Israeli embassy’s attack on Rosengarten just made her stronger

US Politics
on 55 Comments

The author Lillian Rosengarten had just gotten back from a wrenching trip to the country she had left as a refugee 75 years ago when I visited her last week. She’d given nine talks across Germany under the title “A Jew Against Zionism.” Halfway thorough her trip, the Israeli embassy launched an attack on her, saying she was an anti-Semite for linking Israeli behavior with the atrocities inflicted on Jews by Nazis.

Afraid that she was being targeted, Rosengarten almost called off the rest of her trip. But she decided to show strength.

I changed the format of my talk. I talked about the attacks. I said, ‘I was afraid but I am here.’ I put it on the table. Some of the things others are afraid of happening to them—being called an anti-Semite– have happened to me.

Then she called on others to resist the attacks. “Change can only come from you, from the outside. Inside Israel they like the situation. They have annexed most of the land, they have no interest in any kind of real dialogue. They want a Jewish state, they’re happy. The push has to come from the outside. South Africa only changed through the outside push.”

Rosengarten’s log home in the Hudson Valley has peace posters on the porch and Tibetan prayer flags in the trees. We sat by the cold fireplace. She was exhausted by the trip but she said it had been healing.

At some points when I gave my talks I was almost crying. My whole face changed, I got so involved. I talked about my grandfather’s suicide, my father’s suicide. I talked about a dream I had about [her late son] Phil in Theresienstadt. I was in the museum, looking at the wall of the children who died. Their names are covered in glass. My name would have been on the wall, and in my dream the death of my son [in the United States] was interwoven with their deaths, and it was connected with all the Palestinian children who died. I feel  guilt about having survived.

In her talks, she spoke the German she’d learned before she escaped. And just five years ago Rosengarten was deported by Israel for trying to get into Gaza on the Jewish Boat. Now she is publishing a book in which she describes the ways that the rise of the Nazis traumatized her family even after their escape, fostering depression. She has never felt stronger, telling her story. She describes going from a shy and passive nursing student in New York to becoming an outspoken feminist and poet, and activist for Palestine.

She embodies two or three chapters of Jewish history. I asked if she will ever get to speak at the Center for Jewish History or the 92d Street Y. Will she speak at synagogues? She said she’d speak anywhere, but no one has called.

“I said to myself, I would never go to the Great Neck synagogue, where they celebrated the bombing of Gaza. I can’t go to a place that is so closed and hostile. Then I thought, I would go if they invited me. I’d like to be asked in. I’d like to open up some dialogue, and have the mainstream media be interested.”

It is not likely to happen soon. The Zionist establishment wants to shut Rosengarten down. Israel is afraid of her. Here is the attack that was mounted on her from Israel in the Jerusalem Post:

Israel’s embassy in Berlin sharply criticized on Tuesday Germany’s Sparkasse savings bank network – and various NGOs – for allowing an opponent of the existence of Israel, who has likened the Jewish state to the Third Reich, to deliver a talk in its office space titled “Jew against Zionism.”

“We regret that certain organizations provide a platform for hatred. It is important and would have been beneficial if institutions would have double-checked before allowing their resources to be used as platforms to spread hatred. Actions are being taken,” the embassy told The Jerusalem Post.

Rosengarten denied every charge levied at her. She did not liken Israel to the Third Reich; she spoke of the ways that traumatized people reenact abuse. She did not want to destroy anything: she was just for equal rights. “Jews and Palestinians who are brothers and sisters must be able to live together with equal rights. It must happen if there is going to be peace.”

Bill for Lillian Rosengarten's German tour: A Jew Against Zionism

Bill for Lillian Rosengarten’s German tour: A Jew Against Zionism

This is a hard message for German Jews to absorb. They are generally Zionists, or afraid to criticize Israel. Few Jews came to her talks. When she went to Frankfurt, the city she lived in as a girl, she wrote the city’s Jewish mayor to ask him come to her talk.

His secretary answered and said he was busy. I knew he was afraid. I wrote and said, I understand you have some problems with it, but it will be a sweet talk–it will be a discussion. Nothing will frighten you. I’m not against Israel, I’m against the occupation. Please rethink your decision. He never answered.

