How Israeli apartheid is coming unstuck

Israel/Palestine
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Superland
An ad for the Superland amusement park.

One incident of racism, though small in relation to the decades of massive, institutionalised discrimination exercised by Israel against its Palestinian Arab citizens, has triggered an uncharacteristic bout of Israeli soul-searching.

Superland, a large amusement park near Tel Aviv, refused to accept a booking from an Arab school on its preferred date in late May. When a staff member called back impersonating a Jew, Superland approved the booking immediately.

As the story went viral on social media, the park’s managers hurriedly offered an excuse: they provided separate days for Jewish and Arab children to keep them apart and prevent friction.

Government ministers led an outpouring of revulsion. Tzipi Livni, the justice minister, called the incident a “symptom of a sick democracy”. Defence minister Moshe Yaalon was “ashamed”. Prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu demanded that the “racist” policy be halted immediately.

Such sensitivity appears to be a reaction to an explosion of popular racism over the past few months against the one in five Israelis who belong to the country’s Palesinian Arab minority. Some Israeli Jews have started to find the endless parade of bigotry disturbing.

Israeli TV recently revealed, for example, that a group of children with cancer who had been offered a free day at a swimming pool were refused entry once managers discovered that they were Bedouin.

According to another TV investigation, Israel’s banks have a secret policy of rejecting Arab customers who try to transfer their accounts to a branch in a Jewish community, even though this violates banking regulations.

The settlers, whose violence was once restricted to setting fire to the crops of Palestinians or rampaging through their villages in the West Bank, are now as likely to attack Arab communities inside Israel. Torched mosques, offensive graffiti on churches and cars set ablaze in so-called “price-tag” attacks have become commonplace.

Similarly, reports of vicious attacks on Arab citizens are rapidly becoming a news staple. Recent incidents have included the near-fatal beating of a street cleaner, and a bus driver who held his gun to an Arab passenger’s head, threatening to pull the trigger unless the man showed his ID.

Also going viral were troubling mobile-phone photos of a young Arab woman surrounded by a mob of respectable-looking commuters amd shoppers while she waited for a train. As they hit her and pulled off her hijab, station guards looked on impassively.

However welcome official denunciations of these events are, the government’s professed outrage does not wash.

While Netanyahu and his allies on the far right were castigating Superland for its racism, they were busy backing a grossly discriminatory piece of legislation the Haaretz newspaper called “one of the most dangerous” measures ever to come before the parliament.

The bill will give Israelis who have served in the army a whole raft of extra rights in land and housing, employment, salaries, and the provision of public and private services. The catch is that almost all of the country’s 1.5 million Palestinian citizens are excluded from military service. In practice, the benefits will be reserved for Jews only.

Superland’s offence pales to insignificance when compared to that, or to the decades of state-planned and officially sanctoned discrimination against the country’s Palestinian minority.

An editorial in Haaretz this month observed that Israel was really “two separate states, one Arab and one Jewish. … This is the gap between the Jewish state of Israel, which is a developed Western nation, and the Arab state of Israel, which is no more than a Third World country.”

Segregation is enforced in all the main spheres of life: land allocation and housing, citizenship rights, education, and employment.

None of this is accidental. It was intended this way to guarantee Israel’s future as a Jewish state. Legal groups have identified 57 laws that overtly discriminate between Jewish and Palestinian citizens, with a dozen more heading towards the statute books.

Less visible but just as damaging is the covert discrimination Palestinian citizens face every day when dealing with state institutions, whose administrative practices find their rationale in the entrenchment of Jewish privilege.

This week a report indentified precisely this kind of institutional racism when it found that students from the country’s Palestinian minority were confronted by a series of 14 obstacles not faced by their Jewish compatriots that contributed to denying them places in higher education.

The wave of popular prejudice and racist violence is no accident either. Paradoxically, it has been unleashed by the increasingly inflammatory rhetoric of rightwing politicians like Netanyahu, whose constant fearmongering casts Palestinian citizens as disloyal, a fifth column and a demographic threat to the state’s Jewishness.

So why if the state is so committed to subjugating and excluding Palestinian citizens, and Netanyahu and his ministers so determined to increase the weight of discriminatory legislation, are they decrying the racism of Superland?

To make sense of this, one has to understand how desperately Israel has sought to distinguish itself from apartheid South Africa.

Israel cultivates, as South Africa once did, what scholars term “grand apartheid”. This is segregation, largely covert and often justified by security or cultural differences, to ensure that control of resources remains exclusively in the hands of the privileged community.

At the same time, Israel long shied away from what some call South Africa’s model of “petty apartheid” – the overt, symbolic, but far less significant segregation of park benches, buses and toilets.

The avoidance of petty apartheid has been the key to Israel’s success in obscuring from the world’s view its grand apartheid, most obviously in the occupied territories but also inside Israel itself.

This month South Africa’s departing ambassador to Israel, Ismail Coovadia, warned that Israel was a “replication of apartheid”. The idea that the world may soon wake up to this comparison deeply unnerves Netanyahu and the right, all the more so as they risk being identified as the party refusing to make concessions towards peace.

The threat posed by what happened at Superland is that such incidents of unofficial and improvised racism may one day unmask the much more sinister and organised campaign of “grand apartheid” that Israel’s leaders have overseen for decades.

A version of this article first appeared in The National, Abu Dhabi.

About Jonathan Cook

Jonathan Cook won the Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism. His latest books are “Israel and the Clash of Civilisations: Iraq, Iran and the Plan to Remake the Middle East” (Pluto Press) and “Disappearing Palestine: Israel’s Experiments in Human Despair” (Zed Books). His new website is jonathan-cook.net.

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  1. seafoid
    June 21, 2013, 8:05 am

    And Hassan Usruf, the Palestinian street cleaner, is not even eligible for national insurance .

    link to ynetnews.com

    “At around 4 am we began working near the Opera House and made our way toward the Dolphinarium. Suddenly a large group (of Jews) approached. ‘You’re and Arab,’ they yelled. ‘You want a state? Is that what you want?’ I told them ‘relax,’ and then they grabbed me and began to hit me. One of them hit me in the head with a bottle. I fell to the ground, and they took turns kicking and hitting me. I shouted, ‘We are all brothers. For me there are no Jews or Arabs.’”

    According to Usruf, it was at this point that he felt his life was in danger. “I told myself I would never make it home. They were drunk and beat me because I’m Arab. They were racists,” he recounted. “I tried to run away, but I couldn’t. I was on the ground, alone against 20 people. God loves me so I survived. I’ve been working with Jews for years and they are like brothers to me, but these people were drunken racists.”
    Usruf’s nephew told Ynet: “This is very difficult for me emotionally. I grew up with Jews, and when something like this happens it hurts. And it happened in Tel Aviv, which is supposed to be a symbol of coexistence. This shows that such incidents can happen anywhere.”

    link to haaretz.com

    “Gvaryahu noted the case of Hassan Usruf, a contract worker employed by the Tel Aviv municipality who fell victim to nationalistically-motivated violence in February. He has since been unable to return to work due to his wounds. The National Insurance Institute of Israel has paid him a partial salary for three months, but afterwards his family was left without an income.
    “Everyone tells me that everything will be fine, but since the incident I’m scraping by, trying to find a solution,” Usruf’s wife, Marian, said”

    The truth is that Israel has taken advantage of Christian sensibilities around antisemite labelling and still fragile intra religion relations to implement a system of racism against its own minorities that would never be accepted by Jews who live as minorities anywhere in the world. No US Jew would accept state sponsored and institutional bigotry of the type that drives millions of actions in Israel on a daily basis. No Jew should accept this anywhere.

