Why isn’t Kusra killing on the front page of our newspapers?

Imagine for a moment that on the day of the fancy speeches at the U.N. last Friday an Israeli father had been killed by a rocket out of Gaza. You know that the killing and the funeral would have been big news in the States. I bet we would have seen a photo of the grieving family and village on the front page of the Times– alongside of Abbas, asking the world for a Palestinian state. The nightly news would have had some footage.

Well last Friday morning — as Mahmoud Abbas later stated in his speech that day at the U.N.– Israeli soldiers killed a Palestinian father  of 7 in the little village of Kusra in the northern West Bank. Issam Badran was 35.

A group of Israeli settlers came to tear down the village’s olive trees. They had set fire to its mosque earlier this month. And the village is resisting in its way. Three hundred people from the village went out to protect their lands last Friday.

Israeli soldiers came between the settlers and Palestinians. And who did they attack– the villagers! They shot Badran in the neck. Here is the best account I’ve seen: http://www.palestinemonitor.org/?p=2329

And Morgan Bach of Seattle, Washington, a 24-year-old volunteer teacher in another village near Nablus, gave this report of Badran’s funeral.

http://filisteenola.blogspot.com/2011/09/september-25th.html

I see nothng in the New York Times or Washington Post.

Yesterday Haaretz had a report on the killing by its military correspondent Amos Harel. An IDF investigation faults the soldiers’ conduct. http://www.haaretz.com/misc/article-print-page/idf-probe-finds-serious-shortcomings-in-incident-that-led-to-palestinian-man-s-death-1.387100?trailingPath=2.169,2.246,2.247,

But note this astonishing report from the army that Harel parrots:

The remaining soldiers came under attack with rocks thrown by villagers, and most of them suffered injuries, most of them light. At that point a company commander and three other IDF troops rescued the besieged soldiers, but then they, too, came under a hail of rocks from short range. It was only when the use of tear gas failed to disperse the crowd that an order was made to use live weapon fire.

According to the interim findings of the investigation, a soldier directed two shots at the lower part of the body of the Palestinian who was shot in the incident after he ws identified as the leader of the crowd. He was hit around the hips, but the bullet exited from his neck and he died.

Is this believable? It is Palestinian boys who throw stones, not 35-year-old fathers, by and large. Most of the soldiers were injured? They used live weapon fire???! And a bullet fired at the hips kills a man in the neck? What is going on here?

I know why Harel parrots. He’s an Israeli covering the government. And the state of Israel tolerates marauding rightwing colonists as they torch a village’s mosque and make for its olive trees. No one is protecting these villagers, except international volunteers. Morgan Bach is protecting a village not far away, with her presence.

In the 60s the New York Times was factchecking the Jim Crow accounts. This time around the White House is afraid to criticize the settlers, and we must rely for American reports on a 24-year-old idealist from Seattle to tell us what is going on. 

If you wonder why our politics are broken on this issue, and why American public opinion is stuck, a big part of the answer is that American reporters are not going to Kusra. 

About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.
Posted in Israel/Palestine

{ 118 comments... read them below or add one }

  1. Kathleen says:

    “And the state of Israel tolerates marauding rightwing colonists as they torch a village’s mosque and make for its olive trees. No one is protecting these villagers, except international volunteers. Morgan Bach is protecting a village not far away, with her presence.

    In the 60s the New York Times was factchecking the Jim Crow accounts. This time around we must rely for American reports on a 24-year-old idealist from Seattle to tell us what is going on. If you wonder why our politics are broken on this issue, and why American public opinion is stuck, a big part of the answer is that American reporters are not going to Kusra.”

    Thanks….passing on

  2. Seham says:

    I know you have a life and a family and stuff but you should stay there and keep reporting from the ground.

  3. Because when you’re special other peoples death do not count would be my guess.

    Exceptionalism isn’t working for neither the Americans nor the Israelis.

  4. eee says:

    1) High speed small caliber bullets tend to ricochet in the body so what Harel reports makes a lot of sense.
    2) This is not main page news because it is a case of the IDF trying to break up a confrontation between the people of Kusra and settlers. The burning of the mosque did make front page news or at least was well covered.

    • Mooser says:

      “it is a case of the IDF trying to break up a confrontation”

      Yes sir, they sure as hell raise some ethically centered Jewish atheists is Israel, don’t they. What a healthy attitude. I’ll make sure to use it to describe anti-Jewish pogroms. They were just “trying to break up a confrontation” between Jews and villagers.

      • eee says:

        Mooser,

        Just read the description of what happened. Do you think that the IDF should have stayed away and let the villagers and settlers go at each other?

        • annie says:

          Prior to the shooting on Friday a group of about 15 settlers went down into the dry riverbed near Kusra to pray, although a brigade commander in the area had identified the location as a potential flash point in advance and moved troops to the area. Despite the fact that the commander had the authority to declare the valley next to Kusra where the settlers were headed a closed military zone, he did not do so and allowed the settlers to come close to the edge of the village.

          Do we think that the IDF should have stayed away and let the villagers and settlers go at each other? no, i think the idf should have not allowed the settlers to approach the village. obviously.

          why do you think the army investigators found ‘serious shortcomings’ in the soldiers’ handling of the incident? are they wrong?

        • eee says:

          Yes, the area should have been declared a closed military area before hand and all this trouble would have been averted. So the commander made a mistake. But when the incident occurred, he shouldn’t have then sent forces to keep the two sides apart? Of course he should have.

        • They never do. Please don’t try and make out the IDF are anything other thann agents of the settlers, their obedient private little militia who are more than happy to stand by and watch violence and destruction against the people whose land it actually is. Not that you care, with your pathetically constructed excuses for them. Your fantasy version of the sadistic little creeps in the IDF isn’t convincing in the face of the overwhelming evidence and eye witness accounts which have been pouring in for years now.

        • eee, this is Palestinian LAND attacked by violent destructive settlers. They should have ordered the settlers, from an ILLEGAL OUTPOST, to go home or face arrest. Ideally they should have been arrested though, and their outpost destroyed. Instead they attacked the Palestinians protecting their own farmland. Reverse the party identities eeediot and I know you would change your sick biased tribal tune.

    • annie says:

      This is not main page news because it is a case of the IDF trying to break up a confrontation between the people of Kusra and settlers.

      so when a bunch of palestinians leave their village and travel over the a settlement together accompanied by pa police up to a settlement and a ‘confrontation’ breaks out and a settler gets shot in the neck i will remember it is not a ”main page” story.

      maybe the idf shouldn’t allow the settlers to harass this village. did you think of that?

      • eee says:

        “so when a bunch of palestinians leave their village and travel over the a settlement together accompanied by pa police up to a settlement and a ‘confrontation’ breaks out and a settler gets shot in the neck i will remember it is not a ”main page” story.”

        If the settlers throw rocks at the Palestinian police that is there to protect them, then that police is justified in defending itself.

    • Your use of the neutral term “confrontation” fails to convey the notion that it was an attack by the settlers on the villagers, and that the latter were only trying to defend themselves, their property and their livelihoods.

      There is no coverage of the key aspect of this “confrontation,” wich is that the State of Israel does nothing to prevent Jewish criminals from attacking Palestinians. After the mosque torching, these people should have been at the very least restrained from leaving their settlement.

      • eee says:

        “After the mosque torching, these people should have been at the very least restrained from leaving their settlement.”

        I see, you are now FOR collective punishment. Can you please make up your minds?

