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Being Palestinian got me barred from visiting Palestine

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“What is your father’s name?”

“What is your father’s father’s name?”

“Where was he born?”

“Ramallah?!”

“You have Palestinian passport?”

“You have American passport only?”

“You have family in Ramallah?”

“You don’t have family there?”

“Who do you know in Ramallah?”

“You were born in Ramallah but you don’t know anybody there?”

“You JUST TOLD ME you were born in Ramallah.”

A phone call in Hebrew I don’t understand a word of. A hostile glare.

I tell her I’m sorry, that I misheard her, I thought she was asking where my grandfather was born. He was born in Ramallah. I was born in Detroit. I have only an American passport. I am telling her this calmly, but in my mind, I am thinking I am fucked and this would all go so much more smoothly if the Israeli woman with the bad eyebrows behind the counter didn’t know my grandparents were from Palestine. Of course, the irony of the situation does not escape me. Being Palestinian is making it impossible for me to visit Palestine.

This is my first time at the Israeli-controlled border between Palestine and Jordan. I am traveling with 15 young Arab-Americans, mostly Palestinian, to do community service work and connect with our heritage and homeland.​ We have arrived at the Allenby Bridge anxious & apprehensive, having heard countless stories of harassment by Israeli soldiers, and deeply exhausted from a long weekend of delayed flights, desert nights, and the Dead Sea. Our trip was cancelled due to increased violence in the West Bank, and re-planned after the participants wrote a letter stating their determination and commitment to experience life in occupied Palestine, even if that meant putting ourselves in danger. But despite all this, I am thrilled to be returning to Palestine after months of planning, years of dreaming. Tucked in a corner of my wallet are directions to my grandparents’ homes. Nothing, not even the chills of anxiety the Israelis’ intimidation is sending down my spine, can extinguish the flame that was lit when I decided to return.

She gives me a Visitor Information Form to fill out, sends me to a grid of cold metal benches, separated by thick metal bars from the rest of the people waiting to cross into the West Bank. I don’t know why the Israelis need to know my father’s middle name, the location of my workplace in Michigan, or the address of the second cousin of the brother of the doctor of the shop owner who lived on the same street as the sister of the woman my great-great-grandfather might have met once, but I complete the form. It isn’t long before the rest of my group joins me. And not long after that, interrogation starts.

They take J. first. I am silently praying that she can stay strong, because I know she doesn’t know what to expect. Almost an hour later, she emerges from the tiny room, shaking, wiping tears from her eyes. They yelled at her. Accused her of lying. Told her she could be arrested. She is terrified, but she kept her composure. Already, I am full of this strange but familiar combination of rage and pride, the internal swell and crash of injustice and resistance, of indignity and resilience, of being Palestinian.

They call each of our names. They are the hardest on our boys. A. is shuttled between three different rooms, screamed at and threatened by three different officers. T., who has been leading delegations to Palestine for twenty years, warned us while we were still on the bus leaving Jordan: “Stay calm, don’t let them get to you.” We are trying. We are laughing, joking, and playing games in the waiting area as the minutes tick by, as one by one, we are asked the same questions and the Israelis get the same answers. We wait, and talk, and dream of Palestine. We wait.

A baby-faced boy dressed in olive green, with a rifle slung across his shoulders, chooses to sit in the waiting area with us instead of taking C. to the interrogation rooms. “I’m sorry about this,” I hear him say. “I’m sorry you have to go through this.”

“I don’t even understand why we’re doing this, to be honest.”

“I’m 20. This is only my second week in the IDF.”

I sigh. He’s my age; seems like a sweet kid. But this is Israeli occupation, so because he is Jewish and we are Palestinian, he holds the gun and asks the questions. We can do nothing but wait.

(When it is time for iftar, for Muslims to break their daily fast during Ramadan, Baby Face sneaks N. and R. a bottle of water. We do not see him again.)

They take J. again; the same narrow-eyed woman beckons impatiently. “You know, you’re scaring her,” T. tells her.

The Israeli woman rolls her eyes, turns around. “That’s not us. That’s her personal experience. That’s personal, if someone is scared.”

We have been detained at the Israeli border crossing for hours, interrogated, accused of crimes, lied to, and threatened. There are men with guns casually wandering back and forth. The lines at the gates fill and empty, fill and empty, as we watch, waiting to be granted permission from military occupiers to enter our own homeland. That’s personal.

It is 8:30 by the time my name is called last and frankly, I’m wondering what took them so long. The woman with flat blond hair, the one who made J. cry, beckons me to follow her into a tiny room. I wink at my friends as I leave our waiting area.

She is coldly professional. I am polite. “Have a seat.” “Thank you.”

“This will be quick and easy,” she says. Great.

“What is the purpose of your visit?”

“What is the group you are with?”

“What will you be doing?”

“Where will you be staying?”

“Will you be going anywhere else?”

“Will you be going to Ramallah?”

“Nablus?”

“Jenin?”

“Will you be going to any refugee camps?”

“Have your leaders told you to say any specific information?”

“Was there anywhere else they said they might go?”

“Who do you know in Israel?”

“What are you doing here?”

My heart is pounding but I smile, answer calmly. Tourism; a Christian youth group; visiting holy sites; Jerusalem; maybe Bethlehem—you know, holy sites—So you’re Christian?—Yes—That’s personal; I don’t know; I don’t know; no; no; not that I know of; nobody; excuse me ma’am but what are YOU doing here? Did your great-grandparents walk this earth? Did your grandfather tell you the exact location of the fig tree he planted as a child? What are YOU doing here? Is this your home, your history? Didn’t think so.

“Are you sure,” she asks, “because the consequences depend on your answers.”

I’m sure.

I am dismissed, told to stand outside with three other travelers. The blonde woman mutters to a stern-looking man, who instructs us to cross to the other side of the gate, where we cannot see or hear the other members of our group. He points for us to sit. So we sit. And we wait.

T. wanders back to our side, now with a grey sweatshirt on over the Bedouin-via-China dress she bought in Petra. “I think they’re going to deny our entry.”

I am staring down at a spot on the tile floor, a speck missed by the Black man who pushed the cleaning machine around us earlier. I know how Israel treats its African asylum seekers, and it doesn’t escape my notice that the white, European Israelis hold positions of relative power while every Black person I see has been cleaning. We have been sitting on the same metal bench, separated from the rest of our group, for at least an hour. Nobody has told us what is going on. The Israeli officer, who seems to have nothing to do but sit and watch us, spoke only to tell us not to talk to each other, the note in her voice too harsh not to defy—of course we talk to each other. We make sure she hears us laugh. Every small act of defiance feels like resistance to this occupation.

We are still waiting. T. and J. drift back and forth. They are calling the State Department, the Consulate General, waiting for our paperwork, waiting for what? It’s cold inside the Allenby border crossing, and we are tired. The Israelis eventually offer us cheap snacks. How benevolent, how generous they are.

