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Joining up (Tzedek Chicago, and a Judaism beyond nationalism)

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This is part of Marc H. Ellis’s “Exile and the Prophetic” feature for Mondoweiss. To read the entire series visit the archive page.

Sometimes the news is too good to be true. The trauma accumulated over the years makes one pause.

Is it time to take a deep breath and be open to a future you thought closed? At the end of Jewish ethical history as we have known and inherited it, I wonder if I still have the strength – and vision – to be open to a future different than the one contemporary Jewish life presents to the world.

This is how I greet the announcement of a new religious venture, Tzedek Chicago, headed by the rebellious, anti-Zionist and Psalmist, Rabbi Brant Rosen. Truth be told, in my recent conversations with Rabbi Rosen, I knew this was in the works. Nonetheless, the Facebook announcement of the new Jewish religious space took me by surprise.

Initially, I was elated and shared it with my Facebook friends. I promised to join the venture. The next morning, I had second thoughts. At this late date, with the violence and racism of Jewish power I continue to experience in my public and personal life, could this opening be real? Do I want to take another chance?

I doubt I am alone in this elation and hesitancy. Many Jews of Conscience are wary of Jewish symbolism and institutions and for good reason. Even progressive congregations and rabbis have often betrayed us. Shall I – we – venture out once again?

Tzedek Chicago is just beginning. Its unfolding will occur over the coming years. Here is how they describe themselves:

We value…

…a Judaism beyond borders:

We celebrate with a Judaism that builds more bridges, not higher walls. Our community promotes a universalist Jewish identity – one that seeks a greater engagement in the world around us. Within our congregation, we view our diversity as our strength. Membership is not restricted to Jews or those who are partnered with Jews; our community welcomes all who share our values.

We advocate for a world beyond borders and reject the view that any one people, ethnic group or nation is entitled to any part of our world more than any other. Guided by the values in Jewish tradition that bids us to care for the earth that we share with all peoples and all life, we promote personal behaviors and public policies that will ensure preservation of our planet’s natural resources and its survival for future generations.

…a Judaism of solidarity:

We are inspired by prophetic Judaism: our tradition’s sacred imperative to take a stand against the corrupt use of power. We also understand that the Jewish historical legacy as a persecuted people bequeaths to us a responsibility to reject the ways of oppression and stand with the most vulnerable members of our society. We emphasize the Torah’s repeated teachings to stand with the oppressed and to call out the oppressor.

We actively pursue partnerships with local and national organizations and coalitions that combat institutional racism and pursue justice and equity for all. We promote a Judaism rooted in anti-racist values and understand that anti-Semitism is not separate from the systems that perpetuate prejudice and discrimination. As members of a Jewish community, we stand together with all peoples throughout the world who are targeted as “other.”

…a Judaism of nonviolence:

We honor those aspects of our tradition that promote peace and reject the pursuit of war as a solution to our conflicts. We openly disavow those aspects of our religion – and all religions – that promote violence, intolerance and xenophobia.

Our activism is based upon a vision of shared security for the world; we support the practices of nonviolence, civil resistance, diplomacy and human engagement. We take a stand against militarism and colonialism, particularly when it is waged in our name as Jews and Americans.

We oppose all forms of communal, family and interpersonal violence and support organizations working to strengthen community health, and peaceful, supportive coexistence. In all aspects of our communal life, we expect our members to treat each other with respect, engagement, and openness to the differences among us.

…a Judaism of spiritual freedom:

We promote spiritual exploration and encourage our members’ diverse beliefs. Some of our members adhere to more traditional views of the divine while others view God as a human expression of our highest, most transcendent aspirations. Others do not define themselves as religious, but identify with the humanist and cultural aspects of Jewish tradition.

We honor the inherent integrity of all faith traditions and reject all forms of religious exceptionalism. We actively partner with other faith communities in ways that celebrate our shared values and common humanity. In our activism, we actively work for religious freedom in our country and throughout the world.