        • I see, you are now FOR collective punishment.

          Read again. I suggested that the settlers who carry out violent actions (like the mosque torching) be restrained. The State of Israel has a General Security Service that perfectly knows who those settlers are, yet nothing is done to stop them.

          The concept of collective punishment does not apply to people who deserve to be punished.

        • annie says:

          photo from today

          Settlers attacked left wing activists, Anatot, East Jerusalem,

        • eee says:

          Yes, but how do you know which settlers torched the mosque? If the IDF knew who they were, they would be arrested.

        • seafoid says:

          40% of IDF officers are settlers.

          It’s going to be hilarious evacuating the Jews from Hevron.

        • Shingo says:

          If the IDF knew who they were, they would be arrested.

          And then released withotu charge.

        • Sumud says:

          If the IDF knew who they were, they would be arrested.

          Because the IDF is the most moral army in the world, right?

          And they have a long and proud history of observing international laws such as the Geneva Conventions, right?

          And the IDF would never treat an Israeli jew or Palestinian different would they, such is their fierce commitment to justice, right?

          Maybe you need to actually read the article before jumping in to the comments sections eee. Summary:

          1. illegal Israelis settlers attack Palestinian village in occupied West Bank
          2. villagers defend their village from marauding settlers
          3. IDF arrives and (forgetting Geneva Convention responsibities to protect the occupied population) joins with settlers in attacking villagers
          4. IDF kills villager

          Very moral outcome there eee. You should be very proud.

        • DBG says:

          40% of IDF officers are settlers.

          Prove it.

        • Cliff says:

          He’s being generous.

          The IDF couldn’t care less about stopping attacks on Palestinians by settlers. And THAT can be proven by Yesh Din studies and B’Tselem.

          Who gives a damn if the IDF, on paper, isn’t 40% (hyperbole clearly) settler-borne?

          The IDF is not a defense force. It is an army that occupies and subjugates the indigenous population while Jews from Brooklyn STEAL and colonize.

        • DBG says:

          Who gives a damn if the IDF, on paper, isn’t 40% (hyperbole clearly) settler-borne?

          Cliff he said officers, which is of course totally inaccurate. Being the the IDF isn’t a volunteer army, it makes very little sense that 40% of the IDF would be settlers.

        • Cliff says:

          That’s not the point.

          The point is that whether or not whatever percentage is or isn’t settlers – the IDF still colludes with the settlers enough to conclude that they are complicit in settler crimes on Palestinians.

        • Real Jew says:

          The fact that DGB and eee are ineffectively attempting to justify the criminal and violent acts of the settlers goes to show how morally bankrupt they are. Straight clowns. Are they trying to convince us or themselves?

        • seafoid says:

          The professional IDF has slowly been taken over by the settlers and
          their right wingnut supporters within Israel. I can post the article on Monday. You know it anyway DBG. Why the coyness?

        • RJ: Themselves. they’re not convincing anybody else. They have to lie to themselves to maintain the fiction they believe in.

        • DBG says:

          My point is simple, seafoid made an innaccurate claim and I called him on it. nothing more, nothing less.

        • Mooser says:

          Gosh, that sort of begs for the question, ‘why are any illegal settlers in the IDF, let alone officers?’

      • Edithann says:

        As I’ve read of these instances..it’s the settlers who invade Palestinian villages and their lands….

        It’s the ‘intent’ that’s important here eee. So what was the intent of the settlers? Were the settlers there to be good neighbors, or were they there as threatening criminals…

        You spend too much time defending them, rather then defending the truth and especially at this time of the years for you..
        Isn’t this the time were Jews repent for past sins?
        Can you possibly understand that the theft of Palestinian land was the monumental ‘Grand Theft’ of the 20th Century and it’s still going continuing?

        There are no excuses you can give that could explain your position..other then you’re one of them…

        TATA

        • john h says:

          Edithann, perhaps it is you who is spending too much time defending the truth.

          Your question was “Can you possibly understand that the theft of Palestinian land was the monumental ‘Grand Theft’ of the 20th Century and it’s still going continuing?”

          And you gave the answer, “There are no excuses you can give that could explain your position..other then you’re one of them…”

          You are writing to eee and similar others who are “one of them” in intent. They would say no, the land was the monumental Jewish need of the 20th century and still is, come hell or high water.

          You see, that was and is their intent, and it’s set in concrete, and repentance doesn’t enter that equation.

        • Mooser says:

          “Isn’t this the time were Jews repent for past sins?”

          Edithann, “eee” is an “atheist Jew”. He don’t need no stinkin’ repentance, and he don’t need no non-existent God telling him what’s a sin and what ain’t a sin! “eee” relies on the ultimate moral authourity, himself.

    • American says:

      eee…..you seriously need some education.

      Start here by reading some insider opinions on Israel at the National Journal Security site blog. They all say basically the same thing. You seem to think that Israel can continue it’s occupation and reign of terror indefinitely. And that US politicians will protect you indefinitely.
      The politicians will protect you up to the day Zionist hubris brings the house down on the US and their heads. Right now it’s a toss up as to whether the Arabs will get Israel first or the US will let it sink once Israel goes too far.
      Pay particular attention to Freedberg: ..”Here’s the strategic bottom line for Israel: Six million people cannot continue indefinitely to piss off three hundred million without consequences.”
      Carry on eee, Israel’s day is coming. I’ll be around to tell you I told you so.

      Monday, September 26, 2011
      After Palestinian Statehood Bid, What’s Next for the U.S.?

      By Sara Sorcher

      Staff Reporter, National Journal

      Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas formally presented his bid for statehood at the United Nations on Friday. Will the request, and a promised U.S. veto, facilitate or impede a return to direct talks between Israelis and Palestinians and the potential for a two-state resolution? Will the anticipated U.S. veto in the Security Council damage Washington’s credibility as a broker for the direct talks? If the Palestinians move in another direction and become a nonvoting observer state in the 193-member General Assembly, which would give them the opportunity to haul Israeli officials before the International Criminal Court, what would it mean for the prospects for peace?

      September 27, 2011 1:28 PM
      “Peace Process” Now a Misnomer
      By Wayne White
      Adjunct Scholar, Middle East Institute

      Since he first became prime minister in 1996, Bibi Netanyahu has made quite clear he will do practically anything to block fair-minded US-Israeli-Palestinian diplomacy aimed at the establishment of a viable Palestinian state.
      With this not yet clear, the Clinton Administration tried to work with Netanyahu for several years, with candid senior American peace negotiators since concluding that Bibi was highly deceptive–perhaps even a flat-out liar. Particularly devastating about Netanyahu’s behavior back then was that when he first assumed office, there was still reason to hope for a final settlement. Since then, with US support–or Washington essentially looking the other way–Netanyahu’s destruction of the peace process at such a decisive and hopeful juncture has led to even more determined Israeli moves aimed at creating facts on the ground that now have made crafting a realistic vision of a genuine Palestinian state near impossible. Israeli settlement expansion has been massive, the network of Israeli “security” roads to settlements (and related checkpoints…
      For quite some time now, the Israeli vision of the future of the West Bank has resembled more closely a source of lebensraum for Israeli expansion, not a future Palestinian homeland. Yet, Palestinians are blamed by Israel and the US for coming to the UN seeking statehood, as opposed to turning to them for such hope. Israel’s increasingly more ideologically harsh stance toward real peace has been blamed on the 2000 Intifada and now a militant Hamas, not extreme Palestinian suffering and dispair–even desperation–stemming from years of Israeli obstructionism and encroachment that increasingly have wiped out so much of that hope. And Washington’s reputation as a potential dealmaker has sunk to a new low as successive US goverments all but rubber stamp Israeli excesses, and US domestic politics some time ago reached a point at which no American running for national office possibly could hope to succeed without pledging something akin to unconditional fealty to Israel.
      Read More