Since I heard we may be denied entry, I am curled in my metal seat, refusing to let the words settle.

I knew before I boarded a plane to Amman that the Israeli border control could simply decide, for any or no reason, not to let me into Palestine. This is the reason I am careful in everything I do, careful to make sure I am never photographed, that I am un-google-able, that my name is not associated with Palestine solidarity activism in any way. I know they harass activists. They harass everybody. I avoid cameras and journalists. I know I am overly paranoid, but staying as anonymous as possible is just a precaution; it can’t hurt, and it sets my father’s mind at ease, as he worries constantly that even my modest activism will get me in trouble. I knew, but I didn’t think I had much to worry about. I expected questioning; I expected to be detained. This much is standard. To be denied entry is extreme, but not unheard of. So I worry, and I wait.

And I wait. The border crossing is still open, and we see a few families pass, a few single men. We are still separated from the rest of our group and from any access to information about why this is taking so long. There is nothing to do but try to make light of the dread, the weight of anxiety, the uncertainty simmering.

Finally, a young woman with a stud in her nose approaches, holding a stack of passports. N. trails behind her, catches my eye, shakes her head. Mouths the words “we’re not going.”

The Israeli woman clutches the stack of American passports, calls out a few names. Tells them they are going with her to get their luggage. Tells the rest of us to wait for our passports. More officers follow, holding our passports hostage, tell us to collect our bags & that we’re leaving. Not leaving the freezing, hostile border crossing to enter the holy land, but leaving through the door we entered from, leaving back to the no-man’s-land between the West Bank and Jordan. “You’re leaving.”

At this point, deportation doesn’t come as much of a surprise. As the words settle, as yet another thin, blonde Israeli woman approaches with my passport, J. emerges from the other side of the gate, biting her nails.

“We’re banned for five years,” she says.

Five years.

I stop breathing.

Banned from the place my grandparents were born, that I’ve heard endless stories and seen countless photos of, that I’ve dreamed of returning to. Forbidden to see the holy land for five years, a sentence handed down arbitrarily by bored officers who don’t know and don’t care what this means. They are laughing, flirting, leaning back in their chairs, killing time until they get off work, when they can travel freely wherever they want within historic Palestine. Our devastation is nothing to them.

I collect my bags. Later, in a hotel in Amman, I will find that the Israelis have searched my luggage and neatly folded all of my clothing, arranged my t-shirts and bras. The woman returns my passport, opened to page 9 to reveal a new scar.

Entry Denied. Not one but two ugly rectangular red stamps on a formerly clean page of my passport.

Entry Denied.

Five hours of waiting, of interrogation, of reassuring each other the border closes soon, they can’t keep us here forever, they just want to scare us, this is normal. Three hours is nothing. Four, average. Five, entry denied.

Banned. From my own homeland. For five years.

Standing on the street waiting for a bus to take us back to Jordan, I unwrap a piece of gum to mask the bitter taste rising in the back of my throat. A man in a plaid blue shirt and jeans lifts a semiautomatic rifle as he sees me move. Clicks the safety off. I snap a photo, trying to be discreet, as he stands with his finger on the trigger. Not discreet enough. He turns his eyes on me.

Suddenly two men appear on either side of me, speaking Hebrew-accented Arabic, switching to English when they see my blank stare. “Get your passport. Come with me. Give me the cell phone.”

I wait. “Why? Can you tell me what the problem is?” As if I don’t know the problem is the photo, the problem is the potential of sharing Israel’s brutality with the world with a click of a button.

“The security guard gonna ask you a few questions.”

I’m too tired to argue, so I let them lead me away, tell them “I’m sorry, I didn’t know I wasn’t allowed to take a photo, it’s just that I’ve just never seen anything like that in America.”

“Okay, erase the photo.”

“You’re holding my phone. You erase the photo.” He does. “Maybe you took a video too?”

“You’re holding my phone. If I took a video, you’d see it there.”

He thanks me, and in some bizarre attempt to ease the tension, casually asks “So, you going back to Jordan?”

Something in me snaps.

Of course I’m going back to Jordan. Where else am I supposed to go? You and your people just TOLD me I had to go back to Jordan. Because of you—

T. grabs my arm, pulls me away; “stay calm, don’t let them get to you,” murmured in my ear for the thousandth time today.

The man thanks me again with a smirk. I can do nothing but stare back at him.

The next few hours are surreal, blurred memory of chaos and calm. We are silent in our devastation as the reality of what has just happened settles; we are shaking with anger, jaws aching from holding back furious tears; we are finally crying, trying to console each other, realizing some of us may never see our elderly grandparents in Palestine again. The Jordanian tour bus wants to charge us $300 for the drive from the Israeli border across no-man’s-land back to Jordan—hardly more than one mile. We need new Jordanian visas to reenter, though we were only out beyond Jordan’s borders for a few hours. The Jordanians check our passports; we wait; they check our luggage; we wait. Chaos and calm. Rage and disbelief. Exile and acceptance.

Eventually, the Jordanian officers show some sympathy, and taxis arrive to take us back to Amman. At some point during the hour’s drive, to break the heaviest silence I have ever felt, H. points out at some distant hills. “Hatha Amman?” Our driver jerks his lead to the left, “la2, Amman hon.” Amman is over there. And on the right, where she pointed? “Hatha Falasteen.” We are so close, separated from home by just a few miles. Minutes away, but it will be years before any of us can return.

In Amman, we flip through Arabic television channels, desperate for news. Though I can’t understand a word of the anchor’s formal Arabic, I recognize images of Palestine. A photo of a teenage boy wearing a baseball cap flashes across the screen, followed by footage of protests. Muhammad Abu Khdeir has been kidnapped and murdered by Jewish settlers. Israeli soldiers are shooting at protestors in Ramallah and Jerusalem. They have begun airstrikes over the Gaza Strip. It is now 3:00 in the morning, and I am exhausted, struggling to understand; struggling to carry the weight of exile, the burden of my Palestinian blood.

As bombs fall over Gaza, and keffiya-clad youth throw stones at their occupiers, my bones ache to be across the border. To be home.

Amanda Michelle

Amanda Michelle is a third-generation Palestinian-American and a student in Michigan studying political science and sociology.

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71 Responses

  1. just on August 30, 2014, 1:28 pm

    A really well told account of Israeli brutality and excess.

    So the folks that were ‘explaining away’ the Israelis treatment of Dina Shehadeh, another American, are sure to come out and explain this treatment, too…

    “T. wanders back to our side, now with a grey sweatshirt on over the Bedouin-via-China dress she bought in Petra. “I think they’re going to deny our entry.”

    I am staring down at a spot on the tile floor, a speck missed by the Black man who pushed the cleaning machine around us earlier. I know how Israel treats its African asylum seekers, and it doesn’t escape my notice that the white, European Israelis hold positions of relative power while every Black person I see has been cleaning

    is very moving, but what is most horrendous is that you and the others were denied entry because of your heritage. To add further insult to your injury, then you are “Banned. From my own homeland. For five years.”

