the Pro-Israel Pac contribution feeding troughs.

    Check the link below to see the Pro-Israel contributions to our so-called US Congress people and more…. and Ted Lieu is on that list:

    https://www.wrmea.org/pdf/2017maypaccharts.pdf

  11. amigo
    October 7, 2017, 5:18 pm

    Some more facts about Israel that the congressman should know!!.

    “Since 2009, at least 53 churches and mosques have been vandalized in present-day Israel and the occupied West Bank.

    The vast majority of those cases – 45 – have been closed without any charges against perpetrators.

    In all, there have been just nine indictments and seven convictions, according to Israeli government data reported by the newspaper Haaretz. Only eight of the cases remain under investigation.

    They were usually dismissed on the grounds of unknown perpetrators.

    A lawmaker raised the matter in Israel’s parliament, the Knesset, at the request of Tag Meir, an organization that monitors racially motivated crimes.

    According to Haaretz, public security minister Gilad Erdan wrote to the lawmaker that the attacks “were perpetrated from various motives, ranging from negligence through mental illness and, in extreme cases, incidents of arson that appear deliberate.”

    The newspaper noted that Erdan’s assertion “seems to contradict the fact that most of the cases were closed on the grounds of ‘perpetrator unknown.’”

    Moreover, according to Haaretz, all the cases involved arson.

    The name of the organization Tag Meir is a play on the Hebrew words tag mehir – or price tag – the term Israeli settlers and extremists have adopted to describe their sometimes lethal attacks on non-Jews and their property, especially Palestinians.”

    https://electronicintifada.net/blogs/tamara-nassar/israel-doing-nothing-stop-attacks-churches-and-mosques

    This the rogue entity that jeffyboy idolises , but not enough to move there .I guess life is far better in Penn Valley flogging hamburgers , in between posting reams of crap on MW and any other site that will tolerate his BS.

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