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Total number of comments: 74 (since 2010-04-21 21:18:43)

Parity

Check out my website for an innovative peace plan.

Website: http://www.parityforpeace.org

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  • Stirring debate on BDS, 'NYT' allows readers to speak out about inequality
    • Henry, "wonder" no longer. I found the answer this morning. I called up the New York Times Letters section (phone number above) and asked whether the International edition included only one letter or all of the letters in its print edition. It included all of the letters! I'm even going to be sent a copy. I asked that the American print edition also print the letters. The person on the phone said she would relay my request (which was also made yesterday on their answering machine) but that "we get so many letters." (As if that were an excuse.) Heck, they selected these letters for an international audience. Don't Americans need to read them, too? Anyway, now we now that "a version of this letter" can mean all the letters.

    • The letters do appear in the national, as well as international, online edition. Check for yourself. How about writing to the New York Times ([email protected]) and asking them to print the letters in the U.S. print edition? Or call or fax the Letters editor at

      Phone: (212) 556-1873
      Fax: (212) 556-3622

  • Oh hey, you forgot the Palestinian flag
    • Sherien, please give me the recipe for mint lemonade. I love that drink and have tried to make it without a recipe, but so far the results have been disappointing.

      Thank you so much.

  • Sharon's journey was Israel's journey-- and what does that tell you
    • I am reading right now Dr. Kanaaneh's book "A Doctor in Galilee" and would recommend it to all who want to understand what it's like to be a Palestinian citizen of Israel. The same things happened to them that are happening to the Palestinians in the West Bank--land theft, house demolitions, killings, etc.--designed to get the Palestinians to leave.

  • The NY Times Non-Story of 2013: Israeli abuse of child prisoners
    • When I couldn't get the link to the Times article on stone throwing, I searched the article by title and found it and the letters that followed on two successive days.

      The first letter, from someone in Jerusalem, lamented the use of the term 'rite of passage' and thought it would encourage more stone-throwing:
      link to nytimes.com
      The second letter was by someone who had been a target of Palestinian stone throwing and talked about the importance of reversing "the culture of conflict."
      The third and final letter that day was by a Holocaust survivor who lauded the article and said that it's "way past time to let American Jews especially know what is really going on there."

      The next day, the Times published one more letter, by Israeli Ambassador Michael Oren. He thought the times "dehumanized" the settlers that were attacked.
      link to nytimes.com

  • Unintended consequences
    • The missionaries I know, including my parents, assumed that everyone had a right to an education, good health, and freedom. There were no hidden agendas that I know of. My father supported Gandhi while living in colonial India. He also worked hard to train Indians to take over the leadership of the church. Don't forget: In this day and age, Christians are supposed to be able to read the Bible. Leaders need to be educated.

  • Contribute to Mondoweiss end of the year fundraiser and receive copy of Max Blumenthal's 'Goliath'
    • I found out from the receipt for my donation that my address is already known from the credit card information.

    • I just donated $60 via PayPal but was never asked where I wanted the book to to mailed to. How is Mondoweiss going to know where to mail the book?

      Also, it occurs to me that copies of Goliath would make good Christmas presents, so those you who have already bought the book could donate $60 or more and then give the book to someone else.

  • Corasanti responds to Abulhawa: My purpose in writing 'The Almond Tree' was to shine a light on Palestinian suffering and help bring about peace
    • It seems to me Corasanti did a good job of dealing with the criticisms Abulhawa made. Corasanti's heart is in the right place, and Annie gave a good example of how her book is reaching people's hearts and making them sympathetic to and more knowledgeable about the Palestinians. Why are we wasting time on the Corasanti/Abulhawa feud? Let's move on.

  • Preaching to the choir: reflections on Max Blumenthal's 'Goliath'
    • There us precedent for states having equal power. That is how the United Nations General Assembly is set up. Equal power between the Israelis and the Palestinians would be a plus for the Palestinians, because the far richer Israelis could well dominate a single state, even if they are a minority; wealth buys power.

