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Pollard was in it for money, and sold so many dox Cap Weinberger wanted the death penalty

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The late Caspar Weinberger, once Defense Secretary

The late Caspar Weinberger, once Defense Secretary

Last month at a National Summit to Re-Assess the US Israel Special Relationship in Washington, M.E. Bowman, who had a long career in the US intelligence establishment in the Navy, FBI, and National Counterintelligence office, gave a talk titled “The Jonathan Pollard Affair: What does it mean? What does it not mean?” (Bowman penned an NYT piece on Pollard in January, and was written up in the Washington Post in 2010.)

The highlights? Pollard was in it for money, would have sold to anyone. He gave the Israelis so much they had to install two high-speed copiers to handle the volume. By his own admission, those documents would fill a space 6 feet by 6 feet by 10 feet. He never told authorities all that he gave, and the U.S. hasn’t gotten the stuff back. An extended excerpt:

I have worked every major intelli — every major espionage operation between 1979 and 2009. And quite a few that weren’t major operations as well. In my judgment there are four espionage agents who stand out as the ones who did the most damage to the United States. Chronologically they are John Walker, Jonathan Pollard, Aldrich Ames and Bob Hanson, who I knew personally. I never worked the Aldrich Ames case, that’s the only one that I didn’t work because I was transitioning from the Navy to the FBI at that time.

Now, why do I say that Jonathan Pollard is a major problem or did a major damage to us? Background for him, as you heard, he was a Navy Intelligence Analyst. And he wanted to make a lot of money. And he had ideas about weapons schemes and things like this. But one day he was talking to a friend of his in New York who commented that he had met a very interesting person, a Colonel in the Israeli Air Force named Avi Sella and Pollard said can you introduce me to him?

And he did. And right off the bat, Jonathan Pollard said I can help you, what — you know, what is it you would like to have? Well Sella naturally had Jonathan Pollard checked out and they realized that he was intent on what he said. And so he said yes, we’ll be glad to receive anything that you can get.

Well Pollard had a top secret SCI clearance and he had a courier pass. So he could take classified information out and anything he wanted. And he started giving information to the Israelis and one of the comments they said was, don’t give us any secret information, we don’t need that level. Only top secret and SCI [Sensitive Compartmented] information.

And so that’s what he started doing. And because of his credentials and his courier pass, he could go to the various intelligence libraries and get anything he wanted. And pretty soon the Israelis started tasking him with specific documents they wanted.

And the — the way they were able to do that is they had a book that was published by the DIA that was basically a catalog of all of the things that were available. And Jonathan Pollard didn’t give it to them, they got that from somebody else. So Jonathan Pollard started giving them whatever they wanted.

Now just to recap for a moment what Pollard was trying to do. He didn’t start out to give information to the Israelis, he started out trying to sell anything he could, including classified information. He approached the Pakistanis, he approached the South Africans, he approached the Australians. He turned over classified information to a South African attaché just as a show of good faith.

So you know, he’s not a person who was trying just to help the Israelis, he was a pretty venal person here. At one point when they were — he was meeting with his handlers in Paris, he started commenting you know, I’m really taking a big risk, you know, all this sort of stuff. You know I can really get a lot of time in jail for what I’m doing, it’s a big deal. And the Israelis said well, what is it you want? And he said, Up it by $1,000 a month.

So you know this is — this is really what he is. He’s a person trying to make money. Now what did he do to earn my suggestion that he’s one of the top four? He took so much information to the Israelis, that they had to install two high speed copiers in an apartment to take care of everything that he brought them.

He would take information out every night in a couple of briefcases, give it to them to copy and then because they had high speed copiers, they were able to get it back to him quickly. And then he would replace it as soon as he got to work in the morning.

How much did he give them? By his own admission, he said I gave them enough information to occupy a space that would be six feet by six feet by ten feet. That’s his admission. We never got the documents back from the Israelis that he gave them. Now they did give us a few documents back, they gave us a couple of thousand back.

But really, you know we don’t know all that he gave. Although Jonathan Pollard has a — a almost photographic mind. So he was able to tell us an awful lot about what he did. Now the reason he told us all this stuff is we made a deal that we would — his wife was involved in this too. And we made a deal that we would cap her sentence to five years. And that we would not ask for the maximum punishment for him.

Now the information that he turned over, some of it actually was information covered by 18 U.S. Code 194, which is mostly electronics communication information. It carries the death penalty. But at the time that Jonathan Pollard was — did his espionage work, there was no death penalty in the United States. That had been ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. And at that time, a life sentence was really in practice 30 years. So that’s what we were looking at.

Jonathan Pollard was pretty good about telling us all the information that he had given over. And as a consequence of that, one of the things that we do usually with espionage agents, or at least that I did, is I would write an Affidavit for a senior officer to sign that explained what the harm was.

So of the things that he gave us, I selected 19 different documents that represented the different categories of information that he had turned over to the Israelis. And I — just using each one, I explained what the harm is from this type of information, not from this document, but from this type of information and gave it to Secretary Weinberger. And Secretary Weinberger made his edits to it.