…a Judaism of equity

In accordance with Torah’s imperative that there should be no needy among us, we work in solidarity with those who assert that poverty has no place in a civilized and moral society – and that all people have the right to safe food and water, safe living spaces, health care and education.

We are committed to transparent and egalitarian governance and decision-making in our congregational life. We value the contributions of all members equally, regardless of age, gender, sexual orientation, wealth or social standing.

…a Judaism beyond nationalism

While we appreciate the important role of the land of Israel in Jewish tradition, liturgy and identity, we do not celebrate the fusing of Judaism with political nationalism. We are non-Zionist, openly acknowledging that the creation of an ethnic Jewish nation state in historic Palestine resulted in an injustice against its indigenous people – an injustice that continues to this day.

We reject any ideology that insists upon exclusive Jewish entitlement to the land, recognizing that it has historically been considered sacred by many faiths and home to a variety of peoples, ethnicities and cultures. We oppose Israel’s ongoing oppression of the Palestinian people and seek a future that includes full civil and human rights for all who live in the land – Jews and non-Jews alike.

Quite a mouthful for sure and certainly beyond the progressive Jewishness that held the dissent redline in Jewish life for the past decades. As Tzedek Chicago’s leader, Rabbi Rosen knows the progressive ropes well. He voluntarily left that scene when the contradictions became too onerous. He could no longer square his Jewish faith with the redlines of Jewish communal life.

We have arrived at the end of Jewish history and now another, prophetic, opportunity presents itself. Life is strange that way. Why worry about a failed future when the abyss we Jews inhabit is so obvious?

So fare forward, Tzedek Chicago. The deep and treacherous Jewish waters you ply are uncharted.

Or are they? Another way of being Jewish in the world is a return to our prophetic origins.

Yes, I hesitate. Yes, I join. As a witness at the end. With hope that there is more.Please consider making a tax-deductible donation to Mondoweiss today.

Marc H. Ellis

Marc H. Ellis is Professor of History and Jewish Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of the Global Prophetic. His latest book is Finding Our Voice: Embodying the Prophetic and Other Misadventures.

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57 Responses

  1. Mooser on July 6, 2015, 3:01 pm

    For G-d’s sake Mr. Ellis, far enough is far enough! Those people are sitting in what look like folding chairs! It looks like they are in a gym or rented room. What’s next, I ask you? Storefronts? Cheap upright pianos, and (ugh) Hammond organs? This is “religion”?

    • amigo on July 6, 2015, 3:58 pm

      “Those people are sitting in what look like folding chairs! It looks like they are in a gym or rented room. What’s next, I ask you?” Mooser.

      I recognise that room.It,s the waiting room outside Adelson,s Casino office where big loser, s wait to discuss how they are going to make good their debt to him.

      Do I get beaten up or do I promise to beat the next Bdser I meet.

      • Mooser on July 6, 2015, 4:41 pm

        Whatever it is, it sure doesn’t look like the bimah at Adas Israel Congregation.
        And that’s a start in the right direction. And there’s no telling where you will end up!

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 11:59 am

        “You mean like this one?”

        Is that supposed to be the set for a human-sacrifice scene in a cheesy sandal-opera? Maybe the Pharaoh’s burial chamber?

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 8:00 pm

        That’s what the photo of Adas Israel reminds me of:

        They’ve got a condo made of stone-ah!

  2. Mooser on July 6, 2015, 3:11 pm

    “Yes, I hesitate. Yes, I join.”

    Hesitate? Yeah, long enough to take a breath, and yell, “Heck yes!”

    Okay, but take warning from our own history, don’t go to any inter-denominational banquets! You never know what they’ll try to feed you.

    • Steve Grover on July 6, 2015, 6:47 pm

      Don’t worry Mooser, I’ll drop in with some Strauss Hummus at one of their Shabbat pot lucks.

      • talknic on July 6, 2015, 8:59 pm

        Trying to earn extra Hasbara bonus points by being a jerk doesn’t generate much kudos

      • Mooser on July 6, 2015, 9:01 pm

        “Don’t worry Mooser, I’ll drop in with some Strauss Hummus at one of their Shabbat pot lucks.”