He has a position as the mayor of Frankfurt. And Aipac [American Israel Public Affairs Committee] has the same kind of organization in Germany as here. He would be ostracized, he would not win again, and he was afraid. That’s the general atmosphere.

The discourse is much more open in the United States, but Rosengarten may well be marginalized by the mainstream press. Will a reporter for the Times or the Post visit her and hear her astonishing story? Most periodicals are invested in protecting Israel. And Rosengarten’s entire experience undermines that effort. She left Germany for her safety but sees Israel as an unsafe place.

“Why are you against Zionism?” I asked. She shook her head in sadness.

Zionism is an ultranationalist racist regime; and it is a morally corrupt regime. It has been in a state of emergency since 1948. They have been keeping Palestinians under occupation for 70 years. This is unheard of.

The lesson of her trip, she said, was that it will take great strength on the part of those who believe in equal rights to overcome Israel’s supporters. By speaking up, she did not feel lonely and did not feel weak. Reconnected with her German girlhood, she felt strong.

Be strong, do not be afraid of labels. You cannot be intimidated by this. That’s what they want. That is why I go toward the fear.

Rosengarten will be speaking next week in New York about her book, Survival and Conscience: From the Shadows of Nazi Germany to the Jewish Boat to Gaza.

About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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55 Responses

  1. German Lefty
    September 30, 2015, 11:55 am

    I had no idea that Lillian Rosengarten is actually from Germany. Great she came back. However, I find it a bit strange that all her talks took place in the Western part of Germany. Sadly, I couldn’t find a video of her talk.

    • Ellen
      September 30, 2015, 10:55 pm

      Isn’t Charlottenberg, Willhemsdorfer Strasse 136 in Berlin — Eastern Germany?

      BTW, very cool that the dusty mainstream Sparkassen gave this a platform.

      • German Lefty
        October 1, 2015, 5:06 am

        Ellen – “Isn’t Charlottenberg, Willhemsdorfer Strasse 136 in Berlin — Eastern Germany?

        No, Charlottenburg is in the Western part of Berlin. See here: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/West-Berlin#Bezirke
        What counts as “the East” and as “the West” is determined by history, not by a compass.

  2. lysias
    September 30, 2015, 12:42 pm

    For those (like me) interested in her book, it is entitled Survival and Conscience: From the Shadows of Nazi Germany to the Jewish Boat to Gaza. It is due to be released October 5th.

    • German Lefty
      September 30, 2015, 1:23 pm

      Why don’t you read the German version? It was already published last year: “Ein bewegtes Leben: Von den Schatten Nazi-Deutschlands zum jüdischen Boot nach Gaza”.

      • Annie Robbins
        September 30, 2015, 2:33 pm

        a few of us don’t speak german.

      • lysias
        September 30, 2015, 2:42 pm

        Thanks, but unfortunately I’ve already ordered the English-language version.

      • German Lefty
        September 30, 2015, 2:47 pm

        Annie, I responded to lysias. And if I remember correctly, lysias does speak German.

      • Annie Robbins
        September 30, 2015, 10:00 pm

        of course, sorry! i just thought it was a funny thing to read. you’re probably aware 99% of americans only speak one language. ok that’s a joke, i know we’re not that bad. but it’s so not like europe where everyone speaks 7 languages.

        p.s. i have another excuse. sometimes (frequently) i read comments from the back pages where they are isolated, not in context with the conversation. i just found your comment amusing — rolled my eyes like ‘yeah right’. whereas, i should have shut up. my sincere apologies.

      • Ellen
        September 30, 2015, 10:54 pm
  3. German Lefty
    September 30, 2015, 1:20 pm

    Afraid that she was being targeted, Rosengarten almost called off the rest of her trip. But she decided to show strength. “I changed the format of my talk. I talked about the attacks. I said, ‘I was afraid but I am here.’ I put it on the table.”

    This was the right decision! Max Blumenthal did exactly the same thing when he came to Germany and was attacked by Zionist politicians and journalists.
    If not even Jews stood up to such attacks, then how could non-Jews possibly do that?

