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Pro-Israel groups are trying to split the Women’s March with a Zionist alternative

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A host of interconnected Zionist advocacy groups has launched an all-out assault on the annual Women’s March.

Selective and misleading allegations of anti-Semitism-by-association with Louis Farrakhan, who is not involved in coordinating the Women’s March, combined with straightforward Israeli war propaganda, are being used to undermine the largest single-day march in American history and the progressive values it represents. Perhaps most perniciously, WoMen4All, a bizarre rip-off of the Women’s March, has set up an alternate network of “sister marches” to split the Women’s March. The capitalization is designed to signify that men are included, accommodating the right-wing trope that presumes men should feel excluded from supporting feminist groups.

WoMen4All is dedicated largely to condemning Palestinian rights and promoting Zionism by mixing naked Israeli war propaganda with standard feminist causes, such as enacting the Equal Rights Amendment. The group’s mission statement notes, “We are leftists, we are progressives, we are Democrats, we are Zionists who believe a safe, secure and sovereign Israel must exist as antisemitism is too great a threat to Jews worldwide.” [emphasis in original]

WoMen4All’s leadership includes a blatantly anti-Muslim individual and its website supports organizations that allege Islam is an inherently dangerous and intolerant religion alongside right-wing pro-Israel lobbying groups. It claims that the movement to boycott Israel until Palestinian rights are respected is anti-Semitic and by extension that the Women’s March is anti-Semitic because Sarsour and others have condemned Zionism; WoMen4All absolves Zionism as simply a movement to protect the Jewish people, citing right-wing pro-Israel advocacy groups like CAMERA. And, it relays op-eds defending the indiscriminate mass shootings of fleeing Palestinian protesters at the Gaza border.

Beyond condemning of the movement to boycott Israel in its organizational description, WoMen4All heavily emphasizes Zionism in almost all of its materials. WoMen4All is an affiliate of March On, a coalition created by a disgruntled former leader of the Women’s March who resigned over internal organizing issues related to mutual accusations of racism, to split the Women’s March.

WoMen4All has also issued a petition calling on Democrats and Republicans to endorse a definition of anti-Semitism written to conflate support for Palestinian rights with Jew-hatred.

Charges of antisemitism

Since the march came to prominence as the largest single-day demonstration in American history following Trump’s inauguration in 2017, Zionist groups have been attacking the organization based around highly publicized allegations that the organizers are anti-Semites, primarily over ties between Tamika Mallory and Linda Sarsour to Louis Farrakhan.

However, the Women’s March has vocally disavowed Farrakhan’s statement about Jews, LGBT people, and women, and has issued repeated statements condemning anti-Semitism as one of many forms of unjustifiable oppression. Mallory has continued to stand by her stance that she applauds what Farrakhan as done in the black community but is opposed to his anti-Semitism, most recently on The View on Monday. Also yesterday, the Women’s March added three Jewish women to its steering committee.

Farrakhan has made undeniably bigoted statements about Jews and others throughout his tenure as leader of the Nation of Islam, a radical black quasi-religious organization that fuses black nationalism, mythology about African-American community figures, and some Islamic traditions. His organization has a strong presence among black grassroots organizing, making it virtually impossible for anyone involved in black community work to avoid rubbing shoulders with him or his supporters. Indeed, in 2005, President Obama was pictured meeting with Mr. Farrakhan during an event organized by the Congressional Black Caucus. The associations are not limited to critics of Israel; Charles Rangel, one of the longest-standing incumbent politicians in the House of Representatives, was a staunch supporter of Israel during his tenure — and a decades-old associate of Farrakhan.

Split over Zionism

But the Zionist organizations’ complaints go further than Farrakhan. A community advisory sent out by the Jewish Community Relations Council condemns the march because “American Jewish women and their allies should not have to feel torn between their identities as proud Jews and Zionists and as Americans advocating for justice and equality”. Zioness, a poorly astroturfed “progressive” Zionist organization founded by the head of another organization tasked with filing frivolous lawsuits against professors involved in Palestinian rights advocacy and education, similarly called off its participation in the March, citing the “anti-Semitism” of the March’s co-chairs. Though Zioness did not specify, separate statements made it clear that the “anti-Semitism” in question included Sarsour’s condemnation of Israeli oppression and those who enable it. And A Wider Bridge, a group that uses Israel’s gay community to sanitize Israeli occupation among liberals and has a history of issuing bogus anti-Semitism accusations against LGBT groups that support Palestine, will join the JCRC and Zioness for a propaganda panel dedicated to promoting the voices of Jewish women, which all three groups conflate with promoting Zionism.

