Protesters interrupted Passacaglia w/ Beethoven (more on Israel Philharmonic protest in London)

“We will picket the Proms” promised Palestine solidarity activists who had responded to a Palestinian call for a boycott of the BBC Proms concert by the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (IPO) in London.  When the concert went ahead this evening, more than 40 protesters gathered outside while a determined group inside the Royal Albert Hall disrupted both the first and second half of the performance, forcing the BBC to take the Radio 3 live broadcast off air. In anticipation of disturbances, security had been greatly increased, including airport-style bag searches. 

As the orchestra played Passacaglia, Op. 1 by Webern, the group calling themselves ‘Beethovians for Boycotting Israel’ positioned themselves in the choir stalls so they could be seen by the audience. To the tune of Ode to Joy by Beethoven they sang:

Israel, end your occupation:
There’s no peace on stolen land.
We’ll sing out for liberation
’till you hear and understand.

Ethnic cleansing and apartheid
Should belong to history.
Human rights cannot be silenced:
Palestine will soon be free.

Before 13 of the group were escorted out, they held up individual letters spelling, ‘Free Palestine’ – many of which were snatched off them by angry audience members. At the very beginning of the next item, Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, four remaining activists stood up and chanted slogans such as “Settlements are out of tune with international law!” After the interval, and during Albéniz’s Iberia, a number of groups intervened with further slogans. Even after many in the audience had responded with their own chants of “Out, out, out!” and cheered the removal of some of the activists, the words, ‘Free Palestine’ still rang out clearly across the vast hall. The BBC refers to ‘some people in the audience’ who began booing and shouting. You can listen to the BBC audio of the action here

A request by a few members of the orchestra and the audience for the Israeli national anthem, Hatikva, to be played at the end was ignored by the conductor Zubin Mehta. The Jerusalem Post reports that Minister for Culture Ed Vaizey, who was in the audience tweeted, “Demonstrators seem to have turned the entire audience pro-Israel.”’ Another tweet by @JonathanPos compared the disruption to the Night of Broken Glass, or Kristallnacht - the pogroms against Jews in Nazi Germany (in 1938): “Closed my eyes and suddenly imagined I was at the Berlin Philharmonie circa 1936. Breaking glass would have added a bit of colour”.

In an open letter, Out of Tune with Human Rights, Palestinian cultural institutions, including the leading musical organizations, had urged the BBC to cancel the concert, due to IPO’s complicity in whitewashing Israel’s persistent violations of international law and human rights. A letter in Tuesday’s Independent newspaper signed by over twenty musicians explained that when the Director of the Proms, Roger Wright, was asked to cancel the concert in accordance with the call from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott (PACBI), he rejected this call, saying that the invitation is “purely musical”. The British Committee for the Universities of Palestine BRICUP wrote its own letter to Roger Wright on 31st July: “By inviting the IPO, a pillar of the Israeli state system and of its cultural propaganda campaign, you provide the Israeli government, perpetrator of the Cast Lead invasion of Gaza and of so many other violations of international law and of human rights, with the support that they crave. Cancel the concert!”

An inside source reported overhearing orchestra members referring to a cancelled concert tour in Scandinavia in response to the boycott call. 

Posted in BDS, Israel/Palestine

{ 160 comments... read them below or add one }

  1. annie says:

    youtube: ode to boycott/beethovians for boycotting israel. check the credits! this is none other than the same deborah fink of mondo awards fame. a little birdie told me deborah was tied in the awards. it was only after multiple re scoring… she’s such a star. thank you deborah and others in ‘beethovians for boycotting israel’.

  2. seafoid says:

    *PRESS RELEASE FROM BEETHOVIANS FOR BOYCOTTING ISRAEL *

    *Friday 2nd September 2011*

    *FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE*

    A new vocal ensemble, Beethovians for Boycotting Israel (BBI), gave its debut performance at a Prom concert at the Royal Albert Hall yesterday evening.

    Their first piece was intricately interwoven with Webern’s Passacaglia,
    played by guest artists the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (IPO).

    “We thought we’d liven up the Webern a bit” said Deborah Fink (soprano).”The performance of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony at the previous night’s Prom was so exciting that we decided to treat the audience to our own version of the Ode to Joy”.

    The lyrics of the BBI’s “Ode to Boycott” have an unmistakeably Beethovian ring:

    Israel , end your occupation:

    There’s no peace on stolen land.

    We’ll sing out for liberation

    ’till you hear and understand.

    Ethnic cleansing and apartheid

    Should belong to history.

    Human rights cannot be silenced:

    Palestine will soon be free.

    A performance of the piece, recorded earlier by the BBI Chamber Choir, can be heard here:

    link to youtube.com

    Sue Blackwell (alto), who penned the alternative lyrics, said: “We think Ludwig would have approved.He was known to be a bit of a subversive who had no time for conventions, and he admired the French Revolution with its themes of ‘Liberty, Equality, Fraternity’.Sadly, Israel represents the exact opposite of those ideals.”

    During the second piece, Bruch’s Violin Concerto, and in Albėniz’s ” Iberia ” after the interval, BBI duos and trios took part in the Proms charitable tradition of synchronised slogan-shouting, including “THE SIEGE OF GAZA – IS OUT OF TUNE – WITH INTERNATIONAL LAW” and “THE IPO – ARE INSTRUMENTAL – IN AN ILLEGAL OCCUPATION”.

    The BBI recital was somewhat curtailed on this occasion due to its members being removed by the Albert Hall security staff, so that they had to continue outside . However, they are intending to build on their Proms success and are now looking for a suitable venue for their next performance.

    [ ends ]

    *Quotations:*

    Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi (soprano) of Jews for Boycotting Israeli Goods, who was one of the choral performers, said: “All this precious talkabout the purity of the music ignores the toxic nature of Israel ‘s suppression of the Palestinian people.”

    Willem Meijs (tenor, aged 70) said: “As someone steeped in classical music from an early age, and a frequent visitor to the Proms since the fifties, I was very hesitant about disrupting a concert in such a hallowed venue. However, I thought inviting the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra was a provocation in its own right. So I felt voicing a peaceful protest during their concert would be nothing compared to the bombing of innocent civilians and the slow but steady genocide inflicted on the Palestinians by the state of Israel, of which this orchestra claims to be a cultural ambassador.”

    Aharon Shabtai , Israel ’s greatest living poet, wrote recently:

    ‘I do not believe that a State that maintains an occupation, committing on a daily basis crimes against civilians, deserves to be invited to any kind of cultural event. That is, it is anti-cultural; it is a barbarian act masked as culture in the most cynical way. It manifests support for Israel , and … that sustains the occupation.’

    *Notes for editors:

    *

    1. An open letter was sent to the Proms organisers on July 18^th by PACBI, the Palestinian Campaign for Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel.PACBI referred to “the IPO’s complicity in whitewashing Israel’s persistent violations of international law and human rights”, mentioning specifically the IPO’s services to the Israeli army dating back to the ethnic cleansing of the Nakba in 1948 and the occupations of 1967, and continuing up to the present day: “the IPO proudly announces its partnership with the army under a scheme whereby special concerts for Israeli soldiers are organized at their army outposts”.On behalf of the leading Palestinian musical and cultural organisations, PACBI called on the BBC to withdraw its invitation to the IPO.link to pacbi.org

    2. The British Committee for the Universities of Palestine, BRICUP, also wrote to the BBC calling on it to cancel the invitation.http://www.bricup.org.uk

    3. Unknown to the Proms organisers, the protesters had bought over 40 tickets in a variety of locations in the Royal Albert Hall, including boxes.A group of fifteen were seated in the choir.During the Webern piece the “choir” stood up with letters spelling out “FREE PALESTINE” and sang the “Ode to Boycott” repeatedly until they were removed.When a further group of protesters shouted slogans as the Bruch piece was about to begin, the BBC suspended their live transmission on Radio 3.The BBC attempted to recommence after the interval, but further groups of protesters shouted slogans at the start of the Albėniz piece.At this point the BBC stopped live transmission for the rest of the evening.This is believed to be the first occasion when transmission of a Prom has been disrupted by protesters.

    4. All the protesters left peacefully when requested to do so by security.There were no arrests.Some of the protesters were assaulted by members of the audience but they did not retaliate.

    5.Footage of the demonstration and pro-Israel counter-demonstration outside the

    Hall can be seen here:link to youtube.com

    (courtesy ofSeymour Alexander)

    *_
    _*

    6.*For further information, contact:*

    *Sue Blackwell0792 995 3893*

    *Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi0775 902 4659*

    **

  3. seafoid says:

    The other point to note is that the occupation is designed to ensure that Palestinians will never earn the value of their work. They are a non people condemned to mass unemployment, hunger and humiliation with unskilled labour the most many can hope for.

    Israeli musicians may have their concert schedule disrupted. Ultimately nobody will want to host the Israeli Philharmonic. The chaos comes closer.
    The occupation is off balance sheet but not for much longer.

  4. GuiltyFeat says:

    Minister for Culture Ed Vaizey, who was in the audience tweeted, “Demonstrators seem to have turned the entire audience pro-Israel.”’ Another tweet by @JonathanPos compared the disruption to the Night of Broken Glass, or Kristallnacht – the pogroms against Jews in Nazi Germany (in 1938): “Closed my eyes and suddenly imagined I was at the Berlin Philharmonie circa 1936. Breaking glass would have added a bit of colour”.

    Theartsdesk.com music reviewer Igor Toronyi-Lalic, who was at the show, said: “The whole hall was groaning and trying to slow clap them out.