        In an effort to cause food poisoning in the attendees?

      • Steve Grover on July 6, 2015, 9:16 pm

        Talknic,
        Not seeking kudos. Just tryin’ to figure out what is treyf in that shul. I’ll also bring some Yarden wine in for Kiddush just to be nice.

      • Mooser on July 6, 2015, 11:07 pm

        “Not seeking kudos.”

        We get it “Grober”, you are just determined to live up to your name.

        “Just tryin’ to figure out what is treyf in that shul.”

        What the f–k is it to you, “Grober”? Does your denomination have some inherent ecclesiastical authority over any other Jewish place of worship, or is vandalism or battery what you have in mind?

      • talknic on July 6, 2015, 11:51 pm

        Steve Grover cleverly demonstrates how to be a completely arrogant jerk

      • Steve Grover on July 7, 2015, 12:01 pm

        @mooser
        Your propensity to turn hummus and fine wine into anger, foul language and violence makes you sound like a sociopath.
        @talknic
        Prove it. I’m waiting.

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 12:05 pm

        “Steve Grover cleverly demonstrates how to be a completely arrogant jerk”

        He does seem a tad deficient in Tribal Unity. I got a Merit Badge in Tribal Unity when I was in the Boychik Scouts.

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 12:31 pm

        “Your propensity to turn hummus and fine wine into anger, foul language and violence makes you sound like a sociopath.”

        Right, I’m the one who is already planning to walk in there with re-called Hummus (and lousy wine) hoping to give everybody a stomach-ache.

        But then, I guess you’ve got cases of the re-called Strauss Hummus in your garage, and need to get rid of it.

      • catalan on July 7, 2015, 12:42 pm

        “Your propensity to turn hummus and fine wine into anger, foul language and violence makes you sound like a sociopath. – ”
        Steve,
        He is not a sociopath but just wants to be accepted by his wife and her family/friends. Since Roman days, some Jews have been ashamed of their background. We should have compassion for Mooser. When I lived in Bulgaria, the majority of Jews were like that. I wanted to be Ivan Petrov (John Smith of Bulgaria) but my name and appearance were just too much to blend. It’s sad and informative that so many Jews in this country also feel that way. It shows that the American reality is a lot more hostile to Jews than the politically correct media shows.

      • talknic on July 7, 2015, 1:00 pm

        @ Steve Grover

        LOL You’re already proving it pal.

      • Steve Grover on July 7, 2015, 1:10 pm

        Dybbuk Mooser whatever,
        For your benefit, the brand of Hummus I buy is אחלה (Achla). It is made by Strauss just like Sabra. The stores refer to it as Strauss because the label is in Hebrew. It is an excellent product. Their Tehina is excellent as well and I will bring that as well to Tzedek Chicago. I will bring a couple of bottles of Yarden Gewurztraminer as a pairing. This is an excellent pairing. The flowery and spicy notes of this Yarden wine really compliments the flavors of pita and hummus.
        לחיים (L’Chaim)

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 3:14 pm

        “He is not a sociopath but just wants to be accepted by his wife and her family/friends.”

        Well, for the sake of tribal unity, will you put in a good word for me “catalan”? It’s a hell of a thing, after a third of a Century, not to be accepted by my wife and her family/friends. (Look, let’s not go overboard here, while I do contend they accepted me, I would be the last to deny that they may be good and goddamed tired of me by now. That’s different)

        But it’s true, my Gentile Mother-in-Law was very hard about her daughter’s marriage to a Jewish man, when my wife-to-be told her she said:
        “So, you’re marrying a Jewish man! Why don’t you come live in my house?”
        “But Mom” she said “Your house isn’t that big, there won’t be room for all of us”
        “There will be” she said grimly. “We’ll build on an addition!”

        They did, too, later we got our own place.

