Israeli designer eroticizes the Palestinian keffiyeh

Israel/Palestine
on 144 Comments

Tanya Habjouqa, a photographer, reported on her Facebook page a few days ago:

Cultural appropriation to an extreme….in a chic Tel Aviv mall, I stopped in my tracks when I saw the Palestinian and Jordanian Keffiyeh fabric filling an entire boutique. Chic sexy dresses, funky flouncy skirts, long hippie draping gowns….minimum cost 150 USD. No sign or explanation of where this material came from. Even my husband stood frozen in alarm, peering in window. It really was too much. Even by the standards here.

Cultural appropriation: Dodo Bar Or, boutique, foto by Tanya Habjouqa

Cultural appropriation: Dodo Bar Or, boutique, foto by Tanya Habjouqa on her Facebook page

We went on to Dodo Bar Or’s site. She is an Israeli designer with stores in Tel Aviv and an international following. Her foto’s at right.

Dodo Bar Or, fashion designer

Dodo Bar Or, fashion designer

Her new line is based largely on the Palestinian keffiyeh, a symbol of Palestinian resistance. Some of the fashions eroticize the keffiyeh. I can’t imagine Dodo Bar Or is considering the sentiments of 20 percent of the Israeli population, let alone the millions under occupation a few miles away. Many are sure to be offended by these clothes.

Palestinian appropriated fashion by Dodo Bar Or, a Tel Aviv boutique

Palestinian appropriated fashion by Dodo Bar Or, a Tel Aviv boutique

Kuffiyeh fashion by Dodo Bar Or, Tel Aviv designer

Keffiyeh fashion by Dodo Bar Or, Tel Aviv designer

 

Kuffiyeh fashion by Dodo Bar Or of Tel Aviv

Keffiyeh fashion by Dodo Bar Or of Tel Aviv

144 Responses

  1. Ellen
    February 2, 2016, 2:41 pm

    Not creative, lame, cheesy and sad.

    • Krauss
      February 2, 2016, 4:19 pm

      But entirely predictable.

      Israeli Jewish society has tried to steal Palestinian culture for a long time now, just look at their attempt to steal food culture like hummus and bizarrely claim its their own.

      It’s like the white settlers of America, who took in Native American mythology and tried to make it part of their culture, whether it is naming helicopters Apache and Chinook or football teams like the Red Skins(there are many more examples).

      Both are instances of a nervous settler-colonial population with thin roots to the region who try to cover that fact up with blatant theft of the native culture.

      This is disgusting – but entirely expected.

      • tokyobk
        February 3, 2016, 7:04 pm

        Well not exactly. Certainly Israeli culture appropriates in a way similar to all colonialism. I remember learning “rikud ha’am” the people’s dance and realising much later that the people who invented these dances were not my people at all (set to Romanian folk tunes btw).

        But 1/2 of Israelis descend from people for whom hummus was also indigenous. The same cannot be said for Europeans in the Americas.

        The issue is expulsion and conquest not food which is the most “stolen” of all culture. Name any supposedly national cuisine and then research its parts. The property rights fall apart pretty quickly.

        Chick Peas (probably from Turkey) and Fava Beans are a pan-Medeterranian staple and people of all the pre-Abrahamic and Abrahamic faiths were eating them long before Israel or Palestine.

  2. amigo
    February 2, 2016, 2:56 pm

    Wouldn,t someone wearing these be likely to be shot on sight by one of Israel,s most moral soldiers.

    • Marnie
      February 3, 2016, 2:15 am

      Not if she was exposing her breasts like the model, which, I’m pretty sure, no Palestinian woman would consider doing. I’ve always thought most jewish israeli women dress like discount […] in a K-Mart special. This is especially disgusting, stealing the symbol of Palestinian resistance and turning it into something cheap and titillating, IOW, the height of israeli style. I don’t know what these people see when they look in the mirror, but it isn’t reality.

      • Steve Grover
        February 3, 2016, 3:46 pm

        Marnie sez,
        “I have always thought most Jewish Israeli women dress like discount […] in a K-Mart special.”
        I’m hoping the only reason that the moderator let this comment through is to expose Marnie’s hatred of Jewish Israeli women. Would eljay ask Marnie why she hates Jewish Israeli women?

      • eljay
        February 3, 2016, 6:27 pm

        || Steve Grover: … Would eljay ask Marnie why she hates Jewish Israeli women? ||

        Why would I ask her that? She seems to have a problem with how “most Jewish Israeli women dress”, not with “most Jewish Israeli women” or “Jewish Israeli women” or even “the Jews”.

        If her comment upsets you, why don’t you just put her in her place like a real man would? I’m sure you’d find it satisfying and, who knows, maybe she’d even like it.

      • Mooser
        February 3, 2016, 7:07 pm

        “I’m hoping the only reason that the moderator let this comment through… “

        Gosh, “Steve Grover” I don’t know what Israelis would do if they didn’t have you holding them up to standard from Illinois USA.

        What is it about Israelis which offends you so much?

      • Steve Grover
        February 3, 2016, 7:45 pm

        It’s obvious eljay hasn’t seen the hateful words that were redacted by the moderator.

      • eljay
        February 4, 2016, 7:11 am

        || Steve Grover: It’s obvious eljay hasn’t seen the hateful words that were redacted by the moderator. ||

        Obviously. But even if I had seen them, why would you need me to be your tool of condemnation when, clearly, you’re a big enough tool all on your own?

  3. eljay
    February 2, 2016, 3:07 pm

    According to Wiki:
    – “keffiyeh” is “… a traditional Middle Eastern headdress fashioned from a square scarf.”
    – “Palestinian keffiyeh” is “… a gender-neutral chequered black and white scarf that is usually worn around the neck or head.”

    If “(Palestinian) keffiyeh” is the scarf – worn on the head, around the shoulders, etc. – and not just the pattern(s) on fabric, is it really cultural appropriation to use the pattern(s) in Israeli (or even non-Israeli) dresses?

    I’m sincerely unclear on the concept.

  4. hophmi
    February 2, 2016, 3:07 pm

    LOL. I’d have more sympathy if the keffiyeh hadn’t been a fashion symbol in the United States and, apparently, Tokyo, for the last 25 years or so. They’re commonly seen in NYC, where people where them as scarves, and the ones in NYC are doubtless made in the same place most of the rest of them are – China.

    For the record, the keffiyeh is not “Palestinian.” It’s a Middle Eastern headscarf, and there are Jews that have worn it. The only people who have appropriated it are the Palestinians, who have attempted to politicize it and make it into a symbol of their national movement. So the notion that someone who designs a dress using the same fabric as an item that has been part of fashion for three decades is engaging in cultural appropriation is total nonsense.

    • diasp0ra
      February 2, 2016, 3:46 pm

      Umm, no.

      There are different designs to the Keffiyeh and the one worn by Palestinians is the traditional one worn by Palestinian farmers. There is no “appropriation”. You can’t appropriate an item that is already your historical heritage.

      You can scream all you want but the Keffyeh will remain Palestinian, and it will remain a symbol of Palestinian struggles.

      • Misterioso
        February 3, 2016, 7:35 pm

        DiaspOra
        Well and truly stated.

    • amigo
      February 2, 2016, 3:57 pm

      “he only people who have appropriated it are the Palestinians, who have attempted to politicize it and make it into a symbol of their national movement.” hopknee.

      So what , your zionist forefathers/mothers appropiated the Star of David –a symbol of the Jewish religion and put it on a national flag which they used as a symbol to oppress and murder tens of thousands of Palestinians in the name of a rogue supremacist criminal nation.

      Do give over with the hypocracy hopknee.It makes you look idiotic.