    “It had the atmosphere of a riot.”

    link to bbc.co.uk

    BDS – winning hearts and minds with every ignorant act of petty defiance.

    • eGuard says:

      Oh yes. Those famous disruptions at the Berliner Philharmoniker in 1936 when the audience protested the racist Nazi laws and even the Kristallnacht that only happened two years later. Brave Berliners!

      Glad now London can be added to that list of Cities that Protested at the Right Time.

    • Shingo says:

      BDS – winning hearts and minds with every ignorant act of petty defiance.

      Those atending would have been Israeli supporters by and large, so there weer no hearts and minds to be won, just a friendly reminder of Israel’s pariah status.

    • seafoid says:

      “compared the disruption to the Night of Broken Glass, or Kristallnacht ”

      A concert disruption is nothing to being bombed with white phosphorous.

      • Chaos4700 says:

        I’m going to link this back EVERY TIME GuiltyBrit criticizes me for citing what Nazis did to Jews whenever I compare it to what he’s doing to Palestinians.

        What a god-awful hypocrite. So a stupid concert played by IDF veterans got ruined and that’s supposed to be like Krystallnacht? Good lord.

        It is not me who’s triviliazing what Nazi Germany did to Jews, it’s cretins like GuiltyFeat.

    • Donald says:

      ” ignorant act of petty defiance.”

      There’s a pattern of behavior common to many liberal Zionists. A perfunctory acknowledgement of Israeli wrongdoing, often watered down, and then real anger at those who protest against it. At best the anger against Israeli war crimes is about equal to the anger at protestors.

    • Shmuel says:

      Funny. When I was a kid, Jews who tried to disrupt Bolshoi performances were widely admired in the Jewish community, although I’m sure all the cultured people who bought tickets to the ballet weren’t very pleased with them. Maybe it’s because no one was making outrageous comparisons between the non-violent human rights picketers and racist, murderous brown shirts back then.

      • Donald says:

        “When I was a kid, Jews who tried to disrupt Bolshoi performances were widely admired in the Jewish community, although I’m sure all the cultured people who bought tickets to the ballet weren’t very pleased with them.”

        Oh surely not. How gauche, to disturb an evening of enjoyment for such trivial purposes. I’m sure they succeeded in making everyone pro-Soviet.

        • Shmuel says:

          I’m sure they succeeded in making everyone pro-Soviet.

          I distinctly recall the Internationale playing in all the better hotels and clubs for weeks. I think they even named a cocktail after Brezhnev (vodka and kvass with a borshch chaser) at the Ritz-Carlton.

      • Samuel says:

        No Donald, they were not “widely admired” in the Jewish community, they were known as “kahanists” and condemned by the mainstream Jewish community as extremists and harming the legitimate protests against the former Soviet Union who refused to allow Jews to practice their religion.
        Most activists at the time realised that the disruption of the Bolshoi was counter-productive to a just cause, just as the disruption of the “proms” was this week.
        Albeit a small set-back, but it was a set-back for achieving rights for the Palestinians.

        • Chaos4700 says:

          I continue to find it amusing that Zionists will condemn the disruption of concerts and ballets, but blowing up hotels and ethnically cleansing villages? That’s just fine!

        • Shmuel says:

          Samuel,

          I was the one who wrote that disruptions of Bolshoi performances were “widely admired in the Jewish community”, and indeed they were in the community I lived in at the time, in which there were mixed feelings about Kahane’s JDL, but complete solidarity on the issue of Soviet Jews – with the exception of actual violence (there was none in our town, to the best of my recollection). I participated in a number of demos outside the Soviet consulate, and remember that pickets against Bolshoi performances at the local concert hall were looked upon quite favourably even by those (like my parents) who were far from Kahane supporters. To cite another, somewhat related example, there was a lot of understanding in Israel for those who disrupted the first performance of Wagner at Hekhal Hatarbut in Tel-Aviv, even among those who disagreed with them.

          The point is that no one here seriously believes that there is something inherently wrong with disrupting a concert or other cultural event. It all depends on the reason for the disruption. The critics believe that Israel doesn’t deserve such treatment, although I have a feeling that most did or would have approved of such disruptions of Soviet cultural events in the ’70s.

        • Donald says:

          Option four for you (referring to another post below)–principled opposition to anything disruptive. But as even I recall regarding the Kahanists, they were guilty of much worse things than disrupting cultural events. They killed people. To me there’s a distinction. Protestors of all stripes commonly do upsetting things like disrupt concerts, heckle speakers, burn flags or documents (William Lloyd Garrison famously burned a copy of the Constitution in public and called it a pact with Hell for endorsing slavery) and so forth and there’s always this argument about whether such things help or hurt the cause. There’s a difference between this and, you know, actually assaulting or killing people.

          But Shmuel answered you better, because I was young and only vaguely aware of the plight of Soviet Jews in the 70′s (I think). If I had been more aware I would not have been upset to hear that protestors were disrupting Soviet cultural events, any more than I would have been upset in the 80′s if anti-apartheid protestors disrupted South African sporting events.

        • annie says:

          it was a set-back for achieving rights for the Palestinians.

          ? where do you come up w/this? on what evidence? after decades of apartheid you think the disruption of a concert is a set back for palestinian rights? besides you saying so what evidence? nothing, silly allegation. this is getting a lot of attention and that can only be a good thing.

  5. btbLondon says:

    The Guardian said
    “But inside the hall, the two combined seemed to turn the audience – many of whom were no doubt sympathetic to the protesters – into avid supporters of the Israel Phil.”

    and I responded

    I doubt it. Most of the audience seem to have attended because it was the ISRAEL Philharmonic Orchestra. While I would not presume to know anything about their usual frequency of Prom attendance most made a point of attending this particular concert to demonstrate their support for this orchestra.

  6. jon s says:

    Another revolting stunt by the bds goons. I’m sure they’re proud of themselves.

    • Chaos4700 says:

      Nice of you to take some time out of your day from cheering while war planes drop bombs on Gaza in spite of the fact that there’s an utter lack of evidence that the attackers in Eriat can from there, to make some personal snipes at people who are opposed to your bloody occupation and slaughter of Palestinians for fun and profit.

      • DBG says:

        first of all it is Eilat, there is no r. Second the proof has been shown already. Just because you guys don’t believe it doesn’t make it any less true.

        • Chaos4700 says:

          Oh really? There was proof that a TWO YEAR OLD CHILD was responsible as the mastermind for the attack at Eilat? (I’d have better luck with it if you gave me the real Arabic name of the place, incidentally.)

        • jon s says:

          Chaos, Nobody claimed that a two year old was responsible for the attack. Where did you come up with that idea?
          The Arabic name for the place is Um Rashrash .The name Eilat predates the Arabic,being from the Bible:
          -Deuteronomy:2,8
          -2nd Kings: 14,22 and 16,6

        • Chaos4700 says:

          Maybe, jon, because that’s who your military killed. I know you probably didn’t care enough to look that up, but maybe you should.

          Hope you’re good and ready for when some group claiming to be Caananites comes around to wipe you off the map the same way you’re wiping Palestine off the map.

    • Agreed. I just grieve at hearing Beethoven’s Ode to Joy defiled by these crude, stunt-provoking thugs.

      “Beethovians for Boycotting Israel?”

      I think I’m gonna puke.

      • Chaos4700 says:

        Why don’t you guys play a little Wagner to console yourselves? That’s a little more in line, traditionally, with the sort of state policies you seem to enjoy inflicting on the Palestinians.

        • “Why don’t you guys play a little Wagner to console yourselves?”

          Thank you for the suggestion. Don’t mind if I do.

          I have been a member of the Wagner Society of Chicago for over 20 years and have every Wagner opera on CD and DVD (and multiple versions of each), including Sir Georg Solti’s classic 15-disc recording of the Ring Cycle, which I highly recommend.

        • Chaos4700 says:

          Best. Irony. Ever. You don’t even “get” the reference, do you?

        • libra says:

          Robert Werdine: “I have been a member of the Wagner Society of Chicago for over 20 years…”

          Robert, I just Googled “Wagner Society” and was astonished by just how many there were around the globe. Rather controversially, one has been approved even in Israel where apparently his music was banned for quite some time. So it seems these musical boycotts do have a track record.

          That said, now Richard Wagner has been rehabilitated into respectable circles, wouldn’t it be wonderful if by some time warp he could start posting here at Mondoweiss? I’m sure he’d find much to admire about modern Israel and would make a stirling contribution as a third RW, joining yourself and Richard Witty in our elite group of intellectual Zionist contributors.

      • Woody Tanaka says:

        “I think I’m gonna puke.”

        Who wants to bet that Werdine NEVER said he was going to puke in connection with the cold-blooded murder of Palestinians, the theft of their land, or the oppressive policies of Aparthied Israel.

        Murdering Turks and an American, in cold blood?? No problem. But disturbing a concert!?!?!?! Oh, my stars and garters that puts his soft little Zio constitution a-fluttering.

    • Danaa says:

      jon s – see the comment above by Shmuel.

      Maybe you forgot the disruptions of the Bolshoi Ballet? maybe you never knew?

      Or maybe it all depends on who’s doing the disrupting and why. If it’s Jews protesting the plight of Soviet jews, that’s great public action. Culture should not be in the business of putting lipstick on pigs, right? But when it is protest against the “Jewish” state of israel, that “self-determining” island of hate against indigenous people, then it’s shocking. Just shocking.