    Racism is the essence of Zionism. And it won’t be dealt with by a speech.

    And never EVER forget the words of Shimon Peres

    link to nybooks.com

    “A Jew who accepts apartheid ceases to be a Jew. A Jew and racism do not go together.”

  2. Woody Tanaka
    June 21, 2013, 8:13 am

    Great article. The fact that Netanyahoo’s and the others’ response is nothing but PR is the fact that they did not respond by enacting a law which outlaws this kind of discrimination in all walks of life, public and private, and which allocates every and all government resources and benefits without regard for ethno-religious background and, indeed, criminalizes such behavior. If these jokers are sincere, let’s see the israeli state arrest, convict and imprison the people who are doing this discrimination.

  3. seafoid
    June 21, 2013, 8:15 am

    Great piece, Jonathan

    When this comes out into the open the reaction from Africa and African America is going to be something to behold.

    “Ain’t no Vietcong ever called me stinking Arab” as Muhammad Ali might have said.

  4. Shmuel
    June 21, 2013, 9:14 am

    Excellent article. Just one nit to pick. Cook uses the expression “Jewish community”. If he meant Jewish neighbourhood or area, he should have said so. “Jewish community” evokes images of Jewish kinship and voluntary association outside of Israel, rather than the system of discrimination and segregation that is the subject of the article. In Apartheid South Africa, white areas were just that, not “white communities”. (The word community, in and of itself, has warm, positive connotations).

    I presume that Cook was not referring to Jewish settlements – which the settlers themselves and Israeli propaganda like to call “Jewish communities”, precisely for the reasons noted above.

    • German Lefty
      June 21, 2013, 9:36 am

      The word community, in and of itself, has warm, positive connotations.

      I disagree with that. Unless it’s used in expressions like “world community” or “international community, the word “community” implies segregation. For example: Jewish community as opposed to gentiles.

      • Citizen
        June 21, 2013, 1:25 pm

        @ German Lefty
        So, what do you think of the German series Heimat? How do you apply your principles to this production? link to en.wikipedia.org
        PS: I’m probably the only American who has viewed this production. Or maybe not? I’ve never met one.

        • German Lefty
          June 22, 2013, 5:36 am

          So, what do you think of the German series Heimat? How do you apply your principles to this production?
          I have never heard of this series before. Anyway, the word “home(land)” is different from “community”. The first refers to a place, the latter to people.

  5. German Lefty
    June 21, 2013, 9:30 am

    Great article! The next time a Zionist tells me that “the Arabs” are not discriminated against in “the Jewish state”, I can simply link to this article.

  6. goldmarx
    June 21, 2013, 9:36 am

    South African blacks under apartheid did not have the right to vote; Israel’s Arabs always have had the right to vote.

    Does Cook see the right to vote as an example of ‘petty’ or ‘grand’ apartheid?

    • Woody Tanaka
      June 21, 2013, 9:58 am

      “Israel’s Arabs always have had the right to vote.”

      Bull. Some of them do, but the millions who’ve been under the heel of the israeli government for three generations in the West Bank have no right to vote. Based solely on their ethno-religious background. Just like the blacks in South Africa.

      • goldmarx
        June 21, 2013, 12:05 pm

        WT: I do not regard the West Bank as Israel, but an unjust occupation that I oppose, which is why I support BDS. I have always supported the characterization of the occupied West Bank as an apartheid state.

        Cook’s article was dealing with Israel proper, i.e. the nation behind the Green Line. My question was directed to him, not to his self-appointed spokespersons.

        • Woody Tanaka
          June 22, 2013, 1:14 pm

          “WT: I do not regard the West Bank as Israel, but an unjust occupation”

          Whether a state starts a forever occupation without giving the residents rights and equality (based on their ethnicity) or annexing the land without giving the residents rights and equality (based on ethnicity), either way, it’s Apartheid because the course of action by the government in question is designed by racism and aims at furthering the racism.

      • Citizen
        June 21, 2013, 1:28 pm

        Israel is ruled by a coaltion goverment. Israeli Arabs are never a significant part of any ruling coalition.

        • goldmarx
          June 21, 2013, 4:36 pm

          Citizen: True, unfortunately. Israeli politicians allow bigotry to cloud their judgment, but that is all it is.

        • goldmarx
          June 24, 2013, 11:15 am

          Excuse me, Woody, but Citizen over here just used the phrase “Israeli Arabs”. What will you say to him now?

    • Cliff
      June 21, 2013, 10:10 am

      Israeli Arabs are second-class citizens that are viewed and treated as a demographic threat.

      They are discriminated against at every level of society.

      And yet, Zionist propagandists have the gall to use them as an example of Israel’s purported benevolence.

      If we want to know how they’re doing we consult their representatives, like Adalah.

      Not you, Zionist.

      • goldmarx
        June 21, 2013, 4:38 pm

        Cliff: Excuse me, but why are using the term “Israeli Arabs”? Woody Tanaka said it’s a slur if you don’t refer to them as “Palestinians of the zionist entity”

        • Woody Tanaka
          June 22, 2013, 12:35 pm

          “Woody Tanaka said it’s a slur if you don’t refer to them as “Palestinians of the zionist”

          No, they self-identify as “Palestinians.” To call them “Israeli Arabs” is a slur designed by zios to further deny them their rights to their lands. As for the “zionist entity” part, the way I see it, criminal enterprises often make up names and labels and titles (see, e.g., “La Cosa Nostra” or the KKK’s “Exalted Cyclops”). I don’t see how them giving themselves this name obligates anyone to use it. The zionists criminals call their criminal organization “Israel.” Well, good for them.

        • goldmarx
          June 24, 2013, 11:19 am

          WT: So what? The point is, you have not admonished Cliff for his use of the phrase “Israeli Arabs” (which I used to include Arabs who live in Israel who do not identify as Palestinians, such as Bedouins) but only me.

          Does Cliff get a pass because he identifies as anti-Zionist?

        • Woody Tanaka
          June 25, 2013, 10:24 am

          “Does Cliff get a pass because he identifies as anti-Zionist?”

          It’s not about Cliff. Cliff doesn’t support the zionist theft of Palestine, as you do. Cliff’s not a threat to the Palestinian people. People like you are.

    • Maximus Decimus Meridius
      June 21, 2013, 10:30 am

      Would Palestinian (or Jewish) citizens of Israel have the right to vote for an anti-Zionist party? Or does Israeli law outlaw such parties? Genuine question.

      • Shmuel
        June 21, 2013, 10:53 am

        Would Palestinian (or Jewish) citizens of Israel have the right to vote for an anti-Zionist party? Or does Israeli law outlaw such parties? Genuine question.

        The “Basic Law: The Knesset” does bar any list that negates “the existence of the State of Israel as the state of the Jewish people”, but it also bars lists that negate “the democratic character of the State”, or “incite to racism”. Although a number of attempts have been made to bar Palestinian parties, the High Court seems to be uncomfortable with all three stipulations and has overturned decisions by the Knesset Committee in this regard. Nevertheless Palestinian parties (and non-Zionist, Palestinian-Jewish parties) must be circumspect, and are under constant threat of banning and other sanctions. New legislation, already in the works, is aimed at curbing the power of the High Court to intervene in such matters.

        Bottom line, Ta’al or Balad have been able to get away with advocating a “state of all its citizens” so far, but an “Anti-Zionist Workers’ Party” would be banned faster than you can say “Jewish and democratic”.

        • NormanF
          June 21, 2013, 11:31 am

          Israel’s leftist Supreme Court has repeatedly violated the Basic Law requiring parties that advocate undermining Israel as the Jewish State to be banned by allowing them to run in elections. No other country on earth would allow legislators that reject the existence of the state to be seated in its elected body. In this regard, Israel is far too progressive.