One of his edits — I have to tell you about this. One of his edits was he put in a sentence in there that said that if the death penalty were available, I would have no hesitation in recommending it. I crossed that out. And the next version I sent in to him, he put the same thing back in. And finally I said Mr. Secretary, if we can’t ask for the maximum punishment which is life, we can’t say that death is appropriate. He finally got the picture.

But anyway, this Affidavit was then given to Judge Aubrey Robinson, who is now deceased and I took it to him personally. I sat in an out room while he read it and gave it back to me and said thank you very much, that’s all he said. And then we went to sentencing. And at sentencing, the prosecutors really didn’t say anything. They got up and they said he’s done harm, he should receive a substantial sentence, but that’s about the character of all they said.

Jonathan Pollard got up and talked about what he had done and how sorry he was, and by the way I really didn’t do anything that caused any harm. And Judge Robinson said come up here young man. And he pulled out the Affidavit which he now had in his hand. And he pulled it open to a few pages and he said okay, now explain this one.

And Jonathan Pollard couldn’t answer what it was, because it was a very big deal. In fact it has been made public now, so I can tell you what Judge Robinson was pointing at. It was something that’s what we all the Raisin Manual. And the Raisin Manual is — was at that time, a document that described all of the communications capabilities of the Middle East and how the NSA could attack them. And Judge Robinson just said explain this one young man and he was done.

So at sentencing, Jonathan Pollard got life, which as I said, meant about thirty years. He has been there for about 27 or 8 years at this point. He has been eligible for parole for some time. He will not ask for parole because he wants clemency so as soon as he steps out of prison, he can leave the United States and go to Israel.

So that is my story of Jonathan Pollard. I am going to finish it looks like 13 seconds early. So I thank you for coming here today, it’s been a pleasure.

philweiss
About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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65 Responses

  1. Donald
    Donald on April 1, 2014, 1:11 pm

    Pollard is obviously a scum–I didn’t realize it wasn’t even for ideology, just money–but I take intelligence claims of great harm with a grain of salt. It’s how the National Security State functionaries always talk when somebody leaks something. No doubt Pollard did do harm, but I’d want to know specifics before I get all worked up about this. Did someone actually die, for instance, because of what he leaked and what is the proof? They say the same sorts of things about Snowden, Manning, and Assange (not that I’m comparing those people with Pollard.)

    • RudyM
      RudyM on April 1, 2014, 2:14 pm

      So it’s no big deal that Pollard sold such a huge number of documents to the Zionist Parasite, apparently many hand picked by the Israelis?

      Enough intelligence insiders are pissed off about this and do claim that lives were lost as a result that I think the claims of the security state have some credibility in this case.

      • Donald
        Donald on April 1, 2014, 3:29 pm

        “So it’s no big deal that Pollard sold such a huge number of documents to the Zionist Parasite, apparently many hand picked by the Israelis?”

        Might be a big deal. Hard to say. The National Security State always hyperventilates when some of their secrets are stolen. We peons on the outside are supposed to take their word for it that It’s Really Really Serious.

        And it might be. Maybe some people died, or maybe not. But I don’t come to this website because Israel spied on us.

      • lysias
        lysias on April 1, 2014, 3:35 pm

        Take the word of someone who spent a career in military signals intelligence. This really was a big deal (a lot more serious than anything Manning or Snowden has done).

      • Donald
        Donald on April 1, 2014, 3:48 pm

        Well, I tend to believe you, lysias. But I always find it a little odd to see progressives (not that all of us here are progressives, of course) taking the side of people like Cap Weinberger and talking exactly the way the Obamas and John Brennans of the world talk. Pollard seems to be a scummy person who sold secrets for money and that’s reason enough to put him in jail, but on the list of issues covered at this website, whether Pollard stays in jail ranks somewhere around number 9573 in order of importance. For me, anyway. But for that reason, I’ll stop commenting in this thread.

      • Woody Tanaka
        Woody Tanaka on April 1, 2014, 4:04 pm

        “But I always find it a little odd to see progressives (not that all of us here are progressives, of course) taking the side of people like Cap Weinberger”

        Stopped clock is right twice a day…

        “and talking exactly the way the Obamas… of the world talk.”

        Nonsense. The Obama of the world sent Kerry to dangle Pollard in front of Netanyahu.

        “but on the list of issues covered at this website, whether Pollard stays in jail ranks somewhere around number 9573 in order of importance.”

        That, by itself, might be true. But the way I see it, anything that can get between the US and Israel is a net gain for the world and for mankind. And anything that tells the donkey felators in Washington that they serve the US people and not some foreigners in the Levant is a net gain for the USA.

      • RudyM
        RudyM on April 1, 2014, 5:27 pm

        I didn’t come to this website because Israel spied on us either, but I will definitely run with it. If we are going to reach tea party sympathizers, this is just the sort of thing that might work.

