Israeli drones are reported spying on Turkey for the Kurdish group PKK

Israel/PalestineMiddle East
on 65 Comments
heron
Heron unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) Photo: EPA

Israeli drones have been detected spying on Turkish military units in southern Turkey for the PKK (Kurdistan Worker’s Party), according to Today’s Zaman, Turkey’s English version of the mass-circulation Turkish daily Zaman. The PKK is considered by the US and EU to be a terrorist organization.

The Jerusalem Post is also on the story. First, TODAY’S ZAMAN, İSTANBUL

Turkish intelligence agencies prepared a report after the detection of two Israeli Herons in Hatay and Adana roughly two months ago, claiming that the Herons are collecting intelligence on Turkish military units in order to aid PKK operations in those regions.

The report asserts that the PKK’s training camps in northern Syria, near Turkey’s Hatay border “where Turkish military border posts are relatively weak,” were established in those locations based on intelligence collected by the UAVs.

The report also claims that Kenan Yıldızbakan, a PKK member who commanded an assault against a Turkish naval base in İskenderun in 2010, has made repeated trips into Israeli territory, reinforcing suspicions of a possible link between Israel and the PKK.

Today the same publication reported there were “increasing indications” that Israel and the PKK were “uniting against the Turkish government” in an analysis by Dr. Othman Ali titled “Possible consequences of PKK-Israeli union:”

If this alliance is to take place, it will have serious and far-reaching consequences for Turkey and the Kurdish question. It is our contention that the Kurds and the PKK, in particular are going to be the most adversely affected by this alliance. How and why did this union between PKK and Israel come up and what can be done to deny Israel this leverage in its conflict with Turkey? Starting in the early 1950s, the Israeli intelligence service (Mossad) developed what was known as “the “periphery policy” of the Middle East in which it planned to establish ties with ethnic and religious minorities in the area in order to break the Arab embargo and the isolation Israel feels. Thus, Israel cemented close ties with some Maronites, Druze, Copts, the shah of Iran and Kurdish leaders and groups….

Consequently, Mossad managed to penetrate the Kurdish movement in the early 1960s. The story of Kurdish-Israeli ties has been detailed in “The Mossad in Iraq” by Shlomo Nakdimon. It suffices to say that the relationship was very exploitive and had harmful consequences for the Kurds. It was Zionist circles which in response to then-Egyptian President Anwar al-Sadat’s request to end the war in Iraqi Kurdistan asked the shah of Iran in 1975 to cut support for the Kurdish revolution. So Kurds have experienced Israel, with tragic consequences in the last century, and the PKK needs to take this into account.

The Jerusalem Post is following this story under the title ‘PKK using Israeli drones to attack Turkish troops’

The party, known by its acronym PKK, has a long history of violence in pursuit of Kurdish-self rule and is considered a terrorist organization by the United States and European Union.

The report also claims that Kenan Yıldızbakan – a PKK member who led an assault against a Turkish naval base in Hatay in 2010 – has visited Israel on numerous occasions, further raising suspicions of his organization’s ties to the Jewish state.

Seymour Hersh reported in 2004 that hundreds of Israeli agents, including Mossad agents, were conducting covert operations in the Kurdish regions of Iraq, Iran and Syria. PKK militants have confessed to having received training from Mossad officials.

(Hat tip commenter Marc b.)

About Annie Robbins

Annie Robbins is Editor at Large for Mondoweiss, a mother, a human rights activist and a ceramic artist. She lives in the SF bay area. Follow her on Twitter @anniefofani

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65 Responses

  1. radii
    January 18, 2012, 12:08 pm

    and don’t be surprised if israeli drones are spying on the Kurds for the Turks too … the long, sordid history of israel making money off of war, death and suffering all around the world as they sell arms to any and every scum dictator is sad story all on its own – just look at their influence and profiteering in various African countries … and let us not forget our “great friend” and “only democracy in the Middle East” stole and sold our military secrets to our potential enemies USSR and China

    • dahoit
      January 19, 2012, 10:41 am

      And they were also involved in Georgia,and that Russian Georgia war disaster.
      Man,when people fight above their weight class(population),they tend to dementia.Can this explain everything?