      Judaism is a nationalistic religion: according to Judaism, God has chosen to have a special relationship with the Jews and has given them the Land of Israel--indeed, commanded them to take that land. Many Jews therefore consider themselves not just a religious group but a nation. If you regard the Jews as a nation, then I think you could justify having a state for them, especially considering how they have been persecuted. They should not have been allowed to create a state where they were not wanted, but they have done so. Now we need to figure out a way for Palestinians and Jews to share the land as equals, and that is what Parity for Peace tries to do.

    • If Jews are not willing to have a binational state where they would likely become a minority, then the solution is to have two states--one Jewish and the other Arab--with identical borders, forming a condominium or "parallel states." The relationship between these two states would be equal, regardless of the size of each state's population, thus giving each state enough power to protect its people and ensure their rights (to land, water, and other resources) without fear of being dominated by the other. Each state would have its own democratically elected legislature and government. The two legislatures would come together to make laws affecting the common territory, and a special condominium government that was equally staffed by both governments, and with positions of power rotated, would carry out and enforce these laws. Internal and external security would be the responsibility of the condominium government. See parityforpeace.org for details on how such a plan might work. This plan would allow the Palestinians to return to their homes while maintaining a Jewish state that would be a haven for Jews.

  • BBC festival features Palestine Strings and condemnation of apartheid to jubilant applause
    • When I first heard of Israel's June 19, 1967, "peace offer," I was surprised I had not heard of it before, so I did some research. I looked in Mark Tessler's 906-page tome, A History of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (1994), and couldn't find any June 19 peace offer. I looked in The Complete Idiot's Guide to Middle East Conflict (1999), authored by Mitchell Bard, a former AIPAC employee who gives the Zionist spin on every facet of Israeli history. I couldn't find it there either. I finally found something in Avi Shlaim's The Iron Wall (2001), pp 253-254. Shlaim relataes Abba Eban's effusive account of the meeting between him and Dean Rusk on June 21 in which Eban transmitted the June 19 cabinet decision, and quotes Eban as writing, in his autobiography, "A few days later replies came back through Washington stating that Egypt and Syria completely rejected the Israeli proposal." Shlaim goes on to say, "The American record of the meeting confirms that Rusk considered the Israeli terms as not ungenerous, but it makes no mention of a request by Eban to transmit these terms to Egypt and Syria. Nor is there confirmation from Egyptian or Syrian sources that they received a conditional Israeli offer of withdrawal through the State Department in late June 1967. One is left with the impression that Eban was more interested in using the cabinet decision of 19 June to impress the Americans than to engage the governments of Egypt and Syria in substantive negotiations." According to Shlaim, the cabinet decision of June 19 was "a closely guarded secret in Israel. Even the chief of staff was not told about it. Rabin only learned about the proposal from his American colleagues after he had taken off his uniform and become ambassador to Washington. Moreover, the ministers who made the decision soon had second thoughts. They quickly concluded that the offer to withdraw to the international border had been too rash and too generous and that a higher price should be exacted from Egypt and Syria for their aggression. . . . As early as mid-July the politicians started approving plans for the building of Jewish settlements on the Golan Heights. . . . The decision of 19 June became a dead letter even before its formal cancellation in October."

      Without proof that the Egyptians and Syrians received the "peace offer,"how can we say that the Arabs "rejected" it?

  • Why so shy, Lieutenant T?
  • Meet Catherine Ashton, Tony Blair’s pro-Israel proxy in the EU
    • It is hard to imagine why the EU plan to condemn Israel and label settlement products could in any way have hindered the "talks." Because Israel holds all the cards, the pressure needs to be put on Israel.

  • Approaching 60, Norman Finkelstein reflects
    • Israel does not need to disappear, even as a state. What is needed, if the notion of statehood for Jews and statehood for Palestinians is to be preserved, is a different kind of two-state solution--Israel and Palestine on the same land, with the same borders, having equal power over the shared space. A number of people have come up with this idea independently of each other. A detailed explanation of this idea is on parityforpeace.org. Check out also "parallel states" and "parallel sovereignty."