    • zaid
      February 2, 2016, 7:16 pm

      ” is not “Palestinian.” It’s a Middle Eastern headscarf,”

      I never knew that Palestinians are from China!

      by the way it is not middle eastern, it is virtually unknown outside the Levant.

      You are just jealous of our lovely and famous scarf which became symbol of resistance world wide.

      Apart form the troll, The writer said:

      “when I saw the Palestinian and Jordanian Keffiyeh”

      The Koufieyyeh is part of the Levant (Sham) culture and the black scarf is traditionally worn by Farmers while the red one (Called Shmagh) is worn by Bedouins. but since most Palestinians were farmers and most Jordanians were Bedouins , the black became associated with the Palestinians and the red one with Jordan .

      • hophmi
        February 3, 2016, 10:45 am

        “There are different designs to the Keffiyeh and the one worn by Palestinians is the traditional one worn by Palestinian farmers.”

        OK, so what?

        “You can’t appropriate an item that is already your historical heritage.”

        Au contraire. You can certainly take an apolitical item and politically appropriate it.

        “You can scream all you want but the Keffyeh will remain Palestinian, and it will remain a symbol of Palestinian struggles.”

        And Jordanian and Iraqi.

        “So what , your zionist forefathers/mothers appropiated the Star of David”

        Yeah, and your point is what? I’m the one making the argument that complaining about the use of the keffiyeh in fashion cultural appropriation is silly.

        “I never knew that Palestinians are from China!”

        Most keffiyehs happen to be made in China these days. What can you do? Globalization.

        “You are just jealous of our lovely and famous scarf which became symbol of resistance world wide.”

        How am I jealous, exactly? First of all, I own one myself, which I purchased in the Old City, though I’ve never worn it. Second of all, Jews have plenty of interesting headcoverings of their own besides the keffiyeh. Third of all, I would think that using the keffiyeh in fashion would be seen as a form of flattery, rather than cultural appropriation. Fourth, the hipsters who wear the scarves around their necks in NYC aren’t doing it because it’s a symbol of resistance.

      • gamal
        February 3, 2016, 11:40 am

        ” Second of all, Jews have plenty of interesting headcoverings of their own besides the keffiyeh”

        one awaits the yarmulke bikini and tefillin g-string with trepidation, Hamas designers must be working overtime and are probably tunneling to Dizengoff street with box loads of them.

        “second of all….”

        you like a stand up comedian, “interesting headcoverings”

      • diasp0ra
        February 3, 2016, 2:21 pm

        @hophmi

        That is untrue. You’re mixing up terminology. Youre thinking of politicizing not appropriation which has a very specific meaning in anthropology and cultural studies.

        Appropriation by definition means appropriating something that is not part of your history or “culture”.

      • Mooser
        February 3, 2016, 4:41 pm

        ” First of all, I own one myself, which I purchased in the Old City, though I’ve never worn it.”

        Well, it’s always there if you need it. I’m glad you are prepared for the inevitable, that’s always better than denial.

      • Mikhael
        February 4, 2016, 12:13 am

        gamal February 3, 2016, 11:40 am

        one awaits the yarmulke bikini and tefillin g-string with trepidation,

        link to nymag.com

        It’s been done already.

        And big feckin’ deal. A kippa/yarmulke is just a head covering and is not considered a ritual object possessing any inherent sanctity by religious Jews. (However, a dress made out of a talith — a Jewish prayer shawl — would probably offend most religious Jews as it

        A kefiya, likewise, is just an item of clothing. In the past, Jews wore similar headdresses. This isn’t even a kefiya, it’s a dress made out of fabric that is similar to a kefiya. And hipsters in the West have been wearing them since the mid-’80s.

      • Marnie
        February 4, 2016, 4:36 am

        “How am I jealous, exactly? First of all, I own one myself, which I purchased in the Old City, though I’ve never worn it.” – See Mooser.

        “Second of all, Jews have plenty of interesting headcoverings of their own besides the keffiyeh.”
        Yeah, such as the sheitel, the tzniut, the kippah, the shtreimlech, none of which you mention to prove your point, as if we’re supposed to take your word for anything (closet ‘keffiyah’ wearer!).

        “Third of all, I would think that using the keffiyeh in fashion would be seen as a form of flattery, rather than cultural appropriation.” – No surprises here Hophni. Do you also have in your closet, next to your ‘keffiyah’, an original reproduction of a Lakota chief’s headdress? I’ll just be you do.

        “Fourth, the hipsters who wear the scarves around their necks in NYC aren’t doing it because it’s a symbol of resistance.” Sound pretty sure of yourself (heh-heh). You make this statement based on what, the voices in your own head, your extensive research, the latest Pew study or what exactly? You don’t make yourself sound ‘hip’ enough to know what ‘the hipsters’ do anyway Hophni.

      • zaid
        February 4, 2016, 11:38 am

        “And Jordanian and Iraqi”

        So….

        “Most keffiyehs happen to be made in China these days. What can you do? Globalization.”

        So….

        “How am I jealous, exactly? ”

        Yes you are.

        “Second of all, Jews have plenty of interesting headcoverings of their own”

        See…… you are jealous.

        ” besides the keffiyeh”

        Nice try…Jews have nothing to do with the keffeiyah except maybe Arab Jews like Mikahel .

        link to samidoun.net

    • Misterioso
      February 3, 2016, 7:38 pm

      hophmi

      Why do you bother? You have yet to score.

      • hophmi
        February 4, 2016, 12:43 pm

        I’ve yet to score? LOL. Just because people here don’t operate according to basic rules of logic doesn’t make them more right.

        “one awaits the yarmulke bikini and tefillin g-string with trepidation”

        Did you see the Meah Shearim scene in “Bruno?” And what Mikhael said.

        There’s quite a lot of fashion in the yarmulke world, actually. And if Palestinian women want to walk around in leather string bikinis, who am I to stop them? I rather think it would be a serious problem given the conservative mores in Palestinian society.

        But, again, your analogy is ridiculous because the keffiyeh is not a religious symbol, and yarmulkes and tefillin are.

        “Appropriation by definition means appropriating something that is not part of your history or ‘culture'”

        I know what the word means. Last I checked, there’s no rule against appropriating something from one culture into another. It’s part of history. The Palestinians appropriated the keffiyeh from the middle eastern culture that surrounds them. It is in no way exclusive to them.

      • Mikhael
        February 9, 2016, 1:12 am

        Nice try…Jews have nothing to do with the keffeiyah except maybe Arab Jews like Mikahel

        Well, the kefiya-like headress that was worn by Jews in antiquity was called a “Sudra”

        link to en.wikipedia.org

        Since Ashkenazim are descended from the same stock as the Mizrahi Jews who you mistakenly refer to as “Arab” Jews, it is likely that their ancestors wore this headdress as well.

        That aside, the business of modern fashion designers (and it is a silly business) is to find inspiration in all kinds of materials and styles so they can sell their crap and it has nothing to do with cultural theft. This arguably could (and it would be a failing argument anyway) could be an instance of cultural theft if the designer in question was trying to present this garment as uniquely Jewish and/or Israeli, but all it is is a piece of cloth with a design that that is similar to a kefiya being used as fabric for a dress.

      • Mikhael
        February 9, 2016, 1:32 am

        hophmi
        February 4, 2016, 12:43 pmBut, again, your analogy is ridiculous because the keffiyeh is not a religious symbol, and yarmulkes and tefillin are

        I think most modern Orthodox people (and certainly non-religious Jews) would just smirk and laugh at the concept of a kippa bra/bikini (as I recall it got a lot of Facebook shares), while haredim would probably be completely unaware of its existence. And even then, there is nothing inherently sacrilegious about it. On the other hand, if someone cut up and used a real pair of tefilin as a g-string, as Gamal speculates, then it would be considered a desecration of a ritual object by devout Jews, assuming it was a kosher pair with what they consider to be “God’s” name written on it, but if someone made a leather G-string that looked like tefilin, then BFD. The leather straps in and of themselves are just leather straps. It would just be ignored. I think in the early 2000s, some designer was making women’s clothing that was inspired by Hassidic men’s clothing, shawls that were based on a the talith prayer shawl — and I don’t think anyone really cared.