  4. eljay
    September 30, 2015, 1:49 pm

    I continue to have tremendous respect for Ms. Rosengarten.

  5. hophmi
    September 30, 2015, 2:25 pm

    You’ve never quite explained why Rosengarten’s survivor background is relevant, particularly when there are hundreds of thousands of people who are survivors, the vast majority, who disagree with her perspective.

    In addition to facing a growing anti-Muslim and anti-Jewish movement in PEGIDA and an assortment of other neo-Nazi groups, Germany is a place where people really do take offense at people who like to throw around Hitler comparisons as if they’re going out of style, including when they’re Jews being used as fig leaves to cover the BDS movement’s antisemitism.

    • Annie Robbins
      September 30, 2015, 2:43 pm

      not content to give your own opinion, you pretend to know what offends german people and try to squeeze your own narrow vision into theirs and write as tho you embody their mindframe. that would be impossible. no source, nothing. pff

      • hophmi
        October 1, 2015, 10:54 am

        Sure, according to Bertelsmann poll from 2013, a solid majority of Germans reject the Nazi-Israel comparison. See page 36.

        https://www.bertelsmann-stiftung.de/fileadmin/files/BSt/Publikationen/GrauePublikationen/Studie_LW_Germany_and_Israel_today_2015.pdf

      • Sibiriak
        October 1, 2015, 11:49 am

        hophmi: according to Bertelsmann poll from 2013, a solid majority of Germans reject the Nazi-Israel comparison.
        ———————–

        The survey statement was:

        What the state of Israeli is doing to the Palestinians today is essentially the same thing as what the Nazis did to the Jews in the Third Reich

        A slim majority — 51% –disagreed, but a very solid minority– 41%– agreed. There was no question about people “taking offense” at such a comparison.

        I find it noteworthy that such a large number of respondents would agree with such a broad, unqualified–“essentially the same thing as”–comparison.

        The survey says nothing about how people would react to more narrowly- focused comparisons.

        It’s also noteworthy that the study’s authors claim that Israel-Nazi comparisons are, yes, anti-Semitic:

        There is also another distinct form of anti- Semitism that has high social relevance in Germany. Secondary anti-Semitism can be viewed as a reaction to the Holocaust that manifests itself in the relativization, minimization or denial of guilt, the accusation that Jews exploit German guilt over the Holocaust , and the reversal of the roles of victim and perpetrator. Moreover, secondary anti-Semitism has in recent years been increasingly focused on the state of Israel, whose policies provide an opportunity for perpetrator-victim denial.

        By comparing Israeli policies with the crimes perpetrated against the Jews, their post-Holocaust status as victims is questioned and German guilt and responsibility is minimized or even denied entirely… (emphasis added)

        “Secondary anti-Semitism” is apparently an important subset of the “New anti-Semitism”. Perhaps one of our resident discourse analysts could explicate the above statement.

    • German Lefty
      September 30, 2015, 3:11 pm

      “You’ve never quite explained why Rosengarten’s survivor background is relevant.”

      The article deals with Lillian’s trip to Germany. And in this context it makes sense to mention that Germany is not just a random foreign country to her but her actual native country. Besides, the article isn’t only about Lillian’s talks in Germany but it also mentions her book. And in her book, she writes about how she grew up. So, yes, her survivor background is relevant here.

      “There are hundreds of thousands of people who are survivors, the vast majority, who disagree with her perspective.”

      So what? Lillian’s survivor background doesn’t prove her right. The facts prove her right.

      “Germany is a place where people really do take offense at people who like to throw around Hitler comparisons.”

      Only inappropriate ones.

    • eljay
      September 30, 2015, 3:14 pm

      || hophmi: You’ve never quite explained why Rosengarten’s survivor background is relevant … ||

      – Why is it irrelevant?
      – Why is it less-relevant than Elie Wiesel’s survivor background?
      – Have you ever complained when Elie Wiesel’s survivor background it mentioned?
      – Or are you simply suggesting that a person’s Holocaust-survival background should only be used to promote Jewish supremacism in/and a supremacist “Jewish State” (and not to promote justice, accountability and equality)?