        • Maximus Decimus Meridius
          June 21, 2013, 11:51 am

          ”No other country on earth would allow legislators that reject the existence of the state to be seated in its elected body. In this regard, Israel is far too progressive.”

          Ah yes, the ol’ ‘no other state’ trope so beloved of Hasbarists.

          Do you also approve of Iran’s ban on parties that reject the existence of Iran as an Islamic Republic? No doubt, as a good Zionist, you’d also have agreed with your ally RSA’s ban on parties which rejected the existence of South Africa as an apartheid state.

          Far too progressive, indeed.

        • seafoid
          June 21, 2013, 11:52 am

          Jesus H Christ, Norman, do you understand anything about democracy ?

          “No other country on earth would allow legislators that reject the existence of the state to be seated in its elected body. ”

          Sinn Fein MPs from Northern Ireland sit at Westminster. they don’t recognise NI as legitimate and want a united Ireland.

        • Maximus Decimus Meridius
          June 21, 2013, 11:52 am

          Thanks for that.

        • Maximus Decimus Meridius
          June 21, 2013, 12:05 pm

          Just to clarify, my thanks are to Shmuel for his response to my question above.

        • seafoid
          June 21, 2013, 12:08 pm

          Of course Israel still doesn’t have a constitution.

        • Shmuel
          June 21, 2013, 12:10 pm

          Israel’s leftist Supreme Court has repeatedly violated the Basic Law requiring parties that advocate undermining Israel as the Jewish State to be banned by allowing them to run in elections.

          Where there are contradictions, and in the absence of a constitution, it is up to the court to decide. Were the letter of Amendment 9 to the “Basic Law: The Knesset” (Jewish, democratic, no incitement to racism) actually enforced, you’d hardly have a party left in Knesset. But don’t worry about those “leftists” on the High Court. Bennett and co. are working on removing even the pretence of democracy.

          No other country on earth would allow legislators that reject the existence of the state to be seated in its elected body.

          LOL. The world is full of parliaments in which MPs reject the legitimacy and/or sovereignty of the body to which they have been elected.

          In this regard, Israel is far too progressive.

          Yes, second class citizenship really is to good for “Israel’s Arabs”.

        • Citizen
          June 21, 2013, 1:33 pm

          So what the track record of Arab Israeli citizens and any party that claims to represent them as a significant force in Israel’s coalition government?

        • Shmuel
          June 21, 2013, 1:44 pm

          So what the track record of Arab Israeli citizens and any party that claims to represent them as a significant force in Israel’s coalition government?

          0 for 34 (governments since 1948).

        • Bumblebye
          June 21, 2013, 1:49 pm

          Sinn Fein MPs practice ‘abstentionism’. They don’t actually take their seats (or the loyalty oath) in the Chamber, though they have offices and staff at Westminster. And are entitled to perks and privileges, including expenses!

        • Shmuel
          June 21, 2013, 2:07 pm

          Sinn Fein MPs practice ‘abstentionism’.

          But they are allowed to be elected, as are Scottish nationalists and separatists in numerous countries (including Italy, Spain, Canada, France). One could also add anti-Apartheid MPs (in all 3 houses) in Apartheid South Africa, members of Aung San Suu Kyi’s party in Burma, and many other dissidents in countless regimes/occupations/colonies, etc.

        • seafoid
          June 21, 2013, 2:49 pm

          Forgot about that. But they are allowed to represent their people. It’s fairly ridiculous of them not to sit at Westminster seeing as NI is kept going with UK taxes.
          The Scottish nationalists do not want to continue with the UK but they’ll never be carpet bombed by Israeli F16s.

        • HarryLaw
          June 21, 2013, 3:24 pm

          NormanF “No other country on earth would allow legislators that reject the existence of the state to be seated in its elected body. In this regard, Israel is far too progressive.” Many countries do, here in the UK, Scottish Nationalist, Irish Nationalist and Welsh Nationalist MP’s sit in the UK’s parliament.

        • Shmuel
          June 21, 2013, 3:32 pm

          Many countries do, here in the UK, Scottish Nationalist, Irish Nationalist and Welsh Nationalist MP’s sit in the UK’s parliament.

          The UK (and just about every country in the EU) also sends “Eurosceptics” like Nigel Farage to the European Parliament, where they do everything in their power to disband the Union. The anti-Europe group in the European Parliament was recently in the news in Italy, because it expelled one of its Italian members (a member of the anti-Italian Northern League that not only sits in Italian Parliament, but has even participated in a number of national governments), for some unusually racist and sexist remarks (even for him) against a black woman minister in the current Italian government.

        • jon s
          June 21, 2013, 3:52 pm

          Shmuel, not exactly. So far there have been two non-Jewish ministers (Salah Tarif and Raleb Majadleh) and several deputy ministers. Sure, a small number, nothing to boast about, but not 0.
          See here:
          link to knesset.gov.il

        • Shmuel
          June 21, 2013, 4:04 pm

          not exactly. So far there have been two non-Jewish ministers (Salah Tarif and Raleb Majadleh) and several deputy ministers

          And there were the Mapai satellite parties in the ’50s, but that wasn’t Citizen’s question. He asked: “So what the track record of Arab Israeli citizens and any party that claims to represent them as a significant force in Israel’s coalition government?” Druze IDF officers (ret.) and Arab members of Zionist parties or their satellites don’t exactly fit that bill. That track record is still 0 for 34.

        • jon s
          June 22, 2013, 2:27 am

          Shmuel, a fair number of Arab Israeli citizens vote for Zionist parties, and are represented in their Knesset lists. The two ministers , Tarif and Majadleh, represented parties which were “a significant force in Israel’s coalition government”.
          Unfortunately , parties such as Balad and Hadash are still not considered kosher, coalition-worthy potential partners.

        • Shmuel
          June 22, 2013, 3:29 am

          a fair number of Arab Israeli citizens vote for Zionist parties, and are represented in their Knesset lists.

          I don’t know the statistics for this year’s election, but in recent years a majority of Palestinian Israelis have voted for non-Zionist parties (not to mention the ever-growing number of abstentions). In any event the Zionist parties (with the possible exception of the tiny Meretz party) do not represent Palestinians or their interests, individual or collective, in any way shape or form. Although some Palestinians may vote for Labour, for example (heir to Mapai, “ruling party”, clientilism, etc.), that party (in the days when it actually had any clout) could hardly be said to have constituted Palestinian participation in government coalitions. Palestinians, as Palestinians are and have always been excluded from government and marginalised in Knesset.

          Unfortunately , parties such as Balad and Hadash are still not considered kosher, coalition-worthy potential partners.

          That’s the point, and it is (like all of the discrimination against Palestinian citizens) structural rather than incidental. MK Mohammad Barakeh, for example, talks about the exclusion of Palestinians as a collective (as opposed to individuals) from the political process in Israel – referring not only to membership in coalitions, but to the Knesset itself. This exclusion (which renders the work of Palestinian MKs extremely ineffectual) is one of the main causes of the growing disaffection of Palestinian voters with the entire process.

        • Shmuel
          June 22, 2013, 3:50 am

          Just found the statistics for the 2013 elections:

          Palestinian voter turnout: 56.5% (compared to 67.8% for Jews)

          Votes cast for “Arab parties” in “Arab localities”: 78.6%

          Source: link to dayan.org

        • jon s
          June 22, 2013, 4:16 am

          Right, it’s too bad that the Palestinian citizens don’t reach their potential political clout, which should be 20-30 MKs. If they did we would have a whole different government. Certainly Netanyahu wouldn’t be PM.