  2. lysias
    January 18, 2012, 12:11 pm

    To repeat what I posted on the Emptywheel thread on this subject, Turkish Double Talk:

    The İskenderun naval base in Turkey near the Syrian border that the PKK attacked two hours before the Israeli attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla happens to be in Hatay province. A lot of Turkish politicians thought the two attacks had been coordinated. (Any Turkish naval assistance for the flotilla would have come out of the İskenderun base.)

    • Annie Robbins
      January 18, 2012, 12:20 pm

      thanks lysias, i read about that this morning researching for this story.

      • lysias
        January 18, 2012, 12:30 pm

        These PKK camps in northern Syria are probably where the guerrillas came out of that attacked the İskenderun naval base. That would mean the camps were already in existence in the spring of 2010.

        If Israel was already providing the PKK with intel from drones at that point, that is most interesting.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 18, 2012, 12:35 pm

        it’s my understanding the PKK camps have been there a long time. then there’s pjak allegedly joined forces in september (although they have always been aligned, just different regions i think) link to hurriyetdailynews.com

      • lysias
        January 18, 2012, 12:37 pm

        Well, the Today’s Zaman article seems to say those camps were established based on intel collected by the Israeli drones.

        The report asserts that the PKK’s training camps in northern Syria, near Turkey’s Hatay border “where Turkish military border posts are relatively weak,” were established in those locations based on intelligence collected by the UAVs.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 18, 2012, 12:58 pm

        wow, ok. i better finish reading it. i don’t actually know much in the way of specifics wrt where their camps are but it was my understanding they were mostly on the borders of iraq/iran and iraq/turkey and iraq/turkey/syria but i find it instructive to look at the borders of the expanded future state on the ‘new’ map. hersh was reporting in 04 they were in syria.

        i’m sure you know the peshmerga were instrumental in screwing w/iraq for the US. naturally i wouldn’t put it past the ptb to use pkk/pjak to destabilize syria. which reminds me i just read about obama meeting w/the jordnian king yesterday and commending him for being the first arab leader to ask assad to step down. i think we’re on full steam ahead wrt syria.

    • Annie Robbins
      January 18, 2012, 12:30 pm

      oh my, more from the comment section there.

      link to upi.com

      A U.S. Predator drone mistakenly targeted smugglers in southeastern Turkey, killing 35 Kurdish civilians, a report said.

      The drone, was one of four based at Incirlik Airbase in southern Turkey, launched the airstrike in December on the village of Ortasu, sources told Turkey’s Aydinlik.

      Turkish air force F-16 fighter jets arrived on scene about 16 to 18 minutes later and continued the attack on what the military thought were members of the of Kurdistan Workers’ Party terrorist group, Iran’s Press TV said.

      hmm. that’s a lot of dead people if it’s true.

      • marc b.
        January 18, 2012, 12:52 pm

        i read the article, annie. sounds like a strike against an ‘unauthorized’ drug shipment, if you know what i mean. (btw, that will be my last ‘conspiracy’ theory on the thread.)

      • Annie Robbins
        January 18, 2012, 4:35 pm

        (btw, that will be my last ‘conspiracy’ theory on the thread.)

        i’m not complaining marc;)

      • pabelmont
        January 18, 2012, 1:01 pm

        Were those civilians also smugglers? Also PKK? what a tangled life people live. Would Turkey have been justified to kill smugglers without arrest, trial? (As USA now claims a right to detain people, or assassinate them, as a bureaucratic [Death Panel] rather than a judicial act?)

      • marc b.
        January 18, 2012, 2:44 pm

        no pabelmont, no one should have been killed, drug smuggler or wedding party. the whole drone meme is revolting to me, the ideal that there can be risk-free engagement of the enemy, real or mistaken. i am re-reading lindqvist’s ‘a history of bombing’, and despite the high-tech gadgetry it seems that the development of drone tactics aren’t all that different than the first air raids on uppity arabs. what is even more striking is lindqvist’s reference to the literature of the time (early 20th century) wherein air power is seen as the potential technology for the complete extermination of the enemy. i’ll add a couple of excerpts later.