      Alas, what israel did, does and plans to do to palestinians is far more abhorrent and “uncultured” than the Soviets did to jews in the 60′s to 80′s (which was, for the record, a lot less than they subjected many other minorities to). And yes, some will listen to Beethoven while planning the execution by drones of innocents and some, after torturing a few palestinian children, will go home to listen to Bach to unwind.

      BDS – across the board – is all that stands between Palestinians and the fate of the Indians, which is what israel – and most israelis – would really love to bring about, if they could only get away with it….

      • Donald says:

        Danaa–I don’t think they know what to do with the Bolshoi Ballet argument. One possible approach–shock and outrage at the very notion that the USSR could be compared to Israel. (Note to themselves–this parallel is very dangerous. The USSR ceased to exist without people being driven to the sea.) Another approach–chirping crickets. Time to move on to another thread. A third–simply ignore it, play for time, so far it hasn’t taken over the thread, continue to talk as though it hadn’t been brought up. Fourth approach, but I doubt it will be adopted–criticize those who disrupted the Bolshoi Ballet. Take a firm stand on principle. Nah, too much of a mental leap required. Still, could be done out of desperation.

        • Shmuel says:

          I don’t think they know what to do with the Bolshoi Ballet argument.

          Sure they do. The USSR was one of (if not the) worst violators of human rights at the time, and Israel is not, so singling Israel out for such actions is anti-Semitic. Furthermore, everyone knows how left-wing artistic types are, and Zubin Mehta was a great friend of Abie Nathan’s, etc. By boycotting the most progressive elements in Israeli society, you are actually harming Palestinian interests, you racist, war-mongering bigot, you. You should be ashamed of yourself! MW is so full of Israel-bashing haters, I don’t know why I keep coming here.

          How’s that? ;-)

        • James North says:

          Richard Witty said, ‘Hmmm, Shmuel. Food for thought.’

        • Donald says:

          Not bad, Shmuel. You took my option one and really ran with it. It could use a touch of the Nazis sprinkled in somewhere, but as it stands it’ll do nicely. We’ll sit back and see if someone improves on your version, but if they take my advice they’ll just do a little bit of creative plagiarism with your version, or simply copy it word-for-word and hope nobody notices.

        • Shmuel says:

          It could use a touch of the Nazis sprinkled in somewhere

          Oops. Kauft nicht bei Juden! It’s exactly the same thing! And even if it isn’t, it is in the minds of Jews, so it’s anti-Semitic, as well as ineffective because it will remind Israeli Jews that the whole world is against them and make them circle the wagons all the more. MW is so full of Israel-bashing haters …

        • Donald says:

          You guys are cracking me up.

        • Danaa says:

          Shmuel, Donald – you guys are on a roll…..and JN is right, if Witty had an ounce of wit, he’d take what Shmuel handed him – totally free! – and run with it. All it needs is a sprinkle of the “right to self-determination” and a smidgen of “humanizing the other’, and a some fine goulash we got. Much improvement on his usual flat sauce dish, too.

          As for me, I need to learn to be a little nicer and mince words better. This fire and brimstone stuff is taking way too much energy to burn up….also, I am hungry again.

        • Erasmus says:

          re: Shmuel September 2, 2011 at 6:13 pm

          …” And even if it isn’t, it is in the minds of Jews, so it’s anti-Semitic,……

          May i suggest that this grand definition by Shmuel of what is AS, is being declared the official definition of Anti-Semitism!!!

        • jon s says:

          Shmuel, This is great, you can fill the entire thread arguing both sides of the issue…

        • Shmuel says:

          This is great, you can fill the entire thread arguing both sides of the issue…

          Thanks, Jon. I really should have given you credit for a good part of “my” argument:

          link to mondoweiss.net

          link to mondoweiss.net

        • Danaa says:

          Shmuel, those were great arguments you made in that thread in response to jon s’ specious contention of “Israel being singled out”. I missed it unfortunately, in its entirety. I especially liked the comparison to Soviet Russia, which was subjected to Jewish inspired boycott despite the fact that Russia may not have been the “worst” violator of rights either. Actually, not by a long shot if we are speaking of Russia in the 70′s and 80′s. At that time the worst that happened to Jews (for the most part) in Russia is that they were subjected to a Jim Crow type of systematic discrimination. And what they went through then does not begin to compare with what Israeli Arabs are subjected to daily now, in Israel.

          Now that I think of it, it would be great for someone more knowledgeable than me to draw a comparison between the jews in Soviet Russia and Israeli Palestinians nowadays. Superficially at least, the similarities are striking.

          As an aside, that ridiculous argument by hasbaristas that “other are worse, so why pick on israel” is nonsensical. For anyone who rescued an animal in need, or, for that matter, a child, was that act compromised just because there are so many more lives in the world who suffer, possibly more, who also deserve rescue?

        • Chu says:

          “MW is so full of Israel-bashing haters, I don’t know why I keep coming here.”

          How’s that? ;-)

          -spot on!

        • Antidote says:

          “Kauft nicht bei Juden! It’s exactly the same thing! And even if it isn’t, it is in the minds of Jews, so it’s anti-Semitic, as well as ineffective because it will remind Israeli Jews that the whole world is against them and make them circle the wagons all the more. MW is so full of Israel-bashing haters.”

          Oh Shmuel, and MW is so full of Nazi-bashing haters as well, I might add. What were the poor Germans supposed to do after the Jews called for a world-wide boycott of German goods as soon as Hitler came to power? As if the Jews were any worse off in 1933 Germany than in, say, Poland. And how many people were oppressed on racial grounds in the US or India, and much worse than the Jews in Germany in or before 1933? So why SINGLE OUT Germany at the Madison Square Gardens rally in March 1933, reminding the Germans that the whole world, once again inflamed by Germanophobia spread by Jews, and exaggerated accounts of German atrocities, is against them and determined to grind them into the dust by economic and/or military means? JUDEA DECLARES WAR ON GERMANY, read the headline. Where is Judea? Oh right, Judea = ‘World Jewry’, as both Jewish and Nazi spokesmen called it. Wasn’t that the same group who got the Balfour Declaration in exchange for getting the US into WW I and save the UK’s bacon at the expense of Germany, leading to the disaster of Versailles? And now that Hitler, who is determined to put both the Bolshevists and the capitalists (both led by Jews, of course) into their place, and restore jobs, prosperity and peace with honor, is democratically elected, they want to boycott us? For what? For the German Jews being among the most prosperous in Europe (just like the Palestinians are better off in Israel and the OPT than in Arab countries, right?) Disproportionately running banks, businesses, university departments and the media, while millions of Germans are unemployed, have nothing to eat, can’t feed their children and have no roofs over their heads, thanks to you know who?

          But, seriously, here is a review of a book written by an American Jew who travelled to Germany and beyond at that particular time. Well worth reading, and published in Time magazine in 1936 under the headline ‘Vicious Circle’):

          SOME OF MY BEST FRIENDS ARE JEWS— Robert Gessner—Farrar & Rinehart ($3).

          “Robert Gessner was working in Hollywood, preparing the script of his Indian story, Massacre, when Hitler came into power in Germany. A broad-shouldered, heavy youth, author of a book of poems and holder of a pilot’s license, Robert Gessner, born in Escanaba, Mich, in 1907, had not thought much about being a Jew before that time. There had been a few painful instances of hostility in his boyhood, more when he got to college, but before Hitler “race hatred and the Jews were interesting subjects, but not pressing.” Now he found that even in Hollywood Jewish actors and executives were jolted out of their complacency by the realization that “a pogrom could actually occur in a highly civilized country in the Twentieth Century.” To study anti-Semitism at work, and write a book about it, he went to Germany, which left him still puzzled so he went on to Poland, then to Palestine, to Soviet Russia. He wound up with a mass of information, a collection of good photographs, a few good anecdotes, no final answer to his problem but a deep understanding of its international magnitude.

          Last fortnight Author Gessner published his findings in a forthright volume calculated to force Jews to a realistic appraisal of the position of their race, to give Gentiles, except those whose prejudices have petrified, an uneasy realization of the crimes that are committed in the name of racial hatred. Mr. Gessner admits that he got very nervous, perhaps even frightened, when, on the train leaving France, an official shouted “Heil Hitler!” and a flustered lady replied, “The same to you.” He heard of atrocities, saw some oppression, was not molested himself. But after he visited a famed rabbi in Munich, wandered through the ghetto in Berlin, talked with Zionists, Jewish workers, capitalists, he found himself appalled at the conduct of the Association of German National Jews. This organization supports Hitler, fights the Jewish boycott of German goods. Another group, the Nazi Jews, advocates complete loyalty to the Nazi program, and Gessner was told they leave their meetings giving the Nazi salute shouting, “Down With Us!”

          Almost more disheartened by such signs of confusion and disunity in Jewish ranks than by the tales of oppression he heard, Author Gessner went on to Poland, smuggling his notes out of Germany. The picture got blacker as he traveled East. Jews in the U. S. Middle West were better off than in Manhattan, Manhattan Jews were more prosperous than those in London, Londoners were more fortunate than Parisians, Jews in Paris were happy compared with those in Germany, but even in Germany, with anti-Semitism incorporated into the state, Jews were better off than the poverty-oppressed masses living in medieval squalor in the crowded ghettos of Poland. There Writer Gessner learned that Poland’s 3,300,000 Jews pay six and a half times more taxes than Poles. He visited Cracow, Vilna, Lodz where, when Jewish factories are closed, looms are bootlegged and operated in homes behind closed doors, and where he met more abject and hopeless poverty than he knew existed. He got to Palestine as Tel-Aviv was experiencing a building boom and as the Arab-Jew conflict was approaching a climax. He found the country confusing, exhilarating, depressing, its life a strange mixture of the Soviet Union, boom Florida and Nazi Germany. Profoundly disapproving of the Zionist policy of discrimination against Arab labor, he concluded that Jewish nationalism encouraged Arab nationalism, while the depressing of Arab wages made conflict inevitable. Jews who had been persecuted in Germany now persecuted Arabs and preached a doctrine of racial purity as relentless as the one under which they had suffered. A little dizzy from following this vicious circle all the way around, Gessner came reluctantly to a doubtful conclusion: “If we can’t get along with the Arabs, we have failed.”

          link to time.com

        • Shmuel says:

          Another group, the Nazi Jews, advocates complete loyalty to the Nazi program, and Gessner was told they leave their meetings giving the Nazi salute shouting, “Down With Us!”

