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In which Iceland’s first lady played the self-hating card

Israel/Palestine
on 43 Comments

The Forward has an interesting piece up about Iceland’s 100 Jews, almost all of them intermarried immigrants. The Icelandic Jews tell reporter Jenna Gottlieb that they have not experienced anti-Semitism– though there is lots of criticism of Israel there. Good distinction.

Then there’s this amusing story about the most prominent Jew, Iceland’s first lady, having trouble with Israeli immigration. Gottlieb:

Iceland’s closest tie to Israel, however, lies in a personal relationship. In 2003, Iceland’s president, Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, married Israel-born Dorrit Moussaieff — bringing yet one more Jew to Iceland and to an interfaith marriage with an Icelandic native….

Still, the tie has not necessarily helped burnish Israel’s image. During a private visit to the land of her birth in 2006, the Icelandic first lady was taken out of line at passport control and denied permission to leave the country after a three-day stay because she did not have an Israeli passport. An immigration officer refused to accept her British passport, noting that Israeli law requires all citizens to arrive and leave the country using an Israeli passport only.

According to the Israeli daily Yediot Aharonot, the president’s wife was allowed to leave only after an hour-and-a-half, culminating in a shouting match between Moussaieff and the female border patrol officer.

“This is about to become a serious diplomatic incident,” Moussaieff reportedly said. “This is why everyone hates Jews.”

In an interview afterward with Iceland’s national broadcasting authority, Moussaieff did not deny the comment. “I lost my temper,” she said. “I couldn’t say anything else…. At that point, [the immigration officer] didn’t know that I was married to Ólafur. And I said something like: ‘How can you do this to the first lady of another country? I’m not your possession.’”

The immigration officer’s response, according to Moussaieff, was: “I couldn’t care less who you are. I’ve never heard of Iceland, and the people there don’t interest me at all.”

As I say, amusing; but of course Palestinians are subject to far greater restrictions.

About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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43 Responses

  1. hophmi
    August 7, 2013, 10:45 am

    “I couldn’t care less who you are.”

    Seems to me that border security that doesn’t give a crap about the high social status of who passes through is the kind of border security I want in my country.

    • MRW
      August 7, 2013, 12:29 pm

      Why Israel is not ready for prime time as a sophisticated, urbane nation state. Yokels.

    • Chu
      August 7, 2013, 1:28 pm

      Throwing a fellow co-religionist under the bus, because she has wealth and social status? She wanted to be a big shot, and those rube guards didn’t know she was on the guest list. I wonder if she ever returned to Israel after that trip?

      • hophmi
        August 8, 2013, 1:35 pm

        “Throwing a fellow co-religionist under the bus, because she has wealth and social status?”

        No, giving her a hard time because she wasn’t following the law.

      • Annie Robbins
        August 8, 2013, 1:59 pm

        the law is bogus. everyone knows it’s very difficult for any jewish person w/an israeli id to drop that id. the state makes it very difficult if not impossible. there’s also ways in which it imprisons israelis with dual citizenship which puts the immigration authority above the courts. for example w/smadar levie won a court case and tried to leave the country immigration did not return her israeli id which she was required to use to leave the country even tho they released her USpassport. she was held hostage although she had not broken any laws.

        http://mondoweiss.net/2012/10/smadar-lavies-lesson-on-global-neoliberal-restructuring-israeli-style.html

        so the law is thwarted and discriminatory to begin with.

    • Woody Tanaka
      August 7, 2013, 4:01 pm

      “Seems to me that border security that doesn’t give a crap about the high social status of who passes through is the kind of border security I want in my country.”

      I’m sure that they can do just about whatever they want, so long as they oppress the Palestinians and treat them like dogs, and that would get the thumbs up from the likes of you, zio.

    • amigo
      August 8, 2013, 7:41 am

      Spoken like true ill mannered,undiplomatic rude Zionist.

      I pity your neighbours .