    • marc b.
      January 18, 2012, 12:48 pm

      great comments/links lysias. your link to the incirlik comment reminded me of the false flag provocation staged against incirlik in ‘body of lies’. hard to tell who is up to what. the turkish military has a strong incentive to help sustain a managed level of instability through the threat of the PKK, for example.

      • lysias
        January 18, 2012, 3:05 pm

        I read in the German-language Wikipedia’s entry on Incirlik Air Base (English-language Wikipedia unavailable today) that İncirlik Air Base has up to 90 nuclear weapons.

      • marc b.
        January 18, 2012, 3:53 pm

        a busy place. used as transfer point for extraordinary renditions if i am reading that right, and there is a good chance i’m not.

      • lysias
        January 18, 2012, 4:31 pm

        You’re reading that right. I wonder if the entry is right in its implication that the use for that purpose has ended.

        Von 2002 bis 2008 wurde der Flugplatz auch für Zwischenlandungen bei Gefangenentransporten der CIA verwendet.[1]

      • marc b.
        January 18, 2012, 4:59 pm

        the european parliament conducted an investigation of CIA activities in member nations as part of the ‘war on terror’, including sites used for ‘enhanced interrogation’ and rendition. don’t know if there is an ongoing investigation, or how it works with NATO bases, turkey, etc. though.

  3. lysias
    January 18, 2012, 12:32 pm

    The drone, was one of four based at Incirlik Airbase in southern Turkey

    İncirlik is in Adana province, the other province the Today’s Zaman article says Israeli drones were observed operating over.

    • dahoit
      January 19, 2012, 10:47 am

      You would think Turkeys involvement in Syrian regime change would bring Zionist approval instead of Zionist provocation.
      I guess the temerity of Turkey in protesting the murder of its citizens(and ours)by Israel,and besmirching Israels pristine image of civilized behavior,sheesh,brings consequences.

  4. Bumblebye
    January 18, 2012, 12:42 pm

    Israel – State sponsor of terrorism!
    I’ve also read they’re finalising operational plans for distribution to IKF (K=killing) to hit Gaza again “within months”:
    link to middleeastmonitor.org.uk

  5. lysias
    January 18, 2012, 12:44 pm

    The PKK is on the State Department’s list of terrorist organizations. (Indeed, it is one of the two terrorist organizations at issue in the Supreme Court’s recent decision about material support for terrorism, Humanitarian Law Project v. Holder. The other organization being the Tamil Tigers.)

    So, it sure looks as if Israel is providing material support to a terrorist organization.

  6. Avi_G.
    January 18, 2012, 12:55 pm

    This fits perfectly the definition of state sponsored terrorism. That along with Israel’s material support for Mujahideen al-Khalq and Junudu-Allah.

    But, I won’t hold my breath for the State Department to put Israel on the list.

    In addition, Israeli officials repeatedly — but falsely — warn about ‘Moslem Terrorism’ — along with the likes of Pamella Geller — and yet, Israel has managed to be a regional sponsor and supporter of such groups. Fancy that.

    • lysias
      January 18, 2012, 1:41 pm

      Just why does Israel object to Iranian support of Hezbollah and Hamas?

  7. HarryLaw
    January 18, 2012, 1:39 pm

    Not content with starting wars on its own account, the ” Death Star” is using drones controlled by US personnel in Navada to kill 35 Kurdish civilians, creating even more terrorists for Turkey to deal with, Helluva job Obama.

  8. American
    January 18, 2012, 2:38 pm

    This is an example of Israeli overreach and how they think they can achieve Israel regional hegemony by destabilizing and regime change in other countries.
    They are shit stirring all over the place including in SA under the guise of helping the war on terror and rooting out ALQ. Much of what they do will naturally be blamed on or attributed to acting for or with US covert activities.
    When you look at Israel realistically you see this tiny country, overarmed, dependent on the US, that believes it can be a ME empire or some power center in the world by aligning with little armies of assorted terror groups and actors to rearrange or overthrow countries.
    Turkey looks to be treating Israel and PPK as some kind of cockroach problem right now but this is another one of those situations where it could escalate.