These efforts are a destructive consequence of the slow but steady divorce between American progressives and Israel. Pro-Israel Jewish groups have repeatedly attacked leftists and progressives for slowly recognizing that Zionism is a right-wing movement dedicated to racial separatism and the mass expulsion and containment of large numbers of people based on their ethnicity, through the use of brutal — and illegal — military force sponsored by American tax dollars. In only the last month, pro-Israel groups have campaigned to fire or publicly dishonor prominent black leftists over Palestine, from getting Marc Lamont Hill fired from CNN for defending Palestinian freedom “from the river to the sea,” to pressuring the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute into rescinding an award to legendary Civil Rights Era academic Angela Davis over her support for boycotting Israel. Similarly, activist and author of The Color Purple Alice Walker’s endorsement of a fringe conspiracy theorist who trafficks in thinly veiled anti-Jewish tropes — a bizarre and regrettable endorsement that is several years old — has suddenly resurfaced to be weaponized to discredit her work entirely, including her long-standing endorsement of the boycott of Israel.

And yet, despite these attacks on progressive campaigns, Zionists still demand a seat at the table. That Israel is becoming an increasingly partisan matter under the leadership of Netanyahu in Israel and Trump in the United States threatens the “special relationship” that has previously secured bipartisan support for Israel. Having long ensured the complete erasure of Palestine from progressive politics through manipulative accusations of anti-Semitism, Zionist groups appear unprepared to weather the reality of increasingly visible support for Palestine among left-leaning initiatives. The election of several endorsers of the boycott of Israel to the House of Representatives, the ironclad relationship between Netanyahu and Trump Republicans and their mutual support for walling off outsiders, the passage of laws to defend Israel that straightforwardly conflict with the First Amendment, and high-profile campus and community activism emphasizing the ties between marginalized US-based constituencies and Palestinians, have made Zionism a liability.

While the majority of pro-Israel lobbying organizations take on a decidedly and unambiguously right-wing, militaristic, and pro-Trump character following Netanyahu’s example, apologists for Israel have also taken to directly attacking or undermining the Women’s March, Black Lives Matter, the International Women’s Strike, the Chicago Dyke March, the Democratic Socialists of America, the candidacies of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib, and Ilhan Omar, the Bernie Sanders movement, leftist professors, and Occupy Wall Street largely or wholly over campaigns, statements, or actions revolving around advocacy for Palestinian rights.

Notably, Sarsour, Angela Davis, and others vocally criticized Israel’s oppression of the Palestinians during speeches in 2016 and 2017. The International Women’s Strike, a leftist rally held in the wake of the Women’s March in March of 2017, was unambiguously anti-Zionist. Incidentally, the Women’s March initially received heavy criticism from opponents of Zionism at its start over rumors that the March leadership was purposely watering down support for Palestinian rights, and because some of the March’s speakers in 2016 and 2017 were pro-Israel advocates.

Several authors in the pages of Mondoweiss have debated the desirability of having Zionists at left-wing marches. While some emphasize that the presence of Zionist advocacy violates anti-racism norms among leftists, others note the importance of a broad-based coalition and the difficult reality that racism, including Zionism, is normal in American society. But while activists may disagree, the Zionist organizations themselves have ironically become some of the strongest adherents of the former position, vocally and strenuously choosing to pick Israel over progressive politics when faced with a choice. Already, Israeli diplomats are discouraging Jewish groups from mentioning Israel when discussing matters with black groups, and Jewish donors are increasingly hesitant to fund Israel-related advocacy.

Amith Gupta

Amith Gupta is a recent graduate of the New York University School of Law, where he was an Institute for International Law and Justice Scholar. He is a Palestine solidarity activist.

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38 Responses

  1. wondering jew on January 15, 2019, 11:44 pm

    Is the writer blaming the New York times or somebody else for interviewing Alice Walker. The writer seems to be suggesting that there were nefarious reasons for interviewing her. I never considered this question.

    I’m not a person who joins organizations so the coalition building spirit that needs to take place in these situations is foreign to my temperament.