      DIM THE LIGHTS, THE PARTY’S OVER
      By Michael Brenner
      Professor of International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh

      The United States’ strategic position in the greater Middle East is disintegrating. The repercussions of the Arab Spring have undercut the tacit alliance among Washington, Cairo, Riyadh, Amman and Jerusalem with auxiliary members in Yemen and Tunisia among other peripheral states. Mubarak is gone while his former military cohorts sap the revolution’s zeal through symbolic acts that include untying the bonds to Israel while cultivating an alliance with Turkey. Both pillars of the regional sub-system are animated by a deepening anti-American feeling that are spreading across the Islamic world. In Ankara, moreover, the Erdogan government now has its own calculated view of a diplomatic field that no longer has the United States as its hub. The House of Saud is so badly rattled that it is turning on Washington as the cause of its new-found sense of vulnerability. Iraq’s sectarian Shi’ite leadership spurns the idea of a special relationship with us while incrementally building structures of cooperation with the Islamic Republic of Iran. Tehran will not bend …
      Levels of anti-Americanism are so high as to leave those with favorable views of America within a statistical margin of error that reaches to 00.0. The country’s political elite is unifying around the hard position of giving a blunt ‘no’ in response to bellicose demands from Washington that it do our bidding. Everywhere we look, never has America’s standing been so weak, its authority so low, it credibility in such tatters, and its judgment so suspect.
      Little of this registers in official Washington, or in the ante-chambers of power that is unofficial Washington. We continue to bluster and fume, we issue ukase, make declarations, scold and instruct, cast our failures as incidents in the mythic pageant of illusory triumphs from Baghdad to Kandahar to Somalia. The echo chamber keeps reality at bay. Each of these myriad failures has its own saga of hubris, incompetence, willful ignorance and flawed thinking. Iraq stands out only for the brazen deceit and mindlessness that were its hallmark from the inception.
      The kaleidoscope of broken shards that depicts the broken remnants of the American position in the greater Middle East convey incoherence and fragmentation. This is a common element. It is the Israel/Palestine – more specifically, Washington’s progressive subordination of its own interests to the compulsions of Israel’s cynical rulers. It has grown from being a dark shadow that casts suspicions over American actions in the regime to a fatal flaw that has eaten away our authority to act as underwriter, our reputation for integrity and our protestations of concern for the well-being and interests of all peoples. Thus, it aggravates relations, inflames radicalism and sows distrust about Washington’s intentions. Barack Obama’s speech to the United Nations last week confirmed the worst fears of doubters and skeptics. America no longer was just Israel’s protector; it was now Israel’s shil. The President of the United States acted as the shameless mouthpiece for an unsavory client. Obama declared before all the world that he placed his personal electoral advantage above the values and interests of the country – still the potentially most influential state on the face of the earth. His abject behavior humiliated the United States in a way that leaves American diplomacy throughout the Islamic world – and beyond – severely compromised.
      Predictably, these tragic consequences were little noted nor will they be long remembered among a political class whose insularity from the realities of the world is surpassed only by their insularity from the realities of their own nation.
      The chapel light is dim. The script is small. The preacher is blind. The congregants are deaf. And shouts ricochet off the unhearing walls.
      Read More

      Will “they” order us to fight Turkey?
      By Col. W. Patrick Lang

      “Some say the world will end in fire; some say in ice.” Frost

      No. I say it will end in farce. Israel is a small foreign country far away. It has just a handful of people. It is organized politically as the property of a particular religious group. It has very little in the way of natural resources. It is surrounded by hostile countries. Even those countries that have treaties with Israel do not like the Zionist state. Actually, in those countries, “Zionist!” is a deep insult if used in addressing someone.

      Nevertheless, that little country, by the process of relentless “perception management,”and manipulation of our electoral process, has convinced most Americans that it is almost, almost like a part of the US. Oh, yes, there is no treaty of alliance between the two countries.

      Most Americans seem to believe that Paul Newman and Kirk Douglas founded “Izrul” as a kind of extension of the US and its values. Palestine, where is that?” would be the thought of many Americans. Oh, you mean those scruffy, t…

      “Some say the world will end in fire; some say in ice.” Frost
      No. I say it will end in farce. Israel is a small foreign country far away. It has just a handful of people. It is organized politically as the property of a particular religious group. It has very little in the way of natural resources. It is surrounded by hostile countries. Even those countries that have treaties with Israel do not like the Zionist state. Actually, in those countries, “Zionist!” is a deep insult if used in addressing someone.
      Nevertheless, that little country, by the process of relentless “perception management,”and manipulation of our electoral process, has convinced America that it is almost, almost like a part of the US. Oh, yes, there is no treaty of alliance between the two countries.
      Most Americans seem to believe that Paul Newman and Kirk Douglas founded “Izrul” as a kind of extension of the US and its values. Palestine, where is that?” would be the thought of many Americans. Oh, you mean those scruffy, trouble making squatters on Israeli land? Who cares about them. A curtain of silence fell over the subject of Palestinian statehood after the speeches on Friday. This reflects the Israeli desire to avoid discussion of a subject deeply unpalatable to them. With their usual short-sightedness, the Israelis just do not want to think or hear of what General Assembly action on behalf of the Palestinians will mean in terms of Israeli vulnerabilities.
      What will happen as a result of this crazy weekend at the UN and in the Sunday “newsies?” Well, whatever shreds of street credibility the US might still have in the ME will be gone., but, so what! What was left of our once proud claims to being “honest brokers” was just farce.
      What will be the role of the US in the ME? It will be whatever Israel and AIPAC want it to be.
      Read More

      Stop enabling Israel’s self-destruction
      By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.
      http://www.LearningFromVeterans.com

      Here’s the strategic bottom line for Israel:
      Six million people cannot continue indefinitely to piss off three hundred million without consequences.

      Mahmoud Abbas is not Israel’s real problem. The problem is the Arab Spring. Israel has survived for sixty years because of Arab weakness. But Israel’s strategic advantage has been eroding since at least 1982 and will evaporate if the Arab countries ever gets their act even halfway together – which they are finally starting to do. Israel needs to cut a deal with Palestine soon while it’s still in a position to get tolerable terms.

      As for our part, the United States needs to stop enabling Israel’s self-destructive intransigence before it’s too late. We should start by not vetoing Palestinian statehood when it comes before the Security Council.