        • Shmuel
          June 22, 2013, 4:47 am

          Right, it’s too bad that the Palestinian citizens don’t reach their potential political clout, which should be 20-30 MKs. If they did we would have a whole different government. Certainly Netanyahu wouldn’t be PM.

          If Palestinian Israelis had 20-30 authentic representatives in Knesset, the legislature (and government coalitions) would operate as if there were only 90-100 members (out of 120). Palestinian parties would still not be represented in government and their votes would still be discounted. You expect Palestinians to come out en masse in order to get Mofaz or Livni as PM, instead of Bibi? Been there, done that.

          It is the ethnocratic system that denies Palestinians their rights. To lay the blame on the Palestinians themselves for not playing the “Jewish and democratic” game is outrageous.

        • pjdude
          June 23, 2013, 12:11 am

          not really because no to one my knowledge actualy believes Israel doesn’t exist now should exist and the legality of its existence are their but its actuall existence not so much.

    • Shmuel
      June 21, 2013, 10:32 am

      South African blacks under apartheid did not have the right to vote

      But, for a decade or so, “Coloureds” and “Indians” did. For all of the weight given to their political (and other civil) rights, Palestinian Israelis might as well be voting for a separate house. “Grand apartheid” sounds about right.

      • NormanF
        June 21, 2013, 11:33 am

        Israeli Arabs refuse to vote for mainstream parties. If they don’t get a full voice in the country, that certainly has a lot to do with how they vote. And it doesn’t make Israel an apartheid state. Israeli Arabs can and do vote freely for non-Zionist parties.

        • Maximus Decimus Meridius
          June 21, 2013, 11:52 am

          Can they vote for ANTI Zionist parties?

        • Shmuel
          June 21, 2013, 11:55 am

          Israeli Arabs refuse to vote for mainstream parties. If they don’t get a full voice in the country, that certainly has a lot to do with how they vote

          Stubborn mules. If only they voted for the “right” parties, they’d enjoy full democracy!

        • seafoid
          June 21, 2013, 12:41 pm

          Norman

          English people are allowed to vote for UKIP which is not a mainstream party. Why should voters in a democracy be forced to vote for mainstream parties? Most of them are useless.

        • Citizen
          June 21, 2013, 1:35 pm

          @ NormanF
          So how influential have the Israeli Arabs been via their representation in any ruling Israeli coalition?

        • Bumblebye
          June 21, 2013, 4:27 pm

          Poor abNorman. Failed to notice that there doesn’t seem to be a ‘mainstream’ party that would even consider representing the interests of non-Jewish Israelis. Especially not the ayyyrabs. And in that multi-party loony bin, most of the parties are special interest only groupings.

        • pjdude
          June 23, 2013, 12:16 am

          MAybe because that’s because all the mainstream parties in Israel are all about removing the palestinians from palestine. You can’t complain about people refusing to vote for parties that actively seek to harm them?

        • Citizen
          June 24, 2013, 2:59 am

          Reminds me of the two-party system here in the USA. We have lots of political parties, including the Green Party and the Libertarian Party, but only a Democratic or GOP candidate ever gets to be in the final elections. Many candidates outside the main two parties get virtually no news converage, are essentially dead before they start. Further, even many candidates running more locally as Democrats or Republicans get little news coverage and it’s difficult to find their stance on many, many issues even if one has the time to look hard on the internet.

    • Ecru
      June 21, 2013, 10:51 am

      Israel’s Arabs….

      What are they, pets?

      “[Palestinian Israelis] always have had the right to vote.

      It doesn’t really count when their voting power has been deliberately nullified by ethnic cleansing, refusal to let refugees return and bigoted marriage and inheritance laws.

      • German Lefty
        June 21, 2013, 1:25 pm

        What are they, pets?
        Ha, ha. Very good. That’s exactly how it sounds.

        It doesn’t really count when their voting power has been deliberately nullified by ethnic cleansing, refusal to let refugees return and bigoted marriage and inheritance laws.
        Exactly right. The number of Palestinian Israelis is kept as small as possible, so that their votes can’t “harm” the Zionist regime.

    • Sumud
      June 21, 2013, 12:51 pm

      Israel’s Arabs always have had the right to vote.

      Wrong.

      None of the Palestinian refugees from 1948 Israel, who are Israeli citizens denied their legal right of return and their citizenship, are permitted to vote.

      • goldmarx
        June 21, 2013, 4:41 pm

        Sumud: Do any of those refugees consider themselves to be citizens of Israel? Citizens of Palestine, I understand, but Israel?

        • German Lefty
          June 21, 2013, 5:08 pm

          Do any of those refugees consider themselves to be citizens of Israel? Citizens of Palestine, I understand, but Israel?
          Well, Israel is a part of Palestine. Besides, refugees have the right to return to their homeland, regardless of the current regime or the current name of the state.

        • Sumud
          June 21, 2013, 8:58 pm

          Do any of those refugees consider themselves to be citizens of Israel?

          I’m not aware of any polls or surveys on that issue. Are you?

          At any rate it is irrelevant. The right of return is not contingent on a Palestinian’s opinion on the history of Palestine & Israel.

        • talknic
          June 22, 2013, 10:56 am

          @ German Lefty ” Israel is a part of Palestine”

          Israel is independent of any other country, nation, state or entity. Prior to seceding from Palestine, Israel didn’t exist, was never part of, or in, Palestine.

          Israel is in the Middle East, as is whatever remains of Palestine.

          Re-RoR. Indeed. Definition adopted by the UN in reference to UNGA 194 – link to unispal.un.org

        • Woody Tanaka
          June 22, 2013, 11:55 am

          talknic, “Palestine” is the name of the state and the geographical area. regarding the latter definition, the israeli state is part of the land of Palestine.

        • eljay
          June 22, 2013, 6:28 pm

          >> talknic, “Palestine” is the name of the state and the geographical area. regarding the latter definition, the israeli state is part of the land of Palestine.

          According to Wiki, the “land of Palestine” also included parts of Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Egypt, but I don’t see people referring to any parts of those countries as being “part of Palestine”.

          Unless one specifies “Mandatory Palestine”, I agree with talknic that Israel is not part of Palestine. (Israel within its / Partition borders is Israel.)

          I would say, though, that:
          - Israel and the yet-to-be-realized state of Palestine are part of Mandatory Palestine; or
          - Israel and the yet-to-be-realized state of Palestine are part of the Levant.

        • goldmarx
          June 24, 2013, 11:24 am

          Sumud: I was not addressing the Right of Return, which I support as a member of BDS. I was asking whether they currently consider themselves to be citizens of Israel.

    • pjdude
      June 23, 2013, 12:08 am

      the right to vote is irrelevant without the ability to actualy vote for people who will represent your interests. reminds me of the simpsons episode( I believe it was a treehouse of horrors one) where earth is conquered by aliens and they were able to vote between 2 of them and while being beaten homer responds don’t blame me I voted for the other one.

  7. Shmuel
    June 21, 2013, 10:13 am

    Israel’s Arabs always have had the right to vote.

    They are not “Israel’s Arabs”, but Palestinian citizens of Israel, and their vote is still worth less than that of Jewish citizens of Israel, both de jure (e.g. “Basic Law: The Knesset” — soon to be joined perhaps by the proposed “Basic Law: Israel as the Nation State of the Jewish People”) and de facto (e.g. the exclusion of their representatives from every coalition).

    Cook’s point was that “grand apartheid” is meant to look like no apartheid at all. The nominal right to vote (only for those not already ethnically cleansed, of course) is entirely consistent with that analysis.