  • Flipping the political map: Yehouda Shenhav upends liberal understandings of Israel/Palestine in 'Beyond the Two-State Solution'
  • Hopeful reading: Obama will go over Israeli leaders' heads to youth and say regime must change
    • "What we told the Israeli government is that the President [Peres] was very interested in speaking to the Israeli people, and that, in particular, he wanted to speak to young people. "

      Surely the word in brackets is supposed to be Obama, not Peres.

  • '5 Broken Cameras' director detained in LAX on way to Oscars (Updated)
  • The limits of liberal Zionism: 'NYT' columnist Roger Cohen misrepresents the Nakba and the right of return
    • The Jewish desire to reclaim the Land of Israel can be reconciled with the Palestinian right of return under a different kind of two-state solution: two states--Israel and Palestine--on the same land (identical borders), with equal access by all individuals to resources and with 50-50 bilateral governance on all matters of mutual concern. See http://www.parityforpeace.org for a detailed description of how this would work.

  • Tom Friedman's endorsement of Hagel as the DefSec Israel needs is wakeup call to Bill Kristol on Boxing Day
    • A comment by Jeremy, of Morocco, under Tom Friedman's endorsement of Hagel is worth repeating:

      link to nytimes.com

      Perhaps a US Senator should circulate a letter for signature to other senators that says: "I pledge not to sign one more letter on behalf of Israel until a majority of the Israeli Knesset signs a letter pledging always to put US interests - as defined by the US government -- at the front and center of Israeli policy."

  • 'Cross borders, cross pollinate' -- Rae Abileah says goodbye to Code Pink
  • Charting the 'peace process'
    • Israelis will tell you that the Geneva Conventions prohibit FORCED transfer and that since Israeli citizens are going to "Judea" and "Samaria" willingly, it's OK. How does one get around that argument?

  • UK's Owen Jones: 'What people on earth would tolerate...'
    • Syndicated columnist Joel Brinkley has a very one-sided column today in the San Francisco Chronicle and goodness knows how many other newspapers. For example, he writes, "When Hamas began firing hundreds of missiles at Israel this month, and Israel understandably responded . . . " and "Neither Morsi nor any other Egyptian official offered even glancing acknowledgment of the rocket volleys Hamas fired into Israel. That's what ignited this current crisis, not anything Israel did--other than exist" and "Find me a single nation on Earth--including Egypt--that would not respond if terrorists fired missiles at its two largest cities."

      We've got to write rebuttals to this kind of distortion, try to get them into print, and ask editors of the newspapers that carry Joel Brinkley to stop carrying him.

  • 'By God's promise this land is ours!' Settlers attack Palestinian oliver-pickers
    • As the settler says, "By God's promise, this land is ours!" When Israeli soldiers help the settlers dispossess the Palestinians, who is to say that this part of the Jewish religion is not a driving force of the Israeli government? (Reference your new Comments policy.)

  • Exile and the prophetic: Adelson's triumph signals Israel's end as a battlefield for Jewish identity
    • If the link between Israel and Diaspora Jews is weakening, do we really have a Jewish nation that encompasses Jews worldwide, or is Jewish nationhood confined to Israelis?

  • Exile and the Prophetic: Prophet Gray
    • Correction to what I just wrote: Tom Lantos was not in Auschwitz; in lost relatives in the Holocaust.

    • On how obits are written: Rep. Tom Lantos and Dr. George Habash died at about the same time. The mainstream-media obituaries extolled Tom Lantos for being a leader on human rights (not mentioning his blindness toward Palestinian human rights) and connected his passion for human rights with his experience in Auschwitz. George Habash was rightly portrayed as a leader in Palestinian resistance. However, no context for his passion was given. He was a doctor in Lydda (Lod) when the Israeli forces took the town and expelled the Palestinians. In Lydda, he worked in a hospital where many wounded and dead Palestinians were brought following a massacre.

  • The occupation machine can't run on empathy
    • As the view of Jerusalem includes a view of Deir Yassin, where about 100 Palestinians were massacred on April 9, 1948, it would seem fitting to have a Nakba museum on that site.