    • Elliot
      August 8, 2013, 2:53 pm

      Puhleez. When I go back to visit Israel, the moment I start talking Hebrew to airport security, I get the kid glove treatment. Once, I went through security with three bottles of wine in my suitcase. Showed up in the imaging machine. Once again, when I spoke to them in Hebrew, they relaxed. Didn’t even open my bags.
      You don’t think Israeli politicians don’t get waved through security just like anywhere else?!
      You need to wake up from your egalitarian daydream about Israel. What’s it going to be next: girl soldiers and we’re all kibbutznikim singing hava nagila?
      Oh, and the Israeli Consulate over here botched up my new Israeli passport and so, a couple of years ago, when I arrived at Ben Gurion airport, I was sent over to the police station at the airport. The cop fingered my messy Israeli passport. He asked me if I had any other passport from another country. I pulled out my American one which he accepted. We’re all in the same international data base anyway.
      The Israeli obsession with the Israeli passport comes out of Zionist ideology. and general bloodymindedness. An American relative of mine who has an Israeli name and Israeli parents gets grief every time she goes to to Israel. Officials in different organizations tell her over and over again that she must get an Israeli passport; she is treated with suspicion. She strategizes about how to get through these situations each time she goes. It doesn’t help her when she tells the Israeli officials that she is not an Israeli citizen.

  2. piotr
    August 7, 2013, 11:06 am

    Only two comments in Forward addressed Moussaieff, the one below and a dismissive reply.

    Iceland is a joke.

    A piece of land in the middle of nowhere, an afterthought in the Atlantic.

    If it weren’t for its status as a stopping point for crossing from the Western hemisphere to Europe, no one would even mention it. The only time it has come up in the news in the last few years is when its economy collapsed. If it weren’t for the Marshall Plan the country would still be the land of drunken morons I witnessed when I had the misfortune to stay there after my Icelandair flight broke down and left us stranded in this crater.

    Moussaieff is a self-hating Jew who refuses to mix with her local coreligionists. She is deserving of the scorn shown her in Israel. If she retains an Israeli passport then she must abide by Israeli law and use it. The fact that she is the wife of the head of a herring republic is beyond pathetic.

    Iceland is boring, irrelevant, filled with ignorant anti-Semites and those who gratuitously despise Israel. Its population of 320,000 is just a tiny drop compared to that of Israel. It has no hostile neighbors and is in no position to criticize Israel.

    Good riddance.

    • MRW
      August 7, 2013, 12:34 pm

      Iceland has a higher income per capita than Israel, and a higher GDP per capita, and they manage it without living off the teat of the American taxpayer.

      Its population of 320,000 is just a tiny drop compared to that of Israel.

      Yet they’re more successful. Per capita.

      • hophmi
        August 7, 2013, 1:49 pm

        I should hope they do, given that a substantial population of religious Israeli men don’t work and given that Iceland doesn’t have an army and is full of natural resources. Iceland’s GDP was much higher before the credit crunch; their banks were making out like gangbusters before that.

        “they manage it without living off the teat of the American taxpayer.”

        This argument is beyond dumb. The United States accounts for 3/4 of the NATO budget, or, according to 2011 estimates, around 731 billion dollars. Iceland is a member. Every European lives off that money; it is responsible for their security. There isn’t a country on the continent outside of the UK that spends anything substantial on defense, because of what the US puts in.

        In effect, Europe, receives much, much, much more from the US taxpayer than Israel does. The difference is that it’s not as direct, and Europe offers little in return for the money, except griping about US hegemony.

      • William Burns
        August 7, 2013, 7:06 pm

        And what precisely does Israel offer?

      • amigo
        August 8, 2013, 8:41 am

        “I should hope they do, given that a substantial population of religious Israeli men don’t work”hopnee

        So whose fault is that.

        “and given that Iceland doesn’t have an army” hopnee

        Well maybe that,s because they are not stealing anyone else,s land and pissing off their neighbours for decades.

        “In effect, Europe, receives much, much, much more from the US taxpayer than Israel does.”hopnee

        Israel – population 7 million.

        EU population 450million.

        “This argument is beyond dumb. The United States accounts for 3/4 of the NATO budget, or, according to 2011 estimates, around 731 billion dollars.”hopnee Sagan

        billions and billions and billions .

        It,s millions Einstein.

        “The United States contributes between one-fifth and one-quarter of NATO’s budget. In FY2010 that contribution totaled $711.8 million.”Nato source

        link, http://natosource.tumblr.com/post/6525063731/gates-criticizes-nato-how-much-does-u-s-pay

        And here http://www.natowatch.org/node/769

        As regards the officially recognised budgetary process, direct contributions to the NATO common funding pool are made by members in accordance with an agreed cost-sharing formula based on relative Gross National Income. There are three budgets within the common funding arrangements: a civil budget, a military budget and the Security Investment Programme, which pays for NATO installations and facilities.