        And truthfully, the more I learn about Zionism (and obviously without assuming the truth of every claim on every “anti-Zionist” website), the more I see it as not only a grave injustice to the Palestinians, but also as a threat to the Middle Eastern, a threat to U.S. national security, a threat to U.S. national interests in general, a threat to what limited democratic institutions remain in the U.S. (if you squint really hard made you can see them), a threat to the political systems in other western countries, and a threat to the world in general, through its subversion (e.g., stealing passports, or more seriously, participating in destabilization of countries which stand in the way of crushing the Palestinians and attaining regional hegemony).

        There is a difference between selling secrets to a foreign government (one which has a history of abusing what it has learned through espionage on the U.S.) and doing what Bradley Manning did or doing what Snowden did (assuming he’s not playing a game directed by the government to begin with, which I think is questionable). It’s true that there was a profit motive in the case of Assange and, I strongly suspect, in the case of Greenwald, but I haven’t since convincing evidence of that in the case of Manning specifically.

        And I guess I am not enough of a “progressive” to completely not care about national secrets being given to a state which, if not an outright enemy, has a parasitic relationship with my country. I’m glad Russia, for instance, is re-emerging as a partial check on unipolar U.S. power, but if I found a bunch of high level secrets about our defenses, I wouldn’t pass them on to the Russians. (There are claims, though admittedly without any documentation I’ve seen, that Israel passed on much of this material the USSR.)

        Sorry, I know you said you’re leaving the thread!

      • RudyM
        RudyM on April 1, 2014, 5:47 pm

        And it just adds insult to injury when the Israel’s not only rope us into supporting their unjust system and crimes against humanity, but also steal our military and business/industrial secrets. And it’s even worse when Israel and its supporters whine and call for the release of someone like Pollard.

        The endless arrogance and lies. My god. There are just so many different reason to be angry with Israel and its agents.

      • rpickar
        rpickar on April 1, 2014, 9:33 pm

        Donald,

        Maybe you should go to Veterans Today. They are really pissed about Israeli spying and consequent control of the political/military structure of the US.

      • Cliff
        Cliff on April 1, 2014, 3:42 pm

        @RudyM

        I think Donald was simply making the point that the ‘Security State’ – whether it’s Israel or the US – always makes the claim that the leaked intel ‘put our troops in harms way’/’aided the terrorists’/etc.etc.

        Clearly there’s a difference between a Zionist and traitor like Pollard SELLING secrets as opposed to a civilian contractor like Snowden who made a decision based on his principles and morals and felt his country was acting immorally/illegally/etc.

        Donald made that distinction.

        His argument is simply that the reaction to both the traitor and the whistleblower is that of alarm.

        So the next filter we should apply is to look at the leaked intel (if accessible) or listen to the person responsible for said leaks.

        Hear their justification and consider their options in retrospect and their actions.

        I think it’s plain to see that Snowden is nothing like Pollard.

        I think it’s plain to see that Pollard is a scumbag.

    • Cliff
      Cliff on April 1, 2014, 2:31 pm

      Good point Donald.

      • Donald
        Donald on April 1, 2014, 3:30 pm

        Thanks Cliff.

    • atime forpeace
      atime forpeace on April 1, 2014, 6:13 pm

      So we are to believe that he did it for the money (filthy lucre) yet, he refuses to be exchanged for Palestinian prisoners as if the exchange would taint his noble deed (beau geste), done out of a deep seated affection, a dual love of sorts, for Americas’ BFF in the Middle East.

      • on April 2, 2014, 7:49 am

        I find the story that Pollard is voluntarily remaining in prison because he would rather do that than see Israel go ahead with the 4th of 4 rounds of an agreed to prisoner release about as credible as everything else we are fed about Israel

    • libra
      libra on April 1, 2014, 7:09 pm

      Donald: I didn’t realize it wasn’t even for ideology, just money

      Donald, surely you’ve been reading Mondoweiss long enough to work out that Zionism is a seamless mix of money and ideology for many of its supporters?

    • Kathleen
      Kathleen on April 1, 2014, 11:22 pm

      Money and “ideology” Not sure what Bowman’s agenda is.

      ” Pollard was raised in a family where loyalties as a Jew and as an American were one, and was interested in fully becoming part of his country. At an early age Pollard became aware of the horrific toll the Holocaust had taken on his immediate family, and when he was about to become a Bar Mitzva he asked his parents to visit the death camps.[12]

      Pollard grew up with what he called a “racial obligation” to Israel,[15] and made his first trip to Israel in 1970, as part of a science program visiting the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot. While there, he was hospitalized after a fight with another student. One Weizmann scientist remembered Pollard as leaving behind “a reputation of being an unstable troublemaker, the worst case of this kind in the history of the summer camp”.[16] However, this was not at all a view shared by other summer students [who?] on the program, who remember him warmly, considered him no different from any other teenage kid, and were shocked to hear of his later fate.[Sources needed]

      After completing high school, Pollard attended Stanford University, where he completed a degree in political science in 1976.[14] While there, he is remembered by several of his acquaintances as boasting that he was a dual citizen of the United States and Israel and claiming to work for the Mossad and to have attained the rank of colonel in the Israel Defense Forces. None of these claims were true.[17][18][19] Later, Pollard enrolled in several graduate schools, but never completed a postgraduate degree.[1″

      • RoHa
        RoHa on April 2, 2014, 11:47 am

        “claiming to work for the Mossad and to have attained the rank of colonel in the Israel Defense Forces.”

