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Let Pollard go. But first get answers from Tel Aviv

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Jonathan Pollard

Jonathan Pollard

We take seriously the issue of humanitarian release for Jonathan Pollard. Twenty-nine years in prison– half his life until now– is enough. Let him go.

But what should be the terms of his release?

First, The Israelis have never come clean about what they got and what they did with it. They must give us that information before the U.S. unlocks Pollard’s cell. There’s a strong suggestion in Seymour Hersh’s coverage of the case, and others, that some in the intelligence community believe Pollard’s secrets were traded to the Soviet Union in exchange for Soviet Jewish emigres to Israel, at a huge risk to US national security. It’s possible US agents were killed. Were they? Who? We’d like to know. Let us have the answers.

Second. It’s clear that thirty years ago, Israeli intelligence took advantage of an emotionally-distressed young man with drug problems. Have any Israelis paid the price for helping to put this man in prison for thirty years? Pollard certainly approached Israel and offered to spy for them. But who in the end is to blame for this: Israel intelligence handlers stuck him in prison for nearly 30 years and walked away with a boatload of our secrets.

The real villain here isn’t Pollard. He’s a pathetic guy who’s suffered enough. Let him go, but we want answers and the answers don’t come from him. They come from Tel Aviv. Has anyone in the Israeli security apparatus been punished for taking advantage of an insecure young man with drug issues? Why did the investigation of this spying episode stop with him? What was Israel doing? And were any of these Israeli handlers– better called his manipulators– punished for taking advantage of this young man and sticking him in prison and violating American friendship?

Three, What does releasing Pollard on humanitarian grounds have to do with the Israeli occupation of Palestine? Nothing. Why should an American who spied for Israel have anything to do with why Palestinian people who live in Hebron should be free of the crushing burden of apartheid and occupation? (See Yousef Munayyer, who makes a similar point).

Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is senior editor of Mondoweiss.net and founded the site in 2005-06.

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186 Responses

  1. Krauss on April 2, 2014, 11:22 am

    Let him go… in exchange for one of the people responsible for attacking USS Liberty.

    Moshe Dayan is dead, but I’m sure there’s some commander who was young’ish at the time who surely has a few decades left. And if we can’t have him in prison, where he(and his colleagues) belong, then at least do a real investigation. It’s past time.

    Finally, Pollard gets a shot at parole in 2015, so for Obama/Kerry to give him up now doesn’t really matter that much on substance.

    Optics/politics is different, however, where this deal has been seen as yet another craven attempt by desperate Americans to blow fumes into a process that never lived. Just read the NYT comments, the readers of a “liberal” Zionist paper. They are savaging the administration, it’s 99-1 against the release of Pollard.

    • Krauss on April 2, 2014, 11:26 am

      P.S.

      We may just end up in a worst possible situation for Obama/Kerry, where their olive branch has been rejected, thereby doubly humiliating them.

      First, the view that they are bending over backwards for Israel(which should be the other way around in a normal world, considering the VAST disparities of power between the nations).

      Second, the spat in the face from Pollard who has by all accounts rejected their deal, leaving them empty-handed but humiliated.

      Kerry is now pulling all the stops to extend the charade another year. That’s funny, last year he said “this year will be it”. Now all of the sudden he’s changing his mind? No wonder Israel can’t take any American proposal seriously, all their words are meaningless and when it counts, they bend over backwards to appease Israel, which can spit America in the face and get 29 standing ovations from Congress.

      I can’t even get angry about this anymore, I just laugh at the pathetic spectacle. Abbas is a powerless colonial tool anyway. Give the keys to Bibi to maintain the PA, let him take economic ownership after controlling them politically.

      Declare one state and seek citizenship. Be done with the kabuki theater.

      • Krauss on April 2, 2014, 11:51 am

        Unrelated:

        Look, the NYT is already attacking the Palestinians for the failure of the talks.

        “Palestinians Make a Surprise Move, and Mideast Talks Falter”

        http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/03/world/middleeast/middle-east-peace-talks.html?hp

        Surprising the United States and Israel, the Palestinian leadership formally submitted applications on Wednesday to join 15 international agencies, leaving the troubled Middle East talks brokered by Secretary of State John Kerry on the verge of breakdown.

        This is the opening paragraph.

        You don’t actually need to read more, this sums it up. It’s all their fault!
        Rudoren proves once again that when it actually counts, she will line up with the Likudniks, just like all Zionists(MJ Rosenberg, Jane Eisner, Jeremy Ben-Ami, Beinart and so on).

        The ideological differences are a charade and if the talks fail(which I doubt because who will pay Abbas’ salary?), the NYT is already showing in advance to the rest of the media which side to blame.

        Even if the talks get artificially extended for one year, the tone has been set. Palestinian rejectionism. The question is if their liberal reading base will fall for it.

        This isn’t post-Camp David. This is post-Cast Lead.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 12:12 pm

        “Look, the NYT is already attacking the Palestinians for the failure of the talks.”

        So long as they keep letting people who are obviously in a conflict situation cover the story, is anyone surprised??

      • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 2:37 pm

        No surprise..

    • Chu on April 2, 2014, 1:45 pm

      ‘it’s 99-1 against the release of Pollard.’

      You got that right. Look at most comments sections. Here’ sRuth Marcus on WaPo.
      ‘Free Jonathan Pollard’ 300 plus comments, nary one in favor of his release.

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/ruth-marcus-free-jonathan-pollard/2014/04/01/9c8ee61c-b9c9-11e3-96ae-f2c36d2b1245_allComments.html?ctab=all_&

      • Citizen on April 2, 2014, 11:38 pm

        So will they cut off comments? The tip of the rightfully resentful ice berg is growing up, up; I saw all those comments too, and even made a few myself.

      • Ira Glunts on April 3, 2014, 5:01 am

        @Chu and others,
        I do not think this is going to be decided on the basis of public opinion. I am a betting man and I will cover those 99-1 odds.

    • MRW on April 3, 2014, 1:34 am

      They are savaging the administration, it’s 99-1 against the release of Pollard.

      And well they should. Read Allan C. Brownfeld’s 1998 article, The Strange Campaign to Secure the Release of Convicted Spy Jonathan Jay Pollard

      So damaging to U.S. security was Pollard’s role that Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger told Israeli Ambassador Meir Rosenne in 1987 that Pollard should be executed. Joseph di Genova, the prosecutor who handled the Pollard case, said that the damage he did to U.S. security was “beyond calculation.” […] In an affidavit, Secretary Weinberger said: “It is difficult for me, even in the so-called year of the spy, to conceive of a greater harm to national security than that caused by the defendant in view of the breadth, the critical importance to the U.S. and the high sensitivity of the information he sold to Israel.”
      […]

      The U.S. government said that the damage resulting from Pollard’s spying exceeds that caused by Ronald W. Pelton, a former NSA employee, who was convicted in 1986 of selling classified electronic surveillance secrets to the Soviet Union.

      […]

      Ronald Pelton was sentenced to three life terms plus 10 years for selling secrets to the Soviet Union about electronic eavesdropping that he learned in 14 years as an NSA technician. A memorandum prepared by U.S. government prosecutors Leeper and David Geneson said: “Pelton disclosed no classified documents to the Soviet Union. Rather, following his retirement, he met with Soviet agents on approximately nine occasions over a five-year period during which he orally relayed classified information he could recall.”

      Pollard, on the other hand, delivered a 6′ x 6′ x 10′ cube of highly classified documents that contained–and this is only what was being admitted to at the time–our global nuclear missile sites, launch codes, NATO missiles sites, our complete nuclear defense plan, the names of all CIA assets behind the Iron Curtain, and our NOC agents.

      You want him to go to Israel? Send him there in a pine box.

      Just for the record, Brownfeld notes:

      Rear Admiral Sumner Shapiro [Jewish], U.S. Navy (Ret.), who was director of naval intelligence when Pollard began his work with that organization, sharply criticizes those Jewish groups seeking his release.

  2. American on April 2, 2014, 11:23 am

    ” First, The Israelis have never come clean about what they got and what they did with it. They must give us that information before the U.S. unlocks Pollard’s cell. ”>>>

    Well, that’s never going to happen. The Israelis have never and will never come clean about anything, regardless of what they are offered or given.
    Pollards release or continued imprisonment has no effect on anything.
    Release him or not, Israel will keep on doing what its doing.
    Cant change a scorpion’s nature.

    • CloakAndDagger on April 2, 2014, 11:33 am

      @ American

      I agree. There is no way that Israel is going to give us anything – certainly not admit that their actions caused any harm to the US or got any agents killed. The list of damage to the US is long – not just Pollard. Everything from USS Liberty, the theft of Nuclear material (and apparent environmental damage in the process), corruption of our political system, espionage, industrial theft, …, the list goes on.

      I argued yesterday that we should release Pollard as a chess move, but on “humanitarian grounds”?? I don’t quite see Pollard as the poor, taken-advantage-of, innocent that Phil makes him out to be.

      • American on April 2, 2014, 12:47 pm

        I don’t see Pollard as a poor little drug befuddled guy either.
        And I had never heard he had a drug problem before..
        Any evidence of that?

      • bilal a on April 2, 2014, 1:29 pm

        There is no evidence Pollard thought he was giving secrets to the Soviet enemy but rather to an American ally and friend; the Israel government caused the harm.

        He was a psychologically disturbed young man exploited by a cynical mafia.

        30 years is too much.

      • American on April 2, 2014, 3:08 pm

        bilal a says:

        April 2, 2014 at 1:29 pm

        He was a psychologically disturbed young man exploited by a cynical mafia.>>>>

        Well then I suggest you go get the Israelis responsible and we’ll make a swap.
        But I don’t accept the ‘psychologically disturbed’ excuse.
        He *knew right from wrong*.
        That is how guilt is evaluated.

      • RoHa on April 2, 2014, 3:26 pm

        “There is no evidence Pollard thought he was giving secrets to the Soviet enemy but rather to an American ally and friend;”

        It was his responsibility not to give the secrets to anybody.

      • MRW on April 3, 2014, 1:37 am

        There is no evidence Pollard thought he was giving secrets to the Soviet enemy but rather to an American ally and friend.

        Baloney. He was selling info to Pakistan, South Africa, and one other country before he even approached Israel.

