Tag Archives:
Gaza

Emad Khalil’s story as a Gazan worker in Israel

Mohammed Saleem on
Palestinian farmers work at their fields during the Workers' Day, in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip May 1, 2016. (Photo: Ashraf Amra/APA Images)

Gaza-based writer Mohammed Saleem writes, “Skin tanned and hands calloused from working forty-two years under the sun, Emad Khalil, a sixty-one year old retired laborer, sits in front of me. For thirty of those years, he worked in Israel. His story documents a tremendous change in attitude and policy towards Palestinian freedom of movement, employment opportunities, healthcare, and relations between Palestinians and Israelis.”

American basketball coach devotes his time to disabled in Gaza

Isra Saleh El-Namy on
American coach Jess Markt trains disabled Palestinians to play basketball during a training course organized by the Palestinian Red Cross in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip, on May 28, 2016. (Photo: Ashraf Amra/APA Images)

In the aftermath of successive Israeli onslaught waged on the Gaza Strip, the number of Palestinians with physical disabilities drastically increased. Gaza journalist Isra El-Namy covers American coach Jess Markt’s visit to Khan Younis as he trains disabled Palestinians to play basketball and train for future tournaments.

After 68 years of Nakba, is coexistence still possible?

Mohammed Alhammami on
Palestinian boy climbs through an opening in Israel's separation barrier in Shuafat near Jerusalem. February, 2009. (Photo: REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

Mohammed Alhammami recalls stories he heard growing up of Jews, Muslims and Christians living alongside each other in historic Palestine as one people, not divided factions. But he wonders what about now? Can Jews and Palestinians (Christians and Muslims alike) really coexist in the Holy Land, after 68 years of Nakba?

From Gaza to the Corries, with love

Mohammed Alhammami on
Craig and Cindy Corrie, the parents of Rachel Corrie, arrive at Haifa district court before the verdict in a civil case August 28, 2012. (Photo: REUTERS/Amir Cohen)

Mohammed Alhammami writes a letter to Cindy and Craig Corrie on the anniversary of their daughter Rachel’s death, “Thank you, Mr. and Ms. Corrie, for sharing Rachel with us. I know for a fact she has changed many people’s lives, in Palestine and elsewhere. I know she changed mine. May her memory be forever engraved in our hearts.”

Suicides on the rise in Gaza

We Are Not Numbers on
Screenshot: Abu Setta contemplating suicide. Watania Media Agency - Gaza

What happens when a person is forced to struggle for years without enough money to support his family, and there is no way out?

Tolstoy’s War and Peace . . . and Palestine

Mohammed Alhammami on
A scene from War and Peace (Photo: Mohammed Sarsour)

On a recent September evening, two groups of culturally curious people, separated by countries and borders, virtually gathered together for art and social justice. At Said Al-Mishal Establishment for Culture and Science, Gaza’s Theatre for Everybody performed a short version of Tolstoy’s classic “War and Peace.” Simultaneously, on the other side of the world at London’s Az Theatre, a group of British and international supporters gathered to watch a previously recorded version of the same performance. The play was centered on two themes: condemning war and denouncing dictatorship.

Health Under Occupation: Constraints on access to healthcare in the Palestinian Territories

Zahra Bhaiwala on
A doctor walks through the rubble in Gaza to a patient's house, Summer 2014. (Photo: Dr. Akihiro Seita/UNRWA)

The Israeli occupation is the chief structural barrier to quality healthcare for Palestinians—it has exacerbated existing inequities in the population and has given rise to a host of issues unique to this devastating political reality. The structural aspects of the occupation —political, economic, and social— collectively mitigate access to quality health care for Palestinians in Gaza, the West Bank, and Jerusalem. Healthcare is not just measured in mortality statistics or disease prevalence. National health systems are highly influenced by the political climate surrounding them, and as Norwegian physician and activist Mads Gilbert puts it, “Medicine and politics are Siamese twins.”