        They always seems to be colonels. They don’t ever seem to be Group Captains, or Rear Admirals, or Assistant Chief Spymasters (grade one). Just colonels.

      • lysias
        lysias on April 2, 2014, 12:57 pm

        Not just Mossad. The Soviets made Philby a colonel.

    • MRW
      MRW on April 2, 2014, 2:55 am

      Donald, tens of hundreds of US assets died, and their families. This was the greatest breach of US security and intelligence in the country’s history, according to quiet reports in the early 1990s. George Tenet threatened to resign if Clinton pardoned him, and with him the top level of the CIA. Caspar Weinberg went apoplectic at the mention of his name even in retirement (google Richard Sale’s excellent report on this) long after Weinberg begged the court to issue the death penalty in a still-classified 58-page brief of the damage he did to this country. Four former directors of Naval Intelligence wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post in the late 90s that the US releases Pollard at its peril.

      In short, you have no idea, no clue what you’re talking about, with all due respect. I gave some links to the history of it in the comments here.

  2. K Renner
    K Renner on April 1, 2014, 1:13 pm

    It’s hilarious how, informally or formally, you’ll get these people banging the drum and screaming lies about the Palestinians or the Lebanese (they hate America, they’re Al Qaeda, yadda yadda yadda) and attempting to demonize anyone in the US government who says “we should try diplomacy with the Iranians”, and yet plenty of them talk about Pollard being some persecuted martyr who’s been incarcerated unjustifiably and all this ridiculous garbage.

    • Daniel Rich
      Daniel Rich on April 1, 2014, 6:59 pm

      @ K Renner,

      Q: It’s hilarious …

      R: Have you ever wondered why the incredibly articulate Dr. Hanan Daoud Khalil Ashrawi was pushed aside?

      Arrafat was a little dictator on his own, imho.

      Dr. Ashrawi could and would have have changed the perception [of ‘us’ in the west] of the deluge of torment Palestinians are faced with day after day after day. I think ‘we’ [in the west] can relate to sobbing people over a coffin, much more than AK47 firing angry men.

      Although Israel carries most of the blame, the PA, Arraft and Abbas are equally guilty.

      I would urge Mondoweiss to humbly ask if Dr. Ashrawi would be kind enough to join this web site. This is the kind of woman I would like to have on my team. This is the kind of woman who can really help Palestine.

      • annie
        annie on April 1, 2014, 8:02 pm

        to “join the website”? do you mean like a membership or as an honorary staff member? because she may be a tad busy w/her day job.

      • Daniel Rich
        Daniel Rich on April 2, 2014, 2:41 am

        @ Annie Robbins,

        Q: honorary staff member

        R: It would be great to have a person of her caliber as anything she will take [or is able to do], to give us an unbiased insight into what is really going on.

        I’ve always admired her intellect and straightforwardness, because in my book that’s what I see as reliable.

        What do you think, Annie?

  3. Les
    Les on April 1, 2014, 1:17 pm

    What we will never know is how many US foreign agents were executed when Pollard supplied information about our spy networks.

  4. Cliff
    Cliff on April 1, 2014, 1:17 pm

    Paging Abe Foxman!

    SWU! ADL! ZOA!

    This is antisemitic!

    There are plenty of spies, why single out Pollard? Because he’s Jewish of course!

    Hitler! Nazi!

    • Citizen
      Citizen on April 1, 2014, 2:38 pm

      @ Cliff Rabbi Boteach has twittered just that today. Same guy who made Phill turn off his video camera at Columbia.

    • American
      American on April 2, 2014, 11:03 am

      Foxman is on the case already.

      ADL’s Foxman: Pollard Case ‘Vendetta’ Against Jews
      Tuesday, 01 Apr 2014 10:11 PM
      By Abraham H. Foxman

      ”In effect, the continuing imprisonment of this person long after he should have been paroled on humanitarian grounds can only be read as an effort to intimidate American Jews. And, it is an intimidation that can only be based on an anti-Semitic stereotype about the Jewish community, one that we have seen confirmed in our public opinion polls over the years, the belief that American Jews are more loyal to Israel than to their own country, the United States.

      In other words, the underlying concept which fuels the ongoing Pollard incarceration is the notion that he is only the tip of the iceberg in the community. So Pollard stays in prison as a message to American Jews: Don’t even think about doing what he did.”

  5. Citizen
    Citizen on April 1, 2014, 2:50 pm

    Pollard also gave Israel all the top data on the military capability of every state in the Middle East and USSR, and data amounting to a map of all US missile defense systems, and also the names of Israelis who were spying for the US; and the US character sketches of Israeli leaders; he was also willing to give Israel all the “dirt” on those people–Sharon’s guy asked for it, but another Israeli pulled Pollard aside and told him not to that or the deal was off.