    Sarsour’s antiZionism makes me cringe, but hey, she’s Palestinian, of course she’s antiZionist. As far as Farrakhan and his admirer, I don’t think much can be added at this time. Regarding Farrakhan I tend to either freeze my reaction or over react, so it’s not really useful, enough has been written about an important historical figure like Farrakhan. I hope he doesn’t last on the scene much longer.

    When the delegitimization campaign began it was soon clear that there were two modes of reaction: (we) Israel needs to do better or Israel needs to argue better. those who were hopeful in 93 to 95, tend towards the former, but most Israel supporters have relegated the hope of 93 to 95 to the dustbin and attribute that frame of mind to the bleeding heart utopian unicorn kumbaya people. the israel needs to argue better is split into two: we need to argue with a switchblade (butch cassidy: rules in a knife fight?) we need to argue effectively. unfortunately the switchblade arguers seem to have the upper hand.

    i think that israel is making too much out of bds, inflating it, because the politicians are always running for office and they feed the voters bds and say “vote for me. i am a proud israeli against bds”. i do not know enough about economics to really comment on its effectiveness, but there seems to be some politics involved by those who are fighting it so vociferously.

    economically and socially Jewish women of ashkenazi background face entirely different set of problems compared to women of color and thus the tendency of colored women to put the Jewish grouping as something outside the realm that they are fighting. this is in fact historically and sociologically obtuse. the history of white suppression of people of color in america and elsewhere is highly intertwined with the history of european suppression of ashkenazi jews and it reflects a type of ignorance when this intersection is not recognized. the slow awakening of the women’s march to the facts of that intersection is better than no awakening. but it is still a slow awakening.

    • annie on January 16, 2019, 12:54 pm

      Is the writer blaming the New York times or somebody else for interviewing Alice Walker. The writer seems to be suggesting that there were nefarious reasons for interviewing her.

      the nyt is such a shoddy paper. i mean, what is the chance the person who did the interview would have done any research on alice walker before interviewing her? probably zilch. the very idea the intrviewer would have ever even heard about that scandal from a few years ago? totally zilch. i’m sure it was a total coincidence walker was ask about her books at the same time all this handwringing has been going on in the jewish community about their relationship with black community over palestine. all this effort to take down progressive black poeple, there’s no way anyone would actually coordinate that. that’s insane.

      you believe in coincidences don’t you yonah?

      the very idea that anyone in the pro israel community would try to totally ruin a persons reputation, that’s anti semitic. i’m sure it’s some trope.

      • hophmi on January 16, 2019, 5:24 pm

        We really ruined her by forcing her to promote David Ickes’ book and by forcing her to make antisemitics statement about the Talmud years ago. That was a bang-up job by us.

      • Talkback on January 17, 2019, 11:18 am

        hophmi: “We really ruined her by forcing her to promote David Ickes’ book and by forcing her to make antisemitics statement about the Talmud years ago. That was a bang-up job by us.”

        Until now Xpat couldn’t show me one sentence from Icke or Walker that defames Jews as such. It seems to be a bang-up job. Which wouldn’t be a surprise since ‘you’ do it all the time a pathetic substitute for having no counter argument. Does that make you feel at least a tiny bit intelligent?

      • hophmi on January 17, 2019, 1:09 pm

        “Until now Xpat couldn’t show me one sentence from Icke or Walker that defames Jews as such”

        No, it’s totally not antisemitic to raise conspiracies about the Rothschilds or to write a book that blames a Jew for the Holocaust or to write poems suggesting the Jews want to enslave Gentiles.

        Typical antisemitic Mondowhackjob.

      • Mooser on January 17, 2019, 6:46 pm

        “No, it’s totally not antisemitic to raise conspiracies about the Rothschilds or to write a book that blames a Jew for the Holocaust or to write poems suggesting the Jews want to enslave Gentiles.” “Hophmi”

        “Hophmi”, let’s play fair. You know the rules: Nobody gets to say anything worse about Jews than what we say about them.

      • Talkback on January 18, 2019, 5:12 am

        Mooser: “Nobody gets to say anything worse about Jews than what we say about them.”

        What does even that mean? That I have to be Jewish, again? Don’t do that to me, Mooser. I fought so hard to achieve personal freedom and become an individual.

    • Mooser on January 16, 2019, 12:59 pm

      “the history of white suppression of people of color in america and elsewhere is highly intertwined with the history of european suppression of ashkenazi jews”

      Huh? That is ridiculous, “Yonah”. So the European Christians in America really wanted to suppress Jews, but people of color and women were the only ones they could get hold of? Ho-kay.

