Scary JPost columnist calls for one-state-solution

I say that liberals have been shaken up by the failure of the two-state solution and are beginning to look at one-state ideas. Well, looky here, Caroline Glick, neocon in the Jerusalem Post:

As Netanyahu knows, there is consensus support among Israelis for his plan to ensure that the country retains defensible borders in perpetuity. This involves establishing permanent Israeli control over the Jordan Valley and the large Jewish population blocs in Judea and Samaria. In light of the well-recognized failure of the two-state solution [horse feathers edited cause I just ate my dinner] … Israel should strike out on a new course and work toward the integration of Judea and Samaria, including its Palestinian population, into Israeli society. In the first instance, this will require the implementation of Israeli law in the Jordan Valley and the large settlement blocs.

Thanks to David Epstein.

About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.
Posted in One state/Two states

{ 16 comments... read them below or add one }

  1. “In the first instance, this will require the implementation of Israeli law in the Jordan Valley and the large settlement blocs.”

    New Israelistine Constitution (Condensed): No Palestinians (or Arabs or Muslims or Difficult Darkies) in Israelistine

    As long as everyone follows the law, what’s so bad about a one state solution?

    • Nolan says:

      As long as everyone follows the law

      Israel’s Basic Law will most likely remain in place. As a result, the Palestinians in the West Bank will retain the same status Palestinians in Israel do today, namely that of second class citizens.

      • Nolan says:

        OK, I realize now your post was actually tongue in cheek sarcasm.

        Well played, my friend. Well played.

      • “As a result, the Palestinians in the West Bank will retain the same status Palestinians in Israel do today, namely that of second class citizens.”

        If only this were true. It would be a giant step up from the status of West Bank Palestinians today. And it would provide a firm foundation, from which Israel could not retreat, for strong international pressure on Israel to adopt a democratic state based on equality of all its citizens.

  2. Craig says:

    All together now: “Judea and Samaria are historically part of Israel!”

    And we will soon have a Final Solution to the Palestinian problem. Details forthcoming, but you may assume the new concentration work camps for illegal foreign workers are just the beginning. Arbeit macht frei!

  3. potsherd says:

    Notice that the one-state plan only includes the WB territories. Gaza will be retained as a gulag where the dissidents will all be sent.

  4. Chaos4700 says:

    Riiight. And if that happened, several decades from now, they’ll be talking about how those “secure borders” need to extend across the Jordan River into “Greater Israel.”

    And a generation after that, world history will not be able to mention the Jewish Holocaust without mentioning the Palestinian Holocaust hand in hand.

  5. RE: “… Israel should strike out on a new course and work toward the integration of Judea and Samaria, including its Palestinian population, into Israeli society.” – Caroline Glick

    CAROLINE FROM CHICAGO: You go, gurl!!! You and Elliott Abrams are ‘da bomb(s)’!

    Caroline Glick
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Born Chicago, Illinois
    Education Bachelor of Arts in Political Science Master of Arts in Public Policy from Columbia

    Caroline Glick is an American-Israeli journalist and is the deputy managing editor of The Jerusalem Post.[1] She is also the Senior Fellow for Middle East Affairs of the Washington, DC-based Center for Security Policy.[2]

    She immigrated to Israel in 1991 and joined the Israel Defense Forces (IDF).[3]

    She is the Senior Middle East Fellow at the Center for Security Policy and is one of several co-authors of the Center’s latest book, War Footing. She has been a senior researcher at the IDF’s Operational Theory Research Institute (which as Israel’s Defense establishment’s most prestigious think tank is roughly equivalent to the US’s Rand Corporation). She has also worked as an adjunct lecturer in tactical warfare at the IDF’s Command and Staff College.

    In 2003, Glick was named “The Most Prominent Woman in Israel” by the Israeli newspaper Maariv.

    She was the 2005 recipient of the Zionist Organization of America’s Ben Hecht award for Outstanding Journalism (previous recipients have included A. M. Rosenthal, Sidney Zion and Daniel Pipes).