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 3:19 pm

        “Since Roman days, some Jews have been ashamed of their background.”

        Okay “catalan” you got me there. I had to wear a toga once for a school play and hated it! I always felt like my background was showing.

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 3:35 pm

        “Since Roman days, some Jews have been ashamed of their background.”

        C’mon “catalan”, cut it out! What on earth is wrong with you? Why the hell do you guys keep admitting stuff like that, that Jews are full of shame about themselves and their religion, to the Gentiles? They will take advantage of us unless they think out Tribal Unity is strong!

        But just between you and me, “catty”, why do you think we are cursed with this self-revulsion and as “Grober” and “Hophmi” note, our religion is chock full o nuts full of desire to hurt our fellow Jews? Why do you think that is, “catalan”?

        Must be a hell of a thing for the Zionists, now that I think about it, never knowing when a self-hater or traitor would turn up, doubting Tribal Unity all the time, and ever on the look-out for kapos and mosers. Gosh, do other religions have that problem? Just asking!

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 3:48 pm

        “For your benefit..”

        You, “Steve Grober” and “my benefit”? Sorry pal, got plenty of oxy-morons around, don’t need more, thanks anyway.

      • catalan on July 7, 2015, 3:57 pm

        “But just between you and me, “catty”, why do you think we are cursed with this self-revulsion – ” Mooser
        It’s because we are a rootless people. We want to belong, yet out parents told us we are different. We are conflicted, I wouldn’t call it self-revulsion. Since life is a relatively short kind of deal we each have to find own way to deal with this condition. For me, seeing how much some people dislike Jews, all this talk of they run the country, they are rich bankers, etc makes me happy to be Jewish. If I can irritate the people who search for a uniform world, for an all encompassing ideology, national interest, Marxism, then I am happy. I want to be different. I want the world to be colorful, crazy and not a grey left wing or right wing or Muslim paradise. I want to be the thorn.

      • echinococcus on July 7, 2015, 4:44 pm

        If I can irritate the people who search for a uniform world, for an all encompassing ideology, national interest, Marxism, then I am happy. I want to be different. I want the world to be colorful, crazy and not a grey left wing or right wing or Muslim paradise. I want to be the thorn.

        And that’s why you are being the limp rag with total and totalitarian Zionist conformity.

      • echinococcus on July 7, 2015, 4:59 pm

        Re Grover and his Zionist entity-produced or connected gifts:
        It really confirms the observation that no one with average intelligence or above is left to work for Zionist propaganda, even now that the Ministry is paying.
        That “Grober” can’t even understand that such an anti-Zionist congregation will certainly scrupulously adhere to the boycott of any and all Zionist entity-connected products.
        He cannot even realize that they are in all likelihood people with discerning taste, therefore unable to keep down sh***y-tasting stuff made by barbarians.

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 7:23 pm

        “And that’s why you are being the limp rag with total and totalitarian Zionist conformity.”

        Don’t you see, he’s a brave Jewish Marxism fighter! Cause if there’s one thing Jews have always hated and will have absolutely nothing to do with, it’s socialism or communism. There’s no point of contact between the two!

        No, a Jew will have no truck with socialism or communism! We are always on the side of the all-rightnik!

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 7:33 pm

        “It’s because we are a rootless people. We want to belong….”

        “Catalan” I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: When I was a fisherman, I used to literally dream about flycasting the stream you come from. One where they rise to the bait every time.

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 7:41 pm

        “He cannot even realize that they are in all likelihood people with discerning taste, therefore unable to keep down sh***y-tasting stuff made by barbarians.”

        “Grober” will go ten blocks out of his way to avoid the place. What is he going to do, go in and throw his weight around, after announcing he is going to do so on a website? That was his big effort, one or two nasty cracks, and he’s done.

        Than again, you never know, he may have to go there for one of his kids weddings, or a grandchild’s Bar or Bat Mitzvah.