      Besides, aren’t YOU the one who claims it is essential that Jews be granted a ‘separate’ existence, like the people of color, or Native Americans. Isn’t that what you want? It’s “essential”.

    • Mooser on January 16, 2019, 1:30 pm

      “economically and socially Jewish women of ashkenazi background face entirely different set of problems compared to women of color” “Yonah”

      There couldn’t possibly be any overlap or congruity between the two. Unthinkable. You, as a Jewish man, know this oh so well.

    • genesto on January 17, 2019, 6:46 pm

      To answer your question, from what I’ve read, BDS has impacted less than 1% of the Israeli economy. The effectiveness of BDS, to date at least, has been much more psychological than economic.

  2. Marnie on January 16, 2019, 12:14 am

    What a joke. Yet another attempt at the zionist enterprise to co-opt a project they don’t believe in or care about because they make everything all about them. “We are leftists, we are zionists” is all you need to know this is nothing but bullshit and something that posers like these will never grasp – a copy (and bad ones are all they are capable of) is never as good as the original. Self-appointed voice of conservative white women meghan mccain’s ears were on fire when attempting to bully and malign a powerful woman who won’t respond to her attempted shaming and kept her clarity and cool when faced with mccain, who looks like any white woman whose lies instigated a lynch mob.

    • Marnie on January 16, 2019, 3:44 am

      I did not include the powerful woman’s name – Tamika Mallory. She persisted and was spectacular. Something I don’t get, maybe too old for the BS, is that mccain kept demanding that Ms. Mallory ‘condemn’ L. Farrakan’s statements. What would that do for mccain? Or anyone else. That is a game Ms. Mallory refused to play and mccain looked exactly like what she is, a self-righteous loud mouth with years of entitlement and getting her way on florid display.

  3. RoHa on January 16, 2019, 1:42 am

    “Islam is an inherently dangerous and intolerant religion ”

    This may be true, but it is no justification for Zionism.

    • Talkback on January 16, 2019, 8:46 am

      Imagine someone would claim that Judaism is an “inherently dangerous and intolerant religion” and how these pro-Israel groups would react.

      • Boris on January 16, 2019, 9:03 am

        >>> Imagine someone …

        This would just not be based on facts.

      • Talkback on January 16, 2019, 9:20 am

        ROFL. Start here:
        http://daatemet.org.il/en/question/gentiles/

        And then read these books:
        Jewish Fundamentalism in Israel
        Reckless Rites: Purim and the Legacy of Jewish Violence

        Remember. You brought it up, not me. But I will gladly help you to open Pandora’s box.

      • Misterioso on January 16, 2019, 9:38 am

        “Islam is an inherently dangerous and intolerant religion ”
        Nonsense!!

        To quote Rabbi Menachem Froman, chief rabbi of the West Bank settlement of Tekoa, and a champion of inter-religious reconciliation: “[E]very Jew who learns the writings of the great sages – who, at the head of them all stands Maimonides – knows that our great thinkers wrote in the Arabic language, lived in Islamic states and participated with the great Muslim thinkers in the effort to explain the words of God, according to the paths of the sages and amidst the difficult bloody battles that we have had since the beginning of Zionism with the Muslims…. We know… that the war between the Jews and the Muslims is the work of the cursed devil. We know that Islam is named after peace.” (Haaretz, September 18, 2006)

        __________________________________________________________________________

        “So, what did the Muslims do for the Jews? – How Islam Saved the Jews.”
        Lecture by Professor David J Wasserstein.

        David J Wasserstein is the Eugene Greener Jr. Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University. This article is adapted from last week’s [May, 2012] Jordan Lectures in Comparative Religion at the School of Oriental and African Studies.

        Excerpt:
        “Islam saved Jewry. This is an unpopular, discomforting claim in the modern world. But it is a historical truth. The argument for it is double. First, in 570 CE, when the Prophet Mohammad was born, the Jews and Judaism were on the way to oblivion. And second, the coming of Islam saved them, providing a new context in which they not only survived, but flourished, laying foundations for subsequent Jewish cultural prosperity – also in Christendom – through the medieval period into the modern world.

        “By the fourth century, Christianity had become the dominant religion in the Roman Empire. One aspect of this success was opposition to rival faiths, including Judaism, along with massive conversion of members of such faiths, sometimes by force, to Christianity. Much of our testimony about Jewish existence in the Roman Empire from this time on consists of accounts of conversions.