  • Israeli gov't study declares West Bank not occupied, Earth flat
  • A Fresh Coat of Paint for the Rubble: The message the Presbyterian Church (USA) sent to Palestinian Christians
    • The satirical reflection offered in the second part of this piece should be read in lieu of scripture at every Presbyterian Church this Sunday.

  • I left my hasbara in San Francisco
    • How about India, Egypt, Iraq (Mesopotamia)? Or do Middle Eastern civilizations stop being continuous when a different religion becomes predominant? India has certainly had a continuous civilization since ancient times.

  • Lobby will go grassroots in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Florida
    • I, also, would like to see more of Jeff Blankfort again. His knowledge is so detailed and covers such a long period of personal involvement with the I/P issue.

  • Famous Gaza killing featured in 'New Yorker' broke the ceasefire that led to 'Operation Summer Rains'
    • Great work, Annie! And let's not forget Nancy Kanwisher's statistical study reported in "Reigniting Violence," link to huffingtonpost.com, in which she concluded: "it is overwhelmingly Israel, not Palestine, that kills first following a lull. Indeed, it is virtually always Israel that kills first after a lull lasting more than a week." Her study covered data from September 2000 to October 2008.

  • One state, two states and the art of the possible
    • Homingpigeon: "We should be imagineers for the outcome in Israel/Palestine."

      There are some creative plans for solving the conflict. One is Parity for Peace--two states with sovereignty over the whole territory that was once Mandate Palestine, forming what international law calls a condominium. People can live anywhere they want to in the shared territory. Each state governs its own population in personal matters. The two states share governance equally on all matters that relate to the territory, economy, foreign affairs, security, defense, and inter-communal relations. See http://www.parityforpeace.org for details.

      Others have suggested that areas that are 95 % Jewish be the Jewish state, areas that are 95 % Arab be the Arab state, and mixed areas, including Jerusalem, be a condominium.

  • Should we call it apartheid?
    • A South African think tank did a detailed study of the two sets of laws governing Israelis and Palestinians in the territories and concluded that Israel is indeed practicing apartheid. See link to icahdusa.org where you can order or download a condensed version of the study. Also, see this website: link to itisapartheid.org which has the Russell Tribunal's conclusion that Israel is practicing apartheid. Apartheid is a crime against humanity, as opposed to discrimination. Hence, terminology makes a difference.

  • Senate challenge to Obama on refugees came from Israel
    • For the UN's position on who qualifies for refugee status, see this interview with UNRWA spokesman Chris Gunness, link to unrwa.org, who says (the rest is a block quote):

      UNHCR's Handbook on Procedures and Criteria for determining Refugee Status provides in paragraph 184: "If the head of a family meets the criteria of the definition, [for refugee status] his dependants are normally granted refugee status according to the principle of family unity."

      In effect, refugee families everywhere retain their status as refugees until they fall within the terms of a cessation clause or are able to avail themselves of one of three durable solutions already mentioned -- voluntary repatriation, local integration or resettlement in a third country.

      Also, Chapter 5 of the UNHCR publication, Procedural Standards for Refugee Status Determination under UNHCR’s Mandate is very clear that in accordance with the refugee’s right to family unity, refugee status is transferred through the generations. According to Chapter 5.1.2 "the categories of persons who should be considered to be eligible for derivative status under the right to family unity include:" "all unmarried children of the Principal Applicant who are under 18 years."

      Chapter 5.1.1 makes it clear that this status is retained after the age of 18. It states "individuals who obtain derivative refugee status enjoy the same rights and entitlements as other recognised refugees and should retain this status notwithstanding the subsequent dissolution of the family through separation, divorce, death, or the fact that the child reaches the age of majority."

      In addition, UNHCR typically cites a Palestinian refugee population number in their State of the World's Refugees reports: see as an example this document. This makes clear that the practice of registering descendants of refugees is not disputed.