    • Annie Robbins
      January 18, 2012, 2:49 pm

      can’t they just blow them out of the air?

      • American
        January 18, 2012, 4:16 pm

        Yes, they can.
        Pakistan back in December told the US it’s policy would now be to shoot down any drone in it’s airspace.
        There will probably be other countries adopting the policy of just shoot them down….countries do have the right to shoot down anything intruding on their airspace without permission.
        I think I read somewhere that lasers can be also be used to bring them down.

      • lysias
        January 18, 2012, 4:33 pm

        And if the surmise is right that the Iranians brought down our drone there by misdirecting its guidance system, that’s another way that allows capture of an undamaged or minimally damaged drone.

        (I wonder what that has to say about the reliability of our — and other countries’ — missiles in general, if that kind of misdirection can be used against them.)

      • seafoid
        January 18, 2012, 5:21 pm

        “I wonder what that has to say about the reliability of our — and other countries’ — missiles in general”

        I wonder about the reliability of what passes for Western intelligence. If it was any use the Yanks wouldn’t still be in Afghanistan 10 years later.

  9. Annie Robbins
    January 18, 2012, 2:47 pm

    i am so angry right now reading about how israel killed two more people, one of them still a boy.

    link to washingtonpost.com

    ‘near the buffer area’ which they keep expanding and expanding sweeping in whole farms.

    • seafoid
      January 18, 2012, 5:19 pm

      Israel is autistic. I wonder how it will all end. Will the educated middle class english speaking Jews have left before the first war goes wrong?

  10. tod
    January 18, 2012, 2:52 pm

    Not to sound like an Israeli apologist, but Turkey seems pretty eager, lately, to enter into Syria, so maybe the important news here is that the bases are in Syria. This could justify an intervention. As for the Israeli angle, this could be “confirmed”, or denied later according to the developments.

  11. Winnica
    January 18, 2012, 4:45 pm

    Annie –

    I didn’t hijack your thread today. I try to be civil.

    I do hope you recognize that this entire story and thread is based on one Turkish report which offers no verification or evidence, and on lots of inuendo. At least the Iranians had that drone, and even the President admited it was real, even though he never admitted that it had been spying and his underlings claimed it actually hadn’t been. The Turkish story, however, lacks even that. No Israeli kit, no films or photos, no documents, merely a claim. Coming a few weeks after Turkish forces killed those 35 Kurds, you have to wonder if the Turks have any reason to wish to direct attention away from their own actions in the area – tho here, I admit, I’m speculating just as much as you are, if in the opposite direction. My point being that none of us have any hard data or verifiable facts. (Except for the 35 dead Kurds: that’s documented, and no-one is claiming it wasn’t the Turks who killed them).

    • Annie Robbins
      January 18, 2012, 5:08 pm

      appreciated winnica, you’re even on topic. helpful. speaking of propaganda what did you think of jpost’s coverage? do you think it was irresponsible of them to run the story without at least getting a denial from mossad or some other goi org?

      • Winnica
        January 19, 2012, 12:06 am

        No. The JPost, just like all media these days, regularly publishes speculation, innuendo and wild guesses. That’s how the media operates. In the old days respectable outlets didn’t publish stories without reliable third-side verification, but that was in the days of one edition per day when they had at least minimal time to do fact-checking. Nowadays no-one expects it of them, and as a general rule, I’d say that most reportage in most media outlets is uninformed at best, and I’m being generous.

        I’ve noticed that you do lots of your research online using media sources, and it’s indeed my opinion that this is an unreliable method for getting at the truth. It has the advantage that it can be done from the comfort of your home and with minimal expense, but it has the disadvantage of leaving you with almost no exposure to most of the relevant data, which can’t be found on the Web.