  6. pabelmont
    pabelmont on April 1, 2014, 3:08 pm

    Obama considers giving Pollard away as a quid pro quo for what? For something substantial or important or long lasting or to anyone’s credit? No.

    He wants to give Pollard up to induce the Israelis to release a few prisoners they had already agreed to give up as part of the current “round” of the (infinitely looping, never ending) merry-go-round called the “peace process”. And when he gioves them Pollard, and even if they follow through and do as they appear to have promised (for Pollard; not to the PA), then — there’ll still be no peace, Kerry will have empty hands — again — and Abbas will again have to search his soul to see if he has the courage — against very great odds: Israel and USA — to go to ICC.

    And Pollard will be out and home free, and Israel can re-arrest the Palestinians, or arrest someone else, and on and on and on.

    What crap.

    And no-one serious talking about implementing UNSC 465 again but this time with teeth: settlers and settlements gone. Wall gone too.

    That would not be crap, even if it didn’t happen it’d be nice to hear it talked about. But, Noooooooo. That probably crosses some Israeli “red line”. (USA has no “red lines”, does it? Or courage. Or standards of decency.)

  7. lysias
    lysias on April 1, 2014, 3:19 pm

    Congressional Quarterly: Proposal to Free Convicted Spy Pollard Angers Senators. According to the CQ story, Lindsay Graham, Bob Corker, Tim Kaine, and Angus King either opposed Pollard’s release outright, or expressed misgivings about it. Charles Schumer and Foxman/ADL supported releasing Pollard.

  8. JeffB
    JeffB on April 1, 2014, 3:20 pm

    @pabelmont

    And no-one serious talking about implementing UNSC 465 again but this time with teeth: settlers and settlements gone. Wall gone too. That would not be crap, even if it didn’t happen it’d be nice to hear it talked about. But, Noooooooo. That probably crosses some Israeli “red line”. (USA has no “red lines”, does it? Or courage. Or standards of decency.)

    The USA by law is on the other side of that position: http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?c104:1:./temp/~c104KFRZd0::

    American presidents have tried to back away but that’s USA law. A UN rep that refused to act on the express orders of congress would rightfully be impeached.

  9. lysias
    lysias on April 1, 2014, 3:20 pm

    If the Russians want to embarrass Obama, they could release information on what Pollard (indirectly) turned over to them.

    • ritzl
      ritzl on April 1, 2014, 5:55 pm

      Brilliant! lysias. So true. Tangled webs, and all that.

      I’d add that weakness and/or acquiescence may seem like the easy way out of a lot of situations, but it’s really not.

  10. lysias
    lysias on April 1, 2014, 3:24 pm

    one of the comments they said was, don’t give us any secret information, we don’t need that level. Only top secret and SCI [Sensitive Compartmented] information.

    The computer system from which Bradley/Chelsea Manning got the documents he/she released had nothing on it classified higher than Secret.

  11. lysias
    lysias on April 1, 2014, 3:33 pm

    The RASIN Manual involved a lot more than Middle Eastern vulnerabilities to NSA surveillance, as is stated in the Wikipedia piece on Pollard:

    As of 2014[update] the full extent of the information Pollard passed to Israel has still not been officially revealed. Press reports cited a secret 46-page memorandum, which Pollard and his attorneys were allowed to view.[36] They were provided to the judge by Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger, who described Pollard’s spying as including, among other things, obtaining and copying the latest version of Radio-Signal Notations (RASIN), a 10-volume manual comprehensively detailing America’s global electronic surveillance network.[14][37]

  12. Keith
    Keith on April 1, 2014, 3:46 pm

    I have a great deal of difficulty imagining a system so lax that a significant quantity of truly sensitive information was stolen this easily. If so, then the upper echelons of the security establishment should have, at the least, been fired for gross incompetence. Most of the stuff classified as secret or even top secret shouldn’t be. The classification is primarily to prevent embarrassment to the government when official lying is documented by internal records. In other words, to keep the citizenry in the dark. As a consequence, the volume is so large as to require lax procedures as a practical matter, however, truly sensitive material should be beyond the reach of enlisted petty thieves. And if the stuff was truly sensitive, then I am guessing that he had inside help and a lot is being kept quiet.

  13. giladg
    giladg on April 1, 2014, 6:03 pm

    What a load of bs Philip. Caspar Weinberger, may he rot in hell, knew exactly what was given to Israel when the plea bargain was arranged. Pollard was supposed to sit for 3 years. CIA agents in Russia were compromised between the time the plea bargain was arranged and the hearing to approve it, and Caspar Weinberger, may he rot in hell (did I say that already), blamed Pollard for this. It is now known that Pollard had nothing to do with this. His department did not have access to this info. Weinberger then sent a still secret note to the judge who then reneged on the plea bargain. Pollard did not compromise US security. The judge is now dead, Weinberger is dead and it seems that there are those who want Pollard dead as well, so no one will be able to tell the real story. Something else is going on and it has nothing to do with what Pollard gave to Israel for free or for payment or for anything else. 29 years in jail. For What ?? Nelson Mandela sat for less time and he made bombs and used them.