      I know the veto’s going to happen. Then everyone can go home and play to domestic audiences: Obama to the Israel lobby in the U.S., Netanyahu to the Israeli right, Abbas to the Palestinian infatuation with f…

      Mahmoud Abbas is not Israel’s real problem. The problem is the Arab Spring. Israel has survived for sixty years because of Arab weakness. But Israel’s strategic advantage has been eroding since at least 1982 and will evaporate if the Arab countries ever gets their act even halfway together – which they are finally starting to do. Israel needs to cut a deal with Palestine soon while it’s still in a position to get tolerable terms.
      As for our part, the United States needs to stop enabling Israel’s self-destructive intransigence before it’s too late. We should start by not vetoing Palestinian statehood when it comes before the Security Council.
      I know the veto’s going to happen. In recent years, Israel’s policy towards its neighbors has degenerated into what one might call the “drunk jerk doctrine”: “You don’t like us? So what’cha gonna do about it? We can kick all y’all’s asses anyway.” But tactical superiority is not a national strategy, not in the long run, not in the face of overwhelming numbers: Just ask Germany in 1945.
      For its first thirty years, Israel defended and expanded its territory by repeatedly defeating the armies of the Arab states – to be precise, their poorly trained, poorly led, and poorly motivated conventional armies. Then, in 1982, Israel invaded Lebanon and discovered that Arab guerillas could be much more dangerous, determined, and effective. (The U.S. has learned the same lesson in Iraq since 2003). By 2006, Hezbollah militia were able to stand and fight, not just hit and run, inflicting casualties on the Israeli Defense Force at a far higher rate than regular Arab armies ever had. Meanwhile Palestinians had bogged the Israelis down in irregular warfare during the first and second Intifadas.
      Israel’s strategic advantage, like America’s, is eroding because the Arabs are learning – learning not just better tactics but, more important, how to inspire their forces to fight. As long as Arab states were ruled by inept authoritarians, however, they never had either the organizational skill or the political appeal to mobilize their population for military purposes, so they were always going to punch below their weight.
      Now the Arab people are mobilizing themselves. The inept authoritarians are falling. What replaces them may or may not be more democratic, but it will have to be more populist. Unfortunately, while it is a proven fact that mature democracies really don’t make war on one another, it’s equally proven that immature democracies go to war a lot – more than stable autocracies, in fact – and because their people are politically mobilized and therefore highly motivated, they tend to fight a lot better.
      All of this is bad news for Israel. For now, the anger of the Arab peoples is – for good reason – directed domestically against those who (mis)led them for decades. But they’re not particularly fond of Israel either, as witnessed by mob attacks against the Israeli Embassy in Cairo. If democratization fails in Egypt, then authoritarian leaders will once again find that demonizing Israel is a convenient relief valve for popular discontent. But if democratization succeeds, legitimately elected leaders will find lots of votes for an anti-Israeli policy, too.
      Even in the absolute best-case outcome for the Arab Spring – even if vibrant, stable, peace-loving democracies emerge from Morocco to Iraq – any Arab leader with any respect for Arab public opinion is going to do something to help the Palestinians. Hopefully that something won’t be military action but rather diplomatic and economic pressure. But if Israel governments continue to act as if they don’t have to negotiate, if they continue to slow-roll diplomacy while building settlements on disputed land, it becomes more and more probable that their politicians are going to write a check that their troops can’t cash. Then they’ll have the choice of making concessions, going nuclear, or asking the United States to bail them out.
      Now we come to America’s role in this decades-long disaster. We’ve bailed the Israelis out before, most dramatically by airlifting military supplies in the 1973 war. But rather like bailing out Wall Street, America’s unconditional support for Israel creates “moral hazard”: Like investment bankers, Israeli politicians can adopt aggressive, high-risk strategies in the knowledge that Uncle Sam will come to the rescue if things go wrong.
      What does the United States get from Israel in return? Precious little. On this very blog back in 2009, when I was a moderator, I posed the deliberately leading question, “Is Israel a strategic liability for the United States?” No less a figure than Dov Zakheim, a top Pentagon official under Donald Rumsfeld, acknowledged that, in cold strategic terms, it was. After laying out a long list of advantages of the alliance, Zakheim wrote that
      None of the foregoing, however, can fully justify the vast aid that the United States provides to Israel on an annual basis.

      link to security.nationaljournal.com

      • eee says:

        American,

        Have you been ONCE to Israel? Your whole understanding of what Israel and its society are all about comes from hate sites like these. What you write has been written by thousands before you for decades. And? Israel is here and getting stronger by the day. At some point in time you will realize you are howling at the moon. History clearly supports what I am saying, not your doom and gloom BS.

        • seafoid says:

          eee

          “History clearly supports what I am saying, not your doom and gloom BS.’

          What happened to the last Jewish state in the Middle East?

        • American says:

          eee…

          The National Journal is not a ‘hate site”…where did you pull that from?
          I suggest you start reading some of what the invited experts to that site have to say.
          You just aren’t facing reality.
          Israel isn’t facing reality.

      • American says:

        I forgot to add my chant…oil embargo, oil embargo, oil embargo, oil embargo

        • eee says:

          Why not pray to your fairy godmother also?

        • DBG says:

          American, you’ve mentioned an oil embargo before. Would you be will to sacrifice the American economy to doom Israel? That is what I am getting out of your comment.

          As an American first and a citizen of the world second. I really don’t think it would be worth it. The American economy and global economy is a mess right now, I don’t think it is worth the sacrifice.

        • annie says:

          Would you be will to sacrifice the American economy to doom Israel?

          try asking who would be willing to temporarily sacrifice the American economy for a palestinian state. you might get the answer you’re looking for.

        • DBG says:

          I am not sure i’d be willing to sacrifice the American economy for either Israel or Palestine.

          I am all for a Palestinian state and would/will completely reject a veto @ the UN. I just don’t see why any American would be will to risk our economy for a foreign entity.

        • annie says:

          I just don’t see why any American would be will to risk our economy for a foreign entity.

          we do that for israel already.

        • seafoid says:

          “I just don’t see why any American would be will to risk our economy for a foreign entity’.

          Feith, Wolfowitz, and the rest of the elders already took the risk. And lost. The US spent $2tn fighting Israel’s wars post 9/11 and that sank the economy.

        • DBG says:

          this fighting Israel’s war stuff is nonsense. Israel took care of any threat from Iraq in ’81, as for Afghanistan, even trying to link the two is ridiculous.

        • American says:

          Let me put it this way DGB…I think the threat should be made.
          If the threat isn’t taken seriously then the embargo should be done.
          Why am I willing to risk the economy?..because we don’t actually have a viable economy anyway. We have a casino on a leaky boat.
          DC needs to be shaken to it’s core. The politicians need to be made to stare into the abyss of what they have created and destroyed.
          Big crisis means big opportunites and big exposures in domestic and foreign policy. Big enough exposures to demand changes.
          Short term pain, long term gain.

        • DBG says:

          American, fair enough, but is this all Israel’s fault? do you blame both our domestic and foreign policy problems on them?

          Saudi Arabia would need to join in on this embargo, in all honesty I think the GCC countries are more aligned with Israel than they are with the Egyptian/Turkey/Iranian sphere of power in the ME. An oil embargo in SA would mean the end of the monarchy, something they would never risk.

        • American says:

          “American, fair enough, but is this all Israel’s fault? do you blame both our domestic and foreign policy problems on them?”…..

          No, I don’t blame Israel for our domestic problems or all our foreign problems.
          I blame US zionist and Israel for a large part of our ME problems and for the corruption of US policy.

          The reason it ‘seems like’ everything is blamed on Israel is because mondo deals strictly with Israel, I/P and Zionism, so we stick to that subject and don’t go off into other economic issues and etc..

          I’ve never seen anthing to indicate the GCC countries are aligned with Israel. Last time I looked, at their conference a year ago, they laughed Gates off the stage when he made some remark about Israel’s peace efforts…. but if something has changed since then let me know what you’ve seen.