    Every American should read this. Every Congressperson should hear yours and others testimony. Israel should be severely sanctioned by our nation.

    Thanks Amanda.

  2. Betsy on August 30, 2014, 1:54 pm

    Amanda — thank you for writing this. It is a devastating picture of the violence that US tax dollars fund. As Just says “Every American should read this”. Thank you for your strength in enduring this outrageous injustice, and your strength to tell the story. May your voice be heard across this country. May we finally wake up.

  3. chocopie on August 30, 2014, 2:49 pm

    Amazing piece of writing.

    Shows too what a crapshoot it all is, and trying to maintain anonymity online doesn’t even help. I guess the randomness of the deportations is one of the ways Israel discourages most people of Palestinian heritage from even attempting to enter. My college-aged daughter reversed her plan to study abroad at Birzeit because a deportation would have messed up her academic progress and delayed her graduation. Israel’s policies interfere with academic freedom for Palestinians and, for now, BDS is the way forward on that front.

    Just don’t give up, Amanda Michelle. You can do a lot from the outside. The only thing Israel hates more than a Palestinian is an educated, law-abiding, outspoken Palestinian, Israel’s Kryptonite.

  4. fredvern on August 30, 2014, 2:55 pm

    Amanda – EVERY country controls its borders. Your grandfather’s birthplace and your American citizenship notwithstanding, you do not possess an automatic right to enter anywhere you choose. No violence (apart from psychological) was done to you, unlike say the 200,000+ casualties to date in Syria from sectarian violence including many tens of thousands of Palestinians. While in Amman did you attempt to make contact with them or visit the refugee camps north of there? Perhaps you could have attempted to enter Saudi Arabia – guess not, Christians are not allowed to enter unless they have a work permit and are not allowed any public worship. Why did some of your group (which you say was largely made up of Christians of Palestinian heritage) get through and you did not – it wasn’t because of your “Palestinianhood,” since some got in and some didn’t. Maybe Israel just didn’t want to deal with another faux victim in waiting.

    • annie on August 30, 2014, 3:02 pm

      Amanda – EVERY country controls its borders.

      fred, the Allenby Bridge is not on israel’s border.

    • just on August 30, 2014, 3:50 pm

      ” Maybe Israel just didn’t want to deal with another faux victim in waiting.”

      What a terrible, rotten, and depraved thing to say.

      Sounds to me from your entire comment that you don’t know what you are talking about– or you are defending Israeli bs.

    • chocopie on August 30, 2014, 4:09 pm

      That’s not Israel’s border. If Israel even has borders.

      They don’t have to deny admission to all Palestinians. Just denying a percentage is effective to deter others who can’t absorb the expense/time/psychological burden of being turned back.

      Israel could of course set up a system whereby potential visitors could apply for and either receive or be denied entrance visas before appearing in person at a crossing/entrance point. You’d think they’d do it for citizens of their “closest ally.” Israel won’t do that of course because it would create a transparency that they dread. They prefer to harass, humiliate, and deport Palestinians because they know Palestinians have an unbreakable tie to the same land and that makes Zionists seethe with jealousy and hatred.

      • annie on August 30, 2014, 5:44 pm

        Israel could of course set up a system whereby potential visitors could apply for and either receive….

        chocopie, israel has no right to set up any kind of system to determine who should be allowed into palestine. that’s for palestinians to decide.

    • Peter in SF on August 30, 2014, 4:57 pm

      fredvern, to say “you do not possess an automatic right to enter anywhere you choose” is missing the point. Amanda is a U.S. citizen, and these border guards are employees of the country that is the #1 recipient of U.S. foreign aid. Why do we pay the Israelis so much if they treat us this way when we try to visit an Israeli-occupied area, even if it’s for the purpose of seeing where a grandparent used to live? And then the contrast with Israeli officials constantly promoting what they call “Birthright” trips to Israel for young Americans who are of Jewish ancestry but may or may not have any ancestors who lived in Israel. AND don’t forget that the Israelis are pushing for an agreement with the U.S. for visa-free tourist travel (with much allowance for “security” exceptions for Americans entering Israel): what do you think of that, after reading Amanda’s story?

      • just on August 30, 2014, 5:53 pm

        Entry into a Israel or the OPT granted to any American (or Europeans) because of their religious background and denied to another American because of their REAL roots in the land is so completely insane.

        See why apartheid and the declaration of a ‘Democratic Jewish State for Jews only’ does. not. work. and should never receive our support?

        It’s a twisted mentality that thinks that this is about anything other than IsrBS.

    • Light on August 30, 2014, 5:22 pm

      “EVERY country controls its borders.”

      Israel has never declared it’s borders.
      The West Bank is occupied territory.
      Rationalize all you want, it’s discrimination.

    • ckg on August 30, 2014, 9:37 pm

      fredvern says “EVERY country controls its borders.”

      Just how is the Allenby Bridge over the Jordan River between Jordan and the West Bank part of Israel’s borders? If you admit that is Israel’s border, then you admit that the West Bank is Israel, that is, Apartheid Israel where ethnocracy rules. Thank you for your admission.

    • Another Steve on August 31, 2014, 1:33 pm

      “Amanda – EVERY country controls its borders.”

      Tell that to the Palestinians.

    • weiss on August 31, 2014, 6:46 pm

      Another faux victim in waiting?

      One would expect more sound judgement by a Red-Neck from Mississippi…

      Your SADISTIC and uncivil Fox News Hasbara Bullet Points are yet another tool of Fascism gone wild in Israel, the US and on the Far Right of the political spectrum.

      This was an American Citizen being denied entry based on a Racist & Supremacist Ideology.

      And you wonder why the US refuses to grant Israel entry into the Visa Waiver Program…

      Only a Fascist would gleefully support this type of Genocidal behavior.

      You are an EMBARRASSMENT to ALL Jews, myself included…

  5. piotr on August 30, 2014, 3:40 pm

    Visa info of Saudi Arabia: “Business visas are available if you can find a company in the Kingdom to sponsor you for one and pay the rather stiff application fees. Once you’re in, you’re in and the Kingdom is your oyster, except for the Muslim-only zones of Mecca and Madinah. Contrary to popular belief, business visitors do not need an exit visa, that only applies for long-term work visas. And if your wastah (connections) are strong enough, anything is possible: I’ve met single women and Jews in the Kingdom on these visas.”

    Tourist visa requires a paperwork from a Saudi travel company. Women under 30 only with a husband or a brother. No limitations concerning the religion anywhere in the visa application.