    • Cliff
      June 21, 2013, 10:20 am

      Wow, I just noticed that he referred to Israeli Arabs as ISRAEL’S Arabs.

      They are Palestinians. They are the remnants of the Palestinian society that was destroyed in 1948.

      • Woody Tanaka
        June 21, 2013, 10:53 am

        ” Wow, I just noticed that he referred to Israeli Arabs as ISRAEL’S Arabs.”

        I noticed that, but let it go. There’s only so much of this causal racism that one can correct…

        • goldmarx
          June 21, 2013, 11:49 am

          WT: Israeli Arabs, Israel’s Arabs – what’s the difference?

          Look – I can also say “Israel’s Jews”. Who would then accuse me of treating them as pets?

          Pedantic. much?

        • Citizen
          June 21, 2013, 1:39 pm

          57 of Israel’s basic laws discriminate directly against Arab Israeli citizens. Many more discriminate them indirectly. NO JEW in America would stand for this. It’s clear the Jewish Establishment in America is all about who’s ox is being gored.

        • Woody Tanaka
          June 21, 2013, 2:30 pm

          “Israeli Arabs, Israel’s Arabs – what’s the difference?”

          Nothing, both names are slurs. If you want to talk about Palestinians who are citizens of the zionist entity, then you call them Palestinians.

        • seafoid
          June 21, 2013, 2:41 pm

          Strictly speaking they are Palestinian Jews.
          They will be soon anyway.

        • Cliff
          June 21, 2013, 3:50 pm

          @goldmarx

          But you didn’t. You said Israel’s ARABS.

          They are Israeli Arabs or Palestinian Israelis.

          They are the indigenous population that Jewish terrorist groups and the pre-State army didn’t ethnically cleanse in 1948.

          They do not ‘belong’ to Israel.

        • Ecru
          June 22, 2013, 3:57 am

          Pedantic? You don’t like pedantry? So you won’t be so pedantic about the use of the term Israeli Apartheid from now on I take it – won’t insist for the comparison to be valid it has to be exactly identical to that practised in South Africa down to the smallest detail. Yes sure.

        • goldmarx
          June 24, 2013, 11:28 am

          Cliff: “They are Israeli Arabs or Palestinian Israelis.”

          But according to the all-knowing Woody Tanaka, “Israel Arabs” is a slur designed to erase the Palestinian identity of those Arabs. So, Cliff, YOU are slurring them, according to Woody. What is your response to Woody?

        • Cliff
          June 25, 2013, 5:21 am

          My response is that the terms are interchangeable.

          Using the term ‘Israeli Arab’ might be a whitewash depending on the person’s politics.

          Taken in and of itself, I see it as harmless – but this conflict is not well understood by the general American public. It’s not reported on frequently or honestly.

          ‘Israeli Arabs’ has a propagandistic connotation to it insofar as it contributes to the lie that the Arab minority is treated fairly.

          So yea, I would agree with WT. I just wouldn’t mind it’s usage from someone who understands the conflict and speaks about it honestly (and isn’t trying to ‘point score’). If we’re here talking about this conflict, and we know each other (which we do to the extent that that’s possible on-line), then it’s fine.

          It’s a completely different connotation when Isabel Kershner uses the term in an article that whitewashes the recent violence for example.

          (Gazan fishermen harassed by Israeli Army thugs for months, but the trolls at the NY Times characterize the rocket fire as being spontaneous and driven by Islamism)

        • goldmarx
          June 25, 2013, 8:59 am

          Cliff: Well, I’m not Isabel Kershner, and I use “Israeli Arabs” to mean the totality of Israel’s Arab communities – Palestinian, Druze, Bedouin (and if I left out a group, I apologize). “Israel’s Arabs” is just a stylistic variant, not some “animalizing” conspiracy. The fact that I have to even spell this out is pretty pathetic.

          You are playing a dangerous game when you endorse a double standard by saying it’s OK for someone to use a demographic term like “Israeli Arab” but not OK for someone else. It’s well nigh impossible to communicate when artificial language barriers are put up.

        • seafoid
          June 25, 2013, 11:04 am

          Israeli Arab is a highly political term that harks back to the days when the bots believed there was no such thing as a Palestinian.
          The Bedouin are Palestinian and so are the Druze. They are all shafted by the Jewish establishment.

        • Cliff
          June 25, 2013, 11:07 am

          I look at this the same was as the reviewer of ‘Defamation’ looked at that movie’s impact.

          She (I forget her name) said that it’s an important movie and should be reason enough for discussion. But she felt uncomfortable in how it would be interpreted outside the Jewish community.

          So I agree with you about ‘artificial language barriers’ to an extent.

          But people do use ‘Israeli Arabs’ alongside typical pro-Israel memes like ‘Israeli Arabs live better than other Arabs in the ME’.

          In that sense, it is part of a greater ‘animalizing’ , as you say, connotation (although you refer to that as a ‘conspiracy’).

          It’s not a conspiracy if it’s true and it is indeed true. Pro-Israel ideologues regularly use the Palestinian citizens of Israel as talking points.

          Talking points – because that is how rhetorical their existence is to Zionist Jews.

          They are a ‘token’ population. And the reason they have the right to vote is because they pose no political threat.

          If Israel treated them fairly and equally and allowed a RoR for Palestinians, then it would be a different story.

          One ethno-religious group has a special ‘Law Of Return’ that ensures that that population will remain the majority. The Arab minority is and will forever remain a MINORITY.

          And keeping the Arabs a minority in Israel, IS what Israel means as a Jewish State.

          It’s apartheid lite in Israel and full blown (worse actually) apartheid in the territories.

          These labels matter because everything matters because your camp lies about everything.

    • Ron Edwards
      June 21, 2013, 10:33 am

      Seconded (you beat me to it, Shmuel).

      Americans are far too easily hoodwinked by their belief in the magical power of “voting,” especially since they* are unfamiliar with coalition-based party systems. Sure, the Palestinian citizens of Israel “can” “vote.” That doesn’t mean they have any resulting political presence or receive any fairness from the institutions of society, or from the constitution-less justice system. Before anyone gets anywhere with this line of talking with me, I ask them to explain why these citizens are officially excluded from the status of nationals. In Israel, Jewish citizens are nationals, and non-Jewish citizens are not. That distinction is the source of blatant discrimination of all kinds, and it’s never mentioned by arrant liars like Goldmarx while they push ignorant Americans’ buttons with their talk of “voting.”

      Disclosure: I am a U.S. citizen. “They” used to include me until I managed to unlearn my indoctrination. The sign of this indoctrination is pronouncing the word “democracy” in a special tone, specially emphasizing the second syllable, which confounds about a dozen things (some fictional) into a presumed single phenomenon which you achieve merely by voting.

      And in case it doesn’t get said often enough: Iran is a democracy. Lebanon is a democracy. Turkey is a democracy. Say that sometime in Americans’ presence, and brace yourself for a storm of qualifiers and tap-dancing to preserve the confusion rather than to examine it.

      • goldmarx
        June 21, 2013, 11:57 am

        RE: “Americans are far too easily hoodwinked by their belief in the magical power of “voting,”

        Well, let’s see. African-American fought long and hard for the right to vote. One of the major goals of the US civil rights movement was passage of the Votings Right Act. One of the mjor talking points of the anti-apartheid movement was that South African blacks were denied the right to vote. So, yeah, you could say that I, as an American leftist active in the anti-apartheid movement of the late 1980s, was “far too easily hoodwinked” into believing the right to vote is sort of important.

        Next time some oppressed group denied the right to vote asks for help, I’ll point them to Mondoweiss and tell them that they are delusional in thinking that this is at all important.