      • Ellen
        September 30, 2015, 10:59 pm

        My first thoughts. It is only relevant when it is to promote the Zionist colonial project, not justice, truth and accountability.

    • Annie Robbins
      September 30, 2015, 3:25 pm

      You’ve never quite explained why Rosengarten’s survivor background is relevant

      because hophmi is not content to use his own imagination wrt to why Rosengarten’s grandfather and father both committed suicide, he wants the excruciating details about how that might have impacted the author, activist and speaker.

      or maybe he’ll grace us with reasons why those suicides might not have had anything to do with the holocaust. or maybe he’ll tell us how a lot of survivors got thru those terrible times without killing themselves and therefore those suicides represented weakness in her family. why there’s probably so many derogatory ways hophmi can suggest uncomfortable things. all with the presumed aim of confronting phil. you never this and you never that and you never bla bla bla. let us count the ways.

      • hophmi
        September 30, 2015, 7:08 pm

        Sorry Annie, but your act is not convincing. Either you acknowledge that survivorship matters or you don’t. What you can’t do is make a big deal out of it only when it serves your particular political perspective.

      • Annie Robbins
        September 30, 2015, 7:25 pm

        i didn’t make a big deal about it, you brought it up. i also think it matters and have not argued otherwise. go bloviate on someone else hops.

      • Mooser
        September 30, 2015, 8:15 pm

        “What you can’t do is make a big deal out of it only when it serves your particular political perspective.”

        Aww, c’mon Hophmi. I provided a link to your archive, wordsearch “survivor”, but did you go and read it? Nope.

      • hophmi
        October 1, 2015, 10:58 am

        “because hophmi is not content to use his own imagination wrt to why Rosengarten’s grandfather and father both committed suicide, he wants the excruciating details about how that might have impacted the author, activist and speaker.”

        LOL. Make stuff up much? I think I made my point. When you have a pro-Palestinian Holocaust survivor, you’ll make sure to prominently mention her past, without acknowledging that most Holocaust survivors see things very differently from the way she sees them. Clearly, you’ve never heard the saying that what’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

        “i didn’t make a big deal about it, you brought it up.”

        I think that the BDS movement never misses an opportunity to highlight Ms. Rosengarten’s past. It’s the main reason they tokenize her.

      • eljay
        October 1, 2015, 11:09 am

        || hophmi: … I think I made my point. … ||

        And, as usual, your point is that you’re a hateful and immoral Zio-supremacist and a hypocrite.

        || … When you have a pro-Palestinian Holocaust survivor, you’ll make sure to prominently mention her past, without acknowledging that most Holocaust survivors see things very differently from the way she sees them. ||

        And when people have Zio-supremacist Holocaust survivors such as Elie Wiesel, they make sure to prominently mention his past without acknowledging that other Holocaust survivors see things differently from the way he does. But that doesn’t bother you.

      • Mooser
        October 1, 2015, 3:34 pm

        Somebody said: “A Holocaust survivor is someone and -only – someone who was in the camps and who lived through it. Period.”
        Hophmi wanted a more inclusive definition of “survivor”:

        Hophmi: “OK. I think you’re very wrong. We wouldn’t refer to a survivor of the Rwandan genocide as only people who survived machete attacks. The category encompasses Hutus who were in Rwanda at the time of the genocide, because they were the targets. And that’s because the event caused them to behave in survival mode….”

        Hophmi:“Elie Wiesel is not perfect either. He just happens to be one of the most eloquent speakers and writers on genocide we have in the United States. You really have some nerve talking about a Holocaust survivor that way. Who do you think you are?”

        Hophmi: “One doesn’t need to be a death camp survivor to be a Holocaust survivor. Anyone Jew (and others who were persecuted) who was in Nazi-occupied territory during the war years is a survivor.””And so it should be defined that way. All of these people were affected by German barbarism. “

        Hophmi: “a Holocaust survivor is generally defined as any Jew who lived for any period of time in a country that was ruled by the Nazis or their allies.

        Hophmi: “Uh-huh. Or it’s simply that the vast majority of Holocaust survivors support Israel…”

      • Annie Robbins
        October 1, 2015, 7:35 pm

        LOL. Make stuff up much?

        well what are you going on about then?