    It is telling that Israeli defenders have to give an example of one of the most undemocratic countries in the world, with big majority of undemocratic countries being much easier to visit. I read a story written by a guy who bicycled from Europe to China through Turkey, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Iran, Turkmenistan etc., perhaps because of Silk Road tradition (lacking in Israel) there were rather few hustles. When they were in Iran, an American member of the group was denied visa to Turkmenistan, so he had to fly to Uzbekistan and wait for the others there.

    Every country can control who is allowed to enter, but Israel is arguably most arbitrary and mean spirited in the way it is done.

  6. MHughes976 on August 30, 2014, 4:58 pm

    Well, Amanda, anyone would think from your attitude that you thought you had a birthright in the Holy Land.

    • just on August 30, 2014, 5:05 pm

      good one, MH976.

      Really good one.

      • MHughes976 on August 30, 2014, 5:30 pm

        I surely felt that the immigration officer detected that thought in Amanda and decided, for good and all, to disabuse her of it.

  7. Kay24 on August 30, 2014, 5:38 pm

    Amanda, it is such a shame you had to go through this kind of humiliation and interrogation.
    This sounds very much like a brutal police state, and not a democratic ally of the US.
    After all that grilling, you were turned away. It is unfortunate.

    Please do other American Arabs and Palestinians a big favor by writing to your congress people, and also to others like Barbara Boxer, who is pushing hard for Israelis to enter our country, with easy exit visas. We should treat other nations like they treat us, and in this case Israel has treated our citizens like dirt. Even the State Department has warned Americans to be careful about the arrogant Israeli officials and their harsh interrogations, at Ben Gurion.

    They take our aid, weapons, and are like parasites feeding off it’s host, but treat US tax payers like garbage.

    • Mike_Konrad on August 30, 2014, 6:37 pm

      Amanda, it is such a shame you had to go through this kind of humiliation and interrogation. This sounds very much like a brutal police state, and not a democratic ally of the US. After all that grilling, you were turned away. It is unfortunate. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2014/08/palestinian-visiting-palestine.html/comment-page-1#comment-706706

      Israel has genuine security concerns, but there is NO reason an innocent party should allow him/herself to be treated as a criminal.

      Be polite.

      Just say.

      This is my name

      This is my occupation (do not list place or location)

      This is my passport #

      I will be visiting some general areas.

      Give them nothing more.

      Ask them for a warrant of a court order if they want more information.

      DO NOT raise your voice.

      DO NOT be impolite

      Just refuse to play the game.

      They are counting on your desperation. Do not reward them with info.

      The cycle has to be broken.

      It will take a generation until the info they have now is out of date.

    • ckg on August 30, 2014, 9:53 pm

      Amanda– Mike_Konrad thinks the solution is to expel Palestinians from their homeland. He is just a very confused individual.

  8. Mike_Konrad on August 30, 2014, 6:26 pm

    This situation is a comedy of errors.

    Number one: If Israel is “controlling her borders” then Israel should admit that the Jordan River is her border, and Israel has NO INTENTION of a two-state solution.

    I could live with that. I do support Israel, but Israel should admit it rather than putting on a charade that Israel is working towards a two-state solution.

    Again, I am not opposed to Israel from River to the Sea, I admit it.

    The second fault is with the Palestinians who visit.

    Why do they give the Israelis any information at all? This is all put in a database and used to crosscheck with others. Miss Michelle was not caught because of information on the internet – she said she made sure there was no incriminating internet information.

    Michelle was caught because someone else – eager to be allowed in – listed her as a friend.

    Bingo! She was caught.

    Basically, nothing should be given but name, occupation (baker, student, engineer), and passport number. Nothing. If they refuse you, then so be it.

    If they ask, “What towns will you be seeing,” Give general answers. “BirZeit, Ramallah.” and stop there. Do not elaborate. Say you are on vacation; and will go where the wind blows. If you are with a tour, answer similarly.

    After a while, it will get out that NO Arab is being allowed in; and Israel will be embarrassed.

    What Israel is using is Kafkaesque police state methodology. They have created an information matrix, No one is allowed to move unless they “collaborate” with information.

    Do not give it to them.

    They have enough info for a decade or so. Do not give them the information.

    Every bit of info: Your father’s name. Where was your grandfather born?, your grandmother?, your uncle’s name?, goes into the matrix.

    Do not give them one bit of info.

    Be polite. Very polite.

    Madam officer of the IDF, there is no need for you to know my uncle’s name. I am rather harmless.

    Sir, officer of the IDF, my grandfather’s birthplace is immaterial. I cannot give.

    “WE WILL NOT LET YOU IN.”

    “That is your choice, officer.”

    Do not give them one bit of info.

    I support Israel strongly, but you are going about this the wrong way. They now have a matrix of information on every Arab in the USA. Something that is none of their business.

    If you ever want to see the area, you have to stop giving them the info.

    Do not lie. Just do not give it to them. It will take a generation for what they have now to age out of usefulness. Until then, by telling them your father, they can track your father, and his children in the USA for another generation.

    Do not give them anything.

    Name, occupation (not location) and passport #. If asked, just a general area where you will visit.

    Complain to your congressman upon return.

    I love Israel, and the Palestinians here are to blame.

    Yes, this will mean large scale refusal at first. Suck it up.

    • just on August 30, 2014, 10:00 pm

      “After a while, it will get out that NO Arab is being allowed in; and Israel will be embarrassed.”

      It’s already happened and Israel never gets “embarrassed”!

      “I love Israel, and the Palestinians here are to blame.”

      Oh, “the Palestinians here”, there and everywhere are to blame for Israel’s horrible policies?

      “Yes, this will mean large scale refusal at first. Suck it up.”

      There is and has been “large scale refusal” for a long time.

      Your final directive is appalling.

    • amigo on August 31, 2014, 11:30 am

      “Number one: If Israel is “controlling her borders” then Israel should admit that the Jordan River is her border, and Israel has NO INTENTION of a two-state solution. – ” MK

      They already have,

      “a. “The Jordan river will be the permanent eastern border of the State of Israel.”

      b. “Jerusalem is the eternal, united capital of the State of Israel and only of Israel. The government will flatly reject Palestinian proposals to divide Jerusalem”

      c. “The Government of Israel flatly rejects the establishment of a Palestinian Arab state west of the Jordan river.”

      d. “The Jewish communities in Judea, Samaria and Gaza are the realization of Zionist values. Settlement of the land is a clear expression of the unassailable right of the Jewish people to the Land of Israel and constitutes an important asset in the defense of the vital interests of the State of Israel. The Likud will continue to strengthen and develop these communities and will prevent their uprooting.”
      – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2011/11/netanyahu%E2%80%99s-party-platform-flatly-rejects-establishment-of-palestinian-state.html#sthash.prnjkBju.dpuf

      How much clearer can they be.

  9. philweiss on August 30, 2014, 8:59 pm

    Beautifully told story, thank you Amanda.
    As I read it, I reflected on the planeloads of Jewish American young people on Birthright trips getting to go to their “homeland” without any of this pettifogging racist tyranny. They have no problem; they are welcomed. Does anybody really need any more evidence of what is wrong with this society? Liberal Zionists, doing anything about Amanda’s horror story?