          Seriously? And this “group” felt the need to meet with other Jews to express this sentiment? Well, maybe they had no choice, since they couldn’t be members of the real Party. Where’s Groucho when you need him?

        • Shmuel says:

          Thanks, Danaa. You reminded me of something. My wife used to be involved in an animal rights group in Israel, and members were constantly accused of “not caring about humans”. The kicker was that every single member was also involved in at least half a dozen “human” causes as well – more than could be said of the critics.

          In my experience, people involved in Palestinian rights issues, are also committed to and active in many other causes as well. That must be why I always see the same people at demos* – regardless of the cause. The “singling out Israel” argument is thus based, inter alia, on the false premise that Palestine is all we care about. That was also part of the point I was trying to make to jon s, on that other thread. Do the you’re-singling-Israel-out crowd really think that this is our first boycott ever?

          * This is also something that makes the “social justice” movement in Israel a little different. In Italy, people who march for social justice also march for Palestine and against war and for immigrant rights and against all forms of discrimination. The Israeli model seems to be able to compartmentalise. Maybe it’s related to their ability to compartmentalise democracy.

        • annie says:

          what a weird article! i’m flabberghasted.

  7. I’m sure the action stiffened the backbone of irritation at anti-Israel protest, and motivated their contribution, and without distinguishing humane from inhumane effort.

    I think these things are utter failures.

    • Donald says:

      “I think these things are utter failures.”

      Unlike the actions of liberal Zionists like yourself–when one looks at the widespread contempt among Western politicians for the lives of Palestinians and the racist double standards employed in judging the actions of the two sides one has to admit that the propagandists for liberal Zionism have been quite effective.

    • seafoid says:

      The system is now falling apart, just as the naive optimism of America’s Iraq hawks fell apart when that country descended into chaos. Eventually, reality intrudes. Then the backlash comes. The “experts” are upended. We see the cost of not having an honest, open argument, whether about Pentagon strategy or about how the banking system really works, and the media feel embarrassed: “How did we miss that?” In Washington, and elsewhere, the answers are often the same. It comes down to unspoken deals between powerful people, and smiling faces telling fairytales

    • libra says:

      RW: “I think these things are utter failures.”

      I’m not sure about utter failures Richard but then I’m sure you remember from your activist days that such actions take time to succeed. But especially in the case of BDS because Israel produces such desirable products that even the most ardent anti-Zionist is tempted to stray from a hardline boycott.

      Why just today for instance, I must truthfully confess to eating at least half a dozen cherry tomatoes with my lunch. And all the sweeter they were for being such an illicit indulgence. But out of solidarity with Israelis I’m still holding firm on the cottage cheese boycott. Though I’m not sure for how much longer I can hold out. I’m hoping some Israeli commenter here on Mondoweiss will let me know when they’ve secured their right to low-cost dairy products so my guilty lunchtime pleasure can be doubled.

      • The activism that I was successful at were the ones in which I organized self-help efforts and sought to change hearts and minds first.

        The anti-Vietnam and anti-nuclear efforts were utter failures.

        • Chaos4700 says:

          So was your pro-segregation stance, apparently. Heh!

        • Donald says:

          Richard isn’t in favor of segregation in the US, I’m sure.

          But on that subject, there were a lot of upsetting protests back then. Martin Luther King has been claimed by the mainstream now, but he was considered a nasty troublemaker by many in the 50′s and 60′s (and what he said about Vietnam crossed the line even for many so-called liberals). The white South didn’t change its policies because hearts and minds were changed down there–the policy changes were forced on it by the national government and the hearts and minds (or some of them) changed afterwards.

          If one relied on Richard’s favored approach, I seriously suspect there might still be Jim Crow in the south. At the very least change would have taken much longer.

        • Donald,
          I laid out doable non-violent dissent that Israelis and Palestinians could conduct together, but they and all suggestions that did not punish Israel, instead only sought to inform, were roundly condemned here as insufficient, too patient. I think the true general feeling was to seek to control Israel, or to punish, rather than empower with knowledge and prospect of good relations.

          Martin Luther King commanded respect because he kept to his convictions, even in very down times. One of his critical principles was that he was going to have to live with those that he was demonstrating against, and acted accordingly.

          And, he stood on the shoulder of giants.

          There is Palestinian activism that makes enormous sense to humane people everywhere, including Zionists, and there are too many statements of activists that exagerate their suspicions to truth, and then willingly punish “someone” for it.

          If activists stay with principles, and pick demonstration that reflects principles, they will be successful.

        • James North says:

          Richard Witty said, ‘What’s this?

          doable non-violent dissent that Israelis and Palestinians could conduct together

          ‘Would this work to end the massive and illegal Israeli Jewish settlement in the West Bank, the greatest single threat to a lasting peace?
          ‘I hope not. Because I FAVOR the illegal settlements/colonies. I think they should STAY RIGHT WHERE THEY ARE.’

        • Donald says:

          “One of his critical principles was that he was going to have to live with those that he was demonstrating against, and acted accordingly.”

          Sounds like those who favor a one state solution with Jews and Palestinians living with each other in a land they both love, doesn’t it?

          The fact is, though, that civil rights for blacks in in South didn’t come about because white Southerners were melted by Dr. King’s moral position. (I agree completely that he avoided the trap of demonizing white people, but he wasn’t afraid to criticize them either, including the so-called white moderates.) There was outside coercion involved. Federal law, the National Guard, etc…. Hearts and minds sometimes take generations to change. Some people do change–apparently you have changed to some degree, though I think you’re unaware of how far you have to go. But others don’t change much at all, or only after the change has been forced down their throats and they learned to live with it, sometimes grudgingly. And there are still white Southerners who refuse to give up their racist views of slavery, Jim Crow, and southern history.

          The similarities between this and the I/P conflict are obvious, except that we are still in the Jim Crow phase.

        • jon s says:

          The analogy with the American South is false. I wonder where the African-American community would be today had they resorted to anti-white terrorism. If instead of Freedom Rides and sit-ins they had blown up buses carrying whites and bombed restaurants and murdered white children and declared their intention of destroying the United States.

        • Donald says:

          There were some blacks who advocated violence. And there were major riots in the late 60′s. The civil rights movement combined with the coercion supplied by the Federal government is probably what kept those riots from becoming something much worse in the long run. People don’t for the most part become violent if they think there’s a chance of obtaining improvement via nonviolent means.

          And if you go back further to the 1800′s there was Nat Turner’s revolt, which sent shivers down the spines of every white person in the South at the time. Southern whites have always been paranoid about black violence, both real and imaginary. There’s no particular reason to think blacks in the South wouldn’t have revolted if given a reasonable chance of success-when the Civil War came large numbers joined the Union Army and so if there’d been a realistic opportunity to repeat the Haitian slave revolt (which reached genocidal proportions in terms of the death toll) I think it’s fair to wonder what might have happened.

          As for the Palestinians, nonviolent protest is met with violent repression by the Israelis.

        • Donald says:

          Though in some ways you’re right, Jon S. Israel is more like apartheid South Africa than the American south during the 60′s. That’s because there was no larger government willing to impose change on a racist white population in one region of the country. The national government in South Africa was on the side of the racists, whereas our government was split, with the FBI as always spying on the civil rights movement, but at least some help given to the good guys and with the laws of the land ultimately in favor of justice.

          I suppose your next move is to claim that the ANC didn’t target S.A. whites. But there was enormous violence between the ANC and the government-backed Inkatha party, with gruesome atrocities on both sides. Oppression generally leads to violence and we can always count on the “civilized” oppressors to then turn around and claim that this shows they were right all along.

        • Antidote says:

          “Though in some ways you’re right, Jon S. Israel is more like apartheid South Africa than the American south during the 60′s. ”

          Neither South African nor American whites were in complete denial about their treatment of blacks being morally wrong. Neither group was in any serious doubt about who was the victim, and who the beneficiary of their apartheid regimes. Only Germany during the Third Reich and Jews in Israel (and beyond) were or, in the case of Israel, still are wrapped up in an eternal victim complex, fueled by propaganda, that effectively blinds them (or many of them) to reality. In this scenario, every protest, especially violent protest, but also non-violent boycotts or appeals to human rights organizations and international governments, only feed the victim complex and are used to justify disproportionate retaliation, thus escalating the conflict. And anyone who objects is defamed as a traitor or enemy of the state/nation.

  8. As it has been on all the news bulletins throughout the morning, it will be counted as a significant success. It doesn’t matter what you think of it, irritation or whatever, it raises the issues in the same way as the sporting boycott of South Africa did at the time. As for the patronising comments, well what do you expect? Same old attitudes, same old complacency and excuses. The more they sneer and whine, the more they will encourage more boycotts.