        “Great and permanent reductions in numbers through conversion, between the fourth and the seventh centuries, brought with them a gradual but relentless whittling away of the status, rights, social and economic existence, and religious and cultural life of Jews all over the Roman Empire.”

        “Had Islam not come along, Jewry in the west would have declined to disappearance and Jewry in the east would have become just another oriental cult. This went along with the centuries-long military and political struggle with Persia. As a tiny element in the Christian world, the Jews should not have been affected much by this broad, political issue. Yet it affected them critically, because the Persian Empire at this time included Babylon – now Iraq – at the time home to the world’s greatest concentration of Jews.

        “Here also were the greatest centres of Jewish intellectual life. The most important single work of Jewish cultural creativity in over 3,000 years, apart from the Bible itself – the Talmud – came into being in Babylon. The struggle between Persia and Byzantium, in our period, led increasingly to a separation between Jews under Byzantine, Christian rule and Jews under Persian rule. Beyond all this, the Jews who lived under Christian rule seemed to have lost the knowledge of their own culturally specific languages – Hebrew and Aramaic – and to have taken on the use of Latin or Greek or other non-Jewish, local, languages. This in turn must have meant that they also lost access to the central literary works of Jewish culture – the Torah, Mishnah, poetry, midrash, even liturgy.”

      • Yitzgood on January 16, 2019, 11:00 am
      • gamal on January 16, 2019, 12:28 pm

        “and Jews under Persian rule”

        and that second temple built in 500’s bce, was built with Persian money, the Persian state maintained all religious buildings according to their adherents specifications at state expense, and by Egyptian engineers the only people capable of bringing off the rather grand design the Jews favoured, so it’s not like we are bretheren or anything, the empire is so disappointing, as are Zionists and shrill with all its Sunni Vs Shia, Arab Vs Kurd, Muslim vs Jews, it’s like the Imperial Ubermensch is nothing but a bitter fucked up and demented wanker intent on dragging us all into its internal conniptions …but it’s time to grow up and stop dreaming America, time to step up and be cool, don’t worry we have anthem and flags…

        https://youtu.be/XPDdO7VgJds

      • Mooser on January 16, 2019, 12:49 pm

        “To quote Rabbi Menachem Froman, chief rabbi of the West Bank settlement of Tekoa, and a champion of inter-religious reconciliation”

        You bet! More than anything, he wants the Palestinians reconciled to the theft of their country.

      • Mooser on January 16, 2019, 12:52 pm

        “Speaking of Reckless Rites”

        Reckless? Very. Poppy-seeds can produce false positives in drug tests.

      • eljay on January 16, 2019, 1:24 pm

        || Yitzgood: Speaking of Reckless Rites

        https://www.commentarymagazine.com/articles/reckless-rites-by-elliot-horowitz/ ||

        … If there is any legacy at all, it is the legacy of Jewish non-violence—as both Jews and Christians were always quite aware, the Jews generally with pride in their higher moral standards, the Gentiles more often with disdain for the Jews’ lack of physicality and manliness. …

        Zionism changed all that: It convinced the majority of Jews to take great pride in lower moral standards, and it showed Gentiles that Jews could commit (war) crimes and do “necessary evil” as well as anyone else.

    • genesto on January 17, 2019, 6:55 pm

      Suggesting that Islam may be an inherently intolerant religion displays a great deal of ignorance. Certain fundamentalist versions of the religion can be considered intolerant. But assigning this claim to the entire religion promotes Islamophobia and its terrible consequences. All the world’s major religions have intolerant, as well as universally inclusive, versions.

  4. Kathleen on January 16, 2019, 11:48 am

    “These efforts are a destructive consequence of the slow but steady divorce between American progressives and Israel. Pro-Israel Jewish groups have repeatedly attacked leftists and progressives for slowly recognizing that Zionism is a right-wing movement dedicated to racial separatism and the mass expulsion and containment of large numbers of people based on their ethnicity, through the use of brutal — and illegal — military force sponsored by American tax dollars. In only the last month, pro-Israel groups have campaigned to fire or publicly dishonor prominent black leftists over Palestine, from getting Marc Lamont Hill fired from CNN for defending Palestinian freedom “from the river to the sea,” to pressuring the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute into rescinding an award to legendary Civil Rights Era academic Angela Davis over her support for boycotting Israel. Similarly, activist and author of The Color Purple Alice Walker’s endorsement of a fringe conspiracy theorist who trafficks in thinly veiled anti-Jewish tropes — a bizarre and regrettable endorsement that is several years old — has suddenly resurfaced to be weaponized to discredit her work entirely, including her long-standing endorsement of the boycott of Israel.”