  10. ckg on August 31, 2014, 12:37 am

    Amanda, thank you for contributing to MW. You are an excellent writer and I wish that you contribute more in the future.

  11. Walid on August 31, 2014, 3:09 am

    Another macabre episode straight out of the twilight zone for American-Palestinians with the full knowledge and consent of the USA. If the US has no respect for its native born citizens of Palestinian roots, how can one expect a better treatment of these people from the depraved Zionists? This story comes at the heel of the one of Tareq that was savagely beaten.

  12. JeffB on August 31, 2014, 4:25 am

    @Amanda —

    Sorry to hear about that. I truly hate the petty harassment that Israel engages in at all levels.

    _____

    As for the discussion of Allenby Bridge, Allenby Bridge is Area-C. At this point Area-C is de-facto though not de-jure annexed. Which is not to say that Israel might not at a future date relinquish part or all of Area-C it, but what’s going on in Area-C is not occupation but internal development and management.

    • Shmuel on August 31, 2014, 5:09 am

      what’s going on in Area-C is not occupation but internal development and management.

      That would make the differential treatment of Palestinians in that area analogous to apartheid (or “de-facto” apartheid, if you prefer) rather than administration of an occupied population supposedly denied civil and other rights pending a political solution.

      • JeffB on August 31, 2014, 10:02 am

        @Shmuel

        The 300k Palestinians living in Area-C are current hostile to their government I think the right analogy is a non-integrated minority. But yes I think the resolution for them needs to be that they migrate to Area-A or become Israeli citizens legally. You can see citizenship playing out in Jerusalem where the Palestinian population is finally realizing that their situation is permanent and agreeing to become Israeli citizens rather than pretending their lives are governed by an imaginary state of Palestine. It took 33 years but it is finally happening. The same thing will happen when Israel formally annexes Area-C and offers citizenship.

      • Walid on August 31, 2014, 10:20 am

        Greetings, Shmuel, glad to see you back. With the new Mondo, it’s hard to follow where new posts are being made.

      • Shmuel on August 31, 2014, 10:39 am

        … when Israel formally annexes Area-C and offers citizenship

        Ah, the joys of de-facto annexation — like that old Israeli ad for women’s underwear: “You’ll have it on, but you’ll feel like you don’t.”

      • Shmuel on August 31, 2014, 10:40 am

        Thanks, Walid.

      • just on August 31, 2014, 10:44 am

        It is nice to “see” you again Shmuel.

      • Shmuel on August 31, 2014, 12:05 pm

        It is nice to “see” you again Shmuel.

        And you, Just :-)

      • James North on August 31, 2014, 4:47 pm

        Shmuel: We’ve missed you — and your calm, incisive humane dissections of Israeli injustice.

      • Shmuel on August 31, 2014, 5:00 pm

        Thanks, James.

      • annie on August 31, 2014, 5:34 pm

        shmuel ;) let me add my name to the list of those who welcome you back. it’s been too long.

      • tree on August 31, 2014, 10:18 pm

        The 300k Palestinians living in Area-C are current hostile to their government I think the right analogy is a non-integrated minority.

        Since they had no vote and no say in “their government”(since you mean the Israeli government) for the last 47 years, based solely on the fact that they are not Jewish, then apartheid is in fact the operative word here., despite Jeff’s latest attempt at victim blaming.

        And being a “non-integrated minority” that is currently “hostile” to “their government” is a classic Catch 22. Since the Palestinians in the West Bank have no say in ‘their government” and have no civil rights as well, it is entirely natural to be “hostile” to such a government. When they cease to be hostile to having no rights, they might then qualify as Jeff’s “integrated minority” that could be given citizenship, but then, if they are willing to have no rights, there would be no need for Israel to give them any, would there?

        That’s some Catch.

        The beatings will continue until morale improves.

        P.S. Add me to the long list of those happy to see you here, Shmuel, although I hope its not for lack of current employment.

      • tree on August 31, 2014, 10:20 pm

        Cr*p. Need edit function! Only first paragraph of my comment above is JeffB’s quote . The rest is mine despite the misplaced italics.

      • Shmuel on September 1, 2014, 4:17 am

        Thanks annie and tree.

        @tree, work’s fine. It’s my level of anger and sadness that have come down enough to allow me to comment again.

      • just on September 1, 2014, 8:36 am

        Shmuel– I think there are very many all around the world that are angry. sad and keeping company with you.

        I know I am.

        Sometimes you just have to hug yourself to make sure that you are not alone.

    • justicewillprevail on August 31, 2014, 2:57 pm

      “internal development and management”

      Ha ha, trust old jeff to turn up with his zio translator. A handy guide to redefining those embarrassing words like occupation, apartheid and racism, all of which Israel excels in. We’ll just call them some bureaucratic obfuscatory jargon, and hey presto, no occupation, apartheid, racism, dispossession or neo fascism anywhere. Lol. Pull the other one, pedant.

    • pjdude on August 31, 2014, 11:45 pm

      um no its occupation. that israel claims its theirs doesn’t change the legal facts.

    • talknic on September 1, 2014, 7:00 am

      @ JeffB “Allenby Bridge is Area-C. At this point Area-C is de-facto though not de-jure annexed. Which is not to say that Israel might not at a future date relinquish part or all of Area-C it, but what’s going on in Area-C is not occupation but internal development and management”

      UNSC res 476 says your spouting bullsh*t buster!

      • Pamela Olson on September 3, 2014, 11:31 pm

        “what’s going on in Area-C is not occupation but internal development and management”

        No, officer, I didn’t steal that car. I was just aiding in its location reassignment and ownership modification.

        No, your honor, I did not kill that man and chop up his corpse. I was assisting him in life extraction and sanitary limb disassembly.

        I could do this all day…

  13. just on August 31, 2014, 8:09 am

    “Detroit— During a speech at the annual convention for the Islamic Society of North America on Saturday, former President Jimmy Carter said peace between Jews and Muslims in the Middle East is a dream he still prays can be achieved.

    “You can’t bring peace to the Middle East without justice and human rights for the Palestinians,” Carter told a packed hall at Cobo Center. “When my prayers are answered and we have peace in that Holy Land then the Israelis and all their neighbors will be blessed to live in peace and prosperity.”

    Carter spoke mainly about preventing violence against women and girls, encouraging all present to fight for equal rights for both sexes.

    “One thing that all men can do is to be sure that you treat your wife as you would like to be treated yourself,” Carter said, amid cheers. “My hope is all Christians, all Muslims, all people of other faiths, even those who don’t have one, will join in this crusade to end the plight of our wives, our sisters, our daughters.”