        While the NATO website does provide some background on the process (as indicated via the links above) the actual budget amounts and respective member state contributions are not given. A US Congressional Research Service (CRS) report is very helpful in shedding some light (although CRS reports are themselves not publicly available, but some are posted online by the US Federation of American Scientists’ Project on Government Secrecy). It shows that in 2010, the US financial contribution to these three budgets was $84.1 million, $430 million and $197 million respectively – or about 25% of the total common NATO budget.

        Your argument is not only dumb.It is one big lie.Nothing new there.

      • seanmcbride
        August 8, 2013, 9:57 am

        Amigo,

        “This argument is beyond dumb. The United States accounts for 3/4 of the NATO budget, or, according to 2011 estimates, around 731 billion dollars.”hopnee Sagan

        billions and billions and billions .

        It,s millions Einstein.

        “The United States contributes between one-fifth and one-quarter of NATO’s budget. In FY2010 that contribution totaled $711.8 million.”Nato source

        Unbelievable.

        This is the way it usually goes with Israeli hasbara — one insult to reality and truth after another.

        Iceland is a highly attractive country, by the way — and Icelanders tend to get along well with other people in my experience — they aren’t bogged down in endless ugly confrontations about militant ethnic or religious nationalism.

      • hophmi
        August 8, 2013, 10:48 am

        My mistake. I misread the chart. We spend 731 billion on our military. However, my point stands. Our contribution to European security is far, far in excess of what we contribute to NATO. I don’t think any rational person would deny that. It’s difficult to estimate the number, but under the NATO guidelines, members are supposed to be spending two percent of GDP on defense. No one meets that standard besides the US and UK.

        As you disingenuously omitted, the 711 million we contribute to NATO “factors in only direct payments, not deployments of personnel which – outside of special operations, such as in Afghanistan or Libya – may be used to train European forces (for example, in anti-terrorism skills) that benefit U.S. security. …” Not to mention US troops still stationed in Europe.

        So I can admit my mistake. Can you admit yours?

        More importantly, there is nothing that we get from Europe for doing this, and no reason Europe, with high GDPs, cannot spend more on defense; outside of the UK, they don’t even meet the minimum NATO benchmark. That is why they are referred to as free riders.

        “Well maybe that,s because they are not stealing anyone else,s land and pissing off their neighbours for decades.”

        As Norman Finkelstein said, you’re clever, but only in your cult. Iceland is the only EU state without an army.

      • hophmi
        August 8, 2013, 2:07 pm

        http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203335504578086762629230722.html

        “The World Economic Forum ranks Israel among the world’s top countries for technological and business innovation. Scores of major U.S. manufacturers—from General Electric GE 0.00% to General Motors, GM +1.32% Microsoft, IBM, IBM -0.35% Google, GOOG +0.49% Apple and others—have R&D centers and technology incubators in Israel, where they conduct research at about one-half to two-thirds of the cost in the U.S. (thanks to lower labor, rent and regulative costs, plus public investment and tax incentives).

        Israel returns the favor, each year contributing thousands of skilled professionals, hundreds of joint patent applications, and hundreds of coauthored scientific and technical papers to the U.S. economy—almost half as many as contributed by Germany, which has 10 times Israel’s population. In these areas, said State Department science and technology adviser Dr. E. William Colglazier last year, “Israel is a world leader and a model not only for small countries, but all countries.”

        With about 3% of the region’s population, Israel accounted for about 25% of U.S. exports to the Middle East in 2011. For seven years, U.S. exports to Israel have equaled or surpassed those to oil-rich Saudi Arabia. Across the U.S., Israeli firms or their subsidiaries have set up manufacturing plants that employ tens of thousands of Americans.

        Each year Israel sells the U.S. military about $1.5 billion in advanced items, from specialized munitions to life-saving armor and sensors for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. Many such items are produced by Israeli firms working with American partners (such as General Dynamics GD +0.23% or Northrop Grumman NOC -0.10% ), or by U.S. subsidiaries of Israeli firms. U.S. and Israeli manufacturers are now partnering to sell Israeli rocket and missile interceptors, such as David’s Sling and Arrow, to U.S. allies.