  5. Herchel
    February 2, 2016, 7:48 pm

    Many are sure to be offended by these clothes.

    Let us tip toe gingerly over the delicate Palestinian’s egg shell sensibilities. They can’t even stab Jews any more without being shot dead… they don’t need this extra measure of degradation from the zio-supremacists!

    • Mooser
      February 2, 2016, 9:28 pm

      “They can’t even stab Jews any more without being shot dead…”

      I’m sorry Herschel, maybe I missed something. Why is the religious preferences of those injured or killed aiding the illegal Zionist settlement and illegal Israeli occupation of such interest to you? Does being called “Jewish” grant somebody an exemption from laws or consequences? If so, please let me know, it’s looking like three strikes for me.

      • kalithea
        February 3, 2016, 1:53 am

        It is way past three strikes for this one and the welcome mat should have been pulled out from under this hasbarat for some time; go figure.

      • Herchel
        February 3, 2016, 1:11 pm

        Obviously it’s you that is obsessed with the religion of the people murdered by Egyptians, Jordanians and others masquerading as members of a fictitious people. If I’m wrong, please direct me to your comments concerning the killing of rival Arab political factions by Hamas, Hezbolah or other Arab terrorist organization. Oh, that’s right, we like to brush that stuff under the rug because, after all, there would not be any violence but for the oppressive occupation of the evil Jews… I mean Zionists

      • diasp0ra
        February 3, 2016, 2:24 pm

        Shorter herchel : help the people who don’t exist are attacking us.

      • zaid
        February 4, 2016, 11:47 am

        ” religion of the people murdered by Egyptians, Jordanians and others masquerading as members of a fictitious people.”

        Are you talking about the European, Slavic and Khazar people masquerading as Semites and calling themselves Ashkenazim Jews, or are you talking about Egyptians and north African Berbers masquerader as Semites and calling themselves Mizrahim Jews

        The only fictitious nation in the middle east are Israelis.

        This is called Psychological projection.

        link to en.wikipedia.org

        Look at the Israeli model for god sake………this delusional woman believes she is a Semite!

      • eljay
        February 4, 2016, 11:55 am

        || zaid: … Look at the Israeli model for god sake………this delusional woman believes she is a Semite! ||

        Dunno about Semitic, but I think she’s cute. :-)

      • zaid
        February 4, 2016, 10:17 pm

        :-)

      • Mikhael
        February 9, 2016, 7:47 am

        zaid February 4, 2016, 11:47 am
        Are you talking about the European, Slavic and Khazar people masquerading as Semites and calling themselves Ashkenazim Jews

        “Semites” are by definition people who speak Semitic languages or are descended from people who spoke Semitic languages. Ashkenazim in Israel speak Hebrew and even non-Hebrew speaking Ashkenazim are substantially descended from Hebrew- and Aramaic-speaking populations. Hebrew and Aramaic are Semitic languages. While Ashkenazim are in part descended from European populations as well as Middle Eastern Jews who settled in Europe , there is very little evidence (linguistic, genetic or historical) to substantiate the “Khazar” theory of the origin of Ashkenazi Jews.

        The only fictitious nation in the middle east are Israelis.

        6 million+ Hebrew-speaking Jews live in Israel, and most of them and their descendants will be there for the foreseeable future.

        Look at the Israeli model for god sake………this delusional woman believes she is a Semite

        LOL< another idiot who is harping on the fact of light-skinned Jews while ignoring the fact that there are many light-skinned and blonde Arabs. (If I'm not mistaken you're one of those who also believe that Jews of Mizrahi heritage like me are so-called "Arabs"). What do you think a "Semite" looks like?

        Are you trying to say that fair-skinned, light-haired women cannot be Semites?
        Does that apply to Arabs, or only Jews?
        Would you say the same of Mira Awad — is she a non-Semite?

        link to eitb.eus

        Hala Gourani, non-Semite?

        link to lemonde.fr
        link to en.wikipedia.org

        n/mira-awad-lyrics.html
        What about Suha Arafat?
        http://cdn.timesofisrael.com/uploads/2013/02/F070830SP33-195×293.jpg

      • zaid
        February 9, 2016, 5:54 pm

        ميخائيل my Arab brother.

        ““Semites” are by definition people who speak Semitic languages or are descended from people who spoke Semitic languages. Ashkenazim in Israel speak Hebrew”

        Just Recently. their Original mother tongue is Yiddish .

        “and even non-Hebrew speaking Ashkenazim are substantially descended from Hebrew- and Aramaic-speaking population.”

        No they are not, they primarily European, Slavic and Khazar in origin and all genetic research points to that and that includes Zionists like Haber who proved that Ashkenazi Jews cluster closer to Turks and Kurds (Also Khazar in Origin) than to Semites like Arabs and Palestinians.

        “Hebrew and Aramaic are Semitic languages.”

        So is Arabic which is a language that branched from the proto Canaanite languages which existed in western Levant (Modern day Palestine).

        “While Ashkenazim are in part descended from European populations as well as Middle Eastern Jews who settled in Europe ”

        Recent Archaeology proved the Exile to be a myth, so did historians like Shlomo sand, Koestler and others….hell even ben gurion believed it was a myth.

        link to bbc.co.uk

        “there is very little evidence (linguistic, genetic or historical) to substantiate the “Khazar” theory of the origin of Ashkenazi Jews.”

        There is , but you just want to keep banging your head against the facts.

        see Sand,Eran Elhaik and Martin Richardson research on that.

        “6 million+ Hebrew-speaking Jews live in Israel, and most of them and their descendants will be there for the foreseeable future.”

        So do the 6 million Palestinian living in Hebron, Jerusalem , Nazareth and Gaza.

        “LOL< another idiot who is harping on the fact of light-skinned Jews while ignoring the fact that there are many light-skinned and blonde Arabs."

        There are few , but i dont know about "Many", unless you count those who die their hair…LOL

        " (If I'm not mistaken you're one of those who also believe that Jews of Mizrahi heritage like me are so-called "Arabs")."

        If you were From the Levant or Arabia then maybe, otherwise You are probably a Berber or Egyptian and they are not Semites (most of them).

        What do you think a "Semite" looks like?

        Palestinians, Syrians ,Lebanese, Iraqis (Partial) and Arabs (Arabia).
        (YOu can tell an Arab form th eLevantine by their physical features becasue they branched form Canaanites long time ago 5000 Yr

        "Are you trying to say that fair-skinned, light-haired women cannot be Semites?"

        If they were a mix then maybe.

        "Does that apply to Arabs, or only Jews?"

        Arabs are diverse groups and although you can find Blonde Palestinians and Syrian you wont not find a Saudi , Yemeni or Sudanese Blonde.

        "Would you say the same of Mira Awad — is she a non-Semite?"

        Of course, since she is a Palestinian.

        We are a mixture (Canaan, Roman, Crusades,Arabs…etc)

        but you guys on the other hands are not

        You can clearly see that all Ashkenzi are European looking and a lot of them are blonde blue eyed, but none of the Yemenite are like that .

        If there were Semitic looking ashkenzai or a blonde Yemenite Jew i might have believed that. but there is not.
        Each group are distinct and separate, unlike us Semitic Palestinians.

        By , the way it is not just hair and eye color.

  6. Elliot
    February 2, 2016, 9:53 pm

    It seemed like that the keffiya pattern went mainstream in the States after the Arab spring. Over the last few years, I asked several women about the kefiiya design they were wearing. They had no idea it was inspired by the keffiya.
    A woman rabbi I know who is an outspoken backer of the IDF and its wars wears a jacket with a supersized keffiya pattern. I found her chutzpah breathtaking.