      • Citizen on April 2, 2014, 11:47 pm

        Me either–before he got an Israel state rep to deal with him, he had already gone two three other state reps from foreign countries. When younger, he use to tell people he was a Mossad agent. His biggest drug was ziocaine and it’s only competition was tons of cash. When he was living the high life by the merger of these two motives, pumping US top secrets to Israel and getting paid well for it, he and wifey were loving’ it. Israel has lots of money in a trust account for him.

  3. edwin on April 2, 2014, 11:23 am

    First, The Israelis have never come clean about what they got and what they did with it. They must give us that information before the U.S. unlocks Pollard’s cell.

    Why? There are two different issues here. One is the actions of Pollard. Two is the actions of what is perceived of the US’s closest allie, Isarel.

    I don’t think we should be taking revenge on Pollard for the actions of Israel. Pollard is responsible for his own actions and the consequences of those actions. Israel is responsible for its own actions and the consequences. While Pollard’s actions led and allowed Israel’s actions we need to draw a line here. It is wrong to hold Pollard hostage to try and force Israel’s hand. If he should be released (and I agree that he should) then he should be released, regardless of the actions of Israel. It is the difference between being responsible for one’s own actions and the consequences of those actions, and being responsible for the actions of someone else. Pollard is not responsible for the actions of someone else.

    • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 11:48 am

      I disagree that he should be let go. He got life, he should die in prison. The fact that he is eligable for parole is repulsive to me.

      But, that being said, it’s not taking revenge on Pollard or holding him hostage; it’s ensuring that the US is made whole before it extends compassion against those who harmed it. The Israelis have clearly made this one of their own cause and are responsibile for their acts, so if we are going to insure that we are doing the right thing in releasing him, we have to be sure that everyone who is guilty is not only become remorseful and experienced contrition, and has made amends and begged for forgiveness for their actions. If that is accomplished then, and only then, should there be given any thought to humanitarian release.

      So unless both Pollard and the Israelis express sincere remorse and contrition, provide all of the information so that we can finally know what was stolen and correct for it and until both Pollard and Israel beg for forgiveness (I would require Netanyahoo to come to the White House and, in front of the press corps, literally get on hands and knees and beg), then we should not even entertain early release. To do otherwise would be to send the message that spying for another state is not a big deal at the end of the day.

      • MRW on April 3, 2014, 1:38 am

        He’s not eligible for parole. The laws at the time he was sentenced allowed time off for good behavior. They got rid of that law because of Pollard.

      • gamal on April 3, 2014, 7:41 am

        perhaps the US could exchange Pollard with itself for Sirhan Sirhan, on behalf of Israel, everybody wins.

    • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 2:40 pm

      The Israeli’s will never come clean on this issue or any other. Tough action would be the only thing they might understand and that has not and will not happen. BDS only answer

    • Real Jew on April 2, 2014, 8:54 pm

      Its absolutely ridiculous to think that because this man was in bed with a more sinister entity that he should be shown mercy. Its like saying a soldier in a mexican cartel should be excused for murder because he was given the order by the cartel. Whatever his habits, whatever his mentality this traitor who was obviously competent enough to pull this off should be punished on par with the crime. Would people be asking for sympathy if pollard was from Iran, Russia, Cyprus ect…absolutely not

    • Citizen on April 2, 2014, 11:52 pm

      “Pollard is not responsible for the actions of someone else.”
      Yes he is, because that someone else could not do whatever they did with out information he gave them. He wasn’t dancing solo. It was pair dancing all the way.

  4. jewishgoyim on April 2, 2014, 11:30 am

    Sometimes, the most reliable websites and individuals seem to defend positions that are not understandable. Like when Glenn Greenwald was pleading FOR Scooter Libby in the Plame affair.

    Why on Earth would North and Weiss all of a sudden push for a long standing goal of the Israel lobby on “humanitarian grounds”? I think James and Phil have things obviously backwards. First let us know what happened and then decide on letting Pollard go. How do we know that Pollard he’s not lucky he has not been sentenced to death at this point? It is altogether possible that justice has had kid gloves with him. We don’t know.

    Releasing Pollard now is sending a clear message: if the lobby is now strong enough to have him freed, anyone can spy for Israel without taking any risks: we have your back!

    This is disastrous. Why are James and Phil now pushing for this??? I think honest players concerned about Pollard can only ask for the truth, then, maybe, for his release.

    • Chu on April 2, 2014, 1:42 pm

      good question. And to make this statement [He’s a pathetic guy who’s suffered enough. ] without a clear explanation doesn’t help.

      This media story has also become more about the desperation of Obama and Kerry, while making Pollard out to be a sort-of victim/pawn between governments.

    • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 2:46 pm

      And they describe Pollard as a “pathetic” character who was just totally taken advantage of. As if Pollard did not go looking for Israel. Read about the guys history. Totally devoted to Israel. Willing to sacrifice U.S. National Security. North and Weiss’s stance is odd. What Pollard did was beyond the pale, Casper Weinberger saying he wished they could sentence him to death and Weiss and North are supporting letting this guy out. Wonder who they are talking with? Barney Frank, Schumer?

    • Taxi on April 2, 2014, 3:00 pm

      I agree, jewishgoyim.

      There’s a double weird disconnect with North and Weiss linking arms with aipac on Pollard. I don’t trust those two’s judgement sometimes. Feels too much staged for the sakes of the MW brand. Feels, well…. conformist, pedantic, and even a tad dishonest. But hey, that’s their editorial prerogative.

      It’s possible that this whole Pollard episode is an Obama bluff/setup. Pollard was never gonna get released. Obama threw that easy Pollard bait at the zios and they took it pronto – and now, 48 hours after the Pollard-release leak (with White House permission, no doubt), it’s all over: Pollard will stay in jail, Obama will stay in the White House, and who’s left in the media spotlight with American citizens seething at them but all them loud-mouthed zio nutjobs looking like they serve the country of israel and not the United States.

      It’s a similar maneuver to how Obama left the zios high and dry and alone on Syria, with the American public expressing their disgust and disdain at israel’s influence on our foreign policy. Obama saw another chance to chip away at zio credibility and the public perception of them through the Pollard bluff.

      “Releasing Pollard now is sending a clear message: if the lobby is now strong enough to have him freed, anyone can spy for Israel without taking any risks: we have your back!”

      It is for this very precise reason you cite above that it’s simply impossible to release Pollard. This is what concerns our Intelligence Agencies the most: that israel will be able to recruit multitudes upon multitudes of new agents, both domestic and foreign, under the banner of ‘Not even the world’s superpower can touch our agents’. The zio’s nefarious spying activities would be so numerous (and devious) that it would suck our Intelligence resources dry, both monetary and manpower, just keeping up with them.

      It will never happen in a million years. In fact, there’s a better chance of making peace in the middle east than there is for a Pollard release.

      Obama just did a kabuki dance with the zios and their spies. North and Weiss watched from the balcony and had quite the bleeding-heart liberal experience, so it seems. They’re wrong on this one, but I still like them cuz most of the time they’re very smart and most charming.

      • annie on April 2, 2014, 3:06 pm

        It’s possible that this whole Pollard episode is an Obama bluff/setup. Pollard was never gonna get released. Obama threw that easy Pollard bait at the zios and they took it pronto – and now, 48 hours after the Pollard-release leak (with White House permission, no doubt), it’s all over: Pollard will stay in jail

        ha! we think alike, and you even mentioned syria. my hunch was that obama/kerry knew abbas was going to make his move and the kerry airplane/canceled meeting was all staged. and, to sweeten the deal they threw in pollard as red meat to capture the press and then BAM, big news of yesterday crushed that. i loved it. if it wasn’t staged, well, it was a miracle of timing.

      • American on April 2, 2014, 3:22 pm

        ‘to sweeten the deal they threw in pollard as red meat to capture the press and then BAM’..annie

        Heheheh….well it worked….the I-people stepped right in it didnt they.
        I’ve been monitoring the news channels this am and everyone has covered the Pollard flap.
        And they keep saying he spied ‘for Israel’….opps….they are suppose to say he did it for money.

      • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 8:59 pm

        I hope the two (annie, taxi) of you are right.

      • American on April 2, 2014, 3:16 pm

        Taxi says:

        April 2, 2014 at 3:00 pm

        I agree, jewishgoyim.
        There’s a double weird disconnect with North and Weiss linking arms with aipac on Pollard. ”
        >>>>>>>>>>>

        Maybe sometimes they just want to get a ‘reaction’ out of us…….I think mondoweissers are excellent lab rats for a certain experiments…….lol

      • Walid on April 2, 2014, 3:37 pm

        seafoid, a jewel from Foxman from one of your linked articles:

        “… The fact that Pollard shared information with an ally — Israel — was no reason for him not to be punished. But after this long imprisonment, the fact that it was such a close ally who received his information should have influenced a positive response when the subject of parole arose…”

        The Zionist mind never ceases to amaze. For Foxman, Pollard only “shared” information with an “ally”. In other words, the US should not have been upset with Israel screwing it because Israel was a friend. Do these guys actually believe this BS or is it just part of the show?

      • Walid on April 2, 2014, 4:32 pm

        Taxi, I think Obama was sincere in wanting to free Pollard and the only game he was playing was to score points for himself. Keep in mind that in 1998, Clinton almost freed Pollard to help his buddy Netanyahu and the only thing that prevented it from happening was George Tenet threatening to resign if Pollard was freed.

        Anyway, nobody has yet written-off the prospect of seeing Pollard released on Obama’s watch. I don’t think there’s anything shady about our 2 guys here going soft on Pollard; maybe they just don’t feel as passionate as the rest here about wanting to keep the creep in jail. The day he’ll walk free, so will Barghouti.

    • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 12:01 am

      Yeah, I was surprised by Weiss and North here–I don’t think they are convincing. BTW, the only reason Pollard did not get a death sentence is there was none at the time.

  5. OlegR on April 2, 2014, 11:31 am

    /We take seriously the issue of humanitarian release for Jonathan Pollard/

    Bullshit.

    • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 12:13 pm

      Yes, the idea of releasing this traitor for any reason before it much-too-delayed death is bullshit, but nevertheless…

      • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 2:47 pm

        Another vote for bullshit.