  • Israel lobby's favorite senator tries to erase Palestinian refugee status for millions
  • Walzer says Jews were on the left because the left supported Jews
  • 'Be on our side': Bay Area ad campaign features Palestinian and Israeli women calling for U.S. sanctions against Israel
    • I really like the tone of these NorCal Sabeel ads. They stress the positive: peace with equality and justice, Israelis and Palestinians working together. They are a great contrast to the negative ads Stand With Us has put out.

  • Cuba-Gaza parallels explored (by Gaza Center for Political and Developmental Studies)
    • There is something wrong with this sentence: "Literacy in Palestine is the lowest in the world, say experts." According to UNDP, the adult literacy rate in Palestine is 93.8%. There are countries with higher and countries with lower literacy rates.

  • 'Israel Firster' gets at an inconvenient truth
    • A number of years ago, Congresswoman Lynn Woolsey (my representative) told a group of us sitting in her office in Washington, DC, that other members of Congress had told her that when they had to choose between supporting Israel or supporting the United States, they chose Israel. We did not press for names, and I am sure she would not have given them to us if we had.

  • A regular commenter on this site seeks a more temperate comment board
    • Thank you for publishing this piece. I sometimes forward the article that a Mondoweiss article refers to rather than the Mondoweiss piece because I don't want readers to be put off by the tone of the commentary following the piece. I'd prefer have a more elevated discussion. Some comments add new, relevant information, but you have to wade through a lot to get to them. Bottom line is that the tone of some of the commentary may be hurting our cause.

  • Two strikes for Ethan Bronner; does he get a third?
    • Not only is Bronner's willingness to moonlight for a West Bank firm doing PR work for Israel an indication of bias, but his bias is reflected in his writing, as in this Times article republished in SFGate:
      "Every year in mid-May many Palestinians mark what they call the nakba, or catastrophe, the anniversary of Israel's declaration of independence in 1948 and the start of a war in which hundreds of thousands of Palestinians lost their homes through expulsion and flight" ("Palestinians hit Israel with wave of protests," SFGate, May 16, 2011)
      link to sfgate.com. In this sentence he inaccurately calls the nakba an anniversary (a day), rather than an event lasting more than a year. He inaccurately puts the focus on the Palestinians' reaction to Israel's declaration of independence rather than on the Palestinians' experience of ethnic cleansing. He ignores the expulsions and flight of some 370,000 Palestinians that occurred during the civil war preceding the declaration of independence and makes it seem that the expulsions and flight were the result of war rather than a campaign that went alongside the wars. His sentence both belittles and ignores the Palestinian experience.

  • Mondoweiss liveblogs the UN General Assembly speeches
    • CNN had some balance after all in that after Netanyahu's speech they had two split-screen commentators who took the sails out of his speech as well.

    • MSNBC ran Abbas for a few minutes then let some commentator take over! I did not want to listen to the commentator instead of the speech, so I switched to CNN, which ran the entire speech. Then CNN had Richard Haas (Jewish?), president of the Council of Foreign Relations, comment on the speech. He did his best to downplay the speech and try to deflate all the hopes raised. Such bias!

  • Palestinian statehood and the struggle for self determination and national rights
  • Chris Matthews's thought bubble: we cut the deal to create Israel and we can't go back on it
  • Campaign to end military aid to Israel enters NY, underground
  • Obama's Gaza test
    • My recollection from newspaper reports is that Obama asked that the fighting stop in time for his inauguration and Israel did him that favor, probably wanting to get off on a good foot with the new president. It's hard to see why Obama would have wanted Israel's reports badly enough to arrange some kind of quid pro quo. A president-elect gets regular and thorough briefings on foreign affairs as a matter of course. Israel would have had an incentive to brief him for no other reason than to be able to select whatever facts would support its actions. Obama said he did not think he should intervene while another person was still president. If his failure to speak arose from a lack of courage--well, what have we come to expect? In my opinion, there was likely no quid pro quo.

    • My recollection from newspaper reports is that Obama asked that the fighting stop in time for his inauguration and Israel did him that favor. It's hard to see why Obama would have wanted Israel's reports badly enough to arrange some kind of quid pro quo.