    • RoHa
      February 3, 2016, 11:57 am

      “With a super sized keffiyeh pattern”

      Sure it isn’t just a houndstooth check?

      • Elliot
        February 3, 2016, 8:59 pm

        Google image has the same pattern as an option for the keffiyeh and houndstooth. (It looks to me like a dynamic Jewish star in motion.) Isn’t houndstooth a fine pattern rather that supersized? Anyway, I don’t remember seeing this pattern around before this and houndstooth has been around for a long time.

      • RoHa
        February 4, 2016, 3:47 am

        Houndstooth is usually fine, but I have seen huge houndstooth patterns. (Nor for thirty or forty years, mind you.) But if it didn’t look like houndstooth, then it wasn’t.

  7. DaBakr
    February 2, 2016, 10:29 pm

    what a bunch of sour-grape prigs. there have been all sorts of supposedly ‘offensive’ german military regalia worn as high fashion as well as bedouin , turkish, russian american first nations and yet somehow these groups all survive. so the designer made a sexy dress that looks like a cross between gingham and a kaffiyeh. get over it. there are bigger fish for all the israel-haters to fry/

    p.s. really appreciate pw showing the most ‘erotic’ of the designers pics.

    • Elliot
      February 3, 2016, 1:07 am

      The question isn’t Palestinian survival. You’ve gotta be kidding that you can get away with this shtick wrt first nations. That’s where Israel is the antithesis of the U.S.
      Israel parades behavior that is shameful over here.

    • Marnie
      February 3, 2016, 2:18 am

      If by “erotic” you mean tacky and cheap, then yep, it’s “erotic”, like most Jewish israeli women, who wouldn’t know style if it jumped up and bit ’em in the ass.

      • Marnie
        February 3, 2016, 6:20 am

        The model’s filthy feet and greasy hair – this photo shoot must have been a real bargain.

      • hophmi
        February 3, 2016, 10:46 am

        “If by “erotic” you mean tacky and cheap, then yep, it’s “erotic”, like most Jewish israeli women”

        Sorry, but that comment is both misogynistic and antisemitic.

      • Marnie
        February 3, 2016, 12:24 pm

        @Hophni –

        I think this is the first time I’ve been told my comment was antisemitic and the funniest part about that is that I was talking about most Jewish israeli women having no class, dressing like bargain basement hookers and all that and now I’ve just got to ask – are you one of these Jewish israeli women who can’t not look tacky as F&#@ 24/7?

      • echinococcus
        February 3, 2016, 1:10 pm

        Hophmi,

        Didn’t I tell you not to use words you don’t understand?

        It’s not misogyny –it only targets “most Jewish israeli women”, which is faaar from including women as such, or even all ‘Jewish-Israeli’ women;

        it’s not “antisemitism”, whatever that means, as it doesn’t target Semites or Jews as such but most females of a particular Master-Race section of a particular, nasty little political entity that, according to deeply religious people I trust, should be the very antithesis of Judaism (I don’t know myself, having no religion.)

      • Mooser
        February 3, 2016, 5:48 pm

        “now I’ve just got to ask – are you one of these Jewish israeli women who can’t not look tacky as F&#@ 24/7?”

        Marnie! “Hophmi” is fighting for Israeli women’s honor…

      • Mooser
        February 3, 2016, 6:28 pm
      • RoHa
        February 4, 2016, 3:40 am

        ““Hophmi” is fighting for Israeli women’s honor…”

        And we should probably wish him success in that, depending on which side he is on.

        (I must admit that I have never physically fought for a woman’s honour., though with some women it has been a struggle to negotiate a discount.)

      • DaBakr
        February 4, 2016, 5:45 am

        @mrn

        the arbiter of all things jewish, israeli and tacky. so asinine as to make any rebuttal completely inane. clearly as far removed from au courant as one can possibly get an remain on the same planet.

      • Mooser
        February 4, 2016, 3:16 pm

        “And we should probably wish him success in that, depending on which side he is on.”

        Yes, “RoHa”, as I am sure you know, the rest of the line reads: “which is more then she ever did”

        Besides, those ‘pedal extremities’…

        (As a married Jewish man [and I use the second and third members of the identity triumvirate very generously] I never raise my eyes above a strange woman’s ankles, which, at least, I would prefer be neatly turned. And if so, dayenu!)

      • Mooser
        February 5, 2016, 12:14 pm

        “the arbiter of all things jewish, israeli and tacky.”

        Get used to it, “Dabakr”. It was the Zionists who decided to lay “all things jewish, israeli and tacky” on the table and bet a Jewish State on them.
        You didn’t figure they would be up for discussion? Get used to it. This is the way you want it.
        And get used to not being able to stop it by crying “Jewish”!

    • eljay
      February 3, 2016, 7:12 am

      || DaBakr: what a bunch of sour-grape prigs. … ||

      You ain’t seen nothing: Put a Star of David on a concert prop and just watch the melodrama as Zio-supremacists wail and gnash their teeth.

      • Marnie
        February 3, 2016, 8:37 am

        +infinity and beyond eljay!

    • Froggy
      February 3, 2016, 9:46 am

      Time for a Tallit bikini with Tefilin boxes (to hold keys, and money) strapped round the waist.

      Very sexy.

      • DaBakr
        February 4, 2016, 6:00 am

        tefilin are quite pricey and difficult make. they aren’t adept to the demands of high fashion. but yes, your correct that they would make for one curious-ass piece of decoration among the secular fashionista’s tefilin as pasties maybe makes more sense.

  8. stanny2
    February 2, 2016, 11:47 pm

    Those silly Palestinians. I’m sure we Jews would have absolutely no problem if the Palestinians posed a model nude in a tallis.

    • hophmi
      February 3, 2016, 10:47 am

      Well, again, the keffiyeh isn’t a religious item, so I’m not sure what your analogy is about. You guys seem really, really ignorant.

  9. kalithea
    February 3, 2016, 1:56 am

    Don’t you know that depravity is an occupational hazard?

    Dodo — the irony of it. I disagree with Shakespeare; sometimes the name speaks volumes.

    • echinococcus
      February 3, 2016, 1:27 pm

      I suppose there is a Dodo Bar in every university town. For a few years, I used to give a sizable part of my meager earnings to one Dodo Bar –didn’t look at all like this one.

  10. Eva Smagacz
    February 3, 2016, 6:47 am

    Sickening and predictable. Many Jewish Israelis know so little about Palestinians and their connection to land that they cannot empathise with them on any level, and it appears that those who know, don’t care a jot

  11. pipistro
    February 3, 2016, 7:52 am

    I wonder what they’d say about sexagram underwear.

  12. upsondundas
    February 3, 2016, 8:32 am

    I think it could back fire on any one who would use this distinct Bedu cloth pattern as a form of visual ridicule! I t would have been like the British Troops wearing Tartan as an emblem at the battle of Colluden. The Hebron Women’s Workers Coop have all sorts of colors and styles to sell. I suppose any Jewish Woman who has a Fascist Zionist Husband would have it ripped of her body in a breath anyway so why worry! if it really catches on maybe they could issue a special winter version for the IDF so the poor souls don’t feel the cold. LOL Jonathan

  13. gamal
    February 3, 2016, 10:07 am

    its worth repeating

    and i am suprised it was left to me to do so (this poor girl is operating under the misconception that she is Arab, like her scarf )

    • Shmuel
      February 3, 2016, 10:25 am

      Not quite the same when the expropriator is not a colonial occupier, but it’s interesting to see an affirmation of cultural ownership sung/performed in the idiom of another (oppressed and historically misappropriated) culture.