      • Walid on April 2, 2014, 3:44 pm

        It’s been claimed that the spy has been in poor health for years. He’s been looking perfectly OK for years in all those PR news clips with visiting Israeli dignitaries.

  6. Marshall on April 2, 2014, 11:33 am

    Oh come on. This shithead is as clear a bargaining chip as there ever was, and Israel’s actions and demands regarding him show their utter lack of interest in American national security, which is shameful for a little shit of a country that wouldn’t exist without our largesse. Plus, they obviously value him more than we do: a perfect bargaining chip, in other words.

  7. Stateless American on April 2, 2014, 11:38 am

    Pollard didn’t want a trial–he pleaded guilty instead–and now he wants a pardon instead of parole. Let him apply for parole when he’s eligible, just like any other prisoner.

    • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 12:10 pm

      I wouldn’t even let him apply for parole. The man deserved to hang from a post across from the Israeli embassy and have his body rot and turned to carrion as a warning. He got life, and that should mean life. He would still be getting off easy.

    • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 2:48 pm

      He plead guilty to lesser charges sealing other documents having to do with what he released to Israel etc

  8. W.Jones on April 2, 2014, 11:41 am

    I’m an opponent of the death penalty, and even look down on life imprisonment, because I like mercy.

    At the same time:
    According to Seymour Hersh, “Israel made dramatic use of the Pollard material on October 1, 1985, seven weeks before his arrest, when its Air Force bombed the headquarters of the Palestine Liberation Organization in Tunisia, killing at least sixty-seven people.”

    • American on April 2, 2014, 12:42 pm

      ” W.Jones says:

      April 2, 2014 at 11:41 am

      I’m an opponent of the death penalty, and even look down on life imprisonment, because I like mercy>>>>>>

      Well the sad truth about mercy is showing mercy to some people only gives them another chance to go after you again.
      I think the uber Israelis and Zionist have proven psychopathic and sociopathic enough to disqualify them from mercy.

      How many people in the world would be alive today if the US had stopped the US
      Zionist Fifth Column in their tracks in 1948?

      • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 1:11 pm

        Exactly right, American. The Zionists have demonstrated over the past hundred years that they, by and large, have absolutely no concept of mercy or human sympathy and we would be fools to give them another chance to do this to us again. (And we’re fools for even having relations with this abomination of a state.)

    • bilal a on April 2, 2014, 1:31 pm

      Pollard didnt bomb the PLO , that was Israel.

      • W.Jones on April 2, 2014, 2:50 pm

        OK, if a person has spent decades in jail and repented of crime and cannot present a further risk to society, I am in favor of letting him/her go. But does Pollard have a better case than the masses of other people in prison for life based on Phil’s explanation?

      • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 12:11 am

        @ W.Jones

        I was thinking the same. Manson’s still in jail for what his “tribe” did. I bet Pollard lived a cushy early life in comparison.

      • W.Jones on April 2, 2014, 3:38 pm

        Dear Annie,

        OK, if a person has spent decades in jail and repented of crime and cannot present a further risk to society, I am in favor of letting him/her go. But does Pollard have a better case than the masses of other people in prison for life?

        Is Pollard regretful that he took the secrets? OK, maybe not everyone is regretful of crime. But how can he reject being traded for Palestinian kids in Israeli jails as part of peace negotiations?

        Glen Greenwald told Channel 10 that the US is hypocritical for spying with the NSA on allies if it imprisons Pollard:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTT8XaH-dSA

        OK, yes it is hypocritical for the US to imprison spies if it spies on other people. But is Greenwald shilling for Pollard?

      • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 12:14 am

        Part of the information Pollard was asked for, and I read he gave, were names of Israeli counter spies who turned over information to the US. Sorry I don’t have the link.

      • MRW on April 3, 2014, 7:51 am

        I’m about to watch the Greenwald clip, W.Jones. I hope he hasn’t said what you say he said, and I have no reason to doubt you. Because if he has, that’s it for me for Greenwald. Would Greenwald campaign for the release of Hanson, Ames, and Pelton?

  9. RudyM on April 2, 2014, 11:42 am

    No. Agents of Israel already get away with too much, constantly. We need to be talking about more prosecutions for Israeli espionage, not the humanitarian release of this Jewish American traitor.

    • RudyM on April 2, 2014, 4:36 pm

      Again, I probably shouldn’t post shortly after I wake up. I don’t think “Jewish American traitor” was necessary–not that he isn’t, but what does it really gain to say it that way?

      • Naftush on April 3, 2014, 1:29 am

        It gains a great deal. In lethargus veritas.

  10. dimadok on April 2, 2014, 11:45 am

    This is probably the most hilarious and quite funny post I’ve ever read on this site. Kudos to authors. The obvious silliness of the statements such as “Let us have the answers”- us who? “American public”, “Progressives” or “Anti-Zionist Jews”- no one will provide you with the answers for doing what ALL the intelligence services do, meaning intelligence gathering, recruiting and (OMG!) even killing people.
    But wait, there is more- “Have any Israelis paid the price for helping to put this man in prison for thirty years?”. I wonder, have any of the authors have even a slightest cue how these thing work? Perhaps I, as the “concerned citizen” of Israel, would like to see who were those CIA/NSA operatives who’d installed a full apartment of surveillance just across the street from Israel Prime Minister/ Minister of Defense/ IDF Chief of Staff Mr. Ehud Barak? That is an idiotic request and should be treated as such.
    And for the desert- “Has anyone in the Israeli security apparatus been punished for taking advantage of an insecure young man with drug issues?”. Have anyone at any secret agency have been? The answer is zero, nada, because there are doing there jobs, exploiting human weaknesses and sins. The probable second oldest occupation in human history.
    One thing I do agree, Pollard has nothing to do with Palestinians or peace talks, and he is an old man, who stood proudly and will be released soon. Mr. Kerry and Mr. Obama had made a terrible choice of carrot, and do not have the stick.

    • amigo on April 2, 2014, 12:08 pm

      “One thing I do agree, Pollard has nothing to do with Palestinians or peace talks, and he is an old man, who stood proudly “dumadoc.

      Stood Proudly?????.

      He was a traitor to his country and then he deserted it to join a criminal racist tin pot nation of crazies.

      He should never see the light of day until he comes clean on who is handlers were.

    • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 12:18 am

      Oh they have a giant stick, but they won’t use it. They owe too much and/or fear too much–the Israel Lobby and its donors.

  11. Sycamores on April 2, 2014, 11:55 am

    Jonathan Pollard has waived his right to a parole hearing in exchange for Palestinian prisoners……….

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/01/us-may-release-israeli-spy-jonathan-pollard-peace-process

    The complex deal that had been floated over the previous 24 hours suggested the US might consider releasing the jailed Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard, who is in the 29th year of a life sentence in a US jail, in exchange for a larger release of Palestinian prisoners and a partial freeze of some Israeli settlement building activities. As more details emerged, it became clear how fragile the proposed deal was. It failed even to have the support of Pollard himself, who, it was disclosed, had waived his right to a parole hearing.

    • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 8:42 pm

      “partial freeze” means nothing to the Israeli government. And any Palestinian prisoners released by Israel can be easily assassinated when Israel decides to do so. What a joke.

  12. justicewillprevail on April 2, 2014, 12:06 pm

    Well, we will never find out the true damage Pollard did. Israel will never tell, and the US has its own reasons to keep quiet. One thing that is bizarre about the whole case is how Israel has transformed Pollard into some kind of symbolic martyr. They cynically exploited a screwed up young man, who should never had the clearance he did, then hung him out to dry, after which they ignored and distanced themselves from him. Now, however, he is treated like some kind of hero wrongly imprisoned – if Israel needs heroes that bad, and of his character, they must be in short supply.
    If the US are considering his release they should make sure that enough facts are made available about his case to ensure that Israel cannot hail him as a hero without at the same time demonstrating their contempt for US laws and citizens, by endorsing Pollard’s actions as somehow justified, or even heroic. The spectacle of a US traitor being hailed in Israel might just make more people realise how inimical Israeli interests are to the US, and question why huge amounts of taxpayers funds are being handed over to already wealthy people.

    • eljay on April 2, 2014, 12:30 pm

      >> … if Israel needs heroes that bad, and of his character, they must be in short supply.

      Where is Captain Israel and why isn’t he enough hero for them?!

  13. Justpassingby on April 2, 2014, 12:08 pm

    This was naive.

    Authors really think Israel will tell you what kind of information they got or how they used it?!

  14. Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 12:14 pm

    “Maybe let him go…”

    Only if you let him go without a parachute out the door of an helocopter hovering over Netanyahoo’s house and make Benji clean up the mess.

  15. Pixel on April 2, 2014, 12:20 pm

    I seriously thought this was an April Fool’s joke until I realized that today is April 2.

  16. Rusty Pipes on April 2, 2014, 12:32 pm

    And what about Mordechai Vanunu?

    • lonely rico on April 2, 2014, 1:11 pm

      @ Rusty Pipes
      Very good : Pollard vs Vanunu
      Insisting however that they are in no way morally equivalent –
      the first a (venal) spy, the second a whistle-blower uncovering Israel’s commitment to weapons of mass destruction.

      • jon s on April 2, 2014, 4:35 pm

        Big difference: Vanunu isn’t in jail.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 6:05 pm

        No, the difference is that Vanunu is a whistle-blower not a spy and traitor, like Pollard.

        Also, he is in jail. You people have turned your whole state into a jail. When he can travel freely and talk to who he likes, then he will be free of jail.

      • jon s on April 3, 2014, 4:04 pm

        Both Vanunu and Pollard were convicted of espionage , both claimed to have idealistic motives for their actions, but both of them took money.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 4, 2014, 11:11 am

        “Both Vanunu and Pollard were convicted of espionage , both claimed to have idealistic motives for their actions, but both of them took money.”

        And Vanunu simply publicized the information and Pollard gave it to an alien intelligence agency. In other words, Vanunu was a whistle blower and Pollard a spy.