    He spoke at length about prostitution, rape on college campuses, female genital mutilation and parents in some countries strangling their daughters because they want to have sons. The audience of men, women and children were rapt and responded with applause when he quoted verses from the Quran and the Bible illustrating the equality of the sexes.

    “Men and women are created equally from one soul,” Carter said. “If you were taught by your parents or you believe you’re superior to your wife just because you’re a man, Allah says your wrong.”……..”

    http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140830/METRO01/308300048/Ex-President-Jimmy-Carter-addresses-Muslim-Americans-fundraiser

    • Citizen on September 2, 2014, 9:34 am

      On Twitter, I saw tweets from American Jews saying the ISNA was a terrorist organization, asking why was Carter speaking at their annual conference? So I pulled up the official US terrorist organization list and the ISNA was not on it. There are Zionist Americans who imply this lie.

      • just on September 3, 2014, 8:45 am

        Yes. I saw at least one article referring to it as Hamas supporting INSA.

        Blatant hasbara infecting the editorial rooms all over.

  14. Basilio on August 31, 2014, 10:55 am

    I am a Palestinian American. I’ve been to Palestine four times in my life. When I first went years and years ago, it was very annoying as it is today, but it was much easier to enter. I went last year for the first time in 13 years. I used the airport. I was kept there for six hours and answered so many questions as calmly and clearly as I could. I didn’t let myself get visibly upset. I try to satisfy their inquiries. I didn’t let myself get upset and was friendly to everyone in the enclosure I was in. I also assumed we were being watched and acted as best and as calm as I could. 6 hours later, they let me in. I was tired. I wasn’t sure if I was going to get in. They asked to see my facebook. I didn’t hesitate. They asked shall we see it as if it was threat, and I calmly opened it. I guess I read what the drill consisted of and did my best to answer. But, look, if you’re an Israeli and you want a visa waiver with the U.S., I don’t support that unless your government stops with this kind of treatment of educated Palestinian Americans who are innocent people. It’s just ridiculous.

    • just on August 31, 2014, 11:26 am

      I am glad that you got in, Basilio.

      With all due respect, I could give a fig whether the Palestinian American was ‘educated’ or not.

      Key word is that they are Americans. I have to believe that it is not only people of Palestinian descent but also those that have any Arab/Iranian/etc roots that they deem unsuitable are blocked from entry.

    • annie on August 31, 2014, 11:59 am

      i’m sorry you had to go thru that basilio. each personal story like this is hard to read.

  15. John Turnbull on August 31, 2014, 11:12 am

    We have far less connection to Palestine than you do, Amanda, so my wife’s denial of entry at the King Hussein wasn’t especially insulting — just absurd. Nothing would have captured the absurdity better than the photograph you took (and the one I was tempted to take) of the jittery guy with the M-16 surveying the bus platform through his orange, mirror sunglasses. His lack of a uniform, his hand-decorated gun, and his mere presence among the blue-uniformed “border” guards made clear how illegitimate the whole settler-Zionist bunch of them really are.

  16. MHughes976 on August 31, 2014, 12:40 pm

    Amanda appropriates some terms we hear from Zionists in this context – dream, exile, return, (ancestral) home etc.. I’d just like to consider how words and symbols can seem to turn things that are in reality the same into things that are different or opposite.
    Amanda’s arrival is of course treated not as a Return but as a dangerous intrusion or a foolish piece of political theatre, to be repelled by interrogators and men with guns, surrounded by symbolism which is as significant as their actual behaviour. Yet her ancestors did live there as much as anyone’s did. When others ‘return to their ancestral home’ their action is treated as so normal, human and beautiful that denying or disliking it would be immoral, near inhuman. Yet in themselves these are just the same actions.
    Dreams and yearnings are taken, when some experience them, to be expressions of the best and noblest side of human nature. Our language – ‘I have a dream!’ – works by treating dreams as beautiful until we are reminded that many of them are frightening and misleading. When others have the same experience we have other words for dream and yearning, like fixation or refusal to move on: so instead of finding admiration for your beautiful nature you are treated like someone in need, at best, of psychotherapy. Yet the experience of very much and painfully wanting something is in itself the same, whoever wants and whatever is wanted. The same whether it’s Amanda, her interrogators or me.
    Religion didn’t come into the dialogue but just to add that when the claim ‘God is on our side’ arises we sometimes react by stressing the faithfulness, commitment and sheer humanity of the believer, so the claim seems noble, rather charming. Sometimes we stress the sheer logical difficulty in showing that God has spoken, so the claim, completely the same in character, seems this time to be arrant superstition and rather ugly.

  17. just on August 31, 2014, 3:52 pm

    I have to share this beautiful story, for Amanda & Basilio and so many others:

    “Palestinians are sentenced to sadness
    Yousef M. Aljamal

    I always wanted to meet my mother’s West Bank family who I had not seen for more than a dozen years. Israel’s policies of separation imposed on the Palestinians in Gaza, where my father was born and where I grew up, and the West Bank, where my mother was born, made it impossible.

    It took my mother 12 years to get a permit to visit her family in the West Bank.

    She was only allowed to go because her eldest brother was dying in hospital, a condition that didn’t apply to the rest of the family. No first-degree relative dying means no permit and thus more forced separation.

    Our family has never been able to gather in one place. Even when my mother went to the West Bank, she could not see all her brothers and sisters. Each time, someone would be missing, someone would be displaced elsewhere.

    Studying in Malaysia and having had my application for an Egyptian visa to go back to Gaza declined, I recently decided to go to Jordan instead. There I could see my relatives in Jordan and my West Bank family, who were supposed to gather to attend my cousin’s wedding.

    But as Gaza was being bombed, and I suffered a grievous loss, it was hardly a celebration.

    The writer (left) with his friend Ayman Shokor who was killed in an Israeli attack in Gaza.

    ….

    “Keep me updated, I will be waiting for you at the arrival hall,” my cousin Ahmed said to me before I took off. “Don’t come on time, I expect some delay,” I replied. I was right. I was held for an hour before I was allowed in to Jordan.

    I had some expired paperwork to enter Jordan that I wanted to renew, but I was told by the Jordanian Embassy in Kuala Lumpur that I didn’t need a visa to get into Jordan, despite my repeated reminders to them that I live in Gaza. I was finally allowed in, to my delight.

    “An hour is nothing,” I said to myself.

    ……….

    Now, for a fact, Ayman has gone, and his smile will be remembered forever. Days after he was killed, his younger brother’s wife gave birth to his first baby boy and they named him after Ayman.

    Another Ayman X, just like my youngest brother Omar, named after his dead older brother, also killed by Israel and who he had never seen.

    The happiness of the wedding was never felt, for Palestinians are sentenced to sadness, the sadness of loss, the sadness of having a family in Gaza which was under constant airstrikes for 51 days by Israel. It is the sadness of Ayman’s grieving mother who lost her son, who had her sweet heart torn out by Israel.