  9. ehrens says:

    I found this part amusing:

    Another tweet by @JonathanPos compared the disruption to the Night of Broken Glass, or Kristallnacht – the pogroms against Jews in Nazi Germany (in 1938): “Closed my eyes and suddenly imagined I was at the Berlin Philharmonie circa 1936. Breaking glass would have added a bit of colour”.

    When someone criticizes Israel on its racial laws or draws a comparison between Zionism and the German nationalism it is related to, that’s “out of bounds.” But the Nazi metaphors keep on coming from Zionists themselves.

  10. CigarGod says:

    “Kristallnacht”

    Really???
    Who knew that a bunch of calm, refined concert goers were just bursting with hysteria?

  11. Cliff says:

    This is awesome. Cheers for BDS!

    • DBG says:

      how is this BDS? those who interrupted the concert paid for the tickets I am sure.

      I would like to thank them for #1 there investment in Israel and #2 allowing those, who came to see a performance but saw it rudely interrupted, understand how bankrupt your movement is.

      • Cliff says:

        That’s bizarre.

        Our movement is not ‘bankrupt’ at all. We disrupt the normalizing of the occupation and Israeli identity by cultural ambassadors like this orchestra.

        Israel is a racist, apartheid State. A settler-colonial State. Israelis are not fighting against radical Islam or terrorism. They are fighting the entire Palestinian people. Their identity.

        BDS is moral and just. Exporting Israeli culture, while Palestinians continue to be dispossessed and violated by Zionism – is NOT.

        And DBG, nothing you or any Zionist says means anything.

        The discussion is over. Zionism is racism. People who care about justice for the oppressed are tired of bullshit Zionist memes and diversions and double standards. We want to be active and help the Palestinian cause. That is what BDS is. Get used to it, you self-centered brat.

        • Self-talk Cliff.

          Zionism is the liberation of the Jewish people, self-determination in contrast to suppression or invisibility.

          The form of Zionism is worthy of question. Anti-zionism is another form of racism, a suppression of a people’s self-governance.

        • James North says:

          Richard Witty said, ‘When I say “self-determination,” what I mean is that I, Richard Witty, have the right to go to Israel, a place I scarcely know and whose language I don’t speak, and steal land on the West Bank from Palestinians who have lived there for centuries, if not millennia.’

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “The form of Zionism is worthy of question. Anti-zionism is another form of racism, a suppression of a people’s self-governance.”

          And do you know of anyone whose oppostiion to Zionism is based on anything other than the form which the Zionists have chosen to put it into practice?? In other words, no one is opposed to Jewish self-determination so long as they don’t oppress another peopel in the process. That’s an opposition to form that you pretend is otherwise because you want to call it racism.

        • jon s says:

          Well put, Richard. Zionism sought to “normalize” the condition of the Jewish people, by ensuring their right to self-determination , same as other peoples. Anti-Zionists deny the Jewish people the same rights accorded other peoples.

        • “In other words, no one is opposed to Jewish self-determination so long as they don’t oppress another peopel in the process.”

          I don’t see that. I see lots of unconditional rejection of zionism. The declaration “Zionism is racism”, is that, the unconditional rejection of the right of the Jewish people (the Israeli ones) to self-govern.

          Even if there is tension between Israel and Palestine, Israel has a right to exist.

          As does Palestine.

        • Witty, can you cite me one instance where you as an American jew lack any sort of “liberation” or “self-determination” or how you are suppressed or made invisible.

          I say this, notwithstanding my own thoughts that the US political and social system is basically a con game, but you know what I mean.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          I don’t see that. I see lots of unconditional rejection of zionism.

          No, what you are seeing is a rejection of Zionism AS PRACTICED IN PALESTINE. And the last 4 generations have demonstrated that the Jews in Palestine cannot ennact their exclusionist and supremecist ideology without the accompanyment of massive human rights violations.

          “The declaration ‘Zionism is racism’, is that, the unconditional rejection of the right of the Jewish people (the Israeli ones) to self-govern.”

          Oh, rubbish. No more than the expression “Marxism-Leninism is racism” in the unconditional rejection of the right of the Russian people to self-govern; or the expression “Juche ideology is racism” is the unconditional rejection of the right of the North Korean people to self-govern.

          By god, not everything in the world revolves around the interests, acts, desires and demands of the Jews. If you could do it without oppressing someone else, I wouldn’t give a damn if you all dressed up in zoot suits and spoke Klingon. Jesus, you REALLY need to rid yourself of the conceit and self-flattery that everyone in the world hates you. You’re just naked African Great Apes, like the rest of us.

          “Even if there is tension between Israel and Palestine, Israel has a right to exist.”
          As does Palestine.”
          Not at the expense of someone else. IF either could not exist as a separate polity without destroying the human rights of the others, then, no, it would not have no “right” to exist. The people, on the other hand, do have a right to demand a polity that respect their human, social and political rights. But that right applies to all the people, and not just the 1/2 that are Jews.

        • Donald says:

          “I don’t see that. I see lots of unconditional rejection of zionism. The declaration “Zionism is racism”, is that, the unconditional rejection of the right of the Jewish people (the Israeli ones) to self-govern.”

          This is an example of disrespect. You know perfectly well why people say Zionism is racism–it’s because the way it turned out, mainstream Zionists decided to establish a state at the expense of the Palestinians already living there. Around 700,000 had to be driven out to make it work. Rather than admit this is what people are talking about and confront the issue, as someone like Jerome Slater or jdledell would do, you pretend not to understand.

        • Anti-zionism is another form of racism, a suppression of a people’s self-governance.

          Yet zionism has been suppressing Palestinian “self-governance” for 63 years. Goose? Gander? -N49.

        • “This is an example of disrespect. You know perfectly well why people say Zionism is racism–it’s because the way it turned out, mainstream Zionists decided to establish a state at the expense of the Palestinians already living there.”

          Then a humane movement would clarity, “likud Zionism” is racism.

          We needed a haven (I use the term “we” because my wife’s family survived the holocaust and then escaped post-war persecution in their former home villages to move to Israel. I call that “we”. My family was like Phil’s, relatively insulated, only experiencing racial quotas.)

          And, a haven wasn’t accepted, but warred on, so we needed a state.

          I consider Zionism a liberation AND the likud form of it an oppression.

          My birth caused great pain. I don’t regret my birth.

        • Haytham says:

          Witty:

          This is why I say you are ethically and morally challenged:

          My birth caused great pain. I don’t regret my birth.

          You don’t live in a reality where truth or logic or justice matter. With regard to your silly analogy:

          1. Your mother decided to have you. She was not raped and forced to give birth to you;

          2. The pain you caused was temporary and (see #1) it was knowingly and willingly taken on by your mother;

          3. You had no choice in the matter. You didn’t invent a myth about yourself, fight for yourself as seen through the paradigm of the myth, declare yourself and then kill people and steal from them in order to be born;

          4. Generally speaking, comparing the theft, murder, and ethnic cleansing that occurred for Israel to be “born,” to the birth of an innocent baby, indicates a sick mind.

          You continue to top yourself in the category of “devoid of all accepted human morality.”

        • Donald says:

          “Then a humane movement would clarity, “likud Zionism” is racism.”

          No, the mainstream variety was too. You always want to pretend it’s those bad old rightwingers who did bad things, but Israel was born out of ethnic cleansing with Ben Gurion’s blessing.

          “And, a haven wasn’t accepted, but warred on, so we needed a state.”

          Zionists from very early on gave a pretty clear indication that they wanted a Jewish state in a land inhabited by Palestinians. It’s a recipe for war. There is no place on earth where group X, persecuted or not, could come to an already inhabited area, declare its intention to create an Xist state and not face great resentment and in the end, violence. Only someone trained not to stare this fact in the face could avoid seeing it. I think Jewish refugees and for that matter, any refugee from genocide should be able to flee to a place of safety. That’s not a license to commit new crimes.

          “My birth caused great pain. I don’t regret my birth.”

          Your analogies are generally silly. You seem to think there is something profound about them, but they don’t work.

        • Chaos4700 says:

          Yes, Likud Zionism! And Kadima Zionism, and socialist Zionism, and militant Zionism, and Christian Zionism, and…. did I miss any?

          Witty, name a form of Zionism that exists in real life that hasn’t profited from ethnic cleansing.

          My birth caused great pain. I don’t regret my birth.

          BELIEVE ME, Witty, what’s come after your birth has been FAR more painful to deal with.

        • There is no question that there are differences between my birth and the birth of Israel.

          There are fundamental commonalities though. One, there was no other choice. Jews could not go back up the birth canal back to where they were just genocided with the complicity of many of their neighbors, and to continued harrassment and even continued genocide in some locales.

          And, they were not invited to Western Europe, to the US, to the members of the British commonwealth, anywhere, except to Israel. That, and the sentimental attachment to the land (a foreign one for most), made it the only place to go.

          And, there was room.

          The characterization of Ben Gurion as an inhumane fascist is innaccurate. Most of the quotes describing his racism are misrepresentatively taken out of context, in which the context is of one of survival, not of intentional ethnic cleansing.

          For a very long time, Ben Gurion sought accommodation and mutual recognition from Palestinian Arab leaders. Sometimes it was respected and granted, but ultimately, it was rejected with the result of war.

          In that sense, the birth of Israel WAS analagous to a person’s birth, and it did cause third parties pain.

          It is past. The present is where democracy resides. The past is where unholy resentments reside.

          If you cannot make common cause with those that sympathize with your community’s current needs and aspirations, because they also sympathized with their own community’s birth struggle, then you have made your potential community of sympathy very small (to the point of inevitable failure), or if you “succeed” you will do so only by the repetition of what you condemn (ethnic cleansing, suppression of a people, etc.)