  17. puppies on April 2, 2014, 12:35 pm

    @Fact is, there is no imaginable benefit to Palestinians in this deal. None at all. The prisoner release was already arranged to try and shield the PA mob from popular wrath over their latest treason. Hard to see what Weiss and North want out of this dangerous release. If Pollard walks it will definitely officialize the fact that the US Gov is owned by the Zionists; it’s sure to lead to a popular backlash in the US –not a likely objective for MW.

  18. doug on April 2, 2014, 12:37 pm

    I love it.

    Letting Pollard go in return for the information he stole and how Israel used it is a classic offer that sounds good on the surface but isn’t viable. It’s much like the non-starting, new demand of Israel to be recognized as a Jewish State condition for any deal with the Palestinians. Israel gets to claim it wants peace but what it really wants is the West Bank free of Palestinians. It can’t and won’t say that so it makes “offers” that would only result in Bantustan clusters with demands that are designed from the start to fail. But the claim can later be made that they yearn for peace to the outside world while what they yearn for is the land of greater Israel.

  19. kalithea on April 2, 2014, 12:49 pm

    Release Pollard and confirm how weak America really is? Zionists have a radar for weakness and have been milking America’s weakness since LBJ.

    Play that hand to get nowhere and what’s left? Oh yeah, defunding and sanctions; and then it won’t be just Jewish extemists comparing America to Nazi Germany.

    The biggest foreign policy mistake U.S. politicians made was indulging Zionism and submitting to Zionist control. Now Zionists get to call the shots. Tough, stupid has consequences!

    Zionists have boxed America in with these choices: Jump, beg and grovel.

    • kalithea on April 2, 2014, 1:00 pm

      *extremists*

    • eljay on April 2, 2014, 1:03 pm

      >> The biggest foreign policy mistake U.S. politicians made was indulging Zionism and submitting to Zionist control.

      “They drove a dump truck full of money up to my house! I’m not made of stone!”

      (with apologies to Herschel Krustofski)

    • Chu on April 2, 2014, 1:34 pm

      USA looks like a paper tiger that has been infiltrated long ago by religious cultists hell bent on making their desert death cult bloom at any cost. But chalk it up as Another straw for the camel’s back.

      If Israel had a a knighthood, Pollard would be knighted. That’s how warped this thing has become. A known dirty traitor for one ally, a hero for the other ally.
      Is there a similar historical case where another allies spy may have been so reveled by an allied nation? I can’t think of one.

    • lonely rico on April 2, 2014, 1:57 pm

      @ Kalithea

      Release Pollard and confirm how weak America really is? Zionists have a radar for weakness and have been milking America’s weakness since LBJ.
      Play that hand to get nowhere and what’s left?

      Perhaps not.
      As I point out above, Pollard vs. Vanunu sounds pretty good to me.
      After a very public release, Pollard’s welcome in Israel will publicize the pusillanimous weakness of the American political class to the state of Israel. And the American public will be forced once again to confront the craven subservience of the USA government to a foreign country.
      Israeli hubris “hoist with his own petard” !

    • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 3:20 pm

      The U.S. would get absolutely nothing from Israel for releasing Pollard. Just another Star of David tatoo on the ass of the U.S.

  20. RudyM on April 2, 2014, 12:50 pm

    Prosecute Arnon Milchan.

  21. JeffB on April 2, 2014, 12:52 pm

    I think we have a pretty good idea what Israel was doing. We know that Pollard gave the Israelis American nuclear targeting information. Israel at the time was trying to develop an independent nuclear deterrent as the USSR had threatened to jump into wars on the Arab side, particularly in 1973. USA policy under Nixon, Ford and Carter was pressuring Israel into an unfavorable settlement and the USSR was seriously considering massive Arab backing to gain influence in the region.

    As for the Israeli intelligence officials. Exploiting vulnerable people in positions of knowledge within foreign countries is their job. They did what every intelligence case officer does everyday, their job. What would they be punished for?

    • kalithea on April 2, 2014, 1:12 pm

      As for the Israeli intelligence officials. Exploiting vulnerable people in positions of knowledge within foreign countries is their job.

      Yeah, and vulnerable being the operative word! Maybe Pollard’s sentence should have been death. That would avoid getting played for a weakling twice!

      Oh, and I’m glad you inserted foreign in there. Foreign is definitely what Israel is.

    • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 1:19 pm

      “I think we have a pretty good idea what Israel was doing.”

      No, we don’t. That’s the point. We have some ideas what these pigs got, but not all, and we don’t know everything they did with it, what people they murdered, how much they put US policy and lives in danger. Until we know that, exactly and precisely, we shouldn’t be demeaning ourselves to even have relations with this state.

      “As for the Israeli intelligence officials… What would they be punished for?”

      Espionage against the United States. Conspiracy to commit espionage against the United States. They are guilty of crimes against the US and every decent American would demand that they be punished for their crimes.

      • JeffB on April 2, 2014, 2:08 pm

        Espionage against the United States. Conspiracy to commit espionage against the United States. They are guilty of crimes against the US and every decent American would demand that they be punished for their crimes.

        You don’t seem to get Israelis are not Americans. There is no crime. For much the same reason we aren’t sending the NSA officials that tapped Merkel’s phone over to Germany for punishment.

        ____

        As for putting USA policy in danger. Tremendously. The USA had no interest in Israel developing an independent deterrent against the Soviet Union. It was a massively destabilizing act for the United States. As for murder there isn’t even allegation of murder.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 6:22 pm

        “You don’t seem to get Israelis are not Americans. There is no crime.”

        One doesn’t need to be an American to violate that statute. Better stick to spreading libels against your moral superiors like Archbishop Tutu. Sure, it demonstrated that you are a character-less scuzzbag, but at least you don’t demonstrate your base ignorance.

      • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 12:30 am

        Gee, I remember when Bibi was here and told us US and Israel were the same, no sky between them. And certainly our politicians always tell us that.

      • JeffB on April 3, 2014, 9:41 am

        @Citizen

        Gee, I remember when Bibi was here and told us US and Israel were the same, no sky between them. And certainly our politicians always tell us that.

        Nice rhetoric but not remotely true. Israel’s interests and the USA’s interests conflict greatly. Mostly Israel sublimates their interests to the USA in exchange for assistance, i.e. a typical vassal relationship. But that relationship has grown with time as the USA has pulled closer to Israel. It was weaker in the 1990s than today, weaker in the 1970s than in the 1990s, weaker in the 1960s than in the 1970s and in the 1950s the USA was if anything mildly antagonistic.

        But ultimately Bibi’s job is to protect the interests of the Israeli people just like Obama’s is to protect the interests of the American people. So for example Obama not going to war with Iran was the right thing to do, even though a USA-Iranian war would have been great for Israel. And by the same token Israel is not going to return to the 1967 borders even though that would be good for the USA.

    • libra on April 2, 2014, 3:58 pm

      Jeffb: I think we have a pretty good idea what Israel was doing. We know that Pollard gave the Israelis American nuclear targeting information. Israel at the time was trying to develop an independent nuclear deterrent as the USSR had threatened to jump into wars on the Arab side, particularly in 1973.

      I think we have a pretty good idea of what you are doing, Jeff. You’re insinuating that Pollard just gave the Israelis information to target the Soviet Union as a deterrent rather than American secrets that Israel then sold on to the Soviets. What a sleazy, if obvious, sleight of hand on your part.

      And you still insist Israel is America’s great ally.

      • JeffB on April 2, 2014, 6:04 pm

        @libra

        I’d like some evidence from a credible source that Israel sold much of anything to the Soviets. The story doesn’t even make much sense unless you are part of the “I hate Israel so everything bad anyone says about them is true” crowd.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 6:24 pm

        If it wasn’t sleazy (mixed with a heaping helping of doltish idiocy), it wouldn’t be Jeff.

    • MRW on April 3, 2014, 1:48 am

      JeffB, Israel put 13 nukes into service during the Yom Kippur War (one at Egypt, another at Damascus) and was threatening Russia. That’s why Kissinger had to fly to Moscow the weekend of Oct. 20, 1973–the same day as the Saturday Night Massacre–to get Brezhnev down off the wall, and Russian nukes out of the Bosporous.

    • amigo on April 3, 2014, 8:23 am

      “As for the Israeli intelligence officials. Exploiting vulnerable people in positions of knowledge within foreign countries is their job. They did what every intelligence case officer does everyday, their job. What would they be punished for?”jeffb

      They spied on AMERICA you mindless dolt.

      Punish them Israeli style.

      We will loan a few Irish Passports to the Americans so these zionist spies can be dealt with.

      No trial, no muss no fuss.

  22. lysias on April 2, 2014, 12:56 pm

    Pollard is no innocent. As a naval intelligence operative, he was trained on the significance of the information that he sold. Remember, he also tried to sell secrets to apartheid South Africa.

    • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 12:31 am

      And Pakistan, and one other foreign country, but I can’t remember which one.

      • irishmoses on April 3, 2014, 11:53 pm

        “…and one other foreign country, but I can’t remember which one.”

        Australia.

      • RoHa on April 4, 2014, 4:08 am

        Australia isn’t foreign.

  23. Chu on April 2, 2014, 1:23 pm

    Funny to watch the Zionist left casting Pollard as a ‘victim’ of the political system. The beltway chorus is really singing for Pollard’s release. Ruth Marcus article today titled ‘Free Jonathan Pollard’ makes him sound like a hero. I think the cake is probably already baked on this one, as so many leftist (npr) Zionists seem to be chanting his release. Even Big man John McCain is on board.

    Foxman even goes as far to blame the continued incarceration as evidence of anti-semitism:

    “the continuing imprisonment of this person long after he should have been paroled on humanitarian grounds can only be read as an effort to intimidate American Jews. And, it is an intimidation that can only be based on an anti-Semitic stereotype about the Jewish community, one that we have seen confirmed in our public opinion polls over the years, the belief that American Jews are more loyal to Israel than to their own country, the United States. In other words, the underlying concept which fuels the ongoing Pollard incarceration is the notion that he is only the tip of the iceberg in the community. So Pollard stays in prison as a message to American Jews: Don’t even think about doing what he did. I come to this conclusion with much sorrow and, as noted, as someone who resisted efforts early on to connect the Pollard affair to anti-Semitism. It is harder and harder to do so any longer.”
    http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/JonathanPollard-Israel-AbrahamFoxman-ADL/2014/04/01/id/563066/

    • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 2:13 pm

      Foxman is such a piece of crap. Who says that he “should have been paroled on humanitarin grounds”? If he’s sick, so what? Let him die in prison where he belongs.