    She also received Israel Media Watch’s 2006 award for critical journalism.

    On May 31, 2009 she received the Guardian of Zion Award from the Ingeborg Rennert Center for Jerusalem Studies at Bar Ilan University.

    • LeaNder says:

      Yes, highly “decorated”, honored, but:

      Jim Lobe’s take . I was thankful for that and this, since she feels highly hysterical to me.

      • Nolan says:

        Am I the only one who’s infuriated by the likes of her who are born in the US, having nothing to do with Israel they move there and before you know it they’re dictating to the native Palestinians – who are under a military occupation – their future? It strikes me as arrogantly racist.

  6. robin says:

    Wow, what a remarkable article. The sheer hate of it makes me feel dirty as I read. It’s like a completely upside-down view of the world, resting on some heinous misrepresentations of reality.

    And yet, somehow I couldn’t agree more with the conclusions she comes to.

    It almost makes me wonder if she’s a Palestinian-solidarity type in disguise as a hard right-winger. She’s essentially willing to bet Israel’s Jewishness that mainstream estimates of Palestinian population are drastically wrong. And even if they are, her proposal involves giving the vote to millions more Palestinians, without any increase in Jewish voters, as of the course the settlers are already enfranchised.

    We’re talking about a massive increase in Palestinian representation in the Israeli government itself. I mean, what could be better for the Palestinian cause?

    And how much better would life be in the West Bank under annexation? That would be the end of occupation there. An actual police force, not drones and tanks and bombers, would hunt “terrorists”. People would have due process. People would no longer be tortured, by the IDF or the PA. There’d be no more checkpoints. No more Jewish-only roads or towns. Jobs in Israel would be open again. The Wall would come down!

    I know that Glick doesn’t propose including Gaza in this. (I’m shocked she even considered citizenship for West Bank Palestinians.) And all the problems of discrimination and second-class status within Israel would now apply in the West Bank too. But, as an interim step, her idea would be momentous. There would be hope for Gaza, and for ending official ethnic chauvinism.

    I can only hope that people in the Israeli right take this seriously. Somehow, though, I think that people like Netanyahu are too smart for this. They understand that policies like these would massively undermine their real goals, which consist of official ethnic chauvinism.

    • potsherd says:

      It is misleading to say these things “would” happen. On paper, the law would mandate that they happen, but in practice, the institutional prejudice would still operate and discrimination would remain in full force.

    • Nolan says:

      We’re talking about a massive increase in Palestinian representation in the Israeli government itself. I mean, what could be better for the Palestinian cause?

      All things being equal, Israel stands to gain from annexing the West Bank and its native population. The Palestinians will provide Israel with cheap labor and low cost goods. At the same time, the Palestinians will be treated the same or worse than their Palestinian brethren in Israel under Israel’s own discriminatory laws.

      In fact, this plan would enable Israel to reap the fruit of economic inequality while avoiding the issue of the right of return.

      In essence, Israel could very well maintain the covert institutionalized system of discrimination while abolishing the overt system of discrimination – Jewish only roads, for example – while being met with very little criticism from the international community.

      After all, once the military occupation ends and Palestinians in the West Bank become citizens, who’s going to intervene in what would be considered Israel’s internal politics?

      • robin says:

        You make good points. Gaza would be on an island, without being able to (effectively) use the term “occupation”. External pressure on Israel (as weak as it is) might evaporate. It would not address right of return.

        But still… it would only be a matter of (much shorter) time that Palestinians would be the majority of Israeli citizens. At that point, they won’t really need outside pressure to represent their voice.

  7. Eva Smagacz says:

    I think it is very naive to assume that the integration of Palestinians into Israel Society equals plans of conferring citizenship on them. If West Bank will be officially annexed as East Jerusalem was, then Palestinians will be offered only residency, but no voting rights. Residency can be taken away the minute any resident has left area as thousands of East Jerusalem residents have found out to their cost as they are stranded indefinitely abroad.