        “…such an anti-Zionist congregation…”

        Not so fast! “Non-Zionist” is as far as they have gotten so far, and it might be the term they stick with. So far, unless I missed something, it’s “non-zionist”
        And if “non-ZIonist” means you won’t constantly be dunned, or the object of a sales pitch every time you attend Tzedek, or aren’t expected to bow and scrape before squatters, it might be enough.

      • echinococcus on July 7, 2015, 8:05 pm

        Mooser,

        You probably hit the head square on the nail with that Socialism story. Good nose. The best description for Cat’s game would be in his alleged own dialect: “Djudió que se enturca por irse al cal sin amartías” (literally “Jew who dresses as a Turk to go the synagogue without sin” but of course the literal sense doesn’t express it at all.)

      • catalan on July 7, 2015, 8:34 pm

        “Cause if there’s one thing Jews have always hated and will have absolutely nothing to do with, it’s socialism or communism. “- Mooser
        In my limited tiny experience, a person’s ideology rarely has something to do with the stuff a human being is made of. You can be of any political view and still be made of the real stuff. What is the real stuff, you ask? I don’t know, it’s some kind of substance. It can show in crisis or under pressure.
        All this socialism communism stuff is nonsense and vanity. Are you the person people go to when they are in trouble and need actions not words? Would you die for something? Are you in peace or troubled and anxious? That’s the deeper stuff. You are too hung up on the demagoguery, masks, spiderwebs, illusions.

      • RoHa on July 7, 2015, 9:06 pm

        “We want to belong, yet out parents told us we are different.”

        And then, when you become parents, you tell your children they are different, and so keep passing the nonsense along.

        If you want a colourful world, don’t confine them in this “Jewish identity”.

      • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 9:40 pm

        “It’s because we are a rootless people. We want to belong, yet out parents told us we are different. We are conflicted, I wouldn’t call it self-revulsion. Since life is a relatively short kind of deal we each have to find own way to deal with this condition.”

        Well, so much for the supportive embrace of the Jewish community, so much for the steadying effect of Jewish family life, the centering power of Jewish communal rites and ritual. Nope, “Catalan” has finally confessed, being Jewish is a short, nasty, brutish, and isolated struggle, and you can’t trust anybody not even your own parents. Hobbs on the cob! And it leaves you with the heeby-jeebies!

        “Catalan” don’t do this! I’m trying to spread the ‘happy-days-in-Anatefska, first-act-of-Fiddler’ tribal unity message and here you are with this ‘what-makes-Portnoy-call-it-sleep’ complaint.

      • oldgeezer on July 8, 2015, 12:22 am

        @catalan
        ” It shows that the American reality is a lot more hostile to Jews than the politically correct media shows. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/07/joining-chicago-nationalism#comment-149187

        I am so sorry to hear that. Of course I’m not as I’m merely being facetious.

        What is the definition of this “American Reality” from your viewpoint and in what way have Jewish people been denied equitable participation in life within the US. I will specify in my query that you can’t go back more than say 45 years in providing an answer. I don’t think it’s any surprise to anyone that a large number of minorities were disadvantaged in the US in the first half, give or take, of the 20th century. You can go back as far as you want of course but without justification of how the experience was unique to Jews and not experienced by Blacks, Catholics, Slavs, Asians your points become less significant.

        As a ps there is still a legacy from that era which needs to be addressed for those who were victimized by it

      • oldgeezer on July 8, 2015, 12:42 am

        @catalan
        It’s because we are a rootless people. We want to belong, yet out parents told us we are different. We are conflicted, I wouldn’t call it self-revulsion. Since life is a relatively short kind of deal we each have to find own way to deal with this condition. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/07/joining-chicago-nationalism/comment-page-1#comment-779889

        Frankly I consider your parents abusive. That probably explains a lot about you quite frankly.

        You are too hung up on the demagoguery, masks, spiderwebs, illusions. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/07/joining-chicago-nationalism/comment-page-1#comment-779889

        Pot, kettle. Demagoguery? Stop watching fox. Really.