      • gamal
        February 3, 2016, 10:33 am

        “but it’s interesting to see an affirmation of cultural ownership sung/performed in the idiom of another”

        I know that’s what makes it great, she makes it her own but its all in how she does it, probably would have been better with a Kletzma (sic) band but that would have limited it’s appeal.

      • gamal
        February 3, 2016, 12:25 pm

        The thing is Shmuel “not a colonial occupier” context is everything,

        This isn’t exactly off topic and i guess i think these pieces would be excellent reading for a number of posters here, its a very rich piece, interestingly Forte writes to criticize the AAA’s BDS vote for what might at first appear to be a4tech-rugish reasoning if you haven’t read Galtung et al i would encourage you to push on through the first para, there is an awful lot here for the interested reader, appropriation, power, ideology, universalism, endnotes and texts, etc

        “Pierre Bourdieu and Loïc Wacquant begin their 1999 article with the basic statement that, “cultural imperialism rests on the power to universalize particularisms linked to a singular historical tradition by causing them to be misrecognized as such” (p. 41). It’s a basic statement in the sense that it is on this that they build their argument against cultural imperialism in academia, and specifically about Americanization via academic imperialism. Their article, not surprisingly, received very hostile responses from a number of US academics, particularly those whose research was carried out in Brazil, and especially from those namedl by Bourdieu and Wacquant in their article (French, 2000, who called the piece “hysterical”, p. 109; also, Hanchard, 2003; Lemert, 2000), joined by some UK academics in some of their criticisms (Venn, 1999), while others offered more sympathetic exegeses of the work (Friedman, 2000; Robbins, 2003), and some are vaguely in between (Werbner, 2000), even if still essentially offering apologia for empire. The impression is that Anglo-American academics were generally left reeling in shock by the “polemical blast” of their article (Venn, 1999, p. 61). Did Bourdieu not say he viewed sociology as a combat sport?”

        link to zeroanthropology.net

        and

        link to zeroanthropology.net

      • Shmuel
        February 3, 2016, 5:40 pm

        Thanks gamal.

      • Mooser
        February 3, 2016, 5:53 pm

        cultural imperialism rests on the power to universalize particularisms linked to a singular historical tradition by causing them to be misrecognized as such

        Thank you “gamal”. Plainer than that, it can’t be put.

        And when the imperial power* goes looking for “particularisms” they can find damn near anything they want, or have it made-to-order.

        *Yes, yes, Zionists aren’t imperial, just poor, bedraggled, powerless people crawling on their knees one by one, to their “histrionic homeland”.

      • gamal
        February 5, 2016, 4:29 am

        “historically misappropriated”

        Sorry Shmuel i couldn’t help but be flippant previously.

        you couldnt be more wrong Shadia is a London girl, the cultural form she is using is pervasive in the mestizo inner london ghetto youth culture, I would guess from her accent in English that she’s a north east London girl, its all very RB and rap over that way, in the west we were all roots reggae, 100% British roots, Paul Fox, Dub Judah, Robert Tribulation, i could go easily from Rotterdam to the banlieues to Frankfurt and find the same immigrant/black youth culture, french language
        reggae is occasionally adequate.

        I was long a defender of the reputedly pathological ghetto (perhaps working class would be better than ghetto it has a negative sound, except to me, influenced by Jamaicans) youth culture, for its glorious energy and eclecticism and the serious new forms that are always arising within it, there is nothing more natural than that girl rapping in Arabic about whats on her mind, working class London culture is incredibly international, i ran a reggae sound system for 25 years, i grew up with that music Uroy is mine, we have all become like that multikulti sure works for us, sorry about the rest of you,

        Shadia explains

      • gamal
        February 5, 2016, 4:40 am

        My sound system, back in the day, always one crazy white guy in white shirt steps the whole night hours without a pause, every nation followed us, the trumpeter is Nigerian

        the camera mic distorts under the weight of bass

      • Mooser
        February 5, 2016, 12:42 pm

        in the mestizo inner London ghetto.

        My dear sir, please, mind your appropriations!

      • Annie Robbins
        February 5, 2016, 5:00 pm

        i love that second shadia mansour video gamal and don’t recall ever seeing it before. of course i know who she is for years now — i always associate her w/the london scene and lowkey. i see that video is posted by the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office. what an excellent interesting video. maybe i did see it before and forgot. i’d watched about everything i could find on her online at one point — but i guess i just missed this or my mind is going.

        and thanks for the regea…it’s been way too long.

    • alen
      February 3, 2016, 10:03 pm

      gamal, I like the points you made. But I am genuinely puzzled why you said Shadia Mansour is under the delusion of being Arab like her scarf. Did I misunderstand or miss something? I thought she was born to Palestinian parents (in London though).

      Thanks for the link though. It is an amazing read and I will explore the site more. I found similar ones that talk about architecture in similar terms. ;)

      • gamal
        February 5, 2016, 4:50 am

        its a long story alen, i was being sarcastic in a British way, i may not be very good at it, i am still learning, like the Maharaja Napoleon joke, i often misstep.

        “she was born to Palestinian parents” there is the merest trace of London in her lovely Arabic

  14. RockyMissouri
    February 3, 2016, 10:37 am

    A Pam Geller look alike…horrifying and demeaning clothes.

    • Marnie
      February 3, 2016, 12:17 pm

      @RockyMissouri –

      So true, but I’ve been informed by Miss Manners (see above) my comment was misogynistic and, shock and awe shucks – antisemitic. Nothing gets past her.

  15. Sycamores
    February 3, 2016, 11:04 am

    Appropriating the Palestinian culture goes hand in hand with the Israeli illegal occupation of Palestine

    the Israeli designer as well as being offensive, lacks imagination. she is plagiarizing both French and Spanish designers. link to blog.palestine-studies.org

  16. tokyobk
    February 3, 2016, 11:11 am

    “Cultural Appropriation” is an interesting subject. In a sense all culture is appropriated. Its very clear now that Europe only transitioned from hunting and gathering after its appropriation of Levant agricultural techniques brought by an influx of immigrants.

    It makes sense that cultures that are subject to ongoing theft are the most sensitive to having their arts taken without attribution. So, Native Americans are particularly upset about purported native fashions on mainstream runways.

    That said, cloth is just cloth. There certainly would be people miffed by a talit used as a sash but the fact that humans take ideas and things from other humans is why we are still here. There is no fashion that is not derivative. The issue is stealing land, erasing cultures not beads, clothes or falafel. Solve the first and the second will seem more like exchange.

    Last year a group of Asian Americans (mostly not Japanese) got upset at a try-on-a-kimono event at the Boston Museum. In fact the event was part of an exhibition on “Japonisme” which was a very conscious appropriation which the exhibit explained. Moreover, the kimono was made at great time and expense by a very old and prestigious shop in Kyoto. Reaction in Japan (where getting foreigners to appropriate is a business and cultural pride — i.e. renting kimono to foreigners in Kyoto’s Gion to dress up for a day) was largely wtf is wrong with these Americans?

    I could walk down the street dressed as an extra in a samurai period drama, complete with a with pointed shoulder kataginu frock and shaved head with topknot and probably not get more than a few stares.

    But again, I can completely empathise with a Palestinian having to see crap like this which is salt in the wound.

    • Shmuel
      February 3, 2016, 11:34 am

      For another Japanese connection, see Eric Bokobza’s “Sukajan Project”, which alludes to the jackets occupying US troops had embroidered by local artisans in Japan.

      No keffiyehs, but some pyramids, lebanese cedars and even a piece of a Hezbollah flag.

    • Philip Weiss
      February 3, 2016, 12:29 pm

      I also dont object to cultural appropriation generally; it’s the way the world works, and it’s part of the joy of cultural exploration. The unequal power component in this connection is simply overwhelming and grotesque, though.