        I think I made my point. When you have a pro-Palestinian Holocaust survivor ….

        who called her that besides you? no one is making or “proving” your point.

        I think that the BDS movement never misses an opportunity to highlight Ms. Rosengarten’s past.

        so what? it’s extraordinarily common when referencing people who are older to reflect on their past. i mean who says that about older people “why do you bring up their past”. older people have stories to tell. they have experience. it’s completely archetypal to have wise older people in communities everywhere (all over the world) and to revel older people for all the contributions they’ve made in their lives and/or experiences they’ve had. that’s just normal. what’s wrong with highlighting someones past? you sound envious or bitter hops. do you have a problem with her past?

      • eljay
        October 2, 2015, 7:33 am

        || Mooser: Somebody said: “A Holocaust survivor is someone and -only – someone who was in the camps and who lived through it. Period.”

        Hophmi wanted a more inclusive definition of “survivor”: … ||

        Inclusive…except for when he thinks it shouldn’t be. Why, that makes him seem like a bit of a hypocrite. Say it ain’t so! :-(

    • Kris
      September 30, 2015, 3:56 pm

      Thanks, hopmi. It is worth considering once again the horrifying plight of the Holocaust survivors in Israel:

      A day before Holocaust Remembrance Day, the Foundation for the Benefit of Holocaust Victims in Israel (FBHV) has published its annual report, which found that despite a NIS 1 billion plan implemented by the government, about 45,000 of survivors live below the poverty line – 30 percent of all Holocaust survivors living in Israel.

      According to the report, some 78 percent of survivors suffer from health problems, 45 percent often feel lonely and 46 percent believe that their children and grandchildren will forget the Holocaust after they are gone…

      In 2014, approximately 490 infirm survivors died every month compared to 460 in 2013. In addition, in 2013 approximately 60,000 survivors contacted the foundation for assistance – most of the inquiries came from survivors with low income and defined by the Finance Ministry as being “needy and eligible for support”, last year’s report said. Forty-five percent of those who contacted the foundation were 86 years old and older and 50 percent were widows/widowers.

      The FBHV report found that more survivors had to give up food, medication or medical treatment. Four out of ten survivors said that their low income compared to their high expenditures does not allow them to live in dignity. In addition, 27 percent of the survivors said they could not afford to heat their homes last winter. http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4646867,00.html

      Anyone know why Israel mistreats Holocaust survivors? Apparently “honor thy father and thy mother” doesn’t apply to Zionists. Just as “thou shalt not kill, lie, steal, covet, have false gods/idols” don’t apply to Zionists, either. So confusing.

    • Mooser
      September 30, 2015, 4:36 pm

      “You’ve never quite explained why Rosengarten’s survivor background is relevant, .”

      Hophmi, for the answer, simply word-search “survivor” at your own archive.

    • Jon66
      September 30, 2015, 5:43 pm

      I would not classify her as a “survivor” in the sense that she survived the death camps. She says that she was born in Frankfurt in 1935 and the family fled in 1936 at 18 months old. She is a better categorized as a “refugee” from Nazi Germany. She states that she has no memory of her time in Germany. “My exodus although not in my conscious memory is imprinted into my very being. ”
      Source: Mondoweiss, A hidden witness to the Brown Shirts now prepares to go to Gaza

      • Mooser
        September 30, 2015, 5:55 pm

        “I would not classify her as a “survivor” in the sense that she survived the death camps.”

        You better have a talk with “Hophmi” about that, “who is a survivor” thing.

        But we get the basic principle: When it justifies Zionism, everybody is a “survivor”, but when it leads to doubting Zionism, well, then their credentials as a “survivor” are suspect?

        Any grist for your mill, I guess, but wow.

      • Jon66
        September 30, 2015, 7:44 pm

        @Mooser

        I think the principle is one of accuracy regardless of the political or ideological view of the person being described. Albert Einstein and countless others were refugees. Some are Zionists and some are not.

        I don’t know if you have had the opportunity to meet any survivors who were actually in the camps, but based upon the ones I have, I think the experience was fundamentally different.