        This isn’t a political position, by the way. It works in all directions, and I’d say the same thing to a similar operator of the opposite political persuasion.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 19, 2012, 1:11 am

        The JPost, just like all media these days, regularly publishes speculation, innuendo and wild guesses.

        iow you don’t think jpost verifies/fact checks. do you think they are better than press tv? what about RT?

      • Shingo
        January 19, 2012, 1:30 am

        I do hope you recognize that this entire story and thread is based on one Turkish report which offers no verification or evidence, and on lots of inuendo.

        In other words Winnica, you expect us to believe that you know more about this case than the JPost. Yes, the media are all conspiring against Israel.

        Lieberman actually let the cat out of the bag a few months ago when he proposed that Israel should support the PKzk against Turkey, so it doesn’t take much imagination to put 2 and 2together.

        After all. It was also revealed that Mossad are supporting thevJundalla terrorist group against Iran, so it’s also consistent in terms of Israel’s MO.

        You keep alluding to all this mysterious data that can’t be found on the web, while never bothering to specifically mention it. No doubt, you’re probably busy trying to think up some examples.

        Take your time. We’re in no hurry. ;-)

      • Winnica
        January 19, 2012, 3:04 am

        “It was revealed” how? You don’t have access to the Mossad documentation, no-one does. When Mossad killed that Morroccan fellow in Lillehammer it was possible to know what Mossad was doing even without their documentation because there was authoritative Norwegian documentation, but that was a rare case.

        This isn’t a specific Israeli issue, either. Covert actions by spooks of all nations are extremely hard to nail down, and often remain murky until the archival documentation is opened, which is why some countries – Britain springs to mind – have rules against opening it for an entire century. (Actually, some British document from the middle of the 19th century are still sealed, because they contain sensitive information).

        As for what Lieberman said and connecting the dots: have you ever met the concept of politicians saying one thing for political consumption, and doing another thing behind the sealed doors of power?

      • alec
        January 19, 2012, 8:15 am

        So how do you get your information about foreign military activity Winnica? From direct satellite feeds or from calling buddies in Mossad and Shin Bet….

        FUD strikes again.

      • dahoit
        January 19, 2012, 10:59 am

        Even Mossad doesn’t know what Mossad is doing,like the FBI doesn’t know what the CIA is doing,a collection of mushrooms mutually in the dark of their vacuum of morality and humanity.
        There was a story today that some of the antisemitic graffiti in NY was done by a Jewish fellow,imagine that.

    • Annie Robbins
      January 18, 2012, 7:09 pm

      (Except for the 35 dead Kurds: that’s documented, and no-one is claiming it wasn’t the Turks who killed them).

      no, it’s just hard getting an accurate reading on what they were doing there. it’s the same area the pkk attacked turkish forces last august. it’s a horrendous amount of death and ‘sorry’ doesn’t really cut it but considering thousands of people have died over this conflict, why travel in packs in the middle of the night thru this region?

      link to guardian.co.uk

      “The place where the incident occurred is the Sinat-Haftanin area in northern Iraq where there is no civilian settlement and where the main camps of the separatist terrorist group are located,” the air force said in a statement. Investigations into the incident were continuing.

      the locals know this right? why were they there?

      • Winnica
        January 18, 2012, 11:56 pm

        Annie,

        I haven’t the faintest idea who they were, what they were doing there and why. That’s the thing: the fact that I can use Google still doesn’t give me access to most of human knowledge, which isn’t on the Web. What I do know is that the Turks killed 35 people, apparently including teenagers (who are sometimes referred to as “chidren”), who were non-combatants even according to the Turks. It was all over the papers at the time, and the Turks weren’t denying. Beyond that it’s all speculation. The Guardian speculates one way, the Economist speculates another way, and, given the Turkish reaction to the deaths of 9 of their citizens on the Mavi Marmara, some Israelis speculate a third way. None of the speculators knows; they’re all promoting their own pet theories and agendas. The best a body can do is look at the long-term record of the speculator and say “these guy are wrong often, these guys are wrong rarely, perhaps the patterns hold here, too. And perhaps not”.