          It is old, and continually dangerous in the present as just as it sounds, considering only one community’s history and need.

          That is NOT justice. Justice is a balance, a net compassion, not a net retribution.

        • Chaos4700 says:

          One, there was no other choice.

          Didn’t somebody in Germany say something similar to Poland? Also, there are VERY CLEAR indications in Ben Gurion’s writings that he ALWAYS intended to ethnically cleanse Palestinians. Your contortions as a vague attempt to justify the Zionist version of Mein Kampf is degrading and insulting. To Jews especially, I imagine, and Holocaust survivors in particular.

        • Haytham says:

          Chaos:

          BELIEVE ME, Witty, what’s come after your birth has been FAR more painful to deal with.

          This is hilarious and has the added benefit of being undoubtedly correct, and I’m only speaking from personal experience. Imagine people that deal with R. DershoWitty in “real life.”

        • Effective intelligent comment Haytham.

          Please remember that you are speaking of a human being, and in public.

        • tree says:

          Please remember that you are speaking of a human being, and in public.

          If a few personal verbal barbs bother you so much, Richard, maybe you could try holding your nose. It worked for you when you justified the ethnic cleansing of three quarters of a million human beings.

        • tree says:

          And, they were not invited to Western Europe, to the US, to the members of the British commonwealth, anywhere, except to Israel.

          This lie gets repeated often. The Zionists in Palestine were given control by the British over selecting which Jews were allowed into Palestine. They screened them on the basis of their health, their ideology, and their usefulness to the Zionist colony. If you didn’t meet the criterion of “purity” of body and mind, or have an “in” with one of the political parties, or have a useful skill, you didn’t get an immigration permit. They didn’t take “refugees”, they took “pioneers”, and even sent those “pioneers” who became incapacitated in Palestine back to where they came from.

          Of the over two thirds of the German Jews who fled Germany prior to WWII, only ten percent of them went to Palestine, with the majority going to other countries in Europe, to the US, Canada, South America, and even to Asia. This is despite the fact that Nazi Germany allowed specific Zionist training camps for Jews heading to Palestine(the Zionist organization was the only Jewish political organization allowed in Nazi Germany), and cooperated with the Zionist leaders to allow German Jews to transfer personal funds into Palestine in the form of German goods shipped to Palestine that would supposedly, at some later date, be redeemable for the German Jew’s original cash. Nazi Germany made it easier for German Jews to go to Palestine than anyplace else, and yet only ten percent of them went there, both because the majority didn’t wish to go there, and because the Zionist leadership selectively screened which Jews it considered “good human material”, in the Zionist term of those days.

          After WWII, Zionists did their utmost to prevent European Jews from going anywhere other than Palestine/Israel, not because the majority of Jews wished to go there, but because the Zionists knew that they needed Jewish bodies, and because refuge elsewhere would prove that a Jewish “homeland” in Palestine was not necessary. Despite this, the majority of Jewish “displaced persons” in the post-WWII camps chose not to go to Palestine/Israel, despite considerable pressure from the Zionist leadershio in most of the camps.

          And yet, over and over it is repeated that only Zionists in Palestine accepted Jews. Bullsh*t. You’ve been bamboozled into believing a fairytale.

        • Cliff says:

          jon s said:

          Well put, Richard. Zionism sought to “normalize” the condition of the Jewish people, by ensuring their right to self-determination , same as other peoples. Anti-Zionists deny the Jewish people the same rights accorded other peoples.

          Wrong. Zionism sought to create a Jewish State in an area that was not predominantly Jewish. Jews were a minority.

          Self-determination does not belong to religions. It belongs to people of a land.

          Zionism ethnically cleansed and ethnically cleanses Palestinians.

          Zionism is the settlement project in the territories.

          Your ‘self-determination’ is not benign. Do you honestly think that anyone would care about Jewish nationalism if it didn’t come at the cost of Palestinian nationalism? And really, not even Palestinian nationalism. More like Palestinian humanity.

          Palestinians don’t even need to exist as a nationality. They are just people. An entire group of people who were ethnically cleansed to make way for your Jewish State. These people have been occupied for 40+ years and continue to have their land colonized.

  12. hophmi says:

    Yeah, I don’t think the BDSers won anybody over by disrupting a concert. It sounds like most people in the audience got an idea of the depths BDSers will sink to to push their hate-filled agenda.

    IPO 1, BDSers 0.

    • annie says:

      hophmi hate speech 1
      BDS hate speech 0

    • Sumud says:

      Yeah, I don’t think the BDSers won anybody over by disrupting a concert.

      Except we don’t need to “win people over”. In fact I personally don’t want to “win people over”.

      What you don’t seem to understand hophmi is that such actions inevitably raise a very simple question in the minds of those present: “what was that about???” Even if they do not currently understand I/P, they now understand that there are activists that feel so strongly about the issue that they will interrupt an event such as this. Human beings are incredibly curious animals. The next time they hear about Israel or Palestine in the news they will pay a little more attention than normal. These are the first steps of an awakening.

      The reason I said BDS doesn’t need to win people over, is because it is much better that people investigate the issues themselves and make up their own mind. That is so much more powerful – as is the fact that BDS has no problem with facts and reality, whereas hasbara is largely based on lies and propaganda.

      I deliberately never speak with my friends about I/P (those that aren’t actively aware of it, I mean), unless they bring it up. One by one in the last year or so many of them have brought it up, and inevitably it is to express horror at what Israel is doing to Palestinians. A corner has been turned, and the idea that Israel is a vicious apartheid entity with a long bloody history is entering mainstream consciousness.

      You can ramble on about “hate-filled agendas” but that doesn’t square with what BDS activists are about. Trying to convince people that human rights activists are jew-hating nazis will not succeed, because it is quite obviously a load of rubbish. The next question that brings up is “why are these zionists lying to me, and what are they trying to hide”. And human curiousity kicks in again.

      • Haytham says:

        Regarding the post of Sumud September 3, 2011 at 6:32 am, above:

        Everyone should read this post by Sumud. It is an affirmation of the indisputable reality, seen throughout human history, that ultimately facts matter.

        hophmi on the other hand? Not so much.

      • Chu says:

        great point Sumud. Although
        Hophmi’s comment shows his desperation,
        you make a strong point that when people see
        BDS in action, in public places, they are going
        to find out what it’s all about. That is the
        raw power of BDS, and it’s why all these
        zio-trolls are afraid of it. They watch these
        videos and they know their Yesha projects
        days are numbered.

      • MLE says:

        My boyfriend is from Peru and has no idea about the Israel/Palestine conflict. He couldn’t understand how I could be of German-Jewish heritage and he doesn’t know about the Israel-Palestine conflict is- and sometimes I wonder if he could locate the country on a map. I’ve given him some of the basics, and bless his heart, he compared the rights of the Palestinians to the rights of the indigenous populations of South America.

        I think its easy for us to look at our friends or family who feel very strongly about the conflict one way or the other and just assume everyone in the world must have an opinion on the conflict, but there are lots of people who don’t really follow whats going on or are aware of the history. Its important for BDS to reach THESE people. I don’t really try reaching out to other Jews. I find most are completely sold on the narrative were given when were younger or they’re aware that zionism is bullshit, but they don’t want to say anything out of respect to their families who still believe.

        • CigarGod says:

          “…they’re aware that zionism is bullshit, but they don’t want to say anything out of respect to their families who still believe.”

          I understand.
          For years…at every single one of my family gatherings…someone walks away from me in a huff or leaves early…because they are so incensed that I condemn Israeli actions.
          If I am in the conversation…I never let them get away with BS.

          I feel I respect my families better if I share my perspective…even though they don’t think so.
          I certainly do a greater service to the Palestinians, by doing so.

  13. hophmi says:

    link to blogs.telegraph.co.uk

    ” Not content with refusing to buy evil Israeli products and refusing to engage with evil Israeli academics, the anti-Israel lobby now wants to prevent people from hearing music played by evil Israeli musicians. They won’t be happy until everything Israeli – whether it’s fruit, books, ideas, visiting politicians or sweet, sweet music – is expelled from the UK. . .

    “[T]he aversion to everything Israeli has become a weird way of life for some people, where the aim is not so much to achieve any political goals as it is to achieve an inner sensation of super moral smugness. They treat Israel as a uniquely evil, fantastically wicked nation, the most evil nation on Earth in fact, if not in human history, whose every product and thought must be kept at bay. There is a deeply censorious streak in all this. In refusing to engage with Israeli academics and now trying to shut up Israeli musicians, anti-Israel protesters undermine academic and artistic freedom – they stand in the way of the free exchange of ideas and even of music between peoples and nations. Their attempt to shut up the Israeli Phil was especially shocking, since the sound being made by that orchestra did not even contain any ideas, only beauty. Mashing together philistinism with high levels of that trendy malady, Israel Intolerance, these protesters sought to prevent the playing of music purely on the basis of who was playing it – people from Israel.

    “The great and terrible irony is that anti-Israel activists claim to be fighting against Israel’s imposition of an apartheid system in the Middle East, yet they themselves practise a kind of cultural apartheid against Israel, demanding the expulsion from polite European society of everything that originates in that country. The end result is the cultural ghettoisation of Israeli thinkers, artists and musicians. Perhaps the Israeli Phil should only play behind tall brick walls, so that the rest of us no longer have to hear their apparently political, oppressive music. As it happens, I am opposed to the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories and I wholeheartedly support Palestinians’ right to determine their own national and political affairs. But since when has that also meant having to develop an allergy to the people and the many wonderful things that emanate from Israel?”