          I don’t know why you think a Saudi oil embargo would mean the end of their monarchy. The Saudi street is very pro Palestine as an Arab cause so unless you think the US would dethrone them, the monarchy would probably be more popular at home by such a move.

        • seafoid says:

          “An oil embargo in SA would mean the end of the monarchy, something they would never risk”

          Economics not your strong point, is it?
          KSA has a primary surplus of around 15% of GDP .

          A 2 month embargo would bring Israel to the negotiating table and be covered by one year’s primary surplus.

        • seafoid says:

          DBG September 30, 2011 at 9:16 pm

          this fighting Israel’s war stuff is nonsense. Israel took care of any threat from Iraq in ’81, as for Afghanistan, even trying to link the two is ridiculous.

          You are such a clown. do you think I came down in the last shower ?

          First off, here’s Clean Break

          link to en.wikipedia.org

          It’s the real protocols

          And Herzliya 2003

          link to herzliyaconference.org

          The deposal of Saddam Hussein will be a positive strategic watershed for Israel: the removal of a potentially existential threat; Iraq will be taken out of the arena as a potential military threat; the far-reaching changes that will take place in the Middle Eastern strategic landscape – such as the isolation of Syria and the weakening of Iran – will improve Israel’s national security balance.

          · As to the ramifications of the war with Iraq for the settlement with the Palestinians, there are various opinions: one raises the possibility that Saddam’s demise will encourage the Palestinians to end the terror and try to reach a settlement based on compromise. Another proposes that there will be no change in the Palestinian positions and in their terrorist policies.

          · According to one approach, after the war in Iraq the American Administration may turn its attention to the Israeli-Palestinian settlement and this may cause friction between the Administration and Israel. However, President Bush’s normative approach that terrorism must not be rewarded will continue to be the rule. In any case, the Israeli-Arab conflict will not top the Administration’s Middle East policy priorities, as it did after the 1991 Gulf War when the Madrid Conference was convened.

          The Wider Context of the War against Terror, Dictatorial Regimes with Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and Radical Islam

          · Israel has a vital interest in the success of the United States in this “trilateral” war. Never in the history of these two countries has there been such a convergence of interests between the United States and Israel. Therefore, American capabilities and intentions have become a component in the balance of Israel’s national Security.

          ·

        • DBG says:

          KSA has a primary surplus of around 15% of GDP .

          how would their surplus shield them? an embargo would mean no income coming in from their biggest client.

        • Mooser says:

          “I am all for a Palestinian state and would/will completely reject a veto @ the UN. “

          Congratulations on your election to the UN! Are you in the General Assembly, or did they give you a Security Council seat! At last the Palestinians will be treated fairly!

          We see this here all the time. Witty is a past master of the technique: when cornered, the Zionist says, ‘well, a nice Jewish boy like me would never do that (sewage spray, white phosphorus, settler attacks, you name it) and I don’t approve, so now it’s all right’.

          But it’s not BDG (or whatever he’s calling hisself this week) with a seat at the UN, it’s Israel.

    • pabelmont says:

      In the time of the first intifada, Palestinians with a sense of humor used to refer to the very special Israeli bullets which, although shot at people’s legs, hit them so often in the head. (Of course, it was only Israelis who were claiming that soldiers aimed only at legs. Legs were expendable. So were arms. Recall Rabin ordering his soldiers to deliberately break the arms and legs of Palestinians they chose to attack.)

      Here, was there actually an entry point in a leg and an exit from head (an exit without an entrance, that is)? Who’s testimony do we have?

      And why were soldiers who are often said to have been shooting rubber bullets (whatever they may be) shooting (as “eee” suggests or, perhaps, claims) “high speed small caliber bullets” which, as he says, have a tendency to ricochet in the body? Are they deliberately shooting Palestinians (they don’t shoot Israelis with these things do they? Or at all?) with such immensely dangerous weapons? Wouldn’t tear-gas cannisters have done just as well?

    • Chaos4700 says:

      Holocaust deniers at work.

  5. RobertB says:

    Friday, September 30, 2011

    Three Palestinians Treated for Injuries Sustained from Israeli Tear Gas, Settlers Destroy Palestinian Irrigation Pipes.

    “West Bank,(IMEMC)-Palestinian medical sources reported, on Thursday evening, that three residents were treated for the effects of teargas inhalation during clashes with Israeli soldiers invading Yasouf Palestinian village, near the West Bank city of Salfit.

    Local sources reported that the clashes first erupted when a number of armed Israeli settlers attacked the village. Israel soldiers invaded the village shortly afterwards and fired several gas bombs at the residents wounding three.”

    “In related news, a group of armed extremist Israeli settlers destroyed irrigation pipes used by the residents of Madama village, near Nablus.

    Acting village council head, Ehab Al Qit, stated that approximately 20-30 settlers gathered near the spring that belongs to the village, and destroyed irrigation pipes that provide the Palestinian farmlands in the area with the needed water.”

    link to israel-palestinenews.org

  6. Dan Crowther says:

    I think brother Phil needs to stay there for a while too Seham.

    If for no other reason, than to get to the bottom of this new “magic bullet” the Israeli’s seem to have invented.

  7. annie says:

    And a bullet fired at the hips kills a man in the neck? What is going on here?

    this is no different than amir’s death where they lie about everythig. they just make up stories. what happened was the settlers made threats to walk across the land and confront palestinians in their villages which is what they did. the haaretz article should have made clear they desecrated and torched the mosque in the same town just days before, the sunday before as i recall. it’s not very good reporting just to say “One recent incident involved an arson attempt at a mosque in Kusra.” it was not an attempt! they torched the mosque.

  8. LeaNder says:

    a soldier directed two shots at the lower part of the body of the Palestinian who was shot in the incident after he ws identified as the leader of the crowd.

    It’s definitively dangerous for a Palestinian to be identified as a leader in whatever protest. How does one prevent to be perceived as leader. What when nobody show the typical traits, after all there has to be one?

    • Mooser says:

      Oh, it’s easy to identify the leader. All the Israelis have to do is look for that “Palestinian Gandhi” they are always kvetching about and but a few bullets in him.

      • Mooser says:

        Oh well, if it helps young Jews in the US to throw their chests out and pretend they aren’t mutilated, could it be so bad?

        I didn’t write that. I would never, ever be so crude.

        • LeaNder says:

          I didn’t write that. I would never, ever be so crude.

          I know you aren’t crude Mooser, at least not from my perspective. If you were we probably would need to ask ourselves if you could possibly be a rude Israelite, you know, rude, crude and modern times.

          How are times in Washington state?

        • Mooser says:

          How are times in Washington state?

          Honestly, the only thing I can think of right now is “Nord C2, Nord C2″ over and over, ad infinitum forever and amen. I get it Tuesday!

          Nord C2! Google it and see why I’m so excited. It solves the portability-versus-adequate gear issue which has plagued me my whole life. Mostly because I am small, weak and effeminate, but there it is.

        • LeaNder says:

          Gets exquisite quality evaluations, congratulation. I forget the name of the last one that got you excited.

        • Mooser says:

          “I forget the name of the last one that got you excited.”

          So do I! But I didn’t plunk down $3000 for that one, and this time, I took the plunge.
          And today, I just sold my Ducati (1993 900ss) which neatly covered the cost of the organ, and saved my marriage! So it worked out nicely.

        • Mooser says:

          And one of these days, I’m going to learn to play the organ. Really!