        In any case, the fact that you’ve got 70 civilians walking through the mountains of Kurdistan in the night isn’t a capital offence, in itself. Certainly not in an area well-known for its smuggler activity.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 19, 2012, 1:08 am

        you’ve got 70 civilians walking through the mountains of Kurdistan in the night

        kurdistan? what borders are you referencing? and if 70 civilians were walking through the night between the WB and israel would you condemn an israeli attack?

      • Shingo
        January 19, 2012, 1:36 am

        What I do know is that the Turks killed 35 people, apparently including teenagers (who are sometimes referred to as “chidren”), who were non-combatants even according to the Turks. It was all over the papers at the time, and the Turks weren’t denying.

        So having wasted half a dozen posts arguing that you cannot believe what to read on the web, you admit that this is where you get your information.

        As for speculation, you could argue till you’re black and blue that nothing is true, including eye witness accounts, on the grounds they too are speculation. Youre argument is simply nonesense.

        The reality is all too apparent Winnica. You’ve given trying to defend Israel by means of legitimate debate because you obviously found it too difficult. As a result, you’ve settled for rejecting all information that comes your way (as unreliable) in the hope that this passes for plausible deniability.

        You’re far too obvious and unsophisticated.

      • Winnica
        January 19, 2012, 2:52 am

        Shingo –

        As I’ve said, Mondoweiss isn’t a source of information, it’s a source of opinion. I feel no obligation to prove anything to you, and even if I tried, you wouldn’t accept the proof. Earlier I cited a website which is full of evidence-based data, and no-one had much to say about it, though I expect someone will come by eventually to cast aspersion on the organisation, not its data.

      • Hostage
        January 19, 2012, 3:29 am

        As I’ve said, Mondoweiss isn’t a source of information, it’s a source of opinion. I feel no obligation to prove anything to you, and even if I tried, you wouldn’t accept the proof.

        Nonsense. There are plenty of articles and comments here that are excellent sources of factual information. Here are a couple of examples for you that are full of things you never learned in school:

        *http://mondoweiss.net/2011/06/are-palestinians-standing-up-for-an-inclusive-national-identity.html#comment-325396

        *http://mondoweiss.net/2011/05/kushner-effect-beinart-calls-for-an-american-conversation-re-israel-that-includes-anti-zionists.html#comment-319299

      • Shingo
        January 19, 2012, 5:01 am

        Winnica,

        The more you try to explain your argument, the more incoherent and desperate you’ve become.

        As I’ve said, Mondoweiss isn’t a source of information, it’s a source of opinion.

        No, that’s your opinion. Mondoweiss of course, doesn’t claim to be a souce of information, but a forum for debate, which is why Phil calls it the war fo ideas.

        Infomation comes by way of contribution, references and links.

        I feel no obligation to prove anything to you, and even if I tried, you wouldn’t accept the proof.

        Then what is your point of even commenting here? If you have no intention of offering a valid argument, you’re simply wasting your time and everyone else’s. As for accepting what you consider to be proof, that comes down to whether your sources stand up to scruitiny. I have accepted argument from those I vehenmently disagree with when they have provided evidence that is sound and credible.

        If you are so convicned of your argument and believe that truth is on your side, then what do you stand to lose by backing it up? What are you afraid of?

        Earlier I cited a website which is full of evidence-based data, and no-one had much to say about it, though I expect someone will come by eventually to cast aspersion on the organisation, not its data.

        Aer you serious? You provided one link in Hebrew. You haven’t even Who are you trying kidd? You didn’t even provide a specific link to the data you were alluding to or what the data was supposed to prove, which suggests to me not even you bothered to read it.

        You’re simply making a complete fool of yourslf.

    • marc b.
      January 19, 2012, 8:57 am

      I do hope you recognize that this entire story and thread is based on one Turkish report which offers no verification or evidence, and on lots of inuendo.

      what a waste of space. winneka, you obviously don’t know the definition of ‘evidence’ or what constitutes military ‘intelligence’.

