Israeli army stations dedicated PR officer at site of Hebron execution

Israel/Palestine
on 36 Comments

The blood stain where Ramzi Aziz al-Qasrawi was shot dead remains on the ground. The spot where Abed al-Fattah Yusri al-Sharif was executed is no longer visible.

“We washed it off,” a young soldier standing at the checkpoint a few meters away tells me.

Two of the the soldiers at the checkpoint were in full combat uniform, while a third was sitting on a concrete block in a form-fitting outfit. She was from the IDF spokesperson unit, apparently stationed to control the narrative and prevent journalists from speaking to combat soldiers. When I first approached the checkpoint, the heavily-armed Bedouin soldier who demanded identification deferred to her when I asked him if he spoke English.

She was more than willing to speak on subjects other soldiers typically would not. They usually say they are barred from doing so.

She told me Hadeel al-Hashlamoun and the other young women who had been killed at checkpoints did it because their boyfriends had broken up with them.

“I saw it on her Facebook page,” she assures me, then telling me about another girl who attempted to stab a soldier after her boyfriend dumped her by text message. “Most of them are like this.”

Incensed by her comments, my colleague and Hebron local Sohaib Zahda had joined the conversation. “I was born here and have lived here my whole life. People are carrying out stabbings. Why? Ask yourself why!” he says rhetorically.

She interrupts him, “Because of the radio stations. From 2003 or 2002, we’re in different times. Fifteen years have almost passed, you can not compare then to now.”

“Life is impossible here! You know life is impossible here,” he says to her, becoming exasperated.

“Life isn’t easy,” she says.

Soldiers sit at the checkpoint where two Palestinian men were killed after an alleged stabbing. (Photo: Dan Cohen)

Soldiers sit at the checkpoint where two Palestinian men were killed after an alleged stabbing. (Photo: Dan Cohen)

Tel Rumeida, one of Hebron’s neighborhoods being most aggressively colonized, was declared a closed military zone on November 1. Just below is the infamous Shuhada Street, the once-bustling thoroughfare of Hebron’s old city, now a ghost town after the army shut it down and sealed the shops following the 1994 massacre in the Ibrahimi mosque by American-Israeli settler Baruch Goldstein.

Back at the scene of the execution, Youth Against Settlements activist Issa Amro was showing another team of journalists where the execution took place.

An American settler and Chabadnik named Mordechai walks by and confers with the soldiers. As he begins to walk away, I ask him if he speaks English.

“Yes,” he replies in an American accent.

“Where are you from?” I ask him.

“Here.”

“Are you American?”

“I was born there,” he tells me. “I came home!”

Mordechai is from the Crown Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn, where the Chabad Lubavitch movement is based. He is one of a few hundred settlers living in Hebron’s old city guarded by thousands of soldiers.

I ask him what he thinks about the killing. He tells me about terror attacks. “I can understand why the soldier did it,” he adds.

Minutes later, a settler driving a bus full of children stops. The driver opens the door and shouts at Issa Amro. “I saw it,” the settler laughs as kids stare out the windows. “His head went like this!” he says putting his hands behind his head and making an exploding motion.

Minutes later, children who were in the bus walk by. I estimate them to be eight years old.

“My father will kill you,” one of them shouts across the street at Amro.

Aziz al-Qasrawi and family members sit in the mechanic garage they own. (Photo: Dan Cohen)

Aziz al-Qasrawi and family members sit in the mechanic garage they own. (Photo: Dan Cohen)

Just several hundred meters away, al-Qasrawi’s father and uncles gathered in a family-owned mechanic garage.

Aziz al-Qasrawi’s grief over his son’s death made him distraught and skeptical of journalists.

“When was the website you work for founded,” he asked me.

“2006.”

“That was ten years ago. I haven’t seen any change since then,” he replies.

He’s right. It’s an internal struggle I go through from time to time.

“I would never say that my work will change anything or bring justice,” I tell him. “But I think that in order to make change, the first thing is that people have to know what is happening. So that’s my job.”

“How long will that take to achieve” he asks.

“Such a violent reality can’t last forever,” I tell him.