    • annie says:

      the aim is not so much to achieve any political goals

      yawn

    • Did someone say ‘ghettoise’?

      A Torygraph tosser entitles his ignorant screed, There is something very ugly about this attempt to ghettoise Israeli musicians

    • Woody Tanaka says:

      “They won’t be happy until everything Israeli – whether it’s fruit, books, ideas, visiting politicians or sweet, sweet music – is expelled from the UK. . .”

      No, they won’t be happy until there is justice for the Palestinians. The hard-core apologists and even soft-core apologists like the author of this quote really have to get that this is only about Israel because they’re the perpetrators. If they weren’t doing evil, no one would give a shit what they were doing. They’re not that important (except to themselves) that anyone woudl give a damn.

      “[T]he aversion to everything Israeli has become a weird way of life for some people, where the aim is not so much to achieve any political goals as it is to achieve an inner sensation of super moral smugness.”

      I don’t know if this sentiment is the last refuge of the idiot, but it is one of the last. No, people who are doing this are not doing it to feel superior. They actuall do want these Israeli bastards to stop oppressing the Palestinians. Not to feel superior themselves, but because they have the human feelings and sense of justice that is absent among the Israelis.

    • mikeo says:

      Shock & horror!
      Hold the press!
      Torygraph blog writer in right-wing rant!

      Meanwhile in the world of actual public opinion in the UK…

      link to 21stcenturysocialism.com

      link to guardian.co.uk

      link to haaretz.com

      • Taxi says:

        From Mikeo’s first link re BBC survey:

        “Among the most striking findings of the survey is the change in perceptions within the United States, where the negative rating of Israel rose from 31% in 2010 to 41% in 2011, creating for the first time an approximate balance in US popular opinion. The recent factors causing Israel’s declining appeal to people in Western countries are likely to include the raid on the aid convoy to Gaza, in which Israeli military forces killed nine solidarity activists, and the Israeli government’s rejection of President Obama’s proposal for a partial freeze on the construction of Jewish zionist settlements in the occupied West Bank.”

    • “[T]he aversion to everything Israeli has become a weird way of life for some people, where the aim is not so much to achieve any political goals as it is to achieve an inner sensation of super moral smugness.”

      Well put. To these thugs, there is no such thing as an unpolitical act. Everything is a “statement.” Everything is viewed through the prism of pure politics. The notion that the IPO’s performance would “provide the Israeli government, perpetrator of the Cast Lead invasion of Gaza and of so many other violations of international law and of human rights, with the support that they crave” is typical of a lunatic point of view that both politicizes everything, and penalizes those who fail to share their views as aiders and abettors of human rights abuses and crimes. They are all racist propagators of decadent imperialistic bourgeois capitalism who are anti-Palestinian, pro-Zionist/hasbara apologists for genocide, ethnic cleansing, land theft, dispossession, apartheid etc, etc, etc.

      Or something like that.

      Great link hophmi.

      What if a performance is just a performance?

      • annie says:

        lunatic? ouch

        What if a performance is just a performance?

        don’t you wish

      • What if a performance is just a performance?

        Good Question. One that might have been asked by Jascha Heifetz many times, as he realized his arm had been injured to the point it permanently degraded his ability to play:

        On his third tour to Israel in 1953, Heifetz included in his recitals the Violin Sonata by Richard Strauss. At the time, Strauss was considered by many to be a Nazi composer, and his works were unofficially banned in Israel along with those of Richard Wagner.

        Despite the fact that the Holocaust had occurred less than ten years earlier and a last-minute plea from the Israeli Minister of Education, the defiant Heifetz argued, “The music is above these factors … I will not change my program. I have the right to decide on my repertoire.” Throughout his tour the performance of the Strauss sonata was followed by dead silence.

        Heifetz was attacked after his recital in Jerusalem outside his hotel by a young man who struck Heifetz’s violin case, Heifetz resorting to using his right hand to protect his priceless violins from the crowbar. As the attacker started to flee, Heifetz alerted his companions, who were armed, “Shoot that man, he tried to kill me.” The attacker escaped and was never found. The attack has since been attributed to the Kingdom of Israel terrorist group. The incident made headlines in the press and Heifetz defiantly announced that he would not stop playing the Strauss. Threats continued to come, however, and he omitted the Strauss from his next recital without explanation. His last concert was cancelled after his swollen right hand began to hurt. He left Israel and did not return until 1970.

        • Phillip Munger,

          This is a sad and absorbing story. I never knew about this. My paternal grandmother left me a whole collection of Victrola recordings when she died, and I have since transferred them all to CD. Many of them include Heifetz’s recordings of Beethoven piano trios, and violin sonatas he performed with Artur Rubenstein. There are also recordings of Beethoven’s and Mendelssohn’s violin concertos with Arturo Toscannini. They’re superb, especially the Mendelssohn.

          That Heifetz should have been beaten at all for playing Richard Strauss is an outrage. Strauss was a completely apolitical (and amoral) figure. He was interested solely in composing and performing, not in morals or politics. What could there possibly be in Strauss’s music that could ever be in need of banning?

          The Israeli ban on Wagner is at once understandable and incomprehensible to me. I understand that Holocaust survivors can recall Wagner being played on the loudspeakers in the camps, but others not banned (Johann Strauss, Bruckner) were also played.

          Yes, Wagner was beloved by the Nazis but they also loved Liszt and Bruckner, and Beethoven. Yes, Wagner was one of the most voluble and insufferable antisemites who ever lived, and an utterly immoral and opportunistic person. But his music-dramas are not. There is nothing in Wagner’s music that can be remotely construed as a reflex of the ideology and practices of the Third Reich. No way.

          Theodor Herzl, who also loved Wagner, would surely agree.

        • My favorite Heifetz performance is of Alexander Glazunov’s Violin Concerto. I got to truly love it as I prepared to conduct the Alaska premiere of the concerto in 2010.

          In 1905, Glazunov, then head of the St. Petersburg Conservatory, was asked by the Czarist secret police, in the wake of the 1905 Revolution, how many Jews were enrolled at his school. Glazunov, highly irritated, replied, “We don’t count.”

          I wonder how many Palestinians are members of the Israel Philharmonic? Perhaps nobody needs to count.

      • Cliff says:

        Michael LeFavour/Robert the fake Arab said:

        They are all racist propagators of decadent imperialistic bourgeois capitalism who are anti-Palestinian, pro-Zionist/hasbara apologists for genocide, ethnic cleansing, land theft, dispossession, apartheid etc, etc, etc.

        LOL

        BDS is a Palestinian initiative.

        BDS targets the export of Israeli culture (as means to normalize Israeli identity in spite of the occupation and colonization of Palestinian land).

        All your hysterical whining won’t change the nature of the protests. They are just and moral. Colonialism is not. Occupation is not. The end.

    • Cliff says:

      “cultural apartheid against Israel” LOL

      This is no different from the garbage arguments Zionists use like the Nazi boycott of Jewish businesses.

      No, sorry – BDS is not ‘apartheid’. What an insult to real apartheid practiced by Israel against the Palestinians.

      Paying lip service to the Palestinian struggle but then chastising the few, and legitimate ways in which Palestinians can overcome their status is transparent.

      Go BDS!

    • john h says:

      >> “Perhaps the Israeli Phil should only play behind tall brick walls, so that the rest of us no longer have to hear their apparently political, oppressive music… anti-Israel activists claim to be fighting against Israel’s imposition of an apartheid system in the Middle East. As it happens, I am opposed to the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories and I wholeheartedly support Palestinians’ right to determine their own national and political affairs. But since when has that also meant having to develop an allergy to the people and the many wonderful things that emanate from Israel?” <<

      Typical straw man: "apparently political, oppressive music".

      The writer knows BDS was ok and effective against South African apartheid, yet condemns it as an allergy and "cultural ghettoisation" when used against Israeli apartheid and illegal occupation. And then claims it is "cultural apartheid against Israel": utter hypocrisy.

  14. Les says:

    If it works, it is anything but petty. This worked. Congratulations for making more people aware!

  15. With all the hand-wringing over the “vile” actions of the protesters, I would love to see a comparison by the detractors between this act and those against the Jenin Freedom Theater.

    Kristallnacht my @ss.

    • Cliff says:

      It’s very cynical, not to mention contextually false.

      But unsurprising. Zionists have few if any rational, sensible arguments.

      • jonah says:

        Yes, only anti-Zionist pro-Palestinian activists have rational and sensible arguments, particularly when they disrupt a classic concert by the Israeli Philarmonic Orchestra. Maybe it’s unknown to them that the IPO and its conductor are very pro-peace and work actively for reconciliation. Or maybe it’s well-known. In attacking the IPO in such a truly amazing sensible way, they display their so peaceful motivation toward a solution of the ME-conflict. Very very rational and sensible indeed. Congratulations.

        (Is THIS ok, Phil?)

        • Good one, Jonah. But I wouldn’t waste my time arguing with this guy. Talk about someone with “few, if any rational, sensible arguments.”

        • When boycotts of athletic team participation in international events happen, is it based on whether or not the athletes are for or against a particular abuse by the state they represent?

          I don’t think so.

          If the orchestra is that sympathetic to justice and equality for all the people of the region, not only will they understand, but they might be expected to join in song at some point.

        • And your rational, sensible argument for what was done to the Jenin Freedom Theater is what exactly…?

          And, if you don’t mind, what do you waste your time on?

          Remember, you don’t make peace with your friends, but with your enemies.