    • annie says:

      It’s definitively dangerous for a Palestinian to be identified as a leader

      unless they are identified as such after they are already dead. it could be he was just standing there and some guy felt like making a trophy kill on this special day. and then afterwards they claimed he was some kind of ‘leader’.

      • annie says:

        and what kind of army gives permission for settlers to beat up a child before they have a go at it themselves? his face looked pulverized. this is like a sport to these people. it’s disgusting.

  9. Kathleen says:

    great one up by Glen Greenwald on the OBama administrations unlawful assassination
    The due-process-free assassination of U.S. citizens is now reality
    link to salon.com

  10. annie says:

    from phil’s link to filisteenola blogpost (Morgan Bach). it appears from the text she is traveling with haitham katib, the person who took the video now added to the post.

    We climbed up to Qusra and the first thing we heard was the voice of the mosque. “When they read the Quran you know someone is died,” said Haitham. The village was huge, nestled in the hills, and it was all in mourning for this one man. It reminded me of Jawaher. We made our way to the house of the relatives, and there were a hundred boys standing all together, chanting about God and the martyr. They all looked under fifteen. Across from them, outside the house were 40 or so women, all huddled together, some crying. The wife, the mother, the daughters on the balcony. Two of the sons were tear-stained. I couldn’t take it. I didn’t know if the gas had messed up my tear ducts, or if I was just easily triggered, but I had to turn around and collect myself a few times. I didn’t want to cry, but I didn’t mind if people saw me. It felt like the most convenient way to apologize, even if they didn’t know the bullets were American. I was glad for the green vest, but I didn’t try to play reporter. I stood back and watched while Haitham and the others gathered footage. Then we drove up the village, up, up, up to the top of the mountain and over where the shooting had taken place. A witness walked Haitham around and explained what happened. I climbed onto a boulder and took a panorama of our surroundings. This really was the top of the world, and anyone would be lucky to live up here. I understood again why this was a popular area for settlers, but it didn’t change the fact that a good percentage of them should be in jail. Haitham explained that the settlers from Eish Kodesh had recently burned down one of the mosques, but that a settler had been caught by the villagers a few days prior, and they turned him into the Israeli soldiers. Civilly, non-violently.
    After this interview we were going to leave, and I was ready. Then we learned that one of the injured boys was about to be taken to the hospital. I waited in the crowd while Haitham got an interview with the boy.

  11. Kathleen says:

    Just watched video clip. Exhausting. Can only imagine what it is like to do deal with this every day every minute. Will anyone be held accountable for this murder?
    enough enough enough

    • seafoid says:

      “Will anyone be held accountable for this murder?”

      What do you think, Kathleen?
      Was anyone held accountable for the Cast Lead turkey shoot ?

      Anyway I was talking to an Indian Muslim colleague today. I asked him what does the term “Jew” mean to him. He said oppression of Muslims in Palestine. Yahud is the word. The world is watching. And TBH these settlers are doing great damage to Judaism .

      • DBG says:

        I asked a Christian American colleague what the term “Muslim” meant to him, he said terrorists who blew up the WTC.

        I told him he needs to quit stereotyping people, I invited him to attend my interfaith group where we could help learn from each other that we are all humans and we can’t blame a people a world away for all of our problems.

  12. seafoid says:

    “He was hit around the hips, but the bullet exited from his neck and he died.”

    What about some coverage of the type of high velocity bullets the Israelis use on real people ? And the damage they do to bodies.

  13. piotr says:

    The event was reported in one sentence by the ever objective duo Kersher/Bronner. A dozen of settlers approached the village and attempted to pray and then they were beset by the crowd etc.

    It seems that it was perhaps accurate, although the contex that before settlers were committing arson in the village could be some hint what they were praying for. Concerning IDF “investigation”, it is curious what is omitted. For example, attempts to negotiate with the village, perhaps using a bullhorn: settlers go back to their dwellings, villagers stop throwing stones. Second, what the settlers were doing? Did they try to flee, were they surrounded, or they were throwing stones themselves?

    Shooting at hips seems pretty lethal to me. They were supposed to shoot at legs, and given lack of the firearms on the opposite side, I would think that a correct procedure would be to shoot on the ground, getting closer to a person, to force to flee. But this was supposedly to be “disable the leader in the crowd shot”, hence rather inherently lethal (or extremally dangerous). How they arrived at this idea?

  14. pabelmont says:

    Anyone notice that this “confrontation” (and its unfair treatment by IDF) is one GOOD reason why settlers should not be allowed in occupied territory?

    And, guess what? They are not allowed. Settlement by citizens of the occupier of occupied territory is illegal. so is confiscation of land for building the settlements.

    So there are CONSEQUENCES (besides land-stealing) of Israel’s policy of settlement.

    Maybe someone could craft a crafty question to ask the DoS spokesman about this, and about WHY USA’s DOS does not (any more) call settlements illegal (as they are).

  15. Mndwss says:

    Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo
    I’m begging of you, please don’t take our land
    Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo
    Please don’t take it just because you can.

    Your evil is beyond compare
    Your flaming shots of phosphorus flairs
    On our skin
    And your eyes on Palestine

    Your smile is like a breath of death
    And your voice is hard like bullet rain
    We cannot compete with you, Yahoo

    You talk as though you are asleep
    And there is nothing we can do to keep
    From crying when you torture us, Yahoo
    Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo
    I’m begging of you, please don’t take our land
    Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo
    Please don’t take it just because you can.

    Well I can easily understand
    How you can easily take our land
    But you don’t know what it means to us, Yahoo

    Well you could stay on your own land
    And we have almost nothing left
    It’s the only land we have, Yahoo

    And I had to have this talk with you
    My existence depends on you
    And whatever you decide to do, Yahoo

    Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo
    I’m begging of you, please don’t take our land
    Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo, Yahoo
    Please don’t take it just because you can.

    NO MORE BEGGING/”negotiating”!!!!

    If the UN can not even give the Palestinians a state on 22% of their territory, then all member states should realize what a great mistake it was to join this club.

    UN is a joke.

    The world needs a new UN.

  16. crone says:

    Hatred is not a healthy thing… but I am beginning to detect smidgens of hatred in myself for Israelis.

    • James says:

      you can imagine how the palestinians feel now can’t you? you can probably also imagine why people reach a point where they will do anything to right the wrongs too… they become terrorists.. not overnight, not in a few weeks, but over the course of a lifetime of israels selective punishment for being the wrong race, or the wrong religion…

      if anyone needs to imagine what the roots of becoming a terrorist look like, they don’t need to look far with regular examples like this thread depict…

      the mainstream media is bought and paid for by zionism… anyone who wonders why stories like this are not being covered are not looking at the bigger picture here…

      • Kathleen says:

        “f anyone needs to imagine what the roots of becoming a terrorist look like, they don’t need to look far with regular examples like this thread depict…”

        Tell it It is not difficult to imagine that after witnessing the violence of the US invading countries based on known false intelligence, being part of killing and injuring hundred of thousands …or witnessing and experiencing the endless Israeli oppression, death and destruction of individuals, their homes, olive trees etc turns people into radicals. One would have to be the extraordinary individual or with others committed to non violence to over come natural instincts to want to fight back.