    This piece should be shared everywhere you can do so.

  5. hophmi on January 16, 2019, 5:26 pm

    Amith Gupta seems not to know much about what he’s talking about.

    Maybe one day radical leftists will stop defending antisemitism and stop thinking that proclaiming themselves to be against antisemitism is about as useful an indicator of whether they’re antisemitic or not as Donald Trump claiming that he doesn’t have a racist bone in his body.

    • genesto on January 17, 2019, 7:02 pm

      Maybe one day Zionists will stop conflating criticism of Israel with antisemitism. Of course, that would take a different level of consciousness of which they don’t appear capable, at least at this time.

  6. eisaacs on January 16, 2019, 6:50 pm

    While the the article’s explanation of the role of Zionism in the accusations of anti-Semitism is laudable and of import, there are other important discussions to be had about the politics of the Women’s March. While disavowing Farrakhan’s despicable statements about Jews nothing has been said about his reactionary ideas about blackness — that black men’s bad behavior is responsible for poor social status as opposed to racism, that black people should aspire to become capitalists, and of course, separatism. In fact, organizing in cells of ethnic identity has come to be seen as progressive, when it really obscures class differences, divides potential allies and weakens efforts to build movements strong enough to bring about real change, but multiracial unity is not the goal of this movement. The March’s purpose is actually to bring about more participation in the Democratic party, which will certainly fail to actually bring about any of the lofty goals it espouses like equality or justice. From the draconian anti-immigration bill and police expansion and welfare cuts of Bill Clinton to the mass deportations continuation of wars by Obama, Democrats will not solve our problems. They, like Republiscans, operate to promote the interests of American capitalism. A truly progressive movement needs to call on all workers to unite and to question the basic tenets of the system we now endure, one that puts profits first and human life last. You are invited to visit multiracialunity.org.

    • Citizen on January 16, 2019, 10:43 pm

      @ eisacs

      RE: “A truly progressive movement needs to call on all workers to unite and to question the basic tenets of the system we now endure, one that puts profits first and human life last,”

      Exactly. Tactics include breaking up the big banks and seriously curbing their predatory practices, & auditing The Fed; ending the current campaign finance system; ending the “regime change” foreign policy & heavily cutting the Pentagon budget in half, auditing it seriously & curbing the corrupt waste of tax dollars.

  7. just on January 16, 2019, 11:48 pm

    “Rabbis Endorse Women’s March After Addressing anti-Semitism Concerns With Organizers …

    Nine liberal rabbis endorsed the Women’s March after meetings with organizers Linda Sarsour and Tamika Mallory and sharing their concerns about anti-Semitism.

    The rabbis said in a letter that they had engaged in “frank discussions about the issues that are dividing our communities” with Sarsour and Mallory, including the latter’s ties to Nation of Islam Leader Louis Farrakhan, who has a history of making anti-Semitic and homophobic statements.

    Though the letter acknowledged that differences remained, it encouraged members of the Jewish community to attend the march on Saturday.

    “We pledge to remain actively involved with the Women’s March, its next steps, its hopeful agenda, and its leadership, Linda and Tamika in particular,” the rabbis said.

    The statement came out of meetings between the two organizers and 13 rabbis, though not all the attendees signed it, the Forward reported. …

    The signatories of the letter are Rabbis Barat Ellman, Rachel Goldenberg, Lauren Grabelle Hermann, Lisa Grant, Sharon Kleinbaum, Ellen Lippmann, Mike Rothbaum, Joshua Stanton and Nancy Wiener.

    Ellman is the the mother of Women’s March staffer Sophie Ellman-Golan and Kleinbaum works at New York’s LGBTQ synagogue, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah. Grant and Wiener both work at the New York campus of the Reform movement’s Hebrew Union College.”

    https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/rabbis-endorse-women-s-march-after-addressing-anti-semitism-concerns-with-organizers-1.6848791

    And so it goes… Then there’s this:

    “… The Democratic National Committee appears to have joined a number of organizations, including the Southern Poverty Law Center, that have distanced themselves from the 2019 Women’s March.