The grieving father remains skeptical, but indulges me.

“Ramzi liked to play with children and would take them to buy chocolates” al-Qasrawi said. “He was ambitious and loved to joke. He was engaged and worked a lot for his dream to get married.”

“He was a good man,” his fiancée’s father interjected. “He was well-educated and treated me with respect.”

Al-Sharif employed al-Qasrawi in his carpentry business. Neither were politicized or belonged to any political factions, according to Aziz al-Qasrawi.

The father doesn’t believe that the two friends and colleagues carried out an attack.

“They planned to go to Eizariya [Palestinian neighborhood in occupied East Jerusalem] that day,” he said.

“I was working and someone told me there were two guys killed in Tel Rumeida. “My brother called me and told me that my wife saw the pictures on Facebook and realized it was our son.”

“I saw the pictures but didn’t know if it was my son or not because his face was covered. I tried to call Abdel Fattah. The phone rang but there was no answer. Then I tried to call my son but his phone was disconnected.”

I thank Aziz al-Qasrawi for his time, give condolences and get up to leave. Still stoic, he thanks me.

“Would you like to eat with us?”

Editor’s note: An earlier version incorrectly identified both Bisam Abu Aisha and his wife as witnesses. Only Abu Aisha’s wife witnessed the incident.  

About Dan Cohen

Dan Cohen is an independent journalist and filmmaker based in Palestine. He tweets at @dancohen3000.

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36 Responses

  1. gamal
    March 31, 2016, 6:48 pm

    “How long will that take to achieve” he asks.”

    ““Would you like to eat with us?” ”

    if that doesn’t put some iron into Anti-Zionist Jewish spines nothing will.

    “Aziz al-Qasrawi’s grief over his son’s death made him distraught and skeptical of journalists.”

    that should have been edited out, its preposterous.

  2. Annie Robbins
    April 1, 2016, 12:33 am

    great reporting dan.

    He’s right. It’s an internal struggle I go through from time to time.

    me too.

    • yonah fredman
      April 1, 2016, 7:08 am

      The Israeli Zionists are in it for the long haul. The Palestinians in Hebron (and elsewhere) are in it for the long haul. Those who “discovered” the conflict after 9/11 or after the war on iraq, must have some paradigm regarding Vietnam or something. From diem assassination to helicopter out of saigon was less than 12 years, so how can this take longer?

      Would it shorten the path if you joined hamas or cheered violence? Is that the struggle? Maybe shutting your ears to the narrative of the enemy, maybe that’s the key. Or injecting a little more David duke and a little less Norman finkelstein, maybe that’s the ticket?

      (Believe me: when buses blow up on Jaffa road, David duke like rhetoric went through my mind, when an acquaintance and his daughter got blown up the day before her wedding, extreme words passed through my lips. Used to be my politics depended on the headline. It can still be like a roller coaster.)

      But this is not an issue I discovered recently because my career suffered a setback. This is an issue I learned from early childhood and you might call it brainwashing, but even a cold eye can see that the 20th century was built to fill any thinking torah educated jew with too many thoughts to fit in one mind.

      You who have discovered the issue recently must battle anew, why are you fighting a battle that may take another forty years? That’s why there are these constant: ” this is big” “this will change everything.” You lack the perspective of time. You are wet behind the ears.

      • eljay
        April 1, 2016, 7:37 am

        || yonah fredman: … You who have discovered the issue recently must battle anew, why are you fighting a battle that may take another forty years? … ||

        What do you suggest? Another 70 years of “dialog” during which Israel continues deliberately and with impunity to commit (war) crimes in order to:
        – cement its status as a religion-supremacist “Jewish State”;
        – maximize its acquisition of non-Israeli territory; and
        – complete its (final?) solution of minimizing or eliminating the non-Jewish “threatening demographics” within its “Greater Israel” territory?

        To riff again on Jon66’s analogy, Israel isn’t a fun-loving, binge-drinking and occasionally drunk-driving friend who needs a little gentle coaxing to sort himself out. It’s a raging alcoholic who intentionally and unapologetically commits serious crimes. He needs help and he must be held accountable for his unjust and immoral actions.