        • Darcha
          June 21, 2013, 3:00 pm

          I’m curious. Could you please respond to some of the points raised by Mr. (I presume) Edwards? Are you familiar with the Israeli system of government or not? If you are, then you must understand that the whole concept of ‘Jewish democracy’ rests on maintaining the Israeli-Palestinian voting population at a level that keeps it irrelevant to the formation of governments (cf. ‘demographic threat’). Israeli Palestinian MKs can probably take care of a traffic light, but get within a hundred meters of the actual levers of power they never will. Or are you going to tell us with a straight face that an Arab party in the Israeli government is even conceivable to more than a tiny minority of Israelis. It IS a JEWISH state after all, right?

          So yeah. If Israel’s cheap sleight-of-hand is enough for you, I’d say you’re pretty gullible and all-too-easily hoodwinked. Check with the South Africans. They seem to be pretty clear about what Israeli apartheid is.

        • goldmarx
          June 21, 2013, 4:17 pm

          Darcha: The fact that many problems endure even as the franchise exists does not mean apartheid exists. Racist attitudes coexist with voting even in America today – for example, Republicans gerrymandered lots of voting districts to make Congress less responsive than it ought to be, but that doesn’t mean I call America an apartheid system.

          Check with the South Africans? Their version of a one-state solution currently has the white minority as more economically entrenched as the ruling class than ever before, with some black South Africans like Cyril Ramaphosa serving as the white minority’s well-paid flunky. Be careful what you wish for…

        • MLE
          June 21, 2013, 4:38 pm

          More wrongness on your part. The fifteenth amendement was passed in 1870 that states: Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

          States in the south passed all sorts of laws and conditions which made it difficult for the African American communities to vote, such as literacy tests. The civil rights movement in part fought to remove those clauses and make them unconstitutional. Can you please do some research before you post your Zionist word diarrhea on this site.

        • Woody Tanaka
          June 21, 2013, 4:51 pm

          ” The fact that many problems endure even as the franchise exists does not mean apartheid exists.”

          No, the fact that the Israeli government extends benefits, privileges and resources based on people’s ethno-religious background means apartheid exists.

        • Ron Edwards
          June 21, 2013, 9:52 pm

          Some “leftist” you are. Learn some history.

          The Voting Rights Act, like Brown vs. the Board of Education, accomplished very little in terms of facts on the ground. The change in those facts was paid for in blood and bodies, both in the South – where “observers” stood by when civil rights workers were beaten for trying to enforce private voting, and where black activists were routinely mutilated and murdered – and in the North, where the vaunted legislation accomplished precisely nothing as northern whites patted themselves on the back. Paper is only paper, and this history – as opposed to the horse shit repeated every MLK Day, about some fuzzy friend o’whites who never existed – shows this perfectly.

          Votes are only meaningful if accompanied by a supportive infrastructure and a functioning justice system, unafraid to challenge those in power. Until then they are funny little rituals, like a kid playing with a plastic steering wheel in his little booster seat, going “Pbbbb!” while his parent drives. Activism regarding black Americans wasn’t for votes – it was for recognition of full citizenship, usually shortened as “rights,” which happen to include, in this country, the ability to vote (i) at all and (ii) without harassment or worse. Frankly, it wasn’t all that successful, as the War on Drugs became a paramilitary lockdown throughout most primarily black communities in the country, and gerrymandering prevented black interests from interfering with privileged white ones, again, rendering the votes vastly less significant than they should be.

          Similarly, activism regarding South African apartheid hadn’t been for more than just votes, it would have resulted in a Robert Mugabe type election (but in service of privileged whites, just so you don’t get confused here) in which you get to go into a little pop-stand, put your token into this box or that box, receive the approving nod of the armed goon standing right there looking at you, and walk out still breathing.

          Yes: hoodwinked. This is not about “democracy” except insofar as whatever that means, at that time and in that place, results in real political representation and real justice. And “democracy” often doesn’t.

        • Ecru
          June 22, 2013, 4:17 am

          Deliberately missing the point here again I see.

          Having the vote is important but that importance is taken away when your vote is deliberately reduced in power through demographic engineering and ethnic cleansing. Most nations (though not the USA for some reason) make gerrymandering illegal because of just this. Israel gerrymanders with heavy ordinance.

          And interesting that you claim to have campaigned against apartheid in South Africa yet defend it today in Israel. Just another Zionist – “it aint wrong when a Jew does it.”

        • Citizen
          June 22, 2013, 8:14 am

          You forgot about Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965: link to nytimes.com

        • goldmarx
          June 24, 2013, 11:31 am

          Ecru: And how does one ‘defend’ apartheid by supporting BDS?

        • goldmarx
          June 25, 2013, 8:48 am

          MLE: To what “wrongness” were you responding to in my post?

    • NormanF
      June 21, 2013, 11:37 am

      Shmuel,

      That’s like calling the Muslims of India Pakistani Indians. So why aren’t the alleged Palestinians really Israeli Arabs when there are Indian Muslims?

      • seafoid
        June 21, 2013, 12:07 pm

        Stupid analogy. The vast majority of Muslims in India never lived in Pakistan. They are Indian.

        Are Jews who live in India called Indian Israelis?

      • Shmuel
        June 21, 2013, 12:23 pm

        That’s like calling the Muslims of India Pakistani Indians.

        No it’s not. Muslim Indians are not and never were Pakistani in any sense – in their own eyes or in anyone else’s.

        • Citizen
          June 21, 2013, 1:47 pm

          Hope you guys comment more on this issue. We all need to be better informed.

      • MLE
        June 21, 2013, 4:33 pm

        There arn’t Pakistani Muslims in India. Indians and Pakistanis are the same race. And Islam is an official religion of India. Muslim Indians are fully Indians, they don’t recognize themselves as Pakistanis.

        You’re really ignorant about the rest of the world aren’t you?

      • Dutch
        June 21, 2013, 8:42 pm

        The word Arab [pronounce: Aghab] for Palestinians intends to undo them from their land, history, culture and being. It also intends to create twenty alternative ‘homelands’ for them outside Palestine. That’s why the naming is so popular among Israeli’s. And that’s why no one else should use it.

        • seafoid
          June 22, 2013, 11:42 am

          It indicates that the Aghabs are outsiders with no link to Erez Israel.
          They can’t change the past. But they try very hard.

          Dabka will get them in the end.

        • MHughes976
          June 22, 2013, 11:52 am

          There’s a book by John McCarthy, former hostage in Beirut, published in 2012, called You Can’t Hide the Sun, detailing the oppressed lives of Palestinians within Israel. I recommend it, though I can scarcely read it, the story is so depressing. I’ve also been reading Conquest by David Day, which surveys many examples of what he calls ‘supplanted’ populations and the reasons given for supplanting them, including Blooming Desert rhetoric in more than one part of the world.

        • munro
          June 22, 2013, 12:07 pm

          McCarthy Hay Festival audio
          link to hayfestival.com

    • AlGhorear
      June 21, 2013, 9:02 pm

      Shmuel, like so many other commenters on Mondoweiss and the site writers, you are a treasure. I surely hope you don’t disappear like Mooser did. I love this site, but wish someone would tell us why we don’t see him anymore, if they know.

      • Dutch
        June 22, 2013, 8:58 am

        I agree. It’s a petty Mooser disappeared. Does anybody know what happened?

  8. Rusty Pipes
    June 21, 2013, 11:10 am

    Bedouin children are turned away from a “Jews Only” pool, and Foxman calls yet another Black person who notices the similarities to Apartheid and Jim Crow, an anti-Semite.