      And if Foxman is looking for someont to blame for “the belief that American Jews are more loyal to Israel than to their own country, the United States,” then perhaps he should look to the Israelis, who got him to betray his country. Foxman could also look to Benji Netanyahu, who specifically and publically stated that he was trying to bring Pollard “home” [i.e., to Israel], even though he never lived there so it could not be, in any sense of the word “home.” (Unless, of course, Netanyahu believes that all Jews have a loyalty to Israel beyond their native countries, in which case Foxman should really be taking him to task.) Or, of course, Foxman could look to Pollard himself to clarify why this feeling is held, as Pollard is on record as indicating that he believed he had a “racial obligation” to Israel.

      I agree that that the belief that American Jews are more loyal to Israel than America is a pernicious notion and one which needs to be stamped out. But perhaps Foxman would have more success in doing so if he went after people actually spreading the foundation for the idea, rather than speculating based on the fact that someone sentenced to life imprisonment is still imprisoned.

      • Chu on April 2, 2014, 2:58 pm

        It’s all myth-making Woody. They need a hero to worship because there are a depraved state that can’t stop the occupation. This country (by and large from comments of articles I’ve scanned) want Pollard to serve till his death, but in Jonestown he is some sort of knight of the realm. No wonder politicians say there’s no daylight between our nations, otherwise complete bullshit like this may get laughed at by the blogging world (not the msm of course).

        American Jews more loyal to Israel? I can’t say, but if you look at all the major Jewish organizations they are completely for Pollard’s release. So do the major organization speak for the populace of American Jews? I would say yes, they are only 2% percent of the population. But what about the 98%?

      • American on April 2, 2014, 3:36 pm

        ”I agree that that the belief that American Jews are more loyal to Israel than America is a pernicious notion and one which needs to be stamped out. ” …..Woody

        The flip side of that is just as dangerous in practice….that a US Jewish (or Israeli) spy should get more lenient treatment.
        Which is how the I-people want it to be considered.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 6:29 pm

        Absolutely. One can only look with disgust at the way people like Schumer and McCain fall over themselves to felate the donkey over this traitor. One night only imagine how Mr. “bomb bomb bomb Iran” would have reacted if it was a Muslim American who was caught transferring these exact same documents to Iran or even a Muslim ally like Turkey. You know they’d be calling for that guy’s head.

  24. annie on April 2, 2014, 1:37 pm

    i would just like to go on record as saying i don’t agree pollard should be set free, ever. he was an adult and should be fully culpable for his actions regardless of how guilty or influential others were in his gross violations. he’s lucky he didn’t get the death penalty (not that i agree with the death penalty because i do not). but treason is a capital offense for a reason and his actions were highly treasonous. he’s no John Walker Lindh. what he did was unconscionable and completely inexcusable.

    • hophmi on April 2, 2014, 3:01 pm

      “he’s lucky he didn’t get the death penalty (not that i agree with the death penalty because i do not). but treason is a capital offense for a reason and his actions were highly treasonous.”

      He wasn’t convicted of treason. He was convicted of 18 USC 794(c), “Gathering or delivering defense information to aid foreign government”

      It is highly unlikely anyone would be sentenced to death under this statute, especially as a first-time offender pleading guilty. Pollard was quite cooperative once arrested, but violated his plea agreement by talking to the press. If he hadn’t done that, he probably would gotten five years, which I believe was the original agreement.

      However, it’s also clear that Weinberger’s memo played a role in his long sentence, and that is probably something to be concerned about from the criminal justice standpoint, unless you believe ex parte memoranda heavy on unproven allegations not shown to defense counsel should be the basis for sentencing.

      I think your animus toward Pollard reflect your animus toward Israel, and I doubt you’d feel this way if, say, he spied on behalf of France.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 3:24 pm

        “He wasn’t convicted of treason. ”

        So what? He was a traitor to his country whether he was convicted of treason or not.

        “However, it’s also clear that Weinberger’s memo played a role in his long sentence, and that is probably something to be concerned about from the criminal justice standpoint, unless you believe ex parte memoranda heavy on unproven allegations not shown to defense counsel should be the basis for sentencing.”

        Why should it be something to be concerned about? The judge didn’t have to consider it and the sentence was within the appropriate sentence for that crime. Indeed, Pollard earned that sentence based on what he admitted to doing, regardless of the Weinberger memorandum, so he doesn’t really have grounds to complain. If he didn’t want to spend his life in prison, he should not have done a crime for which life imprisonment is an appropriate punishment.

        “I think your animus toward Pollard reflect your animus toward Israel, and I doubt you’d feel this way if, say, he spied on behalf of France.”

        Doubtful. But there’s no doubt what’s behind your position on the issue.

      • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 12:44 am

        Weinberger kept scratching on the revelatory document Pollard should get death, when it was deleted, he scratched it on again. Finally he was convinced that wasn’t appropriate because there was no death penalty at the time.

      • annie on April 2, 2014, 3:26 pm

        He wasn’t convicted of treason. He was convicted of 18 USC 794(c), “Gathering or delivering defense information to aid foreign government”

        yes i know, that’s why i think he was lucky.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treason

        Oran’s Dictionary of the Law (1983) defines treason as “…[a]…citizen’s actions to help a foreign government overthrow, make war against, or seriously injure the [parent nation].

        making the argument his actions did not “help a foreign government seriously injure the US “, passing on that much top secret information to a foreign country, any foreign county, is treason imho.

        this is not the same as a whistle blower whose intent is to reveal information to the public intended to thwart the rupture of our democracy or prevent our government from committing future crimes against others and our own citizens. there is a clear difference.

        I think your animus toward Pollard reflect your animus toward Israel, and I doubt you’d feel this way if, say, he spied on behalf of France.

        you’re so predictable in your ad hominems hops. doesn’t it get old? and you would be wrong. he had a special clearance job and he was smart. passing on the keys to all our NSA codes, it doesn’t matter who they were passed to. that hours and hours of labor to replace and worth billions. you’re a fool. you’re so intent to defend israel you’re willing to throw all logic to the wind to smear anyone. seriously deranged logic.

        i happen to have an aversion to collaborators and american spies who work for other governments. i don’t think a person like ames, whose betrayal resulted in the deaths of CIA assets, should ever be released. it has nothing to do w/israel.

      • hophmi on April 2, 2014, 3:58 pm

        “you’re so predictable in your ad hominems hops. doesn’t it get old? and you would be wrong. he had a special clearance job and he was smart. ”

        One thing I know is that very few partisans on both sides of the Pollard case have their facts right, and you’re no exception. First, you don’t know what treason is.

        Treason, under the US code, is defined as follows:

        “Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.”

        18 U.S. Code § 2381, http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/2381

        Pollard didn’t do anything like that.

        ” he had a special clearance job and he was smart. ”

        Yeah, amazingly, even after it was clear that Pollard was nuts and his clearance was pulled, he was able to get it back. While, as I said, I could not care less about Pollard, I have a strong suspicion that one reason the CIA cares this much is that he’s a big embarrassment to them, but that’s just my opinion.

        “passing on the keys to all our NSA codes, it doesn’t matter who they were passed to. that hours and hours of labor to replace and worth billions. you’re a fool.”

        None of which amounts to treason.

        “you’re so intent to defend israel you’re willing to throw all logic to the wind to smear anyone. seriously deranged logic.”

        No, I just see through political partisanship, that’s all. Ames worked for the USSR. No one ever showed that anything Pollard did got anyone killed, certainly not in court.

      • annie on April 2, 2014, 9:58 pm

        No one ever showed that anything Pollard did got anyone killed, certainly not in court.

        that’s because it was all sealed.

        Treason, under the US code, is defined as..

        but treason, is defines as: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/treason

        Full Definition of TREASON

        1
        : the betrayal of a trust : treachery
        2
        : the offense of attempting by overt acts to overthrow the government of the state to which the offender owes allegiance or to kill or personally injure the sovereign or the sovereign’s family

        don’t give me this “US code”, that is exactly why i said he was “lucky” because the common understanding of the term treason, completely encapsulates what he did.

        I just see through political partisanship, that’s all.

        you lecturing me about political partisanship??? you’d defend israel tooth and nail. go look at the comments in any comment section on the idea of his release. what a cheap shot! what’s next? claiming phil is less partisan than me?

        like i said, addicted to ad hominem, anything to accuse of bias against israel. i can get a word in edgewise without your pathetic cheapshots. grow up.

      • MRW on April 3, 2014, 7:44 am

        I have a strong suspicion that one reason the CIA cares this much is that he’s a big embarrassment to them

        And their colleagues and families died as a result of what Pollard did. I heard 2500 (including family members) back in 1991. These were CIA assets and NOC agents.

      • MRW on April 3, 2014, 7:38 am

        unless you believe ex parte memoranda heavy on unproven allegations not shown to defense counsel should be the basis for sentencing.

        “unproven allegations?” Made up out of whole cloth. You have no idea what was in the memo. We have other people who have confided in reporters telling us. It was identified as a national security memo to the Judge at the time because Weinberger wanted the death sentence.

        Former UPI Intel reporter Richard Sale wrote on October 2, 2010 Pollard 2 – A Brief Comment Richard Sale

        I was quite taken aback by the posted comment that “Pollard’s defense claims Weinberger made a statement before his death that The Pollard Affair was a relatively minor matter.”

        I talked with Weinberger, who was up at his residence in Maine, over a period of years until just before his death. I won’t quote him, but his reaction to Pollard’s treason was consistently one of implacable outrage. Let me add that anyone who would believe the declaration of a defense attorney about anything appears to be someone who suffers from the disease of mental gullibility. If a defense attorney told me the time I would immediately look at my watch.

        Former senior DOD and CIA officials told me that Weinberger gave a secret statement to the court, before Pollard’s sentencing, that detailed the trading of stolen US data to the Soviet Union and the extent of the damage that trading had caused.

  25. James Canning on April 2, 2014, 2:25 pm

    Casper Weinberger would not have said Pollard “should have been shot”, without cause.

    • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 8:53 pm

      Yes indeed. And from what I have read the 58 page document that Weinberger shared with the Judge that confirmed the damage done to U.S. National Security by Pollard’s release of classified intelligence to Israel/Russia has never been available to the public.

  26. Nevada Ned on April 2, 2014, 3:20 pm

    If Pollard is released, it sends a message to would- be Israeli agents: there’s a chance you’ll get out of jail, is Israel tries hard enough long enough.

    If Pollard is not released, it sends totally different message: you’ll never get out of jail. That ought to deter some people.

  27. Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 3:22 pm

    Hoping Grant Smith from IRMEP chimes in on this critical issue.

    • irmep on April 2, 2014, 9:29 pm

      Chime.

      North and Weiss set up a list of conditions that cannot be met. So I add two more:

      Pollard was tasked to collect highly sensitive information by file number, so the Israelis should be also required to hand over the name of the other spy embedded much higher up in the U.S. national security infrastructure.

      Oh, and turn over for prosecution Israeli spymaster Rafi Eitan who ran Pollard (and also penetrated the NUMEC facility in PA for the uranium)…

      http://www.irmep.org/ila/numec

      • philweiss on April 3, 2014, 12:35 pm

        Thanks Grant, I appreciate the highly-informed intervention.
        Phil

      • James Canning on April 3, 2014, 1:51 pm

        Bravo. More info on other Israeli spies embedded in US defence structure would be welcome.

      • Kathleen on April 3, 2014, 2:22 pm

        Grant were the 58 pages that Caspar Weinberger had the Judge look at separately than what was presented in the case able to be accessed through the FOIA?

        Anything on how many assets lost their lives as a result of Pollard’s crimes?

      • MRW on April 4, 2014, 6:24 pm

        I heard (1991) approximately 1500, 2500 with their families included.

        In other words, about half of what we’re told were US soldier deaths in Iraq.

  28. RobertB on April 2, 2014, 3:37 pm

    Breaking the Taboo on Israel’s Spying Efforts on the United States

    Christopher Ketcham
    March 10, 2009

    Israel runs one of the most aggressive and damaging espionage networks targeting the U.S., yet public discussion about it is almost nil.

    Scratch a counterintelligence officer in the U.S. government and they’ll tell you that Israel is not a friend to the United States.

    This is because Israel runs one of the most aggressive and damaging espionage networks targeting the U.S. The fact of Israeli penetration into the country is not a subject oft-discussed in the media or in the circles of governance, due to the extreme sensitivity of the U.S.-Israel relationship coupled with the burden of the Israel lobby, which punishes legislators who dare to criticize the Jewish state. The void where the facts should sit is filled instead with the hallucinations of conspiracy theory — the kind in which, for example, agents of the Mossad, Israel’s top intelligence agency, engineer the 9/11 attacks, while 4,000 Israelis in the Twin Towers somehow all get word to escape before the planes hit. The effect, as disturbing as it is ironic, is that the less the truth is addressed, the more noxious the falsity that spreads.”

    Click on link for the rest of the details:

    http://www.ifamericansknew.org/us_ints/sp-ketcham.html

  29. W.Jones on April 2, 2014, 4:13 pm

    Dear Phil,

    Do you think that you could please write more about your views on this, as it seems like an unusual position? I am OK with letting Pollard go after decades if he is fully regretful of what happened and there is no risk and we demand that all other prisoners are treated with equal clemency. However, his decision led to the killing of almost 70 Palestinians in the PLO office and he refuses to be traded for prisoners in Israeli jails under peace negotiations, many of those prisoners being women and children who have done far less.

    Is your view, like mine, that he should be shown clemency because everyone should? Or are you writing this article mainly to draw out people’s reactions and point out how much information Pollard gave away?

    The other thing I have wanted to better understand is your writing that:

    It’s not like my wife or my friends are very Christian. If they were, we wouldn’t be friends. They respect Christ as a teacher, but mock Christian religious claims

    Do you think that you could please write more about why you feel this way, my friend?

    Thank you for your work.

    • LeaNder on April 2, 2014, 6:02 pm

      It’s not like my wife or my friends are very Christian. If they were, we wouldn’t be friends. They respect Christ as a teacher, but mock Christian religious claims

      W.Jones, how do we as Christians, Muslim, Buddhist, Humanists respond to this expression of a specifically fervent type of Jewish/Zionist religious? Would we have such a Jewish friend that is absolutely sure the land belongs to him since there is a book that says it was given to “the Jews” by the sublime master a couple of thousand years ago?

      Would my or your Jewish friends, to turn the example around no matter if we are Christian, Muslim, Buddhist or Humanists, not more likely mock this special human religious unit, just as we do watching him? Although responses to this type of religious fervor may at time move beyond pure mockery. As a Catholic I did mock virgin birth, but I can still enjoy one of the other rendering of the motif/theme in art. And I found one or the other historical or anthropological approaches to the subject interesting.

      Besides, when I think about a lot of events in Christian history in many cases mocking would be a much too weak response. … Thus, tell me why I should, simply since I was once baptized, respond sensitive to such a statement. And if I do, what do I expect behind, beneath it?

      Concerning Pollard, I agree. The most important point would probably be, what did they get and how could the knowledge be exploited? That seems to indeed be much more important than the man himself. After all he cannot sell them this type of information anymore if he is sent back to the “holy land”.

      • W.Jones on April 2, 2014, 11:56 pm

        Hello, LeaNder.

        Ideally I would hope to get Phil’s thoughts about this, rather than judge what he meant.

        Peace, bro.

      • LeaNder on April 3, 2014, 10:02 am

        Yes, W. this is a really bad habit of mine. Sorry about my uninvited interference.

        Maybe I should have asked why the statement struck you? In a way my slightly patronizing response may result from a basic frustration that triggers memories of an argument I once encountered concerning Jewish/Christian relations, suggesting that “old testament Judaism” is always in search for enemies, actually needs antisemitism in the outside world for group coherence. Add to this with a couple of scholarly theological discussions or more precisely attempts to focus on Jewish animosity or polemic critical attitudes against Christianity, which left me with the impression it was heading in the same direction: Trying to located the ultimate source in antisemitism in Jewish polemics and ridicule of Christian tenets.

        Why possibly frustration? Its actually a topic about which I would like to know much more than I do. Both from my perspective its basic genesis in the 11th century (remember the start of the crusades) and it’s development over time.

        In any case your focus to this nitwit combined with the above described memories and resulting frustration triggered the response. Again I am sorry.

      • W.Jones on April 3, 2014, 1:12 pm

        LeaNder,

        Please don’t be sorry. You are asking good questions. I just posted the question before and Phil did not respond. There are hundreds of posts on Mondoweiss. Perhaps Phil does not have a chance to read them all?

        I don’t want to be judgmental, so I wish he would explain better his idea about this. Maybe he did not really mean it, or he can provide more depth to it?

      • LeaNder on April 3, 2014, 8:06 pm

        W, you are not seriously expecting Phil to be able everything we babble here?

        I don’t want to be judgmental, so I wish he would explain better his idea about this.

        I don’t think there is much more to know than what he already wrote. And I don’t think you should expect him to ponder about every minor detail.

        During the earliest stages of his blog he wrote a series of wonderful everyday stories in which his wife surfaced frequently. He called it The Assimilationist, if I remember correctly. From that perspective it does suggest more to me than that his wife’s WASP family did not expect him to convert and believe in Christ. Just as he did not expect her to convert to Judaism.

        good night, late over here.

      • W.Jones on April 4, 2014, 3:11 pm

        LeaNder,

        Let’s see if I understand you correctly. You see his statement about mocking Christian theology as similar to reacting against religious claims that the Holy Land belongs to all Jews, saying that even mocking is too weak a response to some Christian events. My question asking Phil for a better understanding of his statement reminds you of claims that ancient Judaism was antagonistic and provoked hostility. May I ask what you meant by “nitwit”?

        In any case, as you can tell, the reason I ask is because I really dislike being judgmental. Maybe he has more of an explanation or wrote more about this?

    • Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 8:55 pm

      What are North and Weiss up to with this? Just fucking with folks? Or is this what they really think?

      • MHughes976 on April 4, 2014, 3:51 pm

        We Christians are still, I suppose, the culturally dominant group in the world. ‘Our’ achievements in all the arts and sciences are staggering. This fact tends to hide from us the fact that our faith has characteristics, ‘stones of stumbling’, that set us apart. If I say ‘Our Saviour was born in Bethlehem, died and rose again’ almost everything about this sounds not just false but strange to any ear from a different religion or culture. The soteriology of our hymns – ‘We believe it was for us he hung and suffered there!’ – implies a view of the placation of the deity which others find extraordinary. Our belief in miracles – we can reduce but not eliminate our commitment here – seems to bring us into more conflict with science than is common among religions.
        Bethlehem is normally less of a problem, I agree, but I do remember reading some work by a Jewish archaeologist, claiming that Bethlehem was a best a one-horse town in Herod’s time, so a very unlikely site for a Roman tax office: what I recall was the slight (though polite, indeed unexpressed) impatience of the writer – ‘How on earth’ (he was saying under his breath) ‘can sensible people believe such stuff?’ We have to accept this situation, I think.

      • W.Jones on April 4, 2014, 5:32 pm

        Hello, M.Hughes.
        I admire Phil for making a website that is foremost on the important topic of human rights in the Holy Land, and I see how someone can find miraculous Christian claims strange, and in turn choose to mock strange ideas. However, unfortunately I am still having trouble understanding the selection I quoted, and the thinking behind it. Perhaps he did not really mean it? I could make an unbiased explanation for it not so different from what you said, however since I respect Phil’s opinion, I would like to see if he could give more background about it or just confirm it.

    • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 12:53 am

      Compare:
      “It’s not like my wife or my friends are very Jewish. If they were, we wouldn’t be friends. They respect the…(You can fill in the rest to reverse Phil’s POV).”

    • Chu on April 3, 2014, 10:41 am

      It would be useful to hear the reasons why the authors of the post come to this conclusion. As far as not befriending Christians, this is the provincial attitude of many Jews in NYC. Because there is a diverse population of different ethnicities, one doesn’t have to be friends with actual Christians that worship and believe (because there are enough Christians that say they are Christian in name only). There’s an attitude in nyc that most Christians are primitive, while Jews are really the progressives in town. It’s why crazies like Boteach are taken seriously, with books like Kosher Passion, or whatever he is calling his latest. Not that it’s true, but that what the common belief is moreoften.