        • jonah says:

          Hi Robert –

          To put it in perspective, he is just as good as the others. They are simply too “rational, sensible” to argue with. And have you seen how politely they behave if they can identify you as pro-Israel or – even better – as an Israeli Jew, I mean – regardless of what you as person are or may think? I mean, how dare we enjoy Beethoven’s or even Weber’s music …

        • Chaos4700 says:

          You forgot Wagner!

        • Webern, not Weber. Major differences in their art, their times and their lives.

  16. ToivoS says:

    Non-violent direct action angers the targets of those demonstrations. MLK was probably one of the most despised people in America between 1968-1964. He could not have won any popular elections. Yet when he was through Jim Crow was dead. The electoral political impact was to turn the South over to the Republican Party away from the Democrats that supported the civil rights legislation.

    So yes, without question the BBC audience is angry and they are now filled with hate against those who support justice for the Palestinian people. Doesn’t matter because the more that the cause for Palestinian justice is publicized there will be fewer people who support Israeli oppression. Just like the Southern white racists ideas were slowly replaced with the notion of racial equality. We know that very few of them really changed their minds but they became politically irrelevant and their views disappeared one funeral at a time.

    This dynamic occurred with the abolitionists between 1830 – 1860, the US union movement in the early 20th century and the antiVietnamwar movement in the 1960s.

    • their views disappeared one funeral at a time.

      Very well written. I remember someone quoting George Stephanopoulis on gay rights and he said it was not a matter of if but when. He said the young demographic was not bothered by it and that those opposing it would die out.

  17. The editor of the Jewish Chronicle, Stephen Pollard, writing in the Telegraph culture section today, has compared boycott activists to Nazi blackshirts: ‘When the Israel Philharmonic played on Thursday evening, a band of around 30 thugs – none was wearing jackboots, but they should have been – launched into chanting and mock singing, disrupting the concert…. There is a chilling air to the so-called protests: an air of Weimar Germany, and the way Nazi party members broke up meetings’. The J14 protest movement, however, is acceptable to Pollard because its grievances are with Israel’s economic not apartheid policies or for its ongoing occupation and colonisation of Palestinian land:

    ‘It shouldn’t need saying that protesting against the actions of the Israeli government is not the same as being anti-Semitic. Clearly not: this month, 250,000 Israelis joined rallies against their government’s economic policies. They could hardly be driven by anti-Semitism.’

    No less clear to the reader is the purpose of Pollard’s inverted commas when referring to human rights norms: ‘As the IPO began Webern’s Passacaglia, a dozen people unfurled a banner reading “Free Palestine” and started to sing about “Israeli apartheid” and “violations of international law and human rights”. As the orchestra played over the disruption, the hooligans were removed by security guards.’

    If we can dismiss them with epithets of scorn – as worthless hooligans, racists, bleeding heart liberals – then we have no need to listen to them, just shut them down.

    link to telegraph.co.uk

    • Superb piece by Pollard. Thanks for the link.

      Says he:

      “It seems to me that the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC) long ago moved from legitimate protest for a legitimate cause – the rights of Palestinians to self-determination – to attacks on Jews for being Jews…

      As for the Proms hooligans, there is one big difference from the Weimar audiences. Far from being afraid of the thugs, the Proms audience turned almost as one on them. They chanted “Out, out, out”. As one of the men fought with security guards, a woman can be heard shouting “Shut your mouth”. In fact, their violent, thoroughly illegitimate tactics did nothing but harm to their cause. Ed Vaizey, the Culture Minister, was in the Royal Albert Hall for the concert. As he tweeted on the night: “Demonstrators seem to have turned [the] entire audience pro-Israel.”

      This says it all: their wretched hypocrisy and their infantile thuggishness are their best and most effective advertisement against themselves. Just let them be themselves.

  18. annie says:

    hey! thanks for the updated video!

    • Miranda of British Artists for Palestine did a really professional job (so it took a little longer to put together) and the effect is very powerful, not least the dedication at the end of the video ‘to the music students, musicians and orchestras of Palestine’.

      • annie says:

        i noticed the ode to boycott video had the same dedication, to the musicians of palestine.

        i liked the beginning of the video where you could hear the operatic voices merging with the music. coming thru on the bbc radio must have been thrilling.

  19. mudder says:

    I’ve been reticent to discuss my feelings on this since I think that BSD is so critical to Palestinians–in the end Omar Barghouti may matter much more than Marwan or Mustafa in the liberation of Palestine. But it is important to consider the public relations context. The conservative press is full of editorials denouncing this. The liberal press, excluding this blogsite and a few brave others, are absent in the debate.

    • mudder says:

      “…not hesitating to talk about politics. Yes to a Palestinian state; no to the separation fence; and the disengagement is merely ‘baksheesh’. This is the Maestro.” link to zubinmehta.net

      Don’t turn Zubin against us.

    • mudder says:

      Good night. An hour and a half after submitting and still my comment is awaiting moderation?

      • mudder says:

        Good night forever.

        • annie says:

          forever? what happened.

        • mudder says:

          Usually at least 90 minutes to get a submission posted. Yep-still awating moderation.

        • mudder says:

          Sometimes I think it’s because I denounced Horowitz as running a hate site. But it was clear from the context that I meant David Horowitz not Adam.

        • annie says:

          sumud, who lives in australia, was mentioning the other day he has to wait three hrs sometimes to post (because during the day there everyone is sleeping here). i’ve noticed posts go thru fast starting about 8 am pst, 11 east coast (the timestamp on the blog) night times run a little later. i don’t recall you saying anything outrageous. it seems to me they go thru in batches.

        • mudder says:

          okay annie, I’ll cool down and hang in there. I love this site.

        • annie says:

          hey mudder, i just checked out your comment history and you have a lot of good comments. including the dog attack during the civil rights movement. i might grab that for a front page spread if anything horrible breaks out w/these settler attack dogs. anyway, you have really good comments and a very decent rate of response (more than me but then i comment a lot). sometimes it makes a little energy to get in the flow of the commenters and you have not even made 100 yet. so don’t give up. if people have an issue with your comments in a negative way they will say something, and they haven’t. if you want to get more ‘involved’ go to the ‘active’ threads..straight to to ‘fresh comments’ in the scroll and comment there. because those are the people that are awake and commenting..maybe. unless they are not. but the chances you are, as a rule, waiting longer than other people for their posts is probably not accurate. it’s probably more accurate the moderator is off smoking a dubie or something. maybe they’re off (xxxxxxxxxxxx) doing something that would get my comment banned. who knows. but don’t take it personally.

          I love this site.

          me too! welcome aboard mudder!

        • annie says:

          hey mudder. you should comment 4 more times and we can celebrate your 100th comment together, tonight.

        • Sumud says:

          mud, who lives in australia, was mentioning the other day he has to wait three hrs sometimes to post (because during the day there everyone is sleeping here).

          All true annie & mudder.

          I know nothing about the moderation process but there are times when things get through fast, and times when they get through slow. Don’t take it personal mudder – it’s just the moderator(s) being there or not.

    • ToivoS says:

      in the end Omar Barghouti may matter much more than Marwan or Mustafa in the liberation of Palestine

      I agree. Omar is very effective, I heard him speak in my town about 18 months ago. He was very effective staying on message. Namely, he supported justice for the Palestinians and he didn’t care if it was a one, two or more state solution, the bottom line was justice for Palestinians. He was debating a Zionist who attempted to turn the discussion into the endless details of the 2000 Camp David negotiation points. Omar kept on coming back to one point: any solution requires justice for Palestinians.

      He effectively turned the debate into a simple question: Do you support justice for the Palestinians or do you support Israeli oppression? As far as I can tell Omar is succeeding in this framing. The Zionist effort to turn this into a question of antisemitism is losing.

      • Sumud says:

        The Zionist effort to turn this into a question of antisemitism is losing.

        Agree – every Israeli/zionist response to BDS in the last few months has been about the holocaust and comparing BDS’ers to nazis.

        As irritating as this, on second thought I welcome it – I see it as a sign that zionism is on it’s last legs. The holocaust has always been their big-gun, get-out-of-jail-free card, and it’s stopped working. There’s nowhere to go after that, except down, down, down in the public’s mind.

    • annie says:

      well mudder, i wouldn’t hold my breath the msm in the US is going to be reporting on the boycott especially not in a positive light. that’s just the nature of the beast.

      if we waited for the press we’d be no where. the boycott is spreading. don’t worry about the press. you’re right about omar, he’s awesome.

  20. Erasmus says:

    WELL DONE!! Great BDS activity and Great lyrics by Sue Blackwell !!

    Ludwig v. Beethoven and Friedrich Schiller,
    in other words GERMANY, for PALESTINE,
    Human Rights and Freedom- and this in London!

    Who cares if Angelina Merkel (who is she?) opposes Palestine statehood?

  21. There is a very simple comparison with Krystal nact, but not the one that the stupid Tory minister Ed Vaizey made. It is that the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra and its conductor, Wilhelm Furtwangler also toured abroad, as cultural ambassadors for Nazi Germany.

    Those who say we should not have disrupted the IPO are also saying that the BPO and Furtwanger were also not appropriate subjects for boycott, though the latter was lambasted after the war as a Nazi sympathiser for his cultural work on behalf of the Nazi state (he and the BPO were subsidised by Hitler’s regime).

    the IPO perform a similar function, there are to my knowledge no Arabs in the IPO, and are equally deserving of such treatment.

    Of course Zionists don’t agree. They didn’t agree with a boycott of Nazi Germany. In fact they made a trade agreement, Ha’avara with the Nazis in 1933, which broke the labour movement’s economic boycott of Nazi Germany.