    A very beautiful wedding took place. A very beautiful friend was lost, once and forever.”

    more heartbreak here:

    http://electronicintifada.net/content/palestinians-are-sentenced-sadness/13822?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+electronicIntifadaPalestine+%28Electronic+Intifada+%3A+Palestine+News%29

  18. JeffB on September 1, 2014, 9:19 am

    @tree

    And being a “non-integrated minority” that is currently “hostile” to “their government” is a classic Catch 22. Since the Palestinians in the West Bank have no say in ‘their government” and have no civil rights as well, it is entirely natural to be “hostile” to such a government. When they cease to be hostile to having no rights, they might then qualify as Jeff’s “integrated minority” that could be given citizenship, but then, if they are willing to have no rights, there would be no need for Israel to give them any, would there?

    Remember we are talking Area-C here not the entire West Bank. First off there is no catch-22. I suspect they are going to be given the opportunity for full citizenship during the next generation. Which is what I said. Currently they aren’t being offered that because Israel hasn’t de-jure annexed Area-C. Giving Palestinians in Area-C the vote in Israeli elections would be de-jure annexation. And right now the Palestinians in Area-C are hostile. Certainly if they requested annexation it would be granted and once granted they would be given the vote. Which solves your catch-22.

    For the West Bank Palestinians in general. The problem is more serious because there are far more of them. Were they to offer to become loyal Israelis in exchange for the vote I suspect something would be worked out very quickly. BTW something like this was offered when Sharon was administering the West Bank. At the time he set up village councils which then reported into his bureaucracy for coordination. The Palestinians who agreed to participate were considered collaborators and often killed. The Palestinians have consistently rejected Israeli attempts to give them greater political rights. You have to deal with the reality of the situation that the Palestinian population is obsessed with their anti-colonialist ideology and is perfectly willing to harm their self interest rather than cooperate and compromise.

    • talknic on September 1, 2014, 1:56 pm

      @ JeffB “I suspect they are going to be given the opportunity for full citizenship during the next generation”

      “given”, by a state that does not have sovereignty over the territory? WOW!! Interesting supremacist theory

      “Currently they aren’t being offered that because Israel hasn’t de-jure annexed Area-C.”

      Correct. de jure annexation requires, under customary International Law, the consent of the LEGITIMATE citizens of the territory to be annexed, sans the citizens of “Israel, the Occupying Power”

      Israel has never legally annexed ANY territory it has illegally acquired by war in territory “outside the State of Israel” … “in Palestine”

      “Giving Palestinians in Area-C the vote in Israeli elections would be de-jure annexation”

      No it wouldn’t buster. It would be an illegal act. Illegal is NOT de jure

      ” Certainly if they requested annexation it would be granted and once granted they would be given the vote”

      “if” they requested as they did Jordan But why should or would they? They have a right to their own state in territory which is currently their own. Territory Israel has NO right to!

      “The Palestinians have consistently rejected Israeli attempts to give them greater political rights”

      Of course. Israel has no right to be making illegal offers in non-Israeli territory!

      “You have to deal with the reality of the situation that the Palestinian population is obsessed with their anti-colonialist ideology and is perfectly willing to harm their self interest rather than cooperate and compromise”

      Uh huh. The Palestinians have to forgo their rights and capitulate to the illegal demands of a rogue state in order to get rights from the rogue state.

      Your supremacist theories don’t deal with the reality of the situation. Israel is in breach of the Law and UN Charter and has created so many illegal facts on the ground it has never been able to afford to adhere to the law without going bankrupt.

      The Palestinians ask for their legal rights and they are under no legal obligation what so ever to forgo any their legal rights, even in negotiations.

      Israel MUST negotiate and depend on Palestinian generosity. A generosity Israel has refused time after time, preferring instead to build more and more illegal settlements in non-Israeli territory

      A negotiated agreement is the Jewish state’s only legal way out of the illegal quagmire its leaders deliberately set out to create.

      • JeffB on September 1, 2014, 4:19 pm

        @talknic

        I’m not sure why you keep pushing UN theories around. Yes the UN is a hostile foreign power to Israel and under the UN’s definitions Israel is in violation of many of the UN’s commands. That’s not a disputed fact between you and I. I’m not sure why you keep bring it up.

        In real international law though there isn’t a theory of racial entitlement. All people born in Area-C are legitimate inhabitants of Area-C. One can argue about the people that moved there but there is no argument about those born there. And at this point the born inhabitants are 2::1 Israeli. Of the remaining 1/3rd many of them support the Israeli government and would rather be part of Israel than Palestine (if they were hostile like the inhabitants of Gaza or Area-A they would have been pushed out long ago).

        I’m certainly going to grant the the UN fully supports an anti-self determination program where people are forever enslaved to government they hate because at some point a border was drawn. What they are doing right now in Ukraine arguing that Russians who want to be part of Russia should have to forever answer to the government of Ukraine, or in Iraq where they demand Shia rule over Kurds and Sunnis is fully consistent with their position on Palestine.

        But that’s not international law that is a bastardization of international law as it existed prior to WWII. Israelis along with many other people reject the UN’s pro-slavery position and God bless them for doing that.

      • talknic on September 3, 2014, 1:40 am

        @ JeffB “I’m not sure why you keep pushing UN theories around. “

        Israel agreed to adhere to the UN Charter. Israel hasn’t adhered to the UN Charter, there is a war. The UN has said how the war must end, Israel refuses to comply, preferring to break the law and the basic tenets of Judaism on coveting other folks property, while blatantly lying.

        “Yes the UN is a hostile foreign power to Israel”

        Uh huh. Israel is in breach of the UN Charter. If you break your contract with the gas company, are they ‘hostile’ for issuing you with reminders of your end of the contract? Is the court hostile for sentencing a repeat car thief? You think Israelis are somehow above the law?

        “and under the UN’s definitions Israel is in violation of many of the UN’s commands. That’s not a disputed fact between you and I. I’m not sure why you keep bring it up”

        Because you keep ignoring uncomfortable facts. UNSC resolutions contain how disputes can and should be resolved. Resolve them as required and you have UN support. Ignore them and you get ‘hostile’ reminders. No other country in history has been give as many opportunities to comply with the UN Charter as has Israel has before action has been taken against them.

        “In real international law though there isn’t a theory of racial entitlement”

        Correct.

        “All people born in Area-C are legitimate inhabitants of Area-C.”

        Not if they’re citizens of “Israel, the Occupying Power” .

        “And at this point the born inhabitants are 2::1 Israeli.”

        Exactly. They’re Israeli citizens in non-Israeli territory!

        “Of the remaining 1/3rd many of them support the Israeli government and would rather be part of Israel than Palestine”

        A) They’re Israeli citizens B) It’s not uncommon for people to prefer to be living on their land, even if ruled under illegal Israeli law . Russian Alaskans opted for US citizenship, other wise as Russians, they’d’ve been required to move from Alaska to Russia

        “I’m certainly going to grant the the UN fully supports an anti-self determination program …”

        Why do you need to spout drivel?