    • Kathleen on April 3, 2014, 2:24 pm

      Wondering if they also mock Jewish religious claims?

  30. Taxi on April 2, 2014, 4:16 pm

    Why are zionist icons so frigging fugly?!

    Think Pollard, think Golda Meir, think Abe Foxman, think Peres and Sharon and Ovadia and Benette and Lieberman and Barak and Dayan and Begin and Ayalon and the Dersh and mister and MISSUS Netanyahu and yikes-gross! I can’t bear to add another unattractive mug to this lineup.

    It’s like Revenge of the Unsightly out there in zioland.

    • Woody Tanaka on April 2, 2014, 6:09 pm

      Taxi, that’s not fair. No one chooses to have unattractive features so it’s unbecoming to criticize them for it. And two recent zio icons, Gol Godat and Scarlett Johansson are both very attractive.

      • annie on April 2, 2014, 10:19 pm

        neither of them are zionist icons tho, in the sense taxi used the term, politicians, judges or funded by the state. . not political figures. i’m not defending what she said, but you should come up w/better examples.

        heck, we’ve got eleanor roosevelt, she was no beauty and she’s an american icon. it could be in the eyes of the beholder tho. bennett would not seem so gross to me if his mind was in a better place. yair lapid is handsome, he’s a better example. obviously there are a lot of gorgeous jewish people. no one could argue there wasn’t.

        laura nyro was one of the most beautiful people to ever walk the earth. i just had to say that.

      • Ellen on April 2, 2014, 11:13 pm

        Laura was beautiful and wrote beautiful music.

      • Taxi on April 3, 2014, 12:10 am

        I love Laura (R.I.P). She is, by far, lovelier than Scarlett or Gol. I personally don’t find S or G all that, but I do think that their make-up artists do a stunning job.

        And Woody, beauty is how your inner energy articulates your features – one could be born cross-eyed and still be beautiful if enough warmth is projected through the eyes.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 3, 2014, 7:00 am

        “She is, by far, lovelier than Scarlett or Gol. I personally don’t find S or G all that, but I do think that their make-up artists do a stunning job.”

        I think both Gol and Scarlett are objectively attractive (to the extend we have a scientific understanding of attractiveness…) but having good people to work on you does help.

        “And Woody, beauty is how your inner energy articulates your features – one could be born cross-eyed and still be beautiful if enough warmth is projected through the eyes.”

        Oh, come on. I agree with this point but your original post wasn’t about some notion of inner beauty but on external appearances.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 3, 2014, 6:55 am

        “neither of them are zionist icons tho, in the sense taxi used the term, politicians, judges or funded by the state. ”

        Taxi really didn’t define the term othsr than to say “icon” and my 2 examples fit the bill. Those are just two that I thought of on the fly. I think they’re fine examples and I’m sure there are others who would who are politicians , etc. Zippy the war criminal, for example, is a reasonably attractive woman.

      • Taxi on April 3, 2014, 9:03 am

        The point you’re missing, Woody: my list of ugly are all political icons therefore my reference was clear enough. Plus, it’s clear too that these people really are ugly on the “external”. In other words, I’m describing it as is without embelishment. Or do you think we should muzzle our mouths and not call an ugly spade an ugly spade?

      • annie on April 3, 2014, 9:14 am

        Taxi really didn’t define the term othsr than to say “icon”

        Golda Meir, Abe Foxman, Peres, Sharon, Ovadia, Benette, Lieberman, Barak, Dayan, Begin, Ayalon, Dersh?

        my 2 examples fit the bill

        played apples and oranges lately?

      • Taxi on April 3, 2014, 9:19 am

        “Zippy” is “reasonably attractive”.

        LOL! You gotta be kidding me, right? I would not use either “reasonably” nor “attractive” to describe Livni. She does have a very good stylist and make-up artist though.

        It takes a whole team and a lot of work to even get Livni to this:
        http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5cf75UNQHpA/Ue8TSn8zFfI/AAAAAAAAA_Y/0w6LqTK-hog/s1600/TzipiLivni.jpg

        But hey, if Livni buzzes your magnet, then all I can do is smile and shrug my shoulders.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 3, 2014, 10:54 am

        “The point you’re missing, Woody: my list of ugly are all political icons ”

        The first person on your list is a criminal, not a politician.

        “Plus, it’s clear too that these people really are ugly on the “external”. ”

        Some. Others, like Dayan and Ayalon, aren’t particular ugly, just average looking people of their age.

        “Or do you think we should muzzle our mouths and not call an ugly spade an ugly spade?”

        What I’m saying is that the statement is stupid because it’s juvenile and irrelevant. If these were the most beautiful people on Earth wouldn’t matter one whit.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 3, 2014, 11:01 am

        “LOL! You gotta be kidding me, right?”

        For a women in her fifties who is a politician, and not a fashion model or actress, yes she is reasonably attractive.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 3, 2014, 11:12 am

        “Golda Meir, Abe Foxman, Peres, Sharon, Ovadia, Benette, Lieberman, Barak, Dayan, Begin, Ayalon, Dersh?”

        Yeah, and he also included a spy and a psychologist that you conveniently left off the list.

        “apples and oranges”

        not at all. He’s including non politicians in his list of “zionist icons.”. The only way Johannsen and Gadot wouldn’t meet that definition, and someone like Polard does, is if you’re cherry picking the data to reinforce the rather bigoted premise.

      • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 12:59 am

        Genetically, Johansson is half Danish, if memory serves.

      • Woody Tanaka on April 3, 2014, 7:02 am

        So? She’s a Zionist icon regardless of her background.

      • Taxi on April 3, 2014, 9:04 am

        Woody never misses an opportunity to defend a damsel in distress.

      • annie on April 3, 2014, 9:15 am

        LOL!

      • Woody Tanaka on April 3, 2014, 10:58 am

        “Woody never misses an opportunity to defend a damsel in distress.”

        Nope, I just have low tolerance for irrelevant horseshit like yours.

      • puppies on April 3, 2014, 10:41 am

        @Citizen – But she got a repulsive, stony face with a gaze that matches
        Liberman’s in emptiness. Lots of merchandise from the neck down, though.

    • Kathleen on April 3, 2014, 2:29 pm

      Out of line T. Plenty of physical beauty out there that only runs skin deep. And plenty of so called physically unattractive people who are some of the kindest and most compassionate people on the planet.

  31. LeaNder on April 2, 2014, 4:32 pm

    There’s a strong suggestion in Seymour Hersh’s coverage of the case, and others, that some in the intelligence community believe Pollard’s secrets were traded to the Soviet Union in exchange for Soviet Jewish emigres to Israel, at a huge risk to US national security.

    Yes, I stumbled across these rumors too, over at Pat Lang’s committee of correspondence.

    If that is true, then the aliya from Russia statistics must be classified too. In any case Wikipedia’s Russian source does not show a steep rise in numbers after 1984. And that apparently is the year Pollard joined the Naval Intelligence Command, met Sella and started selling information.

    Wikipedia of course has some Russia connections in Pollard’s Israel section, but only vaguely reminiscent of the tale.

    Here is a highly entertaining account by “counterterrorism expert” John Loftus saved on aish.com: The Truth About Jonathan Pollard. Once you enter the larger spy field in writing it can’t be colorfully entertaining and complex enough. … Soviet bad guy posing as Israeli good guys and allies.

    … and here are a few traces of the counter-terrorism expertise of Loftus on History Commons. Some of you may remember the case against Sami al Arian, whose biggest crime, I guess, is to have Palestinian origins and supporting Palestinians. Maybe for expert Loftus that is a sure sign there must be something more sinister behind it, money laundering for terrorism, for instance? ;)

    • Woody Tanaka on April 3, 2014, 7:04 am

      “If that is true, then the aliya from Russia statistics must be classified too. In any case Wikipedia’s Russian source does not show a steep rise in numbers after 1984.”

      There need not be any change if the USSR threatened to stop all emigration and Israel got them to maintain the previous rates in exchange for the Pollard secrets. In fact, from a counter-counter-espionage position, such a set up would be better from the perspectives of the Israels and USSR as it eliminates an anomaly that American counter-espionage folks could notice. If they had a hint they were dealing with a spy and all of a sudden the number of Jews leaving the USSR skyrocketed, it wouldn’t take a genius to figure out where to look for spies.

  32. dbroncos on April 2, 2014, 4:42 pm

    Israel doesn’t care about Pollard the man – a “pathetic guy” as you put it. Pollard’s release is a just another means of demonstrating Israel’s authority over American policy makers. It’s their way of showing DC who wears the pants. “We can steal your national security secrets, sell them to the USSR, not return them to you and get our spy sprung for your jail. We can do all of this and more without jepardiziing the $3bil gravy train.” The fact that releasing Pollard at Israel’e request is being discussed at all is a telling sign of how pathetic the special relationship is from the US point of view.

    • Citizen on April 3, 2014, 1:06 am

      @ dbroncos
      And Bibi’s been pressing US government to release Pollard for a long, long time. But it’s a little trickier than when Clinton pardoned Marc Rich at the very end of his term in office.

  33. Karl Dubhe on April 2, 2014, 4:48 pm

    Let him go? I’m not a citizen of the USA, so I could only give a suggestion, it might be enough to get me banned. I’m sorry if it is.

    Give him a few meals, laced with polonium 210, then let him go back to Israel.

  34. dbroncos on April 2, 2014, 8:07 pm

    Pity for Pollard – a “pathetic guy” – and whether or not he’s done enough time isn’t the issue. Israel stole reams of top secret documents, possibly selling the info to USSR, smiled in our face and handed over a shoe box of paperwork and continued to collect American tax payers money. Where’s the bottom? How low will we go? If Pollard is released we will sink further still. That’s the issue.

  35. NickJOCW on April 2, 2014, 10:05 pm

    If Pollard were to be released, the orchestrated ballyhoo of his reception over there would likely ignite a grass roots US reaction of near nuclear proportions. Is that what Phil has in mind, I wonder, or is he just being a dear old soft-hearted soul.