    • Woody Tanaka
      June 21, 2013, 11:15 am

      Well, Foxman’s commitment to non-discrimination is rather selective, you see…

    • NormanF
      June 21, 2013, 11:41 am

      There is going to be prejudice in every society. But if we are going to have an honest to goodness discussion about apartheid, let’s point out no Israeli Jew can live in an Arab city or town in Israel while Arabs can and do live in Jewish cities and towns. There is nothing like geographical or territorial apartheid in Israel. At least nothing that is remotely similar to what took place in the old South Africa.

      • tree
        June 21, 2013, 2:30 pm

        But if we are going to have an honest to goodness discussion about apartheid, let’s point out no Israeli Jew can live in an Arab city or town in Israel while Arabs can and do live in Jewish cities and towns.

        Bullshit. There are no restrictions against Jews living in Arab towns in Israel. There are restrictions against leasing properties owned by the JNF to non-Jews. Sometimes these restrictions are ignored, because to enforce them would be detrimental to Jews, i.e. those Jews who have longterm leases in Nazareth Ilit and can find no Jewish takers can always lease to the Palestinian Israelis from Nazareth. Since Nazareth Ilit was built for Jews on land confiscated from Nazareth, those in Nazareth have a hard time finding a place to live there due to its constrictive boundaries. Many Jews don’t want to live in Nazareth Ilit because its too far from Tel Aviv and suffers from restricted employment opportunities nearby. See “Overlooking Nazareth by Dan Rabinowitz:

        link to ebooks.cambridge.org

        Or see Susan Nathan’s “The Other Side of Israel” a British Zionist Jew who moved to Israel and then became concerned with its apartheid and racist nature and moved to the “Arab town” of Tamra in Isreal.

        link to powells.com

      • seafoid
        June 21, 2013, 2:45 pm

        ‘ There is going to be prejudice in every society”

        Yeah. We have roadblocks outside our house to trap any Jew who DARES use our sidewalk. Who do they think they are? There is no way any of them is getting into our holy city.

        And it’s normal to allocate water depending on whether or not the man of the house has been circumcised. It happens in Staten Island but not Manhattan.

        And of course we have parallel road systems for non English speakers and the locals.

        And if they don’t like it they can die. Just like where you live.

      • German Lefty
        June 21, 2013, 3:06 pm

        There is nothing like geographical or territorial apartheid in Israel. At least nothing that is remotely similar to what took place in the old South Africa.
        The ILA administered JNF “owned” lands (13% of the land within the green line) and committed to managing them in accordance with the JNF’s statutory objective, namely the settlement of Jews on these lands. Although most of these lands were confiscated from, and still rightfully belong to, displaced Palestinians, the terms of the law exclude anyone who is not Jewish from benefiting from such land.
        Under Israeli law, the ILA is a public institution. It controls approximately 93% of the land in Israel. The Basic Law: Israel Lands defines this land as “Israel Lands” held in perpetuity for the benefit of the Jewish people. Along these lines, Israeli law prohibits the transfer of “Israel Lands” through sale or any other way. This prohibition is in line with the JNF statute, which also defines its lands as public, i.e. Jewish “national,” and not private property.
        link to badil.org

      • MLE
        June 21, 2013, 4:31 pm

        Ugh really? You want to complain about jews not being able to live in Arab towns? It’s like Americans complaining they’re not allowed to live on Native American reservations. No, you’re not allowed because you’re land thieves and have taken over other areas that were once predominately Arab. Let the Arabs have their neighborhoods in peace.

        Secondly, I don’t believe that if as a Jew, I wanted to live peacefully alongside Arab neighbors and not attempt to come in and gentrify the whole neighborhood, I would be forbidden. Because I’m not a Jewish supremacist, like you.

        • tree
          June 21, 2013, 4:55 pm

          Secondly, I don’t believe that if as a Jew, I wanted to live peacefully alongside Arab neighbors and not attempt to come in and gentrify the whole neighborhood, I would be forbidden.

          That’s what Susan Nathan did as she records in the book I linked above. Her Israeli Jewish friends thought she was crazy but she moved to Tamra and was warmly accepted by the town. Of course her standard of living decreased because of the Israeli government’s neglect of predominantly Palestinian towns in Israel, but that goes without saying, I suppose. Its a good book. I’d recommend it to all.

        • Shmuel
          June 21, 2013, 5:06 pm

          That’s what Susan Nathan did

          And Uri Davis (Sakhnin), and a friend of mine who used to live in Beit Safafa, and undoubtedly others.

        • tree
          June 21, 2013, 5:23 pm

          And Uri Davis (Sakhnin), and a friend of mine who used to live in Beit Safafa, and undoubtedly others.

          And Neta Golan and Allegra Pacheco, who live in the West Bank, so Jews are even welcomed into the occupied territories, as long as they aren’t usurping land. Both are Israeli Jews married to Palestinians, whose husbands are not allowed into Israel strictly because they are not Jewish, but Palestinian.

          And of course there are others as well. Norman F’s statement was, as I said, total bullshit.

        • Shmuel
          June 21, 2013, 5:38 pm

          It’s worth quoting from Davis’ autobiography, Crossing the Border: An Autobiography of an Anti-Zionist Palestinian Jew (p. 66):

          I soon struck up a number of friendships with my Arab fellow students…. I was quickly invited to join them on their weekend visits home. These were my first visits to Arab homes and Arab villages in Israel. I visited Kufr Kana … Kufr Yasif … and Baqa al-Gharbiyya…. The warmth and the generosity of the reception extended by my hosts quickly debunked the almost axiomatic prejudice inculcated subliminally into Israeli Hebrew minds beginning with their first children books, namely, that of Arab treachery. I was not stabbed in the back, and my throat was not slit while I stayed overnight. I was not exposed to danger. I was protected.

        • bintbiba
          June 21, 2013, 7:42 pm

          I am so moved by this, Shmuel. Thank you for sharing.
          With every day’s news ,the heart grows weary . You always manage to bring hope that buoys the spirit.

        • Citizen
          June 21, 2013, 8:35 pm

          Meanwhile, back in the USA, young Jews and Goys get Zionist training: link to thejewishchronicle.net

    • seafoid
      June 21, 2013, 1:02 pm

      When the fact that Israeli judaism is running a full apartheid program as good as if not better than jim crow and that it is covered politically by the leaders of all the major jewish orgs in the US- when this seeps into the public consciousness the backlash is going to be painful to watch.

  9. seafoid
    June 21, 2013, 12:11 pm

    link to haaretz.com

    “Education Ministry official accused of banning Arabic teachers from corresponding in Arabic
    Senior official sends mass email that appears to prohibit teachers from conducting official correspondence in Arabic. The ministry says her quote was taken out of context.
    By Yarden Skop | Jun.21, 2013 | 12:17 PM

    School teachers of Arabic are up in arms over an email sent by a senior Education Ministry official that appears to prohibit them from conducting their official correspondence in Arabic.
    “Why are official documents being issued in Arabic? Please ensure that documents are issued in Hebrew alone,” Dr. Orna Simhon, the Education Ministry’s northern regional director, wrote in an email dated June 1. Haaretz has obtained a copy of that email.
    Simhon’s letter was sent in response to an earlier message from the Arab language coordinator and computerization coordinator for the ministry’s Arab education office.
    That email, which was sent to all fifth- and sixth-grade Arabic teachers in Arab schools, listed detailed instructions for incorporating computers into lesson plans and included details about a special Arabic website intended to help Arab students “connect with our Jewish compatriots in their schools, with the aim of getting to know and being exposed to the other nation’s culture.”
    The initial email also called on Arab teachers who teach Hebrew to “enter the Hebrew version of the site and discover the heritage of the Jewish people through proverbs, words of wisdom and values that are taught in Jewish schools.”
    Also copied on the initial letter were the Arabic language supervisor and the computerization supervisor, as well as Simhon.
    Simhon responded to everyone copied on the email, saying documents should be issued in Hebrew only.
    The Education Ministry says her quote “has been taken out of context.” ”

    • Citizen
      June 21, 2013, 1:50 pm

      Always interesting to compare the US press with the Israeli English press. And then compare the Israeli press with the Arab Press. Gary Pruitt, of the AP, pretends to speak up for the objectice press. At present , he’s talking about the Obama regime’s propraganda and stifiling of US free speech, and US over-classification of US data. He refers to Manning and Snowden as a natural thing. He says, journaiists informing the
      US pubic are what’s needed. But AP doesn’t do that.

