Tag Archives:
Gaza

Meet Reem Anbar, Gaza’s first music therapist

Kate on

“Reem’s sessions take on different styles of therapy, some of which she has invented herself, and others she has collected from other therapists,” reports The New Arab.

Reading Maimonides in Gaza

Marilyn Garson on

Marilyn Garson worked for Mercy Corps and UNRWA in Gaza between 2011 and 2015, where she lived through two wars in four years: “A UN official was quoted as saying that “the world watched in horror.” I felt only bitterness toward the world that did no more than watch.”

Everyone shares the blame in Gaza electricity crisis

Pam Bailey on

The two generators of Gaza’s sole power plant stopped operating Jan. 6 due to a severe fuel shortage. For most residents, that means most areas are receiving power for a mere three hours in between 12-hour blackouts. Who and what is to blame is a subject of many dark jokes and frustration—sometimes breaking into protests and arrests. Most residents in Gaza, however, place a large share of the blame on feuding political leaders.

Life in six words

Pam Bailey on

If you had to sum up life in six words, what would you write? Here’s what Palestinian refugees are saying.

Palestinians shrug their shoulders as Americans eagerly anticipate election results

Pam Bailey on

A new poll shows most Arabs, and especially Palestinians, think Hillary Clinton will be no better for the region than Donald Trump. “I just feel like Americans aren’t choosing between the lesser of two evils, but the quieter of two evils,” says 15-year-old Amera Abunada, a Palestinian writer now living in Turkey.

Emad Khalil’s story as a Gazan worker in Israel

Mohammed Saleem on

Gaza-based writer Mohammed Saleem writes, “Skin tanned and hands calloused from working forty-two years under the sun, Emad Khalil, a sixty-one year old retired laborer, sits in front of me. For thirty of those years, he worked in Israel. His story documents a tremendous change in attitude and policy towards Palestinian freedom of movement, employment opportunities, healthcare, and relations between Palestinians and Israelis.”

American basketball coach devotes his time to disabled in Gaza

Isra Saleh El-Namy on

In the aftermath of successive Israeli onslaught waged on the Gaza Strip, the number of Palestinians with physical disabilities drastically increased. Gaza journalist Isra El-Namy covers American coach Jess Markt’s visit to Khan Younis as he trains disabled Palestinians to play basketball and train for future tournaments.

After 68 years of Nakba, is coexistence still possible?

Mohammed Alhammami on
Palestinian boy climbs through an opening in Israel's separation barrier in Shuafat near Jerusalem. February, 2009. (Photo: REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

Mohammed Alhammami recalls stories he heard growing up of Jews, Muslims and Christians living alongside each other in historic Palestine as one people, not divided factions. But he wonders what about now? Can Jews and Palestinians (Christians and Muslims alike) really coexist in the Holy Land, after 68 years of Nakba?

From Gaza to the Corries, with love

Mohammed Alhammami on

Mohammed Alhammami writes a letter to Cindy and Craig Corrie on the anniversary of their daughter Rachel’s death, “Thank you, Mr. and Ms. Corrie, for sharing Rachel with us. I know for a fact she has changed many people’s lives, in Palestine and elsewhere. I know she changed mine. May her memory be forever engraved in our hearts.”

Suicides on the rise in Gaza

We Are Not Numbers on

What happens when a person is forced to struggle for years without enough money to support his family, and there is no way out?

Tolstoy’s War and Peace . . . and Palestine

Mohammed Alhammami on

On a recent September evening, two groups of culturally curious people, separated by countries and borders, virtually gathered together for art and social justice. At Said Al-Mishal Establishment for Culture and Science, Gaza’s Theatre for Everybody performed a short version of Tolstoy’s classic “War and Peace.” Simultaneously, on the other side of the world at London’s Az Theatre, a group of British and international supporters gathered to watch a previously recorded version of the same performance. The play was centered on two themes: condemning war and denouncing dictatorship.

Health Under Occupation: Constraints on access to healthcare in the Palestinian Territories

Zahra Bhaiwala on

The Israeli occupation is the chief structural barrier to quality healthcare for Palestinians—it has exacerbated existing inequities in the population and has given rise to a host of issues unique to this devastating political reality. The structural aspects of the occupation —political, economic, and social— collectively mitigate access to quality health care for Palestinians in Gaza, the West Bank, and Jerusalem. Healthcare is not just measured in mortality statistics or disease prevalence. National health systems are highly influenced by the political climate surrounding them, and as Norwegian physician and activist Mads Gilbert puts it, “Medicine and politics are Siamese twins.”

State Dept puts American seal of approval on latest Israeli-initiated round of violence

Adam Wolf on

Since the publication of a damning Amnesty International report on IDF practices Israel has seemingly ramped up the killing of Palestinians, including six dead over a 24 hour period last week. US State Department spokesperson Jen Psaki, above, is quick to criticize rockets from Gaza, but withheld such condemnation for Israel’s recent killings, effectively putting an American stamp of approval on the latest Israeli violence.

Notes from the cells

Felice Gelman on

Nine women wait in a holding cell at the Cairo airport awaiting their deportation, after they tried to join a women’s delegation to Gaza. What do we have in common? writes Felice Gelman, above left. An interest in calling attention to the terrible plight the women of Gaza face particularly in the face of the tightening siege. The UN has cautioned an humanitarian disaster is imminent. And Israel, Egypt and the US all have their reasons for blockading the strip.

Remembering Dr. Eyad el Sarraj, 1943-2013

Nancy Murray on

Dr. Eyad el Sarraj died on December 17 at the age of 69 and is being buried today in the Gaza Strip. The founder of the Gaza Community Mental Health Programme in 1990, he made helping people move beyond their personal and collective trauma his life’s work. Nancy Murray remembers el Sarraj and their work together writing he had the “determination to live in open, nonviolent defiance of occupation, both as an assertion of his own humanity, and in recognition of the humanity of others, Israelis as well as Palestinians.” Above, Dr. Eyad el Sarraj and his son Ali in the garden of their house, circa 2005.

A day in the sun for Gaza, or more of the same?

Pam Bailey on

With the news that the UN General Assembly has voted 138-9 to accept Palestine as a “non-member observer state,” fireworks erupted and horns honked in Gaza. Finally, Palestinians were feeling as if they were having their day in the sun.