        I want the world to be colorful, crazy and not a grey left wing or right wing or Muslim paradise. I want to be the thorn. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/07/joining-chicago-nationalism/comment-page-1#comment-779889

        I do too.I love multiculturalism. I love to draw on alternate views as I form and reform through life. I guess sameness is comforting to those who lack the ability to question their beliefs and/or accept change.

        Those are fine words you use yet you support what is essentially a theocratic state. At best an ethnocracy. And inarguably nowhere near a democracy.

        How do you square the circle?

        “I want to be the thorn. ”

        Just as you show a misunderstanding of everything you have talked about so far you clearly confuse being a thorn with being an object of ridicule and mere annoyance.

        You once stated you came here to learn and hone your debating skills. I would sincerely suggest you find an ‘intro to’ website or perhaps a logic and debating for dummies book as your first step.

        If you were a fish you’ve been out of water so long your brain would be suffering from oxygen deprivation. And that said perhaps it’s actually the cause. Either way there is a complete disconnect between your stated values and your opinions on current events and situations.

      • Mooser on July 8, 2015, 12:56 pm

        Doesn’t anybody get it? That’s a brilliant (okay, moronic) inversion of the classic Jewish joke about the son telling his Mom about marrying a non-Jewish girl and Mom says “come live in my house” and son says “But there isn’t room!” and Mom says (grimly): “There will be, I’m going home and put my head in the oven!”

        Oh never mind, I showed it to my wife, and she said it wasn’t that funny. She should know.

      • catalan on July 8, 2015, 1:06 pm

        “Those are fine words you use yet you support what is essentially a theocratic state. At best an ethnocracy. And inarguably nowhere near a democracy. – Oldgeezer”
        I don’t view the political system as an end in itself. Rather, the purpose of a state is to provide a reasonable amount of happiness (if you go with Aristotle). The constituents of this happiness are different for the different classes – the working glass is always going to want bread and circus, the elites will read Plutarch and listen to Bach. I think that by most measures – happiness/human development, Israel achieves this goal, to a lesser degree for its Arab citizens but still not bad even for them.
        The political system is different depending on culture and history of the place. You have Islamic states, Japan, African states, Russia, they all have different systems, many not democratic, some very ethnocratic or theocratic or outright dictatorships.
        I think that each system can work. Thus, the benevelont oligarchy/aristocracy of the United States is doing fine. Likewise, Putin’s Russia – similar to the Romans under the Julio Claudians is OK too. Egypt appears to be better off under some type of autocratic rule as well. I don’t see history as a one way vector toward democracy. Rather, the political systems adapt to the needs of the people.
        That’s why I don’t judge Israel as harshly. That said, I very much disagree with their policies in the West Bank and believe that the Palestinians there should have the same rights as everyone else.
        The one size fits all disaster is on display in Europe, where a socialist system is doing fantastic in the Netherlands and terrible in Greece due the completely different cultures.

      • justicewillprevail on July 8, 2015, 1:49 pm

        As superficial an ‘analysis’ of political systems as you could possibly get, all done as another exercise in excuse-making for israel. None of it bears up under the most cursory examination. Why I am not surprised.

      • lysias on July 8, 2015, 2:30 pm

        Rather, the purpose of a state is to provide a reasonable amount of happiness (if you go with Aristotle).

        Read Max Blumenthal’s new book, and you’ll see how absurd it is to talk about Israel providing “a reasonable amount of happiness” for the population of Gaza.

      • amigo on July 8, 2015, 2:36 pm

        “That’s why I don’t judge Israel as harshly. That said, I very much disagree with their policies in the West Bank and believe that the Palestinians there should have the same rights as everyone else.” ” Catalan.

        You mean the Palestinians should have no rights.

        In case that confuses your 4x graduate degree mind —“everyone else ” are illegal squatters and have no rights and should go back to Israel (Sans Frontiere) proper.Wherever the f–k that is.

      • Mooser on July 8, 2015, 4:52 pm

        ” It shows that the American reality is a lot more hostile to Jews than the politically correct media shows.”