      Turkish intelligence agencies prepared a report after the detection of two Israeli Herons in Hatay and Adana

      PKK’s training camps in northern Syria, near Turkey’s Hatay border “where Turkish military border posts are relatively weak . . .”

      etc.

      this constitutes evidence. if you want to argue that the images of heron drones were erroneous, or that PKK forces do not operate in the areas identified, for example, by all means, let’s hear your counter evidence.

  12. lysias
    January 18, 2012, 4:59 pm

    “Carl in Jerusalem” supports Israeli assistance to the PKK: Finally: Israel helping the PKK? :

    I hope this story is true. It’s long overdue. One of the first rules of life here in the Middle East is ‘my enemy’s enemy is my friend.’ And the Kurds of Turkey are (or can be) a lot more to us than our enemy’s enemy.

    Looks like some Israelis now regard Turkey as an enemy.

    • Shingo
      January 19, 2012, 1:43 am

      Lydia’s,

      This was reported a few months ago as being a policy of the Israeli government.

      link to todayszaman.com

    • justicewillprevail
      January 19, 2012, 10:26 am

      For daring to stand up to the Israelis, and try to help the Palestinians, Turkey is now to be terrorised by Israel’s friends of convenience. Terrorism is Israel’s favourite MO.

  13. lysias
    January 18, 2012, 5:08 pm

    More details from Arutz Sheva: Turkey Claims Israel is Aiding Kurdish Rebels:

    The report also claims that Kenan Yıldızbakan, a PKK member who commanded an assault against a Turkish naval base in İskenderun in 2010, has made repeated trips into Israeli territory, a fact which reinforces suspicions of a possible link between Israeli and the PKK.

    Two weeks ago, the Turkish army nearly downed an Israeli UAV that was observed spying above the Turkish 14th Hawk B. Brigade Command in Hatay’s Kırıkhan district for four hours.

    Turkish media said the aerial vehicle was hovering over the brigade command post in order to capture pictures of missile batteries and radar equipment. It was spotted by military personnel, the reports said, but before they could get permission to attack it the drone moved out of range.

    The comments below the article show a lot of Israeli support for helping the PKK against Turkey.

    • Avi_G.
      January 19, 2012, 6:58 am

      lysias,

      Arutz Sheva is a settler news site. It’s run by the colonists and they operate several media, including a radio station.

  14. lysias
    January 18, 2012, 5:15 pm

    More details from PanArmenian Net: Israeli Heron UAVs collect intelligence on Turkish military units – report:

    In a related development, phone conversations between Mehmet Veysi Dilekçi and Mesude Yasak recently intercepted during investigations into the KCK, included discussions relating to Israeli support for the PKK. Dilekçi and Yasak, who were arrested during a Turkish operation against the KCK in December in Siirt, mentioned a convoy of 400 trucks supplying aid to the PKK that was sent by an Israeli civil society organization – which was identified as Hae Anshei Targum in the Star daily – in 2010.

    The Kurdish Communities Union (KCK) is a political umbrella organization that allegedly includes the PKK.

    2010 again.

    • Annie Robbins
      January 18, 2012, 5:39 pm

      lysias, thanks. that is the same report as the zaman’s yesterday article (open link to first blockquote. scroll). we were prevented from publishing more due to fair use.

  15. proudzionist777
    January 18, 2012, 6:59 pm

    Such sad lives.

    The failures. The failures.

  16. marc b.
    January 18, 2012, 7:13 pm

    from a december 2007 ha’aretz article: the IAI (israel aerospace industries) had a 2005 contract with the turkish air force to supply heron drones to be used for collection of intelligence against the kurds. IAI and erbit were late on delivery so as a compromise, IAI offers to lease Herons operated by Israeli crews, for $10 million, for a period of 12 months. so in december 2007 israeli crews are providing intelligence on the PKK to Turkey’s Chief of Staff, General Yasar Buyukanit, that intelligence being relayed from the UAVs. later, in the article:“The delays have left the TuAF critically short of UAVs when intelligence input from those valuable reconnaissance assets are exceedingly required,” the Turkish military official was quoted as saying. both ends against the middle, as they say. israel sells tech to turkey, but delays intelligence collection against kurds, and has israeli crews on site to skim intelligence from turks. gotta admit. smooth, as in oily, move.