    • Ellen
      Ellen on April 1, 2014, 9:31 pm

      sorry gilad…you have been drinking the Ziocoolaid.

      I worked with the signal commands at that time. Pollard compromised decades of security and intelligence capabilities. While there may not have been individuals who were directly compromised an entire security network was destroyed by Pollard. The damage to the country was immense.

      This man was put into a high position of security and trust by his country. He sold it off to Israel for money and Israel sold some of it off to Russia.

      He would have done the same thing to Israel for money.

      Why do you support him?

      • Kay24
        Kay24 on April 2, 2014, 12:44 am

        Maybe it is reflex action to justify, defend and protect what the zio government does. Israel, right or wrong, mostly wrong.

      • giladg
        giladg on April 2, 2014, 2:44 am

        Ask yourself this Ellen. If a security network was destroyed because of Pollard, then why still keep Caspar Weinberger’s letter to the judge secret? The Russians know about it. Everyone else knows about it except the people of the USA. I assume you are talking about the security network in Russia if indeed your position in signals gave you access to such info? If not then you are just guessing. What really happened was that Pollard saw that some of his superiors where not passing on intelligence onto Israel about Iraq (mainly) even though Israel and the US have and had sharing agreements that allowed such sharing. Remember that this was before the Gulf War where Sadam Husein was building weapons to attack Israel like the super cannon that Canadian Gerald Bull assisted them with. Israel and the US are strong alias. Israel would not have compromised the security of the US. The amount of years Pollard has sat in prison earns him the right to have the secret letter from Weinberger made public. I believe that the publication of this letter will only embarrass the now dead Caspar Weinberger and the CIA director at the time. If the damage has already been done then release the the damn letter. But they won’t. Pollard now deserves my support and yours as well, as well as every so called liberal in the US who thinks they understand what justice means. Twenty nine years in jail. Enough is enough.

      • Ellen
        Ellen on April 2, 2014, 2:32 pm

        Gilad, your assumptions are totally off, especially concerning your ASSUMPTION about Russian security networks. And the old saw that the US was not passing information onto Israel concerning Iraq. This is the apologist line. His only motivation was money and maybe some excitement as he explained in the court proceedings.

        I take no stance on if Pollard should be released or not, but only what he did. Remember, he’d do it to Israel as well.

        I am not a “so-called liberal.”

        One cannot make demands on the Weinberger letter as it did contain classified information that could still have impact. And besides, it is irrelevant. To be honest, it is not in Israel’s interest that the Weinberg letter be released. That is one reason why it is still under classification.

        You have really swallowed a lot of propaganda to support a failed person who is now not only a pawn, but has been a tool for the Zio propaganda machine. That is his only value to Israel, and you believe all this pablum!

      • giladg
        giladg on April 3, 2014, 2:23 am

        Are you saying that you KNOW what is in the letter? And it was CIA agents in Russia who were taken out.

      • eljay
        eljay on April 2, 2014, 3:11 pm

        >> giladg @ April 2, 2014 at 2:44 am

        Israeli Zio-supremacist giladgeee’s concern with justice for American citizen Jonathan Pollard would be a lot more believable if it weren’t for his well-documented lack of concern regarding past and ON-GOING injustices committed by Zio-supremacists like him against non-Jews in Palestine.

    • MRW
      MRW on April 2, 2014, 3:04 am

      giladg, bullshit.

  14. DaBakr
    DaBakr on April 1, 2014, 6:36 pm

    when a site like MW starts to sing the praises os a guy like Casper one definitely has to start wondering and scratching one’s head.
    That very little noise id raised about characters such as Walker, Hanssen and Ames while Pollard is blamed for such damage and such grief! Its taken 30+ years for anyone to even try to prove any real and lasting damage done to the ‘security apparatus’ and while it is obvious Pollard was interested in money in return for his deeds I don’t see anybody hyperventilating about Ames Hanssen and Walker who most definitely DID intend to harm the USA with their deeds while reaping the benefits.
    That Pollard should be punished more extremely then anybody previously convicted of ‘data mining’ and leaking or passing along is a question worth asking. And its nothing more then amusing to see the pure denial and twisted hoops that Pollard haters here are willing to jump through to excuse and separate what Snowden and Manning did. With Snowden all snug as a bug in former Soviet Putins ‘territory’ its hysterical to listen to how Pollard-by turning over Syrian/Soviet missile data to Israel-a non military threat to the US (who was technically breaking its ‘agreement’ to provide such data) was trying to harm the US while Snowden was trying to improve it. You people love to have things both ways-your cake and to eat it as well. I suppose nobody could blame you as long as your not an out and out hypocrite about it.
    p.s. Casper W. was no hero-not then and not now -unless your only requirement for ‘hero’ is that one take a position against Israel. And btw- from an Israeli pov-why should the US care so much about an old and sick for-cash-spy and sometime lunatic for Israel who has served near 30yrs of his life sentence when the US is pushing Israel to release 100s of Palestinians with actual and provable blood on their hands as if its nothing? Or is the US not required to practice what it preaches?