      • Ellen
        September 30, 2015, 11:08 pm

        Right, those who survived the death camps — Jews and others — are survivors. But time has taken most all of this population and the Zionist propaganda machine has extended the expression “survivor” to include even those who were not yet born during this terrible period. But children of survivors and children of refugees. With that, even children of Henry Kissinger (if he had any) would be considered survivors.

        So with this new definition of “Holocaust Survivors” we all are survivors. After all, most of us have at least grand parents, if not parents) great grand parents, etc. that survived some kind of atrocity somewhere at sometime.

    • Annie Robbins
      September 30, 2015, 10:23 pm

      hops, it just occurred to me that if you are in NY ( isn’t that where you’re based?) you could go to hear Lillian talk about her book next week. i just opened phil’s link and it says

      “Lillian Rosengarten, in conversation with Philip Weiss”

      and you could ask lillian or phil these question in person. and/or you could buy the book.

    • RoHa
      September 30, 2015, 11:00 pm

      “You’ve never quite explained why Rosengarten’s survivor background is relevant,”

      Her background as a Holocaust survivor should be irrelevant to moral condemnation of Israel. However, Zionists continually wag the Holocaust at critics of Israel, and that context makes her status relevant.

      “particularly when there are hundreds of thousands of people who are survivors, the vast majority, who disagree with her perspective.”

      Not only has your punctuation broken down, but also your logic. If her status as a survivor is irrelevant to the issue, so is the status of those survivors who disagree with her.

    • Marnie
      October 1, 2015, 1:20 am

      “You’ve never quite explained why Rosengarten’s survivor background is relevant, particularly when there are hundreds of thousands of people who are survivors, the vast majority, who disagree with her perspective.”

      Are you for real? You throw out statements without any sources for your claims. There’s been a number of survivors, besides Ms. Rosengarten, who’ve spoken out against zionism, the occupation, etc., yet they don’t get the coverage they should except on these pages and maybe some others. “Jews being used as fig leaves….” You need to address your persecution complexes as they are preventing you from any kind of understanding about reality.

    • Boo
      October 1, 2015, 12:38 pm

      Well, we’ve discovered something even more odious than Jew-counting: Holocaust-survivor counting. “Odds” of a measly few hundred thousand to one are trivial when the one is in the right.

  6. Annie Robbins
    September 30, 2015, 2:35 pm

    what an excellent article. thanks so much Phil. and thank you Lillian, you are such a wonderful wonderful person.

  7. echinococcus
    September 30, 2015, 2:42 pm

    Rosengarten denied every charge levied at her. She did not liken Israel to the Third Reich

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with likening “Israel” to the Third Reich. Many elements correspond; resemblances and differences can be discussed. In fact, it may well be that some features of the Zionist state come out moire extreme than in the Reich. At the end of the day people can judge by evaluating the charges one by one.

    Nothing wrong with not making the analogy, either, provided one has run the comparison point by bloody point and left one’s deep emotions at the hatcheck –not just avoid and censor it just because it is personally repugnant to one.

  8. Citizen
    September 30, 2015, 3:05 pm

    Lillian is such an admirable and inspiring human.

  9. Citizen
    September 30, 2015, 3:12 pm

    Her book is not available for sale until Oct 5. But it’s free to read online or download here: http://www.freebook.nwiddepok.com/book/9781935982609/survival-and-conscience

    • Helena Cobban
      September 30, 2015, 7:56 pm

      It is *not* available at that “nwiddepok” site, which is a phishing platform used to hoodwink people to gain your credit-card and other personal details. Buyer beware! It *is* available via this page on the Just World Books website– with free shipping for orders placed before the October 5 publication date.

  10. DaBakr
    September 30, 2015, 3:41 pm

    author has no clue why mayor of Frankfurt declined to attend. Maybe he was “scared” as she stated. Or maybe he just thinks she’s a far-left wing nut job. Or maybe he just wasn’t interested in her talk. whatever the case she is only guessing and has no proof of intent. It isn’t as if she is a world renowned speaker. The mayor may not have even known who she was. no links to any source citing ‘fear’.