        These partnerships have helped the U.S. preserve its military edge. When the U.S. gives Israel $3 billion in annual military aid, 75% of it comes back to purchase American-made products and services. And because Israel is a top innovator in the technologies of modern warfare—cyber, unmanned vehicles, robotics, missile defense—it will remain an important source of innovation for American defense contractors and troops.

        Israel is also a world leader in micro irrigation, wastewater management and reverse-osmosis desalination. Netafim, an Israeli manufacturer of drip-irrigation products, has a production facility in California and has captured half of global market share in this key tool against the risk of climate change. Israeli breakthroughs in high-tech agriculture are permitting increases in productivity for farmers and aquaculturists around the world, in turn promoting sustainability and political stability in the developing world. “

    • Bumblebye
      August 7, 2013, 12:52 pm

      What? This commenter obviously forgot the unpronouncable volcano that grounded air traffic a couple years ago!

      • piotr
        August 7, 2013, 2:27 pm

        Eyjafjallajökull”

        unlike easy to pronounce volcanoes

        Popocatépetl
        Mezhdusopochny

        or, for that matter

        Piotr

    • Chu
      August 7, 2013, 1:17 pm

      ‘Iceland is a joke…’
      That was quite a diatribe.

      I need to try that sort of thing in the morning
      instead of the double mochaccino. That was like
      a morning enema extraction of human hatred to
      get the blood pumping before a long day ahead.

    • Chu
      August 7, 2013, 1:20 pm

      here’s another crazed commenter. Her defense: She is only sharing you what Hashem says in the Torah.

      rawsomegal:
      “It is a schanda – meaning disgrace for the goyim/non-Jews that Jews live like goyim. We are the nation chosen by Hashem/G-d to be a light onto the other nations, NOT TO BE LIKE THEM!!
      May Hashem have mercy on their souls in heaven when then return back to Him when they leave this world. Better yet, there is still time to repent while you are still alive and follow the Torah, the only Holy Book given directly by G-d to the Jews and all the other religions agree that it is true.
      You can check out some amazing websites to get your life back on track divineinformation(dot)com or torahanytime(dot)com or puretorah(dot)com or learntorah(dot)com
      If you aren’t a Jew then you only have to follow the seven Noahide laws to be considered righteous in G-d’s eyes and have a place in heaven
      May Hashem bring the Moshiach speedily in our days, Amen!”

      • thankgodimatheist
        August 7, 2013, 10:08 pm

        “We are the nation chosen by Hashem/G-d to be a light onto the other nations,”
        The sad, depressing thing is that many Israelis believe this nonsense. One frequently see it on blogs and fora. First time around I thought it was sarcasm..

    • American
      August 7, 2013, 1:37 pm

      This atittude is what you get when a state and it’s society is based on ethnic and religious supremacy and privilege of one group. ..they get a delusion of being superior to others even outside of their own ethnic enclave.

      It will bring them down—- just as the neo pushers of the US as the ‘most superior’ country and power are right now bringing the US down.

  3. amigo
    August 7, 2013, 11:44 am

    “Iceland is boring, irrelevant, filled with ignorant anti-Semites and those who gratuitously despise Israel. Its population of 320,000 is just a tiny drop compared to that of Israel.”Forward commenter or troll.

    So when Zionists call for Israel to end co-operation with the EU I hope they think in terms of population.

    Israel , 7 million.

    EU , 450 million.

  4. Chu
    August 7, 2013, 1:04 pm

    “This is why everyone hates Jews.”

    Mel Gibson’s drunken rant only blamed
    ‘the Jews’ for all the world wars.
    She manages to blame the world and the Jews.
    Impressive.

  5. David Doppler
    August 7, 2013, 1:47 pm

    Looks like she’s got some of her own “uninterrogated vanity” issues.

  6. Danaa
    August 7, 2013, 2:04 pm

    This incident doesn’t surprise me. Dorit, like many who left israel when young and never bothered – or did not care – to renew their israeli passport, discovered that israeli “citizenship” is a tie that binds like a razor thin wire. One can never just
    “lose it”, say for for not setting foot in the country for decades. It sticks like an old much regretted tatoo, mercifully hidden and mostly faded but still visible, at least in the eyes of israeli law – and border patrol. Marking you as an eternal member of the cult – one you thought you were able to escape while still sane enough to make another life. The only way out is to officially renounce israeli citizenship – a process as arduous as it is interminable. There is not end to the paper work they want, and no proof it ever actually happened. No sooner you think it’s finally over, that they find yet another paper they just must absolutely have.