  • Propaganda spotlight: The truth about the West Bank
  • Eliot Spitzer lectures Hanan Ashrawi that Israel has a right to the West Bank but Netanyahu 'wants nothing more' than to give it up
    • Back in the 1960s my husband, a graduate student at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), learned about the Arab attack on Israel on May 15, 1948. It made quite an impression on him. A few years ago, when he brought this fact up, I pointed out the Arabs and Jews had been fighting in a civil war for some six months, during which hundreds of thousands of Arab Palestinians had been forced out. That was news to him! Imagine! Of course, the archives of the period had not been opened up by then--still you'd think the professor would have known about the flight.

      Maybe it was the archival document showing Haganah's Plan D, of 10 March 1948, that was necessary to force a look at the reasons for Arab flight. Plan D gave permission to the Haganah to fight in parts of Palestine that had been assigned to the Arabs, to expel the villagers and to raze their villages. The leadership of the Yishuv made a momentous decision when they decided to fight beyond the borders assigned to them in UN Res. 181 and try to gain more territory by force. THEY HAD A BARE MAJORITY IN THE UN -PROPOSED "JEWISH STATE" (1,000 more Jews than Arabs, if the Bedouin had been counted). THE DECISION TO TRY TO ENLARGE THE TERRITORY FOR THE JEWISH STATE COMMITTED ISRAEL TO ETHNIC CLEANSING, FOR THERE WAS NO WAY TO HAVE A JEWISH MAJORITY ON EXPANDED TERRITORY WITHOUT EXPELLING THE ARABS.

      I believe that the

  • The New York Times's shameless Nakba distortion
    • Joel Brinkley, whose foreign policy column is syndicated in 50 newspapers, defines the Nakba (which he lowercases) as "the Arab world's 'day of catastrophe,' the day Israel was founded" ("In the Arab world, it's not just about Israel anymore," Insight, San Francisco Chronicle, March 6, 2011)
      link to sfgate.com

      Joel Brinkley, is a professor of journalism at Stanford University and a Pulitzer Prize-winning former correspondent for the New York Times. He describes himself as having spent many years working in the Middle East. His mischaracterization of the Nakba shows how little effort the mainstream press has made to understand the Palestinian story and how reporters feed on each other's ignorance.

  • America's self-righteous celebration
    • We Americans have killed a person who did us harm, who may well have thought 9/11 was bringing us to "justice" and finding some "closure" against what we had done to Muslims. Unless we pursue justice in the sense of making the world a fairer place, rather than seeking retribution, we will continue to find ourselves in an endless cycle of violence.

  • Miral: A Palestinian disappointment
    • Having seen "Miral," I am still waiting for the blockbuster that will be the Palestinian equivalent of "Exodus." That said, I am happy to report that a couple at my church, who are not activists on Israel-Palestine, made an announcement to the congregation (about 25 people) that they should see "Miral." They were so moved by the film, the husband brought a miral flower (or something like it) together with a palm branch and placed both on the altar.

  • The Jewish sideshow (and why I want to play in it)
    • Phil, you communicated well the fears that Jews have. The good news is that Jews who work with the Palestinians for justice lose their fear. As the Bible says, "Perfect love casts out fear" (John 4:18).

  • Miral fights an R rating in a difficult political climate
  • Obama gives big thumbs up to settlements at UN (and kills the two-state solution --Haber)
  • Saddam is captured --Baghdad Youth Movement claims
  • Times' Kershner uses biased Turkel history to report on biased Turkel report
    • You should ask the New York Times to make a correction on Kershner's 2009 date. We should ask for corrections--or at least write to the editor or the public editor--every time we see a mistake.

  • Congresswoman Barbara Lee, and the silence of friends
    • Jeffrey and Henry, thanks for all the historical insights to what Jim has written. We need to get after Members of Congress who plan not to run again. Might they be willing to show more spine?