      • just
        April 1, 2016, 7:53 am

        … “why are you fighting a battle that may take another forty years? That’s why there are these constant: ” this is big” “this will change everything.” You lack the perspective of time. You are wet behind the ears.”

        Oh, puh- LEEZE. You obviously fervently wish that Israeli violence and injustice will continue with your slander and Zio- supremism, victimhood and other falderol (trumpery, rubbish, and nonsense). Don’t lecture the good folks here who are committed to justice, peace and equality~ hang out in your own neighborhood as who you really are.

      • talknic
        April 1, 2016, 8:30 am

        yonah fredman

        “Would it shorten the path if you joined hamas or cheered violence? Is that the struggle? Maybe shutting your ears to the narrative of the enemy, maybe that’s the key. Or injecting a little more David duke and a little less Norman finkelstein, maybe that’s the ticket?”

        How about the bl**dy obvious instead of more inane, irrelevant Ziodrivel. There is nothing stopping nor are there any moral, ethical, legal or logical reasons why Israel should not simply withdraw from all non-Israeli territories as required by International Law. It’s never been tried

        If you really cared you’d be pitching for Israel to do the right thing

      • eljay
        April 1, 2016, 10:09 am

        || talknic: … There is nothing stopping … Israel [from withdrawing] from all non-Israeli territories as required by International Law. … ||

        There is one thing: Aggressor-victimhood. It’s a tough gig, but someone’s gotta do it.

      • yonah fredman
        April 1, 2016, 11:00 am

        My own preference would be a negotiated settlement within inches or degrees of whatever position Avrum Burg would advocate. Since this is increasingly unlikely I will be constantly undermined in my concern for the existence of Israel by its right wing govt and it’s population which elects its governments.

      • Mooser
        April 1, 2016, 3:26 pm

        “You lack the perspective of time. You are wet behind the ears. “

        “Y onah” on the other hand, is 3500 years old! “Yonah” if we are “in it for the long haul” we better get busy schtupping and brissing.

        Sure, “Yonah” supporting the rogue Jewish State of Israel is what every Jew in the world looks forward to for the rest of their lives!

        BTW, I might mention that “Yonah: lives in NYC. He went to occupied Jerusalem for a while, but wasn’t tough enough to stay.

      • Boo
        April 2, 2016, 8:42 am

        I’m 65 years old. How dare you insinuate that I’m “wet behind the ears”? I read “Exodus” at age 10. I was a big supporter of Israel as a youth because of the Holocaust narrative. We in the US weren’t familiar with the events of the Nakba then.

        You talk about Vietnam — a mere debating point for you, a life-or-death issue for me. I applied for CO status the day I turned 18. Unlike most such applicants, I was granted 1-O status with no hassle at all. Any idea how rare that was back then? But I didn’t hesitate to put my body on the line. I got my head busted open by the Chicago cops in August 1968 in the streets of Chicago, protesting Vietnam during the Democratic convention. I saw Mayor Richard J. Daley on TV yelling at Sen. Abe Ribicoff “Get off the stage, you fucking kike!” And it infuriated me, because I still had respect for Israel. I still have no love for true anti-Semites, either. But I detest those who are doing their worst to conflate anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism.

        Yonah, have you been beaten up for your cause? How much blood have you spilled for your cause? Be specific as to times, places and circumstances please — because the “wet behind my ears” was type AB.

        My love for Israel has become highly selective since then, because I have eyes and ears, and a moral sensibility to go with them. When I think of the USS Liberty, of Operations Cast Lead and Protective Edge; when I ponder the ruthlessness of the IDF who empties their magazines into teenage girls, or blows apart the head of a wounded man lying helpless in the street; when I see bulldozers destroying Palestinian homes and illegal settlers stealing Palestinian land and water; when I think about a sleeping family firebombed and murdered in its beds; upon consideration, it turns my heart and mind against today’s Israel, its government, its religious radical right wing, and all its evil deeds.

        Israel has become less of a “moral beacon of the Mideast” and more of a stinking trash fire. And my former unquestioning love is long gone, never to return.