        “where people are forever enslaved to government they hate because at some point a border was drawn.”

        The border was proclaimed by the Israeli Government May 15th 1948 and recognized as asked by the Israeli Govt as an independent republic within frontiers approved by the General Assembly of the United Nations in its Resolution of November 29, 1947, and that a provisional government has been charged to assume the rights and duties of government for preserving law and order within the boundaries of Israel, for defending the state against external aggression, and for discharging the obligations of Israel to the other nations of the world in accordance with international law. Israel has not since legally acquired any territory. It has been illegal to ‘acquire’ territory by war (Schwebel, Lauterpacht, Herzog) since at least 1933

        ” What they are doing right now in Ukraine arguing that Russians …. etc etc … But that’s not international law that is a bastardization of international law as it existed prior to WWII. “

        A) You’re spouting more drivel B) The UN is relatively powerless against Russia because Russia has the veto vote on resolutions against Russia. Likewise the UN is relatively powerless to act against Israel for its breaches of the UN Charter while the US protects Israel via the US UNSC veto vote.

        “Israelis along with many other people reject the UN’s pro-slavery position and God bless them for doing that”

        A) You’re spouting nonsense and B) is that the same God who was AWOL during the Holocaust?

    • wes on September 1, 2014, 5:26 pm

      area c ……….no catch 22 but murder 3……….

  19. JeffB on September 1, 2014, 9:21 am

    @pjduge

    um no its occupation. that israel claims its theirs doesn’t change the legal facts.

    An occupation is a temporary government setup by a military over territory it controls but lays no claim to. Is that what you think is happening in Area-C?

    • talknic on September 1, 2014, 1:13 pm

      @ JeffB “An occupation is a temporary government setup by a military over territory it controls but lays no claim to. “

      The actual law

      Laws and Customs of War on Land (Hague IV); October 18, 1907 Art. 42 SECTION III
      “Territory is considered occupied when it is actually placed under the authority of the hostile army. The occupation extends only to the territory where such authority has been established and can be exercised.”

      “Is that what you think is happening in Area-C?”
      Think schmink … Law again UNSC Res 476 http://wp.me/pDB7k-W8

      • JeffB on September 1, 2014, 4:09 pm

        @talknic

        I’m surprised you are using the 1907 laws of war. At least you are using International Law I don’t reject. Yes exactly when it is under the authority of a hostile army. The population of Area-C mostly wants the presence of the IDF. It is a friendly not a hostile army to the inhabitants. The local authorities want the IDF. Ergo no occupation.

        Jerusalem is not part of Area-C and 476 applies to Jerusalem. That being said the population of Jerusalem also is supportive of the IDF. Which means unlike the status in 1980 Jerusalem is not occupied.

      • just on September 1, 2014, 6:41 pm

        The IOF is by definition and by action a HOSTILE ARMY.

        Please provide links for your INSANE claim that ‘The population of Area-C mostly wants the presence of the IDF. It is a friendly not a hostile army to the inhabitants. The local authorities want the IDF. Ergo no occupation.’

      • talknic on September 3, 2014, 2:22 am

        @ JeffB “I’m surprised you are using the 1907 laws of war”

        Why are you surprised? They’re current, further codified under the GCs and Israel obliged itself to adhere to them!

        “At least you are using International Law I don’t reject.”

        But you foolishly try

        “… The population of Area-C mostly wants the presence of the IDF. It is a friendly not a hostile army to the inhabitants. The local authorities want the IDF. Ergo no occupation”

        Apart from you spouting un-substantiated drivel, UNSC res 476 one of UNSC res 252’s eight reminders ” 1. Reaffirms the overriding necessity to end the prolonged occupation of Arab territories occupied by Israel since 1967 , including Jerusalem;”

        “.Jerusalem is not part of Area-C and 476 applies to Jerusalem. That being said the population of Jerusalem also is supportive of the IDF. Which means unlike the status in 1980 Jerusalem is not occupied.”

        Uh huh.
        A) By “the population of Jerusalem” do you include illegal Israelis illegally living there?
        B) UNSC res 476 does not apply only to Jerusalem, it “include”s Jerusalem ” 1. Reaffirms the overriding necessity to end the prolonged occupation of Arab territories occupied by Israel since 1967 , including Jerusalem;”
        C) UNSC Res 1860 Jan 2009 “The Security Council,
        Recalling all of its relevant resolutions, including resolutions 242 (1967), 338 (1973), 1397 (2002), 1515 (2003) and 1850 (2008),
        Stressing that the Gaza Strip constitutes an integral part of the territory occupied in 1967 and will be a part of the Palestinian state,”
        The date of that resolution again, Jan 2009

        Keep digging pal. It’s hilarious watching just how far Israel’s apologists will go. I can’t imagine anyone willingly make such fools of themselves without some Pavlovian reward

  20. JeffB on September 1, 2014, 9:43 pm

    @Just

    Please provide links for your INSANE claim that ‘The population of Area-C mostly wants the presence of the IDF.

    You do know the population of Area-C is 2::1 Israeli Jewish::Palestinian. And among the Palestinians about another 40% are pro the settlement enterprise in terms of cooperating with it (i.e. working in the settlements or working in service industries associated with the settlements). So we are looking at a minimum of 65% support for the IDF and more than likely much higher.

    • just on September 2, 2014, 10:02 am

      Nice links, JeffB. You’re out of your mind if you think that Palestinians support the IOF. Did you even read this via Kate 8/30/14?

      “BETHLEHEM (Ma’an) — As the eyes of the world focused on Gaza in recent months, Israel stepped up a campaign of repression, detentions, and settlement building across the West Bank, the Palestine Liberation Organization said in a report released on Thursday.

      Thirty-two Palestinians were killed by Israeli forces in a two month period beginning on June 13, the report said, and 1,397 Palestinians were injured by Israeli fire.

      During the same period, 1,753 Palestinians were detained — an equivalent of 24 a day — while Israeli forces conducted 1,573 military raids across the West Bank, or an average of 21 a day.”

      more here: http://www.maannews.net/eng/ViewDetails.aspx?ID=724086

      Still flinging poo with reckless abandon. It’s not sticking.

  21. Walid on September 2, 2014, 2:31 am

    From Jeff Blankfort to Jeff B, we’ve come a long way..

  22. Citizen on September 2, 2014, 9:47 am

    Israel could be legally delegitimized by the UN since it has never fulfilled its declared promises subsequent re the Palestinian natives that are part of UN recognition of Israel as a UN member state.

  23. John Fearey on April 12, 2015, 4:20 pm

    Amanda, your story is heartbreaking, infuriating and so well told. It’s also an important record of the smug, thuggish behavior of our alleged ally, Israel. Have you considered lodging a complaint with your congressperson?

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