        Glenn Greenwald talks about why Al Alawaki became more “radicalized”
        link to democracynow.org
        GLENN GREENWALD: Well, he, as I said, was born in the United States and went to college in the United States and, for a long time, was considered by the U.S. government and the media to be a moderate Muslim cleric. In fact the Pentagon invited him to a lunch in the wake of 9/11 in order to talk to him and other Muslim leaders about how to root out extremism in the Muslim community. The Washington Post had him host his own chat about the meaning of various Muslim holidays and the like. So, for a long time he was viewed as this, sort of, moderate figure. He became increasingly radicalized, like a lot of people have, over the last decade, as the United States has continued to slaughter Muslim men, women and children in multiple countries around the world, and he definitely became much more hostile in his sermons to the United States, and began arguing that it wasn’t just the duty but the right of Muslims to not just be passive receivers of violence by the U.S., but also to begin to attack the United States back as a means of deterring further violence. And so, he definitely became a great concern to the U.S. because he was so effective in communicating these ideas in English to large parts of the English speaking Muslim world. And, of course, expressing those ideas that the United States is engaged in aggression against the Muslim world and that Muslims have the right or even the duty to fight back rather than getting passively slaughtered, whether you agree with those ideas are not, or think they’re horrible ideas, they’re obviously rights you have to express under the First Amendment of the Constitution. The government began claiming that it wasn’t just his messages and his ideas that were bothering them and making them want to kill him, but the fact he started to have an operational role in various plots, such as the attempt by Abdulmutallab to detonate a bomb in a jet over Detroit over Christmas. They claim that he was involved in the attack by Nidal Hasan on the Fort Hood base that killed 14 American service members. The problem with that is that, there’s been no evidence presented that he’s actually been involved in any of those plots. He is not been indicted or charged. If he has been involved in those plots, then the solution is to charge him with those crimes, bring him before a court of justice, and prove his guilt; not simply to order him killed as though the President is judge, jury, and executioner.”

    • seafoid says:

      We used to live in India and our son went to a local school. One day he came home and showed me what they learnt about Buddha. They learnt his 6 most important teachings :

      Don’t steal
      don’t kill
      Don’t cheat
      Don’t be selfish
      Don’t be angry
      Take care of others

      Buddha would have made a shit Zionist

    • American says:

      “Hatred is not a healthy thing… but I am beginning to detect smidgens of hatred in myself for Israelis.”

      Yes I have the same problem. Mine doesn ‘t extend to all Israelis though, it’s more specific to some and some types.
      What was it Pres. Carter said when asked if he had ever been unfaithful to his wife …..something about he had been unfaithful “in his thoughts”?
      Well, I am a avenging killer ” in my thoughts” when I read about what has been done to these children. I don’t know how anyone could not be.
      Those who don’t are better people than me I guess.

    • annie says:

      i am sorry these thoughts and feelings have crept into your heart and mind crone. you said yourself it is not a healthy thing so you know hatred only eats away at yourself. rise above or else they have won. rise above and do not think or act from a place of hatred.

      i do not hate them. they may make me angry but i don’t hate them, i pity them for their aggression, backwardness, incitement and many reasons..too many to name. steel your heart if you must when it comes to them but do not let yourself be overcome by hatred. . look at their children, see those faces in their defiance and know they are raised in delusion and carry that delusion of supremacy into adulthood. but do not hate them because then you allow them to invade your being. stay strong. we will win this but only in strength. one cannot act from a position of strength with hate in ones heart.

      be strong, overcome. breathe. courage.

      • john h says:

        That was so well said, annie; I salute you.

        “see those faces in their defiance and know they are raised in delusion and carry that delusion of supremacy into adulthood. but do not hate them because then you allow them to invade your being.”

        • annie says:

          i remind this to myself everyday john: “do not hate them because then you allow them to invade your being.”

          do not ever let hatred to invade your being, it only weakens your souls and spirit. i think of mlk. google him and ‘hatred’. it’s true..it’s really true. it’s imperative we come from a place of strength and rising above for we are advocating human rights. all humans even those we may consider enemies. we have to level the playing field. we have to accept our worst enemies to freee ourselves. someday there will be truth and reconciliation so prepare for it now. forgive them. open your self do not close down. hatred is a closing down. steel your heart to hatred and do not let it enter. ever

        • john h says:

          Like you, annie, I can get emotional, and when that happens find it is also a kind of prayer, which brings me comfort and clarity and is a good way to express what I’m feeling.

          I appreciate your honesty and your fire; know that you are one of many making a difference. Just don’t let yourself get sidetracked, especially by trolls; keep the main thing the main thing!

        • Annie is a genuine force of nature.

          “Someday there will be truth and reconciliation so prepare for it now.”

          I’m afraid I’m fairly cynical, but this rang true to me. Hatred does arise from a lack of optimism and faith in the future. We must start acting now as if the world were already as we would like it to be.

          (I hope Adam and Phil are paying Annie the big bucks she deserves for her editorial contibutions. :) Sometimes I think she’s the real heart and soul of this place.)

      • seafoid says:

        Here are their children

        link to youtube.com

        It’s not right to raise children like this. It’s not healthy. Everyone in the settlements is a prisoner of the Israeli government and the lobby. And when push comes to shove the Israeli government will shaft them.

        I think they all need help.

      • crone says:

        just saw your message Annie… you are right, of course. Thank you for your words.

        p.s. – folks commenting about you being a rock are absolutely right-on!

    • Mooser says:

      “Hatred is not a healthy thing… but I am beginning to detect smidgens of hatred in myself for Israelis.”

      To avoid that, I just find them completely hysterical. Say, I wonder how many times our trolls have threatened to leave us? Okay, which one of you keeps begging them to come back and post more?

  17. Jeff Klein says:

    Just a reminder, the “small-caliber” live fire weapons used by the IDF for “crowd control” are Ruger 22 rifles (with silencers!), made by the US company at its New Hampshire plant. The weapons are responsible for at least half a dozen Palestinian deaths over the past couple of years — and many more wounded.

    There is information in the article at the link on how to let them know what you think about that:
    Another Made in USA “less-lethal” weapon kills in Palestine
    link to mondoweiss.net

  18. Elliot says:

    He was hit around the hips, but the bullet exited from his neck and he died.
    This is recycled rubbish. A couple of Intifadas ago, when I worked for the IDF Spokesman, we used to joke that the combat soldiers did indeed fire above the Palestinian protestors’ heads but that the protesters had jumped up and caught the bullet in the head or neck.
    This tasteless quip was our sophomoric way of mocking the soldiers.

    Then, as now, there was no meaningful communication between the combat units and the IDS Spokesman’s Unit. In my day, each general had his own media contact which they cultivated personally. The only function of the IDF Spokesman’s Unit is to counter whatever negativity those pesky journalists wrote. You could actually read those IDF Spokesman statements as a negative mirror of reality.

  19. john h says:

    The Gaza child newspapers omitted, by Ramzy Baroud.

    “Both of Ibrahim’s arms were cut off. He had a hole in his lung. Parts of his legs were missing. His kidney was in a bad condition…we need people to stand with us.”

    These were the words of an exhausted man as he described the condition of his dying son in an interview with The Real News, an alternative news source.

    Ibrahim Zaza was merely a 12-year-old boy. He and his cousin Mohammed, 14, were hit by an Israeli missile in Gaza, fired from a manned drone as they played in front of their house.

    the boy, Ibrahim Zaza, died. His heart was the only organ that had continued to function for nearly thirty days after the drone attack.

    The father, who was allowed to accompany Ibrahim and Mohammed to an Israeli hospital, was then prevented from leaving the hospital, for he constituted a security threat. He kept circulating around his son’s frail body, hoping and praying. He appealed to people to stand by his family, stressing his lack of means to buy a wheelchair, which he thought Ibrahim would need once he woke up again.