    What happened to Dorit Moussaief almost happened to me a while back, which is when i found out about this little law of theirs that you can’t enter the country on your own passport no matter how long ago it was that you had an israeli one. Except that I got a much nicer passport control man, who after 10 minutes of huddling with the “control’ (cf. maanager’) returned to let me in with a warning to never try to do that again. Two years later, having already embarked on the ‘arduous’ process of “removing the tatoo” but the process being still far from completed (due to that ever increasing mountain of demands for old papers, some notarized, etc) I was able to enter and leave with a temporary document certifying that the process of citizenship renounciation was “in progress”. Again, lucky me, I got a really nice border control person, who was content to just pepper me with questions about why I would want to give up such valuable possession. I believe I said something about the ‘value’ being somewhat dubious at that point, but kept my temper well in check.

    I often get the nice ones everywhere. Even traffic cops. Not sure why that is, but it’s probably part of the reason for whatever temperateness I have left.

  7. piotr
    August 7, 2013, 2:06 pm

    I really thing that the habit of boorish ranting is the biggest threat to the survival of Israel. At some point people in other countries will get tired of it.

    Recently Polish parliament rejected government sponsored amendment to a law regulating animal slaughter, so that would allow for Jewish and Muslim ritual slaughter (courts rejected the previous interpretation of that law that did allow shechita). The main reason was that the main government party did not impose voting discipline but the main opposition party did. Israel (both the government and the press) responded with anti-Polish rants that forced the prime minister to make an official rebuke. The main purpose for Israel is to allow Jews to be xenophobic yokels, something that for 2000 years of Exile was possible only for “the nations”.

    • hophmi
      August 7, 2013, 2:24 pm

      Right, Piotr, the country that passes the legislation against kosher slaughter is open-mindedness personified, and those who protest are the xenophobes.

      • Woody Tanaka
        August 7, 2013, 3:22 pm

        No, they passed a law against inhumane slaughter.

      • hophmi
        August 8, 2013, 2:09 pm

        Yes, I’m aware, Woody, that you consider shechita to be inhumane.

        Surely you consider all slaughter to be inhumane. You’re a vegan, right?

      • Ecru
        August 7, 2013, 4:05 pm

        Hey you want to live in a country – abide by its laws. Isn’t that what Israel’s supposed to be for after all, the one place where Jews can be “true Jews” (insular xenophobes with a war and ethnic cleansing addiction. At least that’s the Zionist version). Including that no mixed marriages thing? Everyone equal before the law goes out the window when “people” like you insist “oh but we’re special, we have to have special laws and we have be treated differently. Boo hoo if you disagree you’re just a nasty antisemite, wahhhh.” Gods it’s so pathetic.

        And if you want an example, just look at how well it’s worked out in New York where Jewish paedophiles have been allowed to operate in Jewish communities and then flee to child abuse heaven – Israel – when the (filthy goy) cops get too close for comfort. Oh those special rules just work so well.

      • tarski
        August 7, 2013, 4:15 pm

        Sorry, but Jews and Muslims demand a special right for their atrocious ritual slaughtering. If the rest of the society has decided to make the killing of animals as painless as possible, then everyone has to obey the law. Same goes for circumcision.

      • piotr
        August 7, 2013, 4:39 pm

        The legislative history of that law is convoluted, but in the last vote the opposition to the amendment was perhaps 50-50 composed of animal rights supporters (on the left and center) and xenophobic yokels. And it was actually fairly close vote. After Israeli statements the number of opponents of shehita would probably increase.

        Blindly arrogant xenophobic attitude dominates Israeli government (and animal rights in Israel are not so great either). The next issue will be that EU has to respond eventually to the prohibition of European charitable activities in the West Bank. Unless GoI will quietly drop it. How it happened, and how jubilant were the readers of Israeli press was perhaps a much clearer case.

    • Danaa
      August 7, 2013, 4:22 pm

      Hophmi, however you choose to look at it, the “kosher slaughter” practice is inhumane and results in unnecessary animal suffering. While once upon a time there were practical reasons for the practice (just like circumcision) these reasons no longer hold, with the result being that such practices are now viewed as barbaric remnants of ancient traditions. It’s high time to abolish such customs but there are no longer high ranking smart and enlightened rabbis to even broach the subject of modernizing the dusty old halacha with some solid new rulings.