      • Steve Grover
        February 3, 2016, 2:42 pm

        Phil sez:
        “The unequal power component in this connection is simply overwhelming and grotesque, though.”
        Why? Because an Israeli woman turned a keffiyeh into a keffiyeah? Those effin Israelis!

  17. Qualtrough
    February 3, 2016, 11:21 am

    Anyone who has read my comments here knows that I am no friend of Zionism and I am proud to say that. I have even been accused of anti-semitism by Hopfmi, which is is a badge of honor because in his usage it means someone critical of Israel and Zionism. TRIGGER WARNING: But having said that, I want to say that I am not at all on board with this ‘cultural appropriation’ trope that has become very popular of late and find nothing to be outraged about here. Wikipedia defines cultural appropriation as, “the adoption or use of elements of one culture by members of a different culture.” It is difficult to think of a culture on earth that hasn’t adopted or incorporated elements of another culture into their own and it works both ways, with minority cultures borrowing from majority cultures, and the majority borrowing from minorities. Where do we stop? Should Europeans not wear ponchos? Should Bolivian women stop wearing bowler hats? Should Asian businessmen stop wearing suits and ties because those belong to Western culture? Is it really wrong for a European women to wear an attractive sari or qipao? Who has the right to police this kind of usage? When was it decided that imitation is not the sincerest form of flattery?

    • RoHa
      February 3, 2016, 11:52 am

      “I have even been accused of anti-semitism by Hopfmi, which is is a badge of honor because in his usage it means someone critical of Israel and Zionism.

      It’s not a particularly exclusive badge of honour. Just about everyone has been accused of anti-Semitism by hophmi.

      • Mooser
        February 3, 2016, 10:53 pm

        “It’s not a particularly exclusive badge of honour. Just about everyone has been accused of anti-Semitism by hophmi.”

        Not me. No way. He hasn’t done it yet, and he wouldn’t dare.

        And I apologize for “Hophmi’s” accusations of antisemitism. He doesn’t really know what he’s saying, or even why he says it. I don’t know what he expects to gain by it, or what result he expects when he does it.

      • hophmi
        February 6, 2016, 4:52 am

        I accuse people of antisemitism when it’s warranted, and I do it a lot less than I could. As usual, people here complain about being accused much more often than they’re actually accused. A lot of people here have very guilty consciences.

      • Mooser
        February 6, 2016, 12:30 pm

        I accuse people of antisemitism when it’s warranted, and I do it a lot less than I could.”

        Thank Heaven for small favors! Good Lard, what would happen if you really let fly!

        Oh wait, it’s Saturday morning, so I’ll just link: The Phil’s will fall away! “Hophmi’s masterpiece (well one of ’em)

        “Hophmi” do you really believe you wield some kind of power over people because you can accuse them of antisemitism? When you have to go to Phil’s “Mondoweiss” blog to do it? You poor pathetic deluded schmendrick.

        “and I do it a lot less than I could.”

        Go ahead jerkoffski.

        “He doesn’t really know what he’s saying, or even why he says it. I don’t know what he expects to gain by it, or what result he expects when he does it.”

      • Keith
        February 6, 2016, 12:32 pm

        HOPHMI- “I accuse people of antisemitism when it’s warranted, and I do it a lot less than I could.”

        While “a lot less” is perhaps an exaggeration, I felt it only appropriate that I recognize your efforts to cut back on the use of the charge of anti-Semite by substituting the charge of “Jew hater.” Kudos to Hophmi on his attempt to improve his outreach. By the way, have you come across any new examples of anti-Semitic punctuation?

  18. eljay
    February 3, 2016, 11:24 am

    || tokyobk @ February 3, 2016, 11:11 am ||

    Good post.

    || … The issue is stealing land, erasing cultures not beads, clothes or falafel. Solve the first and the second will seem more like exchange. … But again, I can completely empathise with a Palestinian having to see crap like this which is salt in the wound. ||

    Agreed.

  19. Jon66
    February 3, 2016, 11:30 am

    Tartans and Paisleys amongst others. Are we really this far gone that getting inspiration or even copying a clothing pattern is an offense? Should the Hindus get mad because we borrowed their numbering system?

    • Theo
      February 3, 2016, 12:15 pm

      Jon66

      We use arabic numbers, not hindu!

      • tokyobk
        February 3, 2016, 12:37 pm

        Actually you’re both right, Jon66 slightly more so (by precedent). Google can tell you why.

      • Jon66
        February 3, 2016, 12:43 pm

        The system was originally developed in India and the culturally appropriated by Persians. It was introduced to the West by the Arabs.

      • YoniFalic
        February 3, 2016, 1:49 pm

        Just so that it can’t be said I don’t give positive credit where due

        The Hindu-Arabic numerals that became standard in Europe represent a variant based on Hebrew scripts used by Jewish Ibero-Berbers in Spain.

        Thus we should really describe European numerals as Judeo-Ibero-Berber-Hindu-Arabic numerals. These forms seem to have become standard because a lot if not most of the translators of Arabic language mathematical works into Latin and other European languages were Judeo-Ibero-Berbers.

        Of course, one must wonder why Judeo-Ibero-Berbers are not credited with their portion of this important contribution to European mathematics, and one can speculate ethnic E. European bigotry is the root cause.

      • Mooser
        February 3, 2016, 6:44 pm

        “Of course, one must wonder why Judeo-Ibero-Berbers are not credited with their portion of this important contribution to European mathematics, and one can speculate ethnic E. European bigotry is the root cause.”

        Well, until somebody can assure me it isn’t the root cause, I don’t see why I should ever pay another bill which uses those stolen numbers!

      • MRW
        February 3, 2016, 9:02 pm

        The Hindu-Arabic numerals that became standard in Europe represent a variant based on Hebrew scripts used by Jewish Ibero-Berbers in Spain.

        Thus we should really describe European numerals as Judeo-Ibero-Berber-Hindu-Arabic numerals. These forms seem to have become standard because a lot if not most of the translators of Arabic language mathematical works into Latin and other European languages were Judeo-Ibero-Berbers.

        Absolute historical rot. Jewish scribes were traveling hat in hand to Cordova in the 900s along with Christian monks to bring back Islamic Science translations to a dark and dumb Europe. The Arabs in Cordova were doing trig and calculus in 900 AD while Europe was still scratching its head trying to figure out Euclid’s Fourth Principle.

        Ptolemy was using zero (0) in the 2nd C as part of his sexagesimal system, something the Chinese had been using for centuries at that time, and which the Sumerians invented in 4000 BC.

      • Theo
        February 4, 2016, 8:45 am

        Hindu numbers, perser numbers, arabic numbers, what is the difference, we got them from the arabs and are lucky to have them.
        When you eat spaghetti, you think it is an italian invention, however according to legends Marco Polo brought it back from China! Would anyone of us think that spaghetti carbonara, (I just love it!), is a chinese dish?
        The old testament has the story of Abraham, Noah, etc., and we are told, or we assume, that those persons were jewish. However ton tablets were found from older civilisations, 1,000 years or older than the jewish one, where this same stories are to be found with different names. Through the milleniums we all learned from eachother, the more advanced peoples gave us their culture and inventions, or we stole it and presented it as our own, as usual even nowdays.

      • YoniFalic
        February 4, 2016, 11:02 am

        I was referring to the shapes of European numerals and explaining why they look different from the Eastern Arabic numerals of any period and in any variant script.

        The Medieval number shapes that developed into European numerals belong to the Gobar numerals that have been traced back to 976.

        link to books.google.com

        I am dubious of the proposed etymology (gobar == dust), but it is indisputable that the time period was characterized by much mathematical interest by Jewish sages (including calendar works by Sadia Gaon and astronomical works by Levi ben Gershon — the last Jewish scholar with much interest in math).