  10. Mndwss
    June 21, 2013, 4:33 pm

    “How Israeli apartheid is coming unstuck”

    Jewish soldier kills jewish man who shouts «Allahu Akbar» near the wailing wall:

    link to nrk.no

    Jewish soldiers are colorblind/religionblind, they do not understand when a jew makes a joke. They just shoot the jew…

  11. Binyamin in Orangeburg
    June 21, 2013, 5:24 pm

    “The catch is that almost all of the country’s 1.5 million Palestinian citizens are excluded from military service. ”

    That statement is not accurate. Arab citizens of Israel are not “excluded” and many Druze and Circassians do serve in the IDF (or Border Police — where they are notable for their brutality). Indeed, every colonizer and ethnic cleanser in history has sought to utilize turn-coats to assist in the ethnic cleansing. Custer had Indian scouts when he carried out his massacre at Wounded Knee.

    Israeli propaganda is forever parading Druze IDF generals as proof of the beauty of Israeli democracy. Here’s the testimony of one of them:

    Asa’ad retired from the Israel Defence Forces (IDF) in 2000 as a brigadier general – the second-highest rank achieved by a non-Jewish officer. Tall, with a neat moustache and impeccably dressed, Asa’ad says the Druze suffer neglect by comparison with the Jews, despite sharing security duties.
    “In the IDF, the Druze feel exactly the same as the Jews. You get the same rights, you feel part of a team. But that ends when you leave the army. You return to your village and it is like getting a slap in the face,” he said. “It kills you.”

    Asa’ad complains that whereas Israel has authorized countless gleaming new towns to welcome in hundreds of thousands of Jewish immigrants since the founding of the state in 1948, they have failed to build a single new village for the Druze.

    link to reuters.com

    • tree
      June 21, 2013, 6:13 pm

      “The catch is that almost all of the country’s 1.5 million Palestinian citizens are excluded from military service. ”

      That statement is not accurate. Arab citizens of Israel are not “excluded” and many Druze and Circassians do serve in the IDF

      No, it is accurate. There are only 125,000 Druze in Israel and the number of Circassians is much, much smaller than that, in the few thousand range. They are the only Palestinian groups who are subject to IDF conscription.

      Over 90% percent of Israeli Arabs are not subject to conscription in Israel. Theoretically, Israeli Arabs can volunteer for service but few do and even among the small number that do, the IDF refuses to accept most of them. There are less than 2000 Bedouin soldiers in the IDF. So “almost all” is an accurate description.

      Israel also usually words its legal perks to veterans in terms of eligibility for conscription, thus denying any benefit to volunteers rather than conscriptees who are overwhelmingly Jewish.

      • goldmarx
        June 24, 2013, 11:34 am

        Do the Druze or Circassians consider themselves to be Palestinians? Or even Arabs?

        • tree
          June 25, 2013, 5:55 pm

          Do the Druze or Circassians consider themselves to be Palestinians? Or even Arabs?

          “Druze” denotes a religion, not an ethnicity, whereas Palestinian is an ethnicity, not a religion. Druze are Arabs, and in those in Palestine are Palestinian.

          Circassians, on the other hand, although Muslim, originally came from the Caucasus in the 1800′s, so maybe not.

    • Ecru
      June 22, 2013, 4:04 am

      Custer had Indian scouts when he carried out his massacre at Wounded Knee.

      Sorry just a question – wasn’t Custer already dead by the time of the Massacre at Wounded Knee? Doesn’t change or invalidate your point since the US Army DID use Native American Scouts, I’m just curious.

  12. gingershot
    June 21, 2013, 6:04 pm

    It’s going to be very interesting, 10 yrs from now, how we will hear from so many Jewish Americans that they ‘did not know’ what was going on in Palestine, and that to suggest otherwise is anti-semitic

    What kind of massive reparations does Israel owe the Palestinians for what it has done in Palestine? – I think the reparations Europe has paid to Israelis should be a good framework, already in place, to do justice to what was done to them

    I guarantee Israel will try to find some way the US/EU will pay these reparations and it will try to pay NOTHING

  13. iResistDe4iAm
    June 22, 2013, 1:03 am

    Some examples of an “institutionalized regime of systematic oppression and domination by one racial group over any other racial group or groups” (crime of Apartheid) [*]

    “Petty” Israeli Apartheid

    One recreation policy for Jewish Israelis (and Europeans), a different recreation policy for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to electronicintifada.net
    link to mondoweiss.net
    link to electronicintifada.net

    One reservation policy for Israelis with Jewish names, a different reservation policy for Israelis with non-Jewish names = Israeli apartheid
    link to haaretz.com

    “Grand” Israeli Apartheid

    One transport policy for Jewish Israelis, a different transport policy for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to haaretz.com

    One housing policy for Jewish Israelis, a different housing policy for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to ynetnews.com
    link to haaretz.com
    link to hrw.org

    One planning policy for Jewish Israelis, a different planning policy for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to economist.com
    link to haaretz.com

    One education policy for Jewish Israelis, a different education policy for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to latimes.com

    One employment policy for Jewish Israelis, a different employment policy for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to haaretz.com
    link to haaretz.com
    link to haaretz.com
    link to haaretz.com

    One farming policy for Jewish Israelis, a different farming policy for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to haaretz.com

    One law for spouses of Jewish Israelis, a different law for spouses of non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to worldnews.msnbc.msn.com

    One travel policy for Jewish Israelis, a different travel policy for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to haaretz.com
    link to imeu.net
    link to haaretz.com

    One security sticker for Jewish Israelis (and VIPs deemed as honorary Jews), a different sticker for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to mondoweiss.net

    One ID card date-of-birth (DOB) format for Jewish Israelis, a different ID DOB format for non-Jewish Israelis = Israeli apartheid
    link to jewssansfrontieres.blogspot.com.au

    One economic outcome for Jewish Jerusalemites, a different economic outcome for non-Jewish Jerusalemites = Israeli apartheid
    link to electronicintifada.net

    One residency policy for Jewish Jerusalemites, a different residency policy for non-Jewish Jerusalemites = Israeli apartheid
    link to guardian.co.uk
    link to haaretz.com
    link to mondoweiss.net

    Since 1948, over 700 Jewish communities have been established inside Israel’s pre-67 borders – but only 7 for Palestinian citizens (and those in order to concentrate the Bedouin population in the Negev).
    link to aljazeera.com

    There are more than 50 Israeli laws that discriminate against Palestinian citizens of Israel in all areas of life, including their rights to political participation, access to land, education, state budget resources, and criminal procedures.
    link to adalah.org

    [*] The crime of Apartheid is defined by the 2002 Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court as inhumane acts of a character similar to other crimes against humanity “committed in the context of an institutionalized regime of systematic oppression and domination by one racial group over any other racial group or groups and committed with the intention of maintaining that regime.” [Wikipedia]

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