    Personally? I don’t think Pollard is worth an exchange. He’s is up for parole soon enough and his early release will accomplish nothing more then raising hackles and the US will act like it has just given Israel manna from heaven when in fact-its not very much at all except a short term PR victory. If Pollard were truly the great and ‘heroic’ spy that some make hime out to be he would refuse to be used as a bargaining chip and say he will do his time until he earns parole……period.

    • MRW
      MRW on April 2, 2014, 3:06 am

      Pollard is not up for parole. Because of a law in place when he was sentenced, since removed from the books, he can get off early for good behavior. Has nothing to do with parole.

  15. crone
    crone on April 1, 2014, 7:06 pm

    Seymour Hersh wrote an article for the New Yorker in 1999

    http://cryptome.org/jya/traitor.htm

    For those who do not believe Pollard did any damage to the intelligence community or to the USA – in other words – do not believe he was a traitor, I suggest you do a little homework on the case… above would be a good place to start.

    One other thing – who is the source for “Obama/USA considering offering release of Pollard ….”? most of the time it is Israel – the State Department gets tired of denying the accusation, according to Hersh’s article.

    According to most sources, Pollard certainly did it for the money – in fact he approached several countries before the Israel gov’t contacted him… the Israelis were willing to pay Pollard mega bucks as he gave them more than ‘secret’ info – in fact, Pollard at the request of the Israelis moved beyond secret level to the top levels of intelligence to which he had access.

    A second link – from CNN in 2012

    http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/16/opinion/roland-martin-pollard/

    • DaBakr
      DaBakr on April 1, 2014, 7:52 pm

      I think the term “mega bucks” is a bit of an exaggeration. I remember readign about amounts like: $40,000 and there-abouts. Even if there are proven to be larger payments-its hardly “mega”. The real point about Pollard is not that he did not do any damage. Just by being caught and admitting to the amounts of data he stole is damage enough but nobody can get around the fact that Snowden did the same thing and fled before he could be caught. In fact-Snowden was very smart in that he controlled a large portion of his own narrative. The fact remains that its quite suspicious that he fled to two nations known for their voracious appetites for spying on the US-China and the former Soviet-Russia. Anybody truly belive that China and Russia were denied COMPLETE access to what SNowden stole?
      p.s.-I would imagine and have even read there are many in the intelligence community that would like to hang both Snowden and Manning- not that they are in the majority-but they are there. Why would Pollard generate any more particular ‘hatred’ from the US intell. commun. then a Hanssen? an Ames, Walker, Snowden or Manning? Whats the justification for the heightened level of animosity?

      • annie
        annie on April 1, 2014, 7:57 pm

        using the word ‘fact’ over and over won’t make something true. just sayin’

      • DaBakr
        DaBakr on April 2, 2014, 9:22 pm

        your sayin’ Snowden wasn’t smart enough to flee and control a good part of his own narrative? And are you also sayn’ that the higher ups in the US intell community don’t say, think or believe that Snowden is the only American that “stole more” or did “more damage” then Pollard? -as for at least this was the quote from papers like the NYT , BBC, and a couple others.
        As for wether you have animosity for Pollard, Snowden, one or both really depends on your political position on matters and not facts.

      • MRW
        MRW on April 1, 2014, 8:46 pm

        Pollard worked for Naval Intelligence. Here are four former past directors of Naval Intelligence, William Studeman, Sumner Shapiro, John L. Butts and Thomas Brooks in an editorial in the Washington Post on December 12, 1998.
        http://tinyurl.com/pollardthetraitor

        “Release Pollard At the Nation’s Peril”

        “Jonathan Pollard is serving a life sentence for stealing massive amounts of highly classified and extremely sensitive U.S. national security information. In terms of sheer volume of sensitive information betrayed, [Note: the volume of documents was 10′ x 10′] Jonathan Pollard rivals any of the traitors who have plagued this nation in recent times. Nobody is clamoring for the release of traitors like Aldrich Ames, John Walker or Jerry Whitworth, but Pollard, by manipulating his supporters and conducting a clever public relations campaign both here and in Israel, has managed to generate a small but vocal movement advocating that he be released and allowed to emigrate to Israel, where he expects to be something of a national hero.

        We, who are painfully familiar with the case, feel obligated to go on record with the facts regarding Pollard in order to dispel the myths that have arisen from this clever public relations campaign aimed at transforming Pollard from greedy, arrogant betrayer of the American national trust into Pollard, committed Israeli patriot.

        Pollard pleaded guilty and therefore never was publicly tried. Thus, the American people never came to know that he offered classified information to three other countries before working for the Israelis and that he offered his services to a fourth country while he was spying for Israel. They also never came to understand that he was being very highly paid for his services — including an impressive nest egg currently in foreign banks — and was negotiating with his Israeli handlers for a raise as he was caught. So much for Jonathan Pollard, ideologue!”

        Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger begged the court for the death penalty. Dershowitz got that reduced to a life sentence if Israel would return the documents, which it never did.

        Both Pollard and Israel are traitors to the US. Don’t even dare insert Snowden into this crime.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 2:58 pm

        Would be great if the public had access to the 58 page document that Caspar handed the Judge after what he considered to be a light sentence for Pollard.