        Yes, I thought the extensive digital re-coloring of the victims in the Charleston Synagogue was going way too far.

  3. JLewisDickerson on July 6, 2015, 5:05 pm

    RE: “the rebellious, anti-Zionist and Psalmist, Rabbi Brant Rosen” ~ Marc Ellis

    MY COMMENT: Not to mention courageous!

  4. Mooser on July 6, 2015, 6:08 pm

    Perhaps Phillip Munger will turn out to be the Harry T. Burleigh of Tzedek Chicago! They will need music.

    • Don on July 6, 2015, 7:33 pm

      did you say Music, Mooser?

      The music’s already been written…by a nice Jewish boy…maybe Neil was prophetic …

      • Mooser on July 6, 2015, 11:12 pm

        Oh, you know how I am about this. I think it should be drawn from a wide variety of sources, and a lot of effort should go into it.

      • Mooser on July 8, 2015, 2:51 pm

        Certainly Mr. Diamond’s hit could point us in one good direction. If not the primary one. Wait, here’s a good example of a song by “a nice Jewish girl from Brooklyn” which has here been re-purposed very effectively That’s the idea.

  5. annie on July 6, 2015, 8:13 pm

    thanks Marc. i wish Tzedek Chicago, Rabbi Rosen, you, and everyone involved with building Tzedek Chicago, a joyful journey towards success and fulfillment —

    • Mooser on July 6, 2015, 8:55 pm

      I don’t know, but I have a funny feeling they will need a lot more chairs soon. A lot.

  6. Citizen on July 7, 2015, 7:08 am

    Sure a mouthful string of high abstract ideals–wonder who wrote it? Got everything in it but the proverbial kitchen sink. Reads like an introduction to Humanism.

    • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 12:11 pm

      “Got everything in it but the proverbial kitchen sink”

      Well, so does my house. Anyway, here, I think, is the money shot:

      “we do not celebrate the fusing of Judaism with political nationalism. We are non-Zionist…”

      A promise not to be dunned constantly for Zionism! The relief will be palpable.

  7. CigarGod on July 7, 2015, 9:16 am

    In a counting house somewhere:
    “Uh oh, seems like a lot of energy in this one. Better infiltrate and co-op, quick. Here’s a million bucks.”

  8. David Green on July 7, 2015, 9:49 am

    Brant Rosen has spoken a couple of times down here in Champaign where I live. He sets a high standard both intellectually and morally, and matches it with a calm demeanor which is of enormous value in this difficult work. He has great political instincts, and we should trust those, as well as our own–to each his or her own in this ongoing struggle.

    • Mooser on July 7, 2015, 12:26 pm

      Never underestimate the ability of Americans to get out from under something which has become oppressive, when an alternative is provided! Especially if it is a matter of voluntary religious-style association, a right in the US which is pretty inviolable. What will Zionist institutions do, file a suit to make people come back? Ask for an injunction? Oh, I think I know what the grobers the machers will do, but I’ll let them say it. They will.

    • Steve Grover on January 4, 2016, 11:33 am

      David Green
      You call Annie an intellectually lazy person and praise Brant Rosen. You’re a fool!

      • Mooser on January 4, 2016, 7:07 pm

        “David Green
        You call Annie an intellectually lazy person and praise Brant Rosen. You’re a fool!”

        Quick, Stevie! Maybe it’s not too late to send those e-mails damning Green! Zionist omnipotence never fails!

  9. Steve Grover on January 4, 2016, 8:05 pm

    Mooser,
    You need to get to Tzedek Chicago so Brant Rosen can give you the honor of the Kohen Aliya when they read Mondoweiss as their Torah.

    • Mooser on January 4, 2016, 10:38 pm

      “David Green
      You call Annie an intellectually lazy person and praise Brant Rosen. You’re a fool!”

      Uh, Steve, are you aware the comment from Green you excoriate is from the summer of last year? As is the article. But you go ahead and fulminate.

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