    • Avi_G.
      January 19, 2012, 7:09 am

      marc b.

      That’s typical for Israeli agencies. By arming or training both sides of the same conflict, they have full control over each side and as a result, they are able to fuel conflicts for as long as they wish. See the Tamils vs. the Sinhalese as one example.

      • marc b.
        January 19, 2012, 3:46 pm

        and other compromises to drone intelligence/ssecurity, avi.

        A computer virus has infected the cockpits of America’s Predator and Reaper drones, logging pilots’ every keystroke as they remotely fly missions over Afghanistan and other warzones.

        The virus, first detected nearly two weeks ago by the military’s Host-Based Security System, has not prevented pilots at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada from flying their missions overseas. Nor have there been any confirmed incidents of classified information being lost or sent to an outside source. But the virus has resisted multiple efforts to remove it from Creech’s computers, network security specialists say. And the infection underscores the ongoing security risks in what has become the U.S. military’s most important weapons system.

        “We keep wiping it off, and it keeps coming back,” says a source familiar with the network infection, one of three that told Danger Room about the virus. “We think it’s benign. But we just don’t know.”

        Military network security specialists aren’t sure whether the virus and its so-called “keylogger” payload were introduced intentionally or by accident; it may be a common piece of malware that just happened to make its way into these sensitive networks. The specialists don’t know exactly how far the virus has spread. But they’re sure that the infection has hit both classified and unclassified machines at Creech. That raises the possibility, at least, that secret data may have been captured by the keylogger, and then transmitted over the public internet to someone outside the military chain of command.

        link to wired.com

  17. ToivoS
    January 19, 2012, 12:30 am

    Well this is interesting news. Israel is now engaged in military actions against another neighboring state. It is the most powerful military power in the ME (excepting the US, of course) so it is only natural that they will conduct war against all of their neighbors.

    Diplomacy be damned, let there be war against all. For those who desire to see the destruction of Israel (exempt me from the list) this has to be good news.

    • justicewillprevail
      January 19, 2012, 10:23 am

      Is there any country that Israel is not at war with, subverting, manipulating and fomenting trouble within? I know they love to play the ‘nobody likes us’ card, but they seem determined to make it come true. The bunker state is an asylum for war gaming lunatics.

  18. American
    January 19, 2012, 1:47 am

    More intrigue around Turkey.
    Some newpaper in Turkey claims Turkish intelligence was tipped Iran is going to attack Americans in Turkey. This is ridiculous for so many reasons, one of which is if Iran was going to send the Guards to attack Americans they could do it a lot eaiser and find a lot more Americans in Lebanon. This is good type of false intell misinfo planting by someone. Turkey is the last place Iran would carry out anything like this. This same kind of false intell and 5 alarm media fire was circulated twice about the Iran guards going into Iraq to attack Americans–which of course never happened. Hate to be a one note johnny but smells like Israel intell planting to me.
    Much stuff going on that is upsetting Israel–back channel communications from US to Iran have been taking place up for one thing. The State Dept ‘down played it’ but didn’t deny it which means there are communications. O is evidently stepping up the pressure on Israel because today Israel announced that any strike on Iran was ‘far off”.

    link to haaretz.com

    • dahoit
      January 19, 2012, 11:13 am

      Any chance Obombas change of direction is because of Dr.Ron Paul and his message?
      Methinks so!
      And one note,played with passion and felicity,can be serendipitous.

      • American
        January 19, 2012, 3:31 pm

        I don’t know, may be part of it—- but I think is more like he knows the possible ramifications on the world of a attack on Iran and it has been even more hammered home to him by some real heavy hitters like Russia and China. Not to mention the potential chaos for some US ME interest like Iraq, Turkey, Pakistan and others.

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