      • DaBakr
        DaBakr on April 2, 2014, 9:27 pm

        Your truly a fool if you don’t beleive that US intell officials don’t believe that what Snowden did was worse. And btw-its strictly your opinion-not a fact-that Pollard is a traitor and many in the industry think the same about Snowden (while he sits all cushy in former Soviet Russia after first fleeing to China-two great friends of the US who naturally would NEVER engage in spying on the US)

        again-I am not personally in favor of releasing Pollard. Curious as to why is is so much more hated then spies like Walker, Hanssen and Ames but that another discussion

  16. crone
    crone on April 1, 2014, 10:04 pm

    from the Washington Post 1998

    “Release Pollard At the Nation’s Peril” by former past directors of Naval Intelligence, William Studeman, Sumner Shapiro, John L. Butts and Thomas Brooks, Washington Post, December 12, 1998 http://tinyurl.com/pollardthetraitor

    “Jonathan Pollard is serving a life sentence for stealing massive amounts of highly classified and extremely sensitive U.S. national security information. In terms of sheer volume of sensitive information betrayed, Jonathan Pollard rivals any of the traitors who have plagued this nation in recent times. Nobody is clamoring for the release of traitors like Aldrich Ames, John Walker or Jerry Whitworth, but Pollard, by manipulating his supporters and conducting a clever public relations campaign both here and in Israel, has managed to generate a small but vocal movement advocating that he be released and allowed to emigrate to Israel, where he expects to be something of a national hero.

    We, who are painfully familiar with the case, feel obligated to go on record with the facts regarding Pollard in order to dispel the myths that have arisen from this clever public relations campaign aimed at transforming Pollard from greedy, arrogant betrayer of the American national trust into Pollard, committed Israeli patriot.

    Pollard pleaded guilty and therefore never was publicly tried. Thus, the American people never came to know that he offered classified information to three other countries before working for the Israelis and that he offered his services to a fourth country while he was spying for Israel. They also never came to understand that he was being very highly paid for his services — including an impressive nest egg currently in foreign banks — and was negotiating with his Israeli handlers for a raise as he was caught. So much for Jonathan Pollard, ideologue!”

  17. Kathleen
    Kathleen on April 1, 2014, 11:17 pm

    http://irmep.org/st.htm

    U.S. V. Jonathan Pollard
    http://www.irmep.org/ila/pollard/03041987weinberger.pdf
    SUPPLEMENTAL
    DECLARATION
    OF
    CASPAR
    W.
    WEINBERGER
    SECRETARY
    OF
    DEFENSE

    USA v Jonathan J. Pollard:
    Sentencing Declarations, Filings, Clemency Drive
    http://www.irmep.org/ILA/pollard/default.asp

  18. Kathleen
    Kathleen on April 1, 2014, 11:26 pm

    http://www.irmep.org/ILA/pollard/03031987pollard_response_to_govt_reply.pdf
    “Mr.
    Pollard
    does
    not
    recede
    from
    his
    desire
    one
    day
    to
    return
    to
    Israel.”

  19. Kathleen
    Kathleen on April 1, 2014, 11:32 pm

    Important read over at Foreign Policy
    I Was Against Pollard’s Release Before I Was for It
    John Kerry and Washington’s decades-long fight over releasing Israel’s controversial spy
    http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2014/04/01/i_was_against_pollards_release_before_i_was_for_it

    • hophmi
      hophmi on April 2, 2014, 11:01 am

      I hate Jonathan Pollard and always have, but it’s high hypocrisy for a site like this, to take this position on his sentence. Can you cite another case where you’d support sentencing a defendant based on a secret memorandum ordered ex parte by a judge and not shown to defense counsel?

      I highly doubt it, given how you’ve gone on and on about the Manning and Snowden cases. The only difference is that you disagree with Pollard’s politics.

  20. Taxi
    Taxi on April 2, 2014, 12:00 am
  21. Accentitude
    Accentitude on April 2, 2014, 4:50 am

    I’m glad that the Pollard deal is DOA, as it should be. Pollard is a scumbag through and through and the fact that if he were released he would have received a hero’s welcome in Israel is further proof of Israel’s urinating on American support it so widely receives. I’m sure Moshe Ya’alon would have been all too happy to drop trou. It must be salt to their wound to know that the PLO effectively killed the chances of Pollard standing as a free man in Israel next week. Good riddance to bad rubbish.

  22. American
    American on April 2, 2014, 9:43 am

    Pollard covered on MSNBC news this am.
    Gave some info on how much info Pollard had stolen ‘for Israel’. …yea said ‘for Israel’, didn’t mentioned he did it for money.
    Also talked about was Israel continuing their settlements is bad for peace process.
    So the Pollard push has brought out some comment by msm on Israel.

    • Kathleen
      Kathleen on April 2, 2014, 3:00 pm

      The other morning on Morning Joe even David Axelrod referred to the Israeli Palestinian conflict as being at the core of the troubles in the middle east. I was shocked

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