    There is no need for a wheelchair now. And Mohammed’s unyielding pain continues. His legs are bare with no skin. His belly area is completely exposed. His screams are haunting.

    In The Real News video report, Lia Tarachansky spoke to Lt. Col. Avital Leibowitz, a spokesperson for the IDF, to try and understand why Ibrahim and his cousin were targeted.

    Lia Tarachansky: “There was only one missile shot, according to witnesses, and it was at two children, one 12 and one 14, sitting outside of their house.”

    Avital Leibowitz: “The logic is that when someone is trying to launch a rocket at you, then the logic is – we better target that person before he targets us.”

    The one photo I could retrieve of Ibrahim Zaza showed him posing shyly for the camera, his hair brushed forward. My heart breaks now as I think of him, and all the other victims of Israel’s “logic”. (palestinechronicle)

    These two were victims of Israel’s response to the August attack that we now know did not come from Gaza or Gazans.

  20. POA says:

    BTW, it is not unusual for a high velocity munition to carom inside a body. It is highly feasable that a bullet could enter a lower extremity, and exit through the neck. A very good reason that hardened high velocity bullets should NOT be used, or even supplied, to troops tasked to provide crowd control.

    There is ALWAYS an excuse these murderous bastards can tout as a rationale for these far too common Palestinian fatalities. And there is ALWAYS some hasbarist dirtbag that will defend the IDF, no matter how blatant and egregious the crime committed. This thread proves that premise.

    • DBG says:

      Many soldiers will tell you this about the 5.56 round, once it enters the body it is notorious for ricocheting all around, making it very hard to repair.

      I agree, using this for any sort of crowd control is ridiculous, I hope the soldier is punished to the full extent.

      • kalithea says:

        If you really hope the soldier is punished LEAVE OUT YOUR FIRST SENTENCE! You know very well “eee” already used that as an excuse so you didn’t need to drag it out again! You’re being hypocritical and disingenuous.

      • mig says:

        Dont worry DBG. IDF soldiers are untouchable. The most moral army can do no harm.

      • Oh right, so it’s not their fault, it is the fault of the bullet which doesn’t follow the laws of physics. Israeli ingenuity knows no bounds, they have now invented a bullet which absolves the soldier of any responsibility for its trajectory. How very moral. These Israeli goons, they just fire, where the bullet goes is nothing to do with them, and anyway the Palestinians probably get deliberately in the way, and move while the soldier is firing. Why can’t they just stand still and give the soldier a nice target?

        • DBG says:

          if that is what you guys got out of my statement. i really feel sorry for you.

        • Chaos4700 says:

          DBG the soldier fired that bullet because his GOVERNMENT told him to fire that bullet. What, do you think he threw a clip of paintballs on the ground and loaded a lethal bullet that he brought from home? Just how far are you willing to go to defend state terrorism and murder?

        • Oh, you’ll get over it, when the next atrocity has to be wished away and denied in your surreally imaginative and convoluted way. Then you can patronise us with your cynicism again.

  21. POA says:

    “I agree, using this for any sort of crowd control is ridiculous, I hope the soldier is punished to the full extent” – (Quoting our resident jackboot)

    Don’t be ridiculous. If his superior did not KNOW what ammo this soldier was using, then it is his superior that should be “punished to the full extent”. But you and I both know that if this one soldier was carrying this kind of munition, ALL these troops were undoubtedly supplied with these munitions.

    Your clumsy attempt to mask the nature of this CRIME is transparent to a fault. The more likely scenario, (than this one “rogue” soldier using an inappropriate ammo, as you insinuate), is that these munitions are supplied, and used, routinely.

    Nice try, though. (Not really.)

    • peeesss says:

      I agree. Palestinian life means nothing to the Barbarians. Throughout these many decades of atrocities, massacres, torture, killing for sport, does one truly expect Israeli’s to “investigate’ honestly, or at all , actions of the IDF, settlers, border guards. The Hasbara Corps will say anything to counter the obvious knowing that our “free’ press would then be “objective’ and “balanced’ in not making judgement. This goes on as Israel “investigates’ said atrocity for days ,weeks on end. Of course there is no true investigation. The Israeli’s , privately , laugh at the aquiecense of the western “goyim” world for their “Balanced” approach. TheStory ,incident is forgotten until the next debasement of Palestinian life ensues. Lets stop talking about Commanders or those under his/her command . One Israeli Jewish fingernail is worth more than a thousand, or was it a million, Palestinians.lives said one past Chief Rabbi in Israel.

      • As long as they can lie about it and the media faithfully report it, closely followed by the legions of propagandists and liars online, they could care less. They don’t care about life outside their own little bubble, Palestinians aren’t even human in their books. Fascist and stupid.

        • POA says:

          We go back to an argument Herr Jackboot DBG and I had some time ago……

          Considering that responsibly equipped troops, tasked to provide crowd control, are wearing face shield, helmets, and kevlar vests……

          ROCKS DO NOT POSE A DEADLY THREAT.

          PERIOD.

          So there IS NO argument that can be lodged in defense of the IDF using live and lethal ammunition when faced with a crowd that includes people throwing rocks. The “Mob Throwing Rocks” defense is an absurd Israeli fabrication used to justify heavy handed and lethal military tactics designed to discourage protest and dissent.

          “Deadly Force” should ONLY be used when a policeman’s or a soldier’s life is threatened. A properly equipped soldier’s life IS NOT threatened by people throwing rocks.

        • DBG says:

          “Deadly Force” should ONLY be used when a policeman’s or a soldier’s life is threatened. A properly equipped soldier’s life IS NOT threatened by people throwing rocks.

          So Kassam rockets aren’t a threat, stones thrown at soldiers heads aren’t threats. I am proud of your movement for abandoning suicide bombing, but it doesn’t mean that other less violent actions aren’t still threatening.

          Name another country in the world where you can throw rocks at soldiers and not expect them to react? thrown stones have killed their fair share of Israelis, denying this is silly.

        • POA says:

          “I am proud of your movement for blahblahblah……”

          Its NOT “my movement”. I am simply an American that wishes my country, and our allies, would actually BE what we purport ourselves to be.

          And YOU don’t even vaguely resemble an example of that model. In fact, YOU symbolize everything we claim NOT to be. You stand as testament to a lie.

          I don’t understand how you and your comrads here cannot grasp that simple truth. Everytime you strike the keyboard, you buttress and strengthen our low opinion of you, and expose our disgust as reasonable and just.

        • Chaos4700 says:

          Name another country in the world where children are expected to die in summary execution, DBG. There are examples, of course, but I want you to put Israel in the same category as those states.

  22. POA says:

    ” thrown stones have killed their fair share of Israelis, denying this is silly”

    Show us one instance where a properly equipped soldier has been killed by a thrown stone. You’re a liar, DBG.

  23. Whizdom says:

    More Israelis have been murdered by family members than by Kassam rockets from Gaza.

    More IDF members have been killed by other IDF members than have been killed by rockets from Gaza.

  24. Mooser says:

    I am writing to the Israeli consulate, today. This is the quality of internet troll a high-tech, up-to-date country like Israel supplies? Then again, maybe the intent is to make us feel sorry for a country which seems to be entirely inhabited by sub-normal intelligences and psychopathic beserkers, lead by the morally retarded.