    The move comes amid controversy over organizers’ ties to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who has been widely condemned for his anti-Semitic remarks. In an interview on Monday with ABC’s The View, one of the Women’s March leaders failed to denounce Farrakhan, and this week the DNC disappeared from the list of the march’s sponsors just days before the event on Saturday.

    A cached version of the march’s official website shows the DNC was listed as a sponsor as recently as Monday, but its name was gone as of Wednesday morning. …”

    https://www.newsweek.com/womens-march-2019-dnc-southern-poverty-law-center-appear-withdraw-support-1293448

    Ugh.

    • echinococcus on January 17, 2019, 2:40 am

      As E. Isaacs already made crystal clear,
      “The March’s purpose is actually to bring about more participation in the Democratic party “. And so the “Liberal Rabbis” approved, while the Illiberal Rabbis won’t. And that’s news.

  8. Citizen on January 17, 2019, 4:36 am

    When you’re a Zionist, you are always above the law–even an ideal law applying the notion/principle of equal rights for all. Seems to boil down to whether or not the ex-post facto law applied at Nuremberg (& Tokyo) was meant to be a universal principle or an exclusive principle. Does “Never Again!” apply universally, or uniquely?

  9. oldgeezer on January 18, 2019, 10:37 am

    “Zionism as simply a movement to protect the Jewish people, ”

    I wish I had a nickle for every different “simply” definition of zionism. It’s a very flexible word.

    Yet again we see zionist supremacy raise it’s ugly head. At the same time we have yet another example of the intersectionality of zionism and white supremacy. With Israel zionism is represented by an oppresive majority and has no common cause with oppressed minorities.

    I eagerly await their condemnation of the current GoI and the long list of members of the Knesset who have made extreme racist statements against Muslims, Arabs and Palestinians.

    It’s not going to happen but would enjoy being proven wrong.

    Women4all is a fraud being perpetrated against minority groups who suffer greatly from discrimination and racism. It is a double standard which holds them to higher standards that white people or Jews.

    Nothing good has come from zionism.

    • Mooser on January 18, 2019, 12:22 pm

      “Nothing good has come from zionism.”

      I’ve got to admit, Zionism and organized Judaism is doing a bang-up job of positioning the Jewish community socially in the US.
      Besides, did support of Civil Rights and minorities really pay off for the Jewish community?

      • eljay on January 18, 2019, 1:37 pm

        || Mooser: … I’ve got to admit, Zionism and organized Judaism is doing a bang-up job of positioning the Jewish community socially in the US. … ||

        What Zionists are doing for Jews is…well, JeffB said it best:

        … Not holding the Jews responsible for Jewish policy on the excuse that “well some Jews didn’t agree” is denying them agency.

        And:

        … Israel is the agency by which Jews as a nation take collective action. … What we do, we do as a people.

        With friends like Zionists…

      • Mooser on January 18, 2019, 8:46 pm

        “With friends like Zionists…”

        “WJ” seems to agree:

        ” i think that viewing the jews as a distinct national or economic class that is antagonistic to other national or economic groups (particularly if one puts it in historical perspective without painting with too wide a brush) is a viable argument.”

        But “Yonah” then very acutely observes that this “viable argument” doesn’t have the allure it once had:

        “Unfortunately Hitler gave antisemitism a bad name.”

      • wondering jew on January 18, 2019, 11:28 pm

        Is this a discussion of some sort, an invitation to a discussion? Not really. More like 7th grade and an SNL parody of an on air argument.

      • Mooser on January 19, 2019, 1:25 pm

        “Is this a discussion of some sort, an invitation to a discussion?”

        Please! Chime in, “WJ”. Unlimber your vouschafer and fire away!

        And please don’t misunderstand “Yonah”. I think “Unfortunately, Hitler gave anti-semitism a bad name” is very well said. All too true.

  10. wondering jew on January 18, 2019, 11:34 pm

    It’s conceivable that all of Zionism’s benefits have accrued to Jews. And one might conceivably conclude that the deficits to the Palestinians and to the world are not outweighed by Zionism’s benefit to the Jews.

    But regarding the Jews: 1. I cannot imagine what the post Holocaust would have been like without Zionism. That’s for alternate history writers.
    2. Safe shores provided by the Zionist project. I know that hundreds of thousands of European Jews increased the Jewish population in Mandate Palestine between 1929 and 1939 from about 175,000 to 400,000. Those Jews were saved by Zionism.

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