      • just
        April 2, 2016, 8:54 am

        Thank you, Boo!

        +1!!!

      • eljay
        April 2, 2016, 9:26 am

        || Boo @ April 2, 2016, 8:42 am ||

        Thanks, Boo. Although I don’t expect him to, I do hope that y.f. addresses your comments with a thoughtful – and concise – response.

      • ritzl
        April 2, 2016, 11:53 am

        Well said, Boo. Your CO status was a remarkable feat Your “taking it to the streets” made a difference and meant others did not have to go to kill and be killed. You helped save COUNTLESS lives.

        —–

        Yonah, you do seem to agonize about doing the right thing, or maybe more specifically, HOW to do the right thing, but you always give up so easily and invariably settle back into a scoffing, status-quo mindset of “If it’s not happening to me, how bad can it really be?”

        It’s BAD and ongoing, and you should be thankful “it” is not happening to you. Thankful enough that you build on some of that grace and pitch in to make sure “it” doesn’t happen to anyone – let alone to anyone in your name.

        What bothers me most about your views is that you seem to recognize the issues and stakes, but always find a “reason” to lean away instead of lean in. Your ambivalence is emblematic of what this site is trying to counter in the Jewish “community.”

        Your behavior prolongs the already long time-to-solution you lament in this comment. You are either self-negating or self-fulfilling, I can’t tell which. You either don’t want the Palestinians to stop being oppressed or you don’t care if they continue to be oppressed, I can’t tell which of those either.

        And what everyone else said…

      • yonah fredman
        April 2, 2016, 11:57 am

        Boo- I was addressing Annielynn and Dan Cohen and Phil Weiss, I was not addressing you. There are many people who have been following the Israel versus falastin issue for decades. Phil Weiss ain’t one of them. Neither are Annie robbins nor Dan cohen. Kudos for your shedding blood and serving. My knowledge of blood shed is not first hand. You win. You are the more serious warrior than me.

        The left anti Zionist movement consists of people of a great variety. Many of them are transients. They found an issue and in 20 years they’ll be on to another issue. Some will stick with the issue the rest of their lives.

        When some Palestinian from the west bank questions a journalist and says, what has your Web site accomplished in ten years, he is explaining the violence. Which ain’t great but let’s call it understandable. When the journalist and his editor confess to their internal battles, they either reveal themselves as temporary soldiers or those who cannot wait for history to speed up. I wonder what more or different Dan cohen wants to do. Puff pieces about fedayeen is not enough for him, what’s the next step that his internal argument is advocating . The youngsters who want to blow up buses or lacking that technology kill a soldier with a knife, what is the next step after understanding? Emulation, better bloodier violence, is that the next step? More venomous rhetoric is that the next step?

      • yonah fredman
        April 2, 2016, 12:09 pm

        Ritzl- I envy Peter beinart and avrum Burg for being out ahead of the issue. I really do not see myself in such a leadership role. I am fatalistic: everything is fixed and you nor I can change it. Eventually the American Democratic Party will follow the will of its grass roots and Phil Weiss brought that day 4 years closer. It will happen in 2032 instead of 2036.

      • yonah fredman
        April 2, 2016, 12:29 pm

        Let me add one story. Women in black used to gather in NYC on Thursday evenings at Union square. There were also counter protesters. I hung out with the counter protesters, even though if you were to draw a line denoting the slope of my envisioned solution, it would be closer to the mean slope of the women in black protesters rather than the counter protesters, yet I felt more comfortable with the counter protesters than with the women in black and to tell you the truth it won’t change the fate of Israelis and Palestinians one minute or one drop of blood which side I was on.

      • Mooser
        April 2, 2016, 2:00 pm

        “Women in black used to gather in NYC on Thursday evenings at Union square. There were also counter protesters. I hung out with the counter protesters”

        Nuff said, “Yonah”. We get the point, and will tread lightly. Any man who , in a crowd with other men, will jeer and curse at women, is a guy who packs a hell of a wallop! A real macher!

    • Philemon
      April 2, 2016, 7:53 pm

      “The Israeli