        While Gobar numerals have some minor similarities to Brahmi and Eastern Arabic numerals, there is almost exact form correspondence with 9th and 10th century Ibero-Berber Hebrew cursive letters from aleph through teth.

        If we accept a Hebrew cursive intermediary, the zero becomes understandable. The Eastern Arabic zero is useless to someone that uses Hebrew cursive because it looks too much like the Hebrew numeral for 10. Drawing a circle around it solves the problem (but would be a bad thing for dust numerals). Keeping an internal dot would be good for someone that mostly used Hebrew cursive because otherwise the zero would look like the Hebrew numeral for 60.

        Europeans using the Gobar numerals not having a similar confusion between Gobar numerals and Roman numerals would naturally drop the interior dot, which would be prone to splotching.

    • echinococcus
      February 3, 2016, 12:31 pm

      Jon66,

      The question is “who by”? There was no outcry, in fact just flattered amusement when the same keffiyeh cloth went fashionable in Europe.
      The problem with you is that you see the Master-Race invaders in the Zionist entity with your own eyes, of course: as normal humans one can talk to. They are definitely not so, at least as seen by the invaded.

      • Jon66
        February 3, 2016, 12:48 pm

        Echi,

        I plead guilty. I view the Jews of Israel as humans with the strengths and flaws that humans have. The dehumanization of both sides is problematic, not something to be embraced. I am one of those idiots who generally believe that the more we know each other the better we will get along.

      • echinococcus
        February 3, 2016, 9:31 pm

        Just as predicted, you’ll see criminals against humanity as nothing but normal people because they are like yourself.

      • Jon66
        February 3, 2016, 10:50 pm

        Echi

        “Just as predicted, you’ll see criminals against humanity as nothing but normal people because they are like yourself.”

        – See more at: link to mondoweiss.net.

        Yes, as I said, I see Israelis as normal humans. If that makes me a crminal in your view so be it.

  20. Theo
    February 3, 2016, 12:20 pm

    I personally see no offense by using these designs.
    Just hope that a few short sighted IDF warriors will not mistakenly shoot jewish women.

    • jon s
      February 4, 2016, 2:32 am

      Echinococcus,
      It may be difficult for you to accept, but, yes, Israelis are normal human beings. Some bad, mostly good, people whom you can talk to, people with families and jobs and interests , people like other people, despite your dehumanization and demonization.
      I’m sure you’re familiar with Shakespeare’s immortal words:

      “Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? “

      • echinococcus
        February 4, 2016, 3:52 am

        Wrong. It’s not about Jews but Zionists and everybody knows Shakespeare, so hold that.
        Zionists are racial supremacist colonial invaders, a lot of them shanghaied or born on the spot but in overwhelming numbers, like 94% or so, fervently wishing the disappearance of the owners of the land and sovereignty; they are helping a regime with only quantitative differences to the occupation we experienced in Europe. So NO, those are not people one can talk to etc. They are “good” to their dog and to members of their tribe –“goodness” is not a relevant concept. The exception are the declared anti-Zionists whose action is also correct; the courageous deserters, Atzmon, our own Yoni Falic, etc.
        This is a war, if you only pay attention. Only tribals “talk” to the declared enemy just because they are a member of the tribe. A pity, really, as this makes me miss a substantial inheritance that would have allowed me to finish my days in luxury.

      • talknic
        February 4, 2016, 5:28 am

        @ jon s “I’m sure you’re familiar with Shakespeare’s immortal words”

        They apply to all humans, including the Palestinians

        “ .. if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? “

        The Palestinians didn’t ask to be colonized, bombed, occupied, slaughtered on behalf of the Zionist Federation’s Greater Israel pyramid scheme

      • Marnie
        February 4, 2016, 6:04 am

        What does Shakespeare’s fiction have to do with anything?

      • eljay
        February 4, 2016, 9:30 am

        || jon s: Echinococcus, It may be difficult for you to accept, but, yes, Israelis are normal human beings. … I’m sure you’re familiar with Shakespeare’s immortal words:

        “Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? “ ||

        Those are good words.

        It may be difficult for you to accept, but they also apply to non-Jews, non-Israelis and non-Zionists.

        It may also be difficult for you to accept that nowhere in those words is there any justification for:
        – Zio-supremacism; or
        – an oppressive, colonialist, expansionist and religion-supremacist “Jewish State”; or
        – any of the past and on-going (war) crimes committed by you, your co-collectivists and/or your state.

      • YoniFalic
        February 4, 2016, 11:10 am

        Shakespeare was pointing out that evil people can come up with all sorts of rationalizations for their evil deeds and intentions. Shylock’s speech applies very well to Zionists and their evil.

      • MHughes976
        February 4, 2016, 12:14 pm

        Outrageous and extreme political and religious opinions, violently put into practice, do not exclude anyone from normal humanity. I think. So they don’t abolish the human rights of those subject to them.
        The Merchant of Venice has its Jewish character vengeful in theory and practice, its Christian characters responding warmly to the idea or theory of being merciful but immediately acting highly vengefully, given the chance – so it displays various parodies. of which Shylock’s terrifying speech is one, of the idea that we call ‘human rights’.

      • YoniFalic
        February 4, 2016, 12:36 pm

        @MHughes976’s understanding of the play seems quite reasonable.

        Shakespeare is making a comment on the social cultural and economic developments of his time period when a contract becomes as effective a weapon as a sword.

        In addition, Shakespeare is showing some scathing irony in the portrayal of the money grubbing and materialism of supposedly ethically superior Christians. A lot of the classical allusions in the superficially happy ending are sarcastic to say the least.

        Unfortunately nowadays (unlike in Shakespeare’s time period) educated people don’t have sufficient background in the classics to understand the allusions.

      • Kris
        February 4, 2016, 5:24 pm

        jon s, quoting Shakespeare doesn’t seem to be working out that well for you.

        Maybe you should try quoting the Torah, instead.

        And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God. –Micah 6:8

        Oh, maybe not. Probably The King’s Torah would work better for you? link to maxblumenthal.com

  21. tokyobk
    February 3, 2016, 12:23 pm
  22. Jon66
    February 3, 2016, 12:26 pm

    “Gaza: Hitler 2 clothing store puts Palestinian knife-wielding mannequins on display

    A clothing store in Gaza City named Hitler 2 is displaying mannequins with knives strapped to their hands as an homage to the upsurge in stabbing attacks on Israelis by Palestinians.

    Hijaz Abu Shanab, a 20-year-old shopper, said: The name of the shop is Hitler and I like him because he was the the most anti-Jewish person. They have done us wrong, they took our rights in this land and they left us with nothing. It is better for us now to go and die, we are living like the dead. I like the clothes and the name, it is fantastic.”

    I don’t know if the Nazis would view this as appropriate or not, but it does seem more offensive than borrowing a cloth pattern.

    • eljay
      February 3, 2016, 12:45 pm

      || Jon66: “Gaza: Hitler 2 clothing store puts Palestinian knife-wielding mannequins on display …

      Hijaz Abu Shanab, a 20-year-old shopper, said: The name of the shop is Hitler and I like him because he was the the most anti-Jewish person. They have done us wrong, they took our rights in this land and they left us with nothing. … ”

      I don’t know if the Nazis would view this as appropriate or not, but it does seem more offensive than borrowing a cloth pattern. ||

      I condemn Mr. Shanab’s words and actions. Instead of attacking (the) Jews, he should stick to attacking the real criminals: The hateful and immoral Zio-supremacists responsible for the oppressive, colonialist, expansionist and religion-supremacist “Jewish State” project and all related past and on-going (war) crimes and intransigence.

      As for his store, he should re-name it “Death by Zionism” and put on display mannequins being subjected to all manner of (war) criminal obscenities by Zio-supremacist civilians and members of the Israeli Devastation and Dehumanization Forces.