Hamas has agreed to a ceasefire, says senior Palestinian official (Updated)

Allison Deger on

Update (7/16/14): Yesterday we reported Hamas had accepted a ceasefire with Israel based on a source within the PLO. As of right now a ceasefire has not gone into effect and The Guardian is reporting that Hamas has officially rejected the Egyptian cease fire proposal. While we stand behind the reporting of what were told, […]

State Dept puts American seal of approval on latest Israeli-initiated round of violence

Adam Wolf on

Since the publication of Amnesty International’s damning report on IDF practices in the Occupied Palestinian Territories, Israel has responded by ramping up its killing of Palestinians. Entitled Trigger Happy: Israel’s Use of Excessive Force in the West Bank, the report thoroughly documents the IDF’s violations of international human rights law, and calls on the international community to cease […]

Notes from the cells

Felice Gelman on

Nine women are sitting in the backroom of the Egyptian border control waiting the twelve hours before we will be deported. We had come to Cairo to join a delegation of 100 women from around the world invited to meet the women in Gaza in solidarity on International Women’s Day. Each of us was snatched […]

Remembering Dr. Eyad el Sarraj, 1943-2013

Nancy Murray on
Eyad and Ali

Dr. Eyad el Sarraj, who died on December 17 at the age of 70 and is being buried today in the Gaza Strip, was intimately acquainted with trauma and what cycles of violence do to the human psyche and society. The founder of the Gaza Community Mental Health Programme in 1990, he made helping people […]

Gaza forum showcases youth creativity despite crippling blockade

Abdulrahman Murad on

Gaza proves its creativity everyday. The besieged region has never bowed down to the confines of a brain-sapping blockade complete with crippling closures, meager resources and traumatic experiences of war. Many Gaza youths transcend all of these odds with their dreams, where the stars of hope light up their minds. But how could the youth […]

A day in the sun for Gaza, or more of the same?

Pam Bailey on

With the news that the UN General Assembly has voted 138-9 to accept Palestine as a “non-member observer state,” fireworks erupted and horns honked in Gaza. Finally, Palestinians were feeling as if they were having their day in the sun. First, Israel ended its latest attack – which some believe should be re-named “Operation Pillar […]

4 myths about the Israeli attack on Gaza

Pam Bailey on

 As Israel continues to pound the Gaza Strip, and factions within the beleaguered territory retaliate as best they can, there are many myths and stereotypes dominating mainstream media coverage, and many conversations. Here are a few of the most common misunderstandings: Myth: Hamas started the round of fighting that led to Israel’s “Operation Pillar of […]

Pakistan: A land of competing narratives

Pam Bailey on

After an interminable 48 hours of traveling, I am at home, and looking back at my trip to Pakistan with a bit more distance and perspective. If there is a unifying theme as my thoughts crystallize it is this: There is always more than one narrative, and it is incumbent upon us to seek them […]

March 15 one year later in Gaza: Has the fire gone cold?

Pam Bailey on

One year ago this week, Gaza erupted into one of the most exciting demonstrations of youth “power” I had ever had the joy to witness. The “Arab Spring” was in full swing, and this time, they believed, was “their turn.” Youth, and in many cases, their families, poured into the streets, chanting, singing songs and […]

This is the face of war

Pam Bailey on

 (Reposted from Pam in Progress) As I write this, Israel is bombing with intensity; 10 are dead already and casualties are reportedly filling the ERs. Resistance fighters are retaliating. On this, my last day in Gaza, I am confined to the home of a friend’s relatives — most likely until early in the morning…We are […]

Let there be light: Life in Gaza without electricity

Pam Bailey on

Cross-posted from Pam Bailey’s blog, Pam In Progress (view for photos) There are so many basic things most of us take for granted….like, electricity. But in Gaza — especially these days — it’s a precious commodity. Power (of the electrical kind) has been rationed to some extent ever since I started visiting Gaza in 2009. As […]

NGO ‘industry’: a boon or bane in Gaza?

Pam Bailey on

Erez Crossing, from Electronic Intifada Yesterday was the Islamic holy day, and in Gaza, that means a big meal after the mid-day call to prayer. Among my “circle,” everyone — Palestinian and international friends alike — gathers at the home of the Abusalamas, a moderate-to-liberal family that has “adopted” me since my six-month stay in […]