  • I think Pollard will be freed
    • Jeffrey, you said, "He will likely pardon him WITHOUT any freeze in settlement construction or promise of doing so down the road." Haaretz reported, in its Hebrew edition, that Netanyahu is offering a settlement freeze in exchange for Pollard's release. See reference to this in the following op-ed in the English edition:

      link to haaretz.com

  • The thinktank of the Obama left is helping... Netanyahu!!
  • Contempt for democracy: Chomsky says Arab public opinion counts for nothing in US intellectual culture
    • At the confirmation hearing for Hillary Clinton to become Secretary of State both she and Chairman Kerry said Hamas broke the truce. I was amazed! How can we rely on our government to make good decisions when they don't have their facts straight?

      This summer I talked with an Israeli reporter specializing in Gaza who made a film, "Precious Love," about the efforts of an Israeli medical time to save the life of a Gazan baby with an immune disorder even as Operation Cast Lead was taking place. Although he was a reporter for Gaza, he seemed unaware that Israel broke the truce. With reporters like that, how can we expect the Israeli public to have any other view than that Operation Cast Lead was justified?

  • Sedek review: Stuck on the right of return
    • Ben, Res. 194 gave the right of return to Palestinians willing to live at peace with their neighbors. Presumably, Israel would have the right to deport a refugee who was not willing to live at peace.

      One way Israel could continue to be a Jewish state and still fulfill its obligation to allow the Palestinian refugees to return would be to allow a Palestinian state to exist in a condominium relationship with Israel. A condominium in international law is two states having sovereignty over the same land. In this case, it would be the whole area that once formed Mandate Palestinian. Palestinians and Israelis could live anywhere they wanted to in the condominium and legitimately claim the whole area between the Mediterranean and Jordan as theirs. Each nation would govern its own population, and a condominium government, in which there was equal representation between between the states (thus taking demographic worries out of the equation), would deal with all areas of common concern. See my website http://www.parityforpeace.org for details.

  • Yehoshua sanitizes
    • Phil, you said, "the world gerrymandered a state that was Jewish, by about 600,000 to 500,000 non Jews." You must have been including Jerusalem as part of the Jewish state, but Jerusalem was to be a separate, internationally administered entity. UNSCOP'S figures for the Jewish state were 498,000 Jews and 407,000 "Arabs and Others" (link to mideastweb.org). But note this statement by UNSCOP (same source): "In addition there will be in the Jewish State about 90,000 Bedouins, cultivators and stock owners who seek grazing further afield in dry seasons." If you add the Bedouin to the "Arabs and Others" column, Jews outnumber "Arabs and Others" by only 1,000 in the area designated for the Jewish state.

      According to UNSCOP (same source), the Arab state would have 10,000 Jews and 725,000 Arabs. Combining UNSCOP's figures for the two states, I calculate that 35 percent of the total population of "Arabs and Others" would be living under Jewish hegemony. If the Beduouin are counted, the figure rises to 40 percent.

      Is it any wonder the Arabs rejected partition?

  • Haaretz gets Partition wrong
    • Dershowitz also got the partition figures reversed, I noted in the last Mondoweiss video of him (the "literary" discussion with the Palestinian author). Perhaps this misconception is widely held in the Jewish community. And to think that Dershowitz is considered by many in the Jewish community to be an expert. One can't trust anything he says.

  • What does effective solidarity with Palestinians look like in the US?
  • Enter the Israel Project's 'Best Shots of Israel' contest
    • Maybe we could use this PR stunt to contrast, through pictures, the easy and merry life of Israelis with the suffering of the Palestinians.

  • Two conversations with Europeans in Jordan touch on Jewish fears re anti-Semitism
  • American public opinion and the special relationship with Israel
    • I have skimmed the entire report and think these findings are worrisome:
      There has been an 8-point drop in the in the attitude that Americans should not take either side in the conflict (from 74% in 2004 to 66%) and an 11-point increase in those saying the U.S. should take Israel's side (28%, up from 17% in 2004), while the percentage of Americans thinking we should take the Palestinians' side is 3%. On a scale of how people feel about a country, with 50 being neutral and 100 being very warm and favorable, Israel scores 57 and the Palestinians score 3. How do we ever turn things around with the media so skewed toward Israel? And this is after Operation Cast Lead and Israel's thumbing of the nose to Biden and Obama.

  • Beinart's hermetics

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