      • a blah chick
        February 3, 2016, 1:57 pm

        I guess Jon66 thinks that this store absolutely justifies the brutality against ALL the people of Gaza. It makes the death of those kids on the beach so easier to accept.

      • Jon66
        February 3, 2016, 5:06 pm

        ABC,

        Please reference where I have justified any violence in Gaza in my post about the store. I believe you are imagining things. I do think that a store glorifying Hitler and violence is more offensive than a borrowing of a cloth design. Of course that’s just me.

      • Annie Robbins
        February 3, 2016, 5:54 pm

        you’re threadjacking jon. i think it’s more offensive too just like i think mobs screaming death to arabs is more offensive too. thanks for sharing. can we get back on topic?

      • Jon66
        February 3, 2016, 6:11 pm

        Annie,

        The final line of the piece is,”Many are sure to be offended by these clothes.”

        I think that a comparison of one Palestinian shopkeepers fashion sense to one Israeli designers is legit.

      • Annie Robbins
        February 3, 2016, 6:16 pm

        do you think the occupation army (recognized by many as the new nazi) — in that case guess it might be a form of cultural appropriations.

    • gamal
      February 3, 2016, 2:37 pm

      “it does seem more offensive”

      but all authentic that’s the main thing,

      perhaps he’s a devotee of beach football.

      Its being in Gaza probably has something to do with his hostility, maybe he’s from shujiya, you really expect Palestinians to behave like slaves, the days when anyone was in any position to preach to the Gazans are long gone, the regime (the occupier) that is legally responsible for their welfare is waging war on them and besieging them and your offended? good for you.

      you don’t think they hear you when you talk about mowing the lawn.

    • talknic
      February 4, 2016, 6:01 am

      Say, does the Hitler 2 clothing store actually sell any Nazi related items?

  23. yonah fredman
    February 3, 2016, 12:34 pm

    I recall being told in ’72 that the red kafiya meant support for King Hussein, while the black kafiya meant support for the PLO. Was this ever true? Are there political implications to kafiya wearers today and colors?

  24. a blah chick
    February 3, 2016, 2:11 pm

    Last year, or it might have been the year before, a group of Israeli Jews tried to get their status changed from “Jew” to Israeli. And the High court said they couldn’t do that because there was no such thing as an Israeli. I think they said something like there was not enough time for a distinctive “Israeli” identity to develop. Right, after over 60 years!

    What would a traditional “Israeli” folk costume look like?

  25. Keith
    February 3, 2016, 2:35 pm

    PHIL- “Israeli designer eroticizes the Palestinian keffiyeh”

    As we are all aware, “eroticism” is pornography when done by a woman. Nothing wrong with that. In fact, the more the merrier! Perhaps you need to see beyond the fabric?

    As to cultural “theft”, it is a welcome change to see Israel highlighting at least one aspect of Palestinian culture in view of their history of cultural cleansing. Perhaps not under ideal conditions, but any port in a storm. Besides, anything to wean the Israelis from their love affair with German fashion. The Brown Shirts and Jackboots need to be replaced. Now.

    My primary concern with this post is the utter trivialization of the Palestinian reality. The siege of Gaza, the separation wall, “mowing the lawn,” etc, are extremely serious problems effecting the lives and well-being of the Palestinians. Israeli fashion eroticism, not so much. In fact, I originally didn’t intend to comment on this, however, some of the other comments drew me in, some of which I find rather surprising.

  26. jon s
    February 3, 2016, 3:38 pm

    Eroticizing the conflict – could be a good idea, worth a try…

    • Kris
      February 3, 2016, 4:15 pm

      @jon s: “Eroticizing the conflict – could be a good idea, worth a try… “

      worth a try?

      Israel has been “eroticizing” its abuse of the Palestinians for many decades. Sadomasochism is one of Israel’s signatures, even against Palestinian children. Almost all of Palestinian chlldren arrested by Israelis are tortured; 40% of them are sexually abused:
      link to bennorton.com

      • Rashers2
        February 3, 2016, 4:59 pm

        Read the PPC 2014 report. If true, then it’s not only sad but a damning indictment of the IOF; and of what the Ziopaths have spawned.

    • a blah chick
      February 3, 2016, 6:11 pm

      “Eroticizing the conflict – could be a good idea, worth a try…”

      No, let’s not. Otherwise we’ll get more of those disgusting t-shirts some of the IDF units put out after Cast Lead glorifying the rape and murder of Palestinian women.

  27. ritzl
    February 3, 2016, 3:56 pm

    No market in the US. Rachael Ray got in deep Geller for wearing a scarf that was a keffiyeh (but wasn’t even close).

    link to m.huffpost.com

  28. rosross
    February 3, 2016, 7:16 pm

    I see it as spreading the Palestinian story for the benefit of Palestine and not for the benefit of the colonisers.

    There is a lot of eroticism in fashion so I don’t see that as a feature.

  29. talknic
    February 3, 2016, 8:10 pm

    Anyone who thinks ‘eroticizing’ = showing a lot of a slender model’s bare skin, simply doesn’t know what erotica is

    BTW using the keffiyeh in fashion is soooo old hat link to google.com.au

    link to pinterest.com

    link to pinterest.com

    • Theo
      February 4, 2016, 9:04 am

      You are so rrright, talknic, when I see these bonny creatures with their flappy clothings, my only thought is to give them something to eat, never mind any erotica.
      Most great designers are homosexuall, are they in the process to destroy our female sexappell by marching these living skeletts on the catwalk?

  30. Chouk
    February 9, 2016, 3:50 am

    An important thing is that today, again, “human flesh traffickers” use the current misery in Eastern Europe to exploit women and young people: if the person in the photo was of your family, would you be indifferent? You complain about keffiyeh but not this woman exhibited disrespectful and demeaning manner. I am shocked and disappointed (135 comments) anyone have noted. Nothing changes. Speak out solidarity.

    • rugal_b
      February 9, 2016, 4:50 am

      @Chouk,

      [..]This is more than just an act of cultural appropriation. The unnecessary nudity of the female model, who possess the stereotypical Western beauty standards, wearing the keffiyeh in a sensual manner is part and parcel of capitalism. Capitalism and patriarchy is heavily intertwined, to the extent that, it is impossible to not have sexism within a capitalist society. I find it strange the editor would try to push this as something specific to Israel, when we can find numerous similar artwork in the USA.

      • Annie Robbins
        February 10, 2016, 12:00 pm

        rugal, I find it strange the editor would try to push this as something specific to Israel

        can you site the so called “push” please. because i see no reference to it.

        btw, OT comments discussing our comment/moderation policy are less likely to get published or those sections edited out. if your comment doesn’t get published first time around try extracting the extraneous bs and try again.

    • eljay
      February 9, 2016, 7:48 am

      || Chouk: An important thing is that today, again, “human flesh traffickers” use the current misery in Eastern Europe to exploit women and young people: if the person in the photo was of your family, would you be indifferent? You complain about keffiyeh but not this woman exhibited disrespectful and demeaning manner. I am shocked and disappointed (135 comments) anyone have noted. Nothing changes. Speak out solidarity. ||

      The young woman in the photos appears to be a model doing the job of modelling clothes – a job for which she presumably is paid. I don’t see anything disrespectful or demeaning in those photos, and I don’t see any evidence of exploitation. If she was my (much younger) sister or niece, I’d congratulate her on her photo shoot.

      Do you have any proof that the young woman in the photos is being exploited? If so, please provide it. Thanks.

  31. gamal
    February 9, 2016, 3:51 am

    oh no! look who else has appropriated the Kuffiyah, no complaints though he serves the Matriarch, so no complaint possible. (black is appropriate he is a herb farmer)

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