    • Boo
      October 1, 2015, 12:44 pm

      Certainly not. When the Israeli Embassy issues a communiqué saying “Actions are being taken”, the world knows it’s merely hot air and harrumphery, and by no means is there any reason for anyone to fear.

      • DaBakr
        October 1, 2015, 2:16 pm

        @b

        thats correct. no reason to fear. as was demonstrated this past summer when all the conspiracy nuts were proven to be the fruitcakes they are about how apaic and Zionists ‘control’ the US. Netanyahu certainly didn’t ‘scare’ very many and the US president prevailed in what he evidently sees as America’s best interests.

  11. JLewisDickerson
    September 30, 2015, 4:42 pm

    RE: “The author Lillian Rosengarten had just gotten back from a wrenching trip to the country she had left as a refugee 75 years ago when I visited her last week. She’d given nine talks across Germany under the title ‘A Jew Against Zionism’. Halfway thorough her trip, the Israeli embassy launched an attack on her, saying she was an anti-Semite for linking Israeli behavior with the atrocities inflicted on Jews by Nazis.” ~ Weiss

    ALSO REGARDING THE ISRAELI EMBASSY IN BERLIN, SEE:
    “Israeli diplomat in Berlin: Maintaining German guilt about Holocaust helps Israel” | By Nir Gontarz | Haaretz.com | Jun. 25, 2015

    [EXCERPT] A spokeswoman for the Israeli embassy in Berlin recently told Israeli journalists it was in the country’s interest to maintain German guilt about the Holocaust, and that it isn’t seeking full normalization of relations between the governments.

    Embassy spokeswoman Adi Farjon made the comments in a closed briefing session with journalists at the embassy.

    “We were all in shock,” said a female journalist present at the briefing. “The spokeswoman clearly said it was an Israeli interest to maintain German guilt feelings. She even said that without them, we’d be just another country as far as they’re concerned.”

    Others present at the event confirmed the journalist’s account.

    Some added that the Israeli ambassador himself, Yakov Hadas-Handelsman, was present for some of the briefing, as were other embassy workers who don’t speak Hebrew. Another journalist commented, “It was so awkward. We couldn’t believe our ears. We’re sitting there eating peanuts, and behind the spokeswoman there are two German women sitting there who don’t understand a word of Hebrew – and the embassy staff is telling us they’re working to preserve the German guilt feelings and that Israel has no interest in normalization of relations between the two countries.”

    “I don’t remember saying that,” Farjon told Haaretz in response. “I can’t vouch for any particular quote, she added. “It was an off-the-record conversation, a briefing talk. The way I speak with Israeli journalists is a little different. These things aren’t intended to get out. I can’t reveal the principles I work by. For example, I don’t say who I go to in order to get good stories out here, or who I pay for things like that.” . . .

    ENTIRE ARTICLE – http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/.premium-1.662962

    • JLewisDickerson
      October 1, 2015, 3:57 pm

      RE: [Rosengarten] did not want to destroy anything: she was just for equal rights. “Jews and Palestinians who are brothers and sisters must be able to live together with equal rights. It must happen if there is going to be peace.” This is a hard message for German Jews to absorb. They are generally Zionists, or afraid to criticize Israel. Few Jews came to her talks. ~ Weiss

      SEE: “Gunter the Terrible”, By Uri Avnery, The Palestine Chronicle, 4/13/12

      [EXCERPT] Stop me if I have told you this joke before:
      Somewhere in the US, a demonstration takes place. The police arrive and beat the protesters mercilessly.
      “Don’t hit me,” someone shouts, “I am an anti-communist!”
      “I couldn’t give a damn what kind of a communist you are!” a policeman answers as he raises his baton.
      The first time I told this joke was when a German group visited the Knesset and met with German-born members, including me.
      They went out of their way to praise Israel, lauding everything we had been doing, condemning every bit of criticism, however harmless it might be. It became downright embarrassing
      , since some of us in the Knesset were very critical of our government’s policy in the occupied territories.
      For me, this extreme kind of pro-Semitism is just disguised anti-Semitism. Both have a basic belief in common: that Jews – and therefore Israel – are something apart, not to be measured by the standards applied to everybody else. . .