      Being a [mostly] vegetarian I dislike animal consumption while recognizing that it’ll take a long time to change people’s minds on the subject. Eating habits die hard – everywhere. Just look at the Japanese and their shark fin soup – and no halacha/sharia is even involved – just an old consumption habit that’s hard to change.

      Given that this is a struggle for the long run, in the meantime, we could – and should – at least do what little we can to minimize animal suffering. Whether caused by slaughter or medical experimentation or sheer neglect. Those countries that can should absolutely outlaw – or put strict limitations – on kosher – and halal – slaughter and hooray for Poland (and Switzerland, and Holland and a few more).

      In any case, the religious and orthodox can find creative ways to adapt their laws so that kosher can be established through some symbolic action. just as they do in some enlightened Arabic and muslim communities with regard to female circumcision.

      Personally, I think changes to traditional religious law is what will happen once the orthodox realize that the winds of change are upon them. I have every trust in their ability to find ways to finness the laws. They did it with the Eruv concept, didn’t they? god is flexible that way (and wouldn’t be a god otherwise…).

      In the meantime I recommend staying away from kosher meat – as much as possible. Easy enough to do except in israel, where one could go vegetarian for a time. After all, they do have wonderful salads there….which are ever so good for us.
      .

      • Danaa
        August 7, 2013, 4:24 pm

        PS sorry for the long OT response. But, in the name of all living things, I couldn’t let hophmi’s comment stand unchallenged.

      • hophmi
        August 8, 2013, 2:15 pm

        “Hophmi, however you choose to look at it, the “kosher slaughter” practice is inhumane and results in unnecessary animal suffering.”

        Right. This is definitely the biggest issue facing Europe – the inhumanity of kosher slaughter.

        “It’s high time to abolish such customs ”

        It’s high time that Europe look in the damned mirror and stop restricting Jews from practicing their religion by passing legislation in the EU Parliament to prevent discrimination like this.

        “In any case, the religious and orthodox can find creative ways to adapt their laws so that kosher can be established through some symbolic action.”

        Great idea. How about Christianity? How about we pass legislation abolishing celibacy in the Catholic Church? It has helped lead to untold suffering for millions of Catholic children, who are the victims of paedophilic rape. It is, without question, inhumane.

        Let’s abolish it through secular legislation.

    • talknic
      August 7, 2013, 6:52 pm

      piotr “Recently Polish parliament rejected government sponsored amendment to a law regulating animal slaughter, so that would allow for Jewish and Muslim ritual slaughter “

      It was a complete nonsense. For the last decade or so in Australia, animals are first stunned, then subjected to religious ritual slaughter.

      • piotr
        August 8, 2013, 2:19 am

        Frankly, I have no idea about methods of slaughter. I have seen catching a chicken and wringing a neck, which violates Jewish and Muslim laws. Clearly, the traumatic part is catching it, and in a slaughterhouse animals fear death as they smell the blood.

        So one can raise various arguments. But Jews from Israel and USA invoke Holocaust, and that has totally opposite effect in Poland.

      • German Lefty
        August 8, 2013, 5:33 am

        But Jews from Israel and USA invoke Holocaust, and that has totally opposite effect in Poland.

        I really wish it also had an opposite effect on German politicians, not just on the German people.

  8. German Lefty
    August 8, 2013, 5:32 am

    I’ve never heard of Iceland
    OMG! How can an Israeli not know about the existence of the European country called Iceland? According to Nuttyyahoo, “Europe begins in Israel”. As fellow “European”, I’d expect this Israeli immigration officer not only to know what Iceland is but also where exactly it is.

  9. clairseoir
    August 8, 2013, 2:31 pm

    Not that it’s relevant, but if one were to have a look in an atlas, one might get the impression that Iceland is “European” in only the broadest sense of the term – only slightly more European than Greenland and Newfoundland, one might argue.

    • Woody Tanaka
      August 8, 2013, 4:18 pm

      While geographically, like the Faroe Islands, a mid-oceanic Island, Iceland’s claim to European-ness lies in the lingustic, cultural and genetic connections its inhabitants have with that continent (which is really a subcontinent but that is another argument), and the absence of any connection to any other. It’s not strictly a geographic concept.

  10. just
    August 8, 2013, 4:04 pm

    That’s one dumb and myopic immigration officer.

    Perhaps he/she should join the IOF instead………….

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