    • MRW on April 3, 2014, 7:28 am

      Not to mention giving a face to the dual loyalty charge that actually harmed the US and its citizens, and killed hundreds of its national security assets.

  36. Bill on April 2, 2014, 11:07 pm

    Pollard should die in prison, period.

  37. Yitzgood on April 3, 2014, 12:28 am

    I keep seeing the word “traitor” in this thread, but it seems sort of like a right-wing thing to call somebody when it is really thrown around freely and with relish. What are the politics of the people who are always commenting at Mondoweiss when the subject isn’t Israel? You don’t have to be a leftist, after all, to say a great deal of what gets said here. Pat Buchanan says similar things. Do we have some, say, Paleocons here? Just curious.

    • Woody Tanaka on April 3, 2014, 7:10 am

      I’m as liberal as they come and the guy is a traitor who should die in prison. It is a slander to suggest that liberals cannot be patriots.

      • Yitzgood on April 3, 2014, 12:10 pm

        It is a slander to suggest that liberals cannot be patriots.

        I don’t think I was trying to suggest that. Should Jane Fonda “die in prison”?

    • MRW on April 3, 2014, 7:25 am

      @Yitzgood,

      You weren’t alive in the mid-80s when this happened or you were in kindergarten? Scroll up and read the Allan C Brownfeld article I link to and educate yourself.

      • Yitzgood on April 3, 2014, 12:21 pm

        You weren’t alive in the mid-80s when this happened or you were in kindergarten? Scroll up and read the Allan C Brownfeld article I link to and educate yourself.

        I was in kindergarten in the 60s. Your article includes a quote about the need to deter “supposedly well-intentioned American citizens making judgments about foreign affairs, rationalizing their conduct because it is, after all, an ally they are assisting.” Is that quote relevant to the Pollard case if he is simply another Aldrich Ames?

      • annie on April 6, 2014, 8:28 am

        you’re cherry picking and taking those words out of context.

        Assistant U.S. Attorney Charles Leeper declared, “The defendant has admitted that he sold Israel a volume of classified materials 10 feet by 6 feet by 6 feet.” Leeper said Pollard provided Israel with thousands of pages, including secret information on the location of American ships and training exercises.

        In Leeper’s view, “The deterrent effect of imposing a severe sentence in a case such as this is absolutely critical. Otherwise you will have supposedly well-intentioned American citizens making judgments about foreign affairs, rationalizing their conduct because it is, after all, an ally they are assisting.”

        wrt ” deterrent effect” he’s not talking about pollard, he’s talking about the next guy down the road who thinks maybe it’s not so bad to sell state secrets simply because one might regard israel is our ally. obviously, as an american citizen, there was nothing “well intentioned” about what pollard did.

        you’re thwarting the meaning of a US prosecutor who condemned pollard using those very words to make the case in pollard’s favor. what chutzpa!

    • annie on April 3, 2014, 8:55 am

      “traitor” …. seems sort of like a right-wing thing to call somebody when it is really thrown around freely and with relish…..What are the politics of the people who are always commenting at Mondoweiss when the subject isn’t Israel?

      oh please! if he is not an example of a traitor there’s no meaning to the word!! alleging it is ‘right wing’ to call him a traitor is insane! just this very morning i read:
      http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/1.583595

      the suggestion of Pollard’s release was met with wall-to-wall opposition in the United States.

      wall-to-wall opposition means it crosses all party lines. are you now going to assert there’s wall-to-wall opposition towards israel is the US! it is not right or left wing to be repulsed by traitors. that is the common understanding of what he is.

      http://sabbah.biz/mt/archives/2014/04/02/appeal-obama-release-spy-traitor-jonathan-pollard/

      Urgent Appeal to President Obama: Do Not Cave in to Israel’s Blackmail and Release the Spy Traitor Jonathan Pollard. Do not Dishonor America and Discredit its Security Interests.

      http://triblive.com/opinion/editorials/5868682-74/pollard-jonathan-release#axzz2xpNqakXu

      Release spy weasel Jonathan Pollard? Again, no
      Wednesday – April 2, 2014
      By The Tribune-Review

      Jonathan Pollard was a prolific spook and forever will be a traitor. His release as a weak bargaining chip should be off the table and his parole request next year should be denied. The rest of Pollard’s days should be spent in prison.

      so is the editorial staff at the Tribune-Review all “rightwing”? plllease
      #hasbaraFAIL

      • Yitzgood on April 3, 2014, 12:34 pm

        alleging it is ‘right wing’ to call him a traitor is insane!

        Sanity is overrated. Anyway, thank you for quoting my qualification “freely and with relish.” Didn’t MW have a post entitled “Set Off a Roman Candle for Edward Snowden”?

      • annie on April 6, 2014, 8:10 am

        ha! first fonda and now snowden. another #FAIL. yeah, it’s a right wing thing to throw around traitor “freely and with relish” so loosely as to apply it to a whistleblower or an anti war activist. pollard no whistleblower. get your facts straight.

    • edwin on April 3, 2014, 9:13 am

      from your comments:

      <i.Please explain also how BDS is seeking to restore “dominance to the authentic people” rather than institute universal rights for all people.

      It think BDS-ers want to recreate an Arab majority in Israel and that trumps everything else. If it is actually a set-back for the libertarian human rights–freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, that sort of thing–they will still be deliriously happy. If the Helen Thomas vision of the future is realized and large numbers of Jews become refugees, well, too bad, a guy named Chaim born in Tel Aviv is an usurper by birth.

      I sometimes ask anti-Zionists whether they would support just abolishing all legal distinctions between Jews and non-Jews in the territories governed by the two governments that are supposedly negotiating for peace right now and merging the two territories. That means you would have a completely egalitarian state in what used to be green-line Israel and the West Bank, a country simply for its inhabitants. That new democratic country, let's call it Egalitaria, will have a Jewish majority and will probably not institute an immigration policy designed to reverse the demographics of the country. I even tried asking this question in the comments section of Mondoweiss once. The anti-Zionists always tell me they would not support such a plan. The "right of return" is non-negotiable. It is usually not a good idea to tell one's political opponents what they think–surely they know best what is in their own minds–but I think I'm on fairly solid ground here.

      ====================================

      As point of information – excluding your post traitor appears 10 times. I was actually counting during the time you were posting. There is no question that what is being proposed in this thread by a number of commentators is some form of lynching. (Ah but he is such a bad person!) Even more to the point, people decry the extremely unfair nature of the US justice system and its policies of throw away the key and guilt by association right up to the point where there is someone they do not personally like. At which point suddenly everything is completely different.

      There are worse things though. Your Egalitaria based on first separating people out by religion and ethnicity, then after carefully arranging demographics applying laws that would entrench those demographics would be one of them. Apartheid comes in different forms but they all are based on formalizing who has power and who does not.You are saying that if we commit some crimes at the beginning then set up our egalitarian state everything will be just dandy. Left unsaid but heavily implied is the need for corrective crimes at various points to maintain this wonderful state of affairs.

      People who believe that religion and ethnicity need to be publicly tracked, and that we should set policy and judge people based on religion and ethnicity, like you do, are worse.

      • Yitzgood on April 3, 2014, 11:24 pm

        You are saying that if we commit some crimes at the beginning then set up our egalitarian state everything will be just dandy.

        Not really. I am saying that people who claim that Israel should “simply be a country for its inhabitants” or something like that are not being quite honest. They mean it should be a country for the inhabitants it would have after its demographics are adjusted to meet with Omar Barghouti’s approval. So they aren’t the ones who actually believe that countries belong to the people who live in them. Saying that the restoring the demographics of 1947 is not the supreme political principle of human existence is not the same thing as saying it is OK to “commit some crimes in the beginning.” I don’t grant the premise that the 1948 war was a giant crime anyway, and how much weight we give to currently ongoing life is the question here.

    • puppies on April 3, 2014, 11:03 am

      @Iznogoud – If you haven’t figured it out by now you’re hopeless. When one doesn’t consider Zionist propaganda agents like yourself, the only thing we have in common here is, theoretically, a desire to help the Palestinians get rid of the Zionists. Being “leftist” as you say is surely not a requirement. Besides, “left” is entirely meaningless here, as no supporter of Zionism can strictly speaking be counted anywhere on the “Left”, racism, colonialism and imperialism being the very essence of Zionism.

      • James Canning on April 3, 2014, 3:06 pm

        @Puppies – – I am curious: do you regard Russia’s actions in Georgia, after Georgia attacked Russian peacekeepers in South Ossetia in 2008, as “imperialist”?

    • James Canning on April 3, 2014, 2:28 pm

      Some who post on this site seem unaware of Paleocons.

  38. Steve C on April 3, 2014, 9:17 am

    I’d like to see some media recognition that the only logical reason for Israel to lobby for Pollard is that they want to show any current spies that they’d also stick up for them.

  39. Kathleen on April 3, 2014, 2:44 pm

    Some of the individuals who have been pushing for the traitor Pollard to be released. Many ask why someone like Pollard should be imprisoned so long for releasing U.S. classified intelligence to an “ally” Israel.

    Kissenger, James Woolsey, Korb,, George P Schulz, Dennis Ross, Malcolm Hoenlein, Robert Wexler, Abe Foxman, Barney Frank, Senator Schumer. Just know Rep Ros Lehtinen’s name has to on one of these list that request his release.

    Watch this clip
    http://www.jonathanpollard.org/

    Also some of the most recent articles supporting his release. Also letters from our Reps pushing for his release etc at the Release Pollard website. Been over a year since I have spent any time at the site.
    http://www.jonathanpollard.org/calls.htm

    Oh yeah Micheal Mukassey, Anthony Weiner. 39 U.S. Congress folks Brad Sherman. Nadler, Charles Rangel, John Lewis, Patrick Kennedy, Eleanor Holmes Norton,
    http://www.jonathanpollard.org/2010/111810.pdf

  40. Yitzgood on April 4, 2014, 11:51 am

    a desire to help the Palestinians get rid of the Zionists

    That’s a very interesting formulation. Who are the “Zionists” in this sentence? Jewish Israelis in general? Where will they be once they are gotten rid of?

    Your pal,

    Yitzchak.

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