      ENTIRE COMMENTARY – http://www.palestinechronicle.com/gunter-the-terrible/#.UpTfHMSsh8E

  12. JLewisDickerson
    September 30, 2015, 5:04 pm

    RE: “Rosengarten denied every charge levied at her. She did not liken Israel to the Third Reich; she spoke of the ways that traumatized people reenact abuse.” ~ Weiss

    SEE: “Netanyahu’s Ministry of Fear” | by Uri Avnery | Counterpunch | September 25, 2015

    [EXCERPT] . . . Fear is a necessary condition for human survival. Most animals in nature possess it. It helps them to respond to dangers and evade or fight them. Human beings survive because they are fearful.

    Fear is both individual and collective. Since its earliest days, the human race has lived in collectives. This is both a necessary and a desired condition. Early humans lived in tribes. The tribe defended their territory against all “strangers” – neighboring tribes – in order to safeguard their food supply and security. Fear was one of the uniting factors.

    Belonging to one’s tribe (which after many evolutions became a modern nation) is also a profound psychological need. It, too, is connected with fear – fear of other tribes, fear of other nations.

    But fear can grow and become a monster.

    Recently I received a very interesting article by a young scientist, Yoav Litvin, dealing with this phenomenon.

    It described, in scientific terms, how easily fear can be manipulated. The science involved was the research of the human brain, based on experiments with laboratory animals like mice and rats.

    Nothing is easier than to create fear. For example, mice were given an electric shock while exposed to rock music. After some time, the mice showed reactions of extreme fear when the rock music was played, even without being given a shock. The music alone produced fear.

    This could be reversed. For a long time, the music was played for them without the pain. Slowly, very slowly, the fear abated. But not completely: when, after a long time, a shock was again delivered with the music, the full symptoms of fear re-appeared immediately. Once was enough.

    Apply this to human nations, and the results are the same. . .

    ENTIRE COMMENTARY – http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/09/25/netanyahus-ministry-of-fear/

  13. Mooser
    September 30, 2015, 9:05 pm

    […]

    UH-oh, he’s past jocose, been lachrymous, and now he’s gettin bellicose. Let’s hope comatose comes soon.

    “Grober” you’re all class.

    • James North
      September 30, 2015, 10:17 pm

      Moose: Can we be sure that “Grober” actually exists, and isn’t just a sock puppet you invented using a different IP address to get past the alert moderators?

  14. Helena Cobban
    October 1, 2015, 8:42 am

    Just fyi everyone, Lillian herself is very careful *not* to describe herself as “a Holocaust survivor”, but as “a refugee from Nazi Germany”.

    Also, NYC people, yes please do come to the book launch next Monday when Phil Weiss and Lillian will be exploring these issues in person with the audience.

    I wish Phil had put the notice about the event at the top of the article, not the bottom. But that’s just Phil, being self-effacing.

    Really, people, come out and show your support for Lillian and her right to tell her story! (Pre-registration at that Eventbrite page is required.)

    Thanks!

    • Mooser
      October 1, 2015, 3:03 pm

      “Just fyi everyone, Lillian herself is very careful *not* to describe herself as “a Holocaust survivor”, but as “a refugee from Nazi Germany”.”

      Thanks, Ms. Cobban! If Lillian herself is not insisting on, in fact disclaims the label “survivor” for term “refugee”, what on earth could the motivation for Hophmi’s and “Jon s” dissection of the “survivor” term be? They used to be sooooo liberal about who was a “Holocaust survivor” (as I found by checking their archives.) I wonder what changed when it came to Ms. Rosengarten?

  15. Mooser
    October 1, 2015, 10:40 am

    “and isn’t just a sock puppet you invented using a different IP address to get past the alert moderators?”

    Please don’t even suggest that. I could never manage that. Until I looked it up when I read this comment, I thought an “IP address” was the GPS coordinates of my municipal sewer-line connection.

  16. yourstruly
    October 1, 2015, 8:48 pm

    an accurate Israel-Nazi Germany comparison –

    Gaza and the Warsaw Ghetto

    same place
    different time
    while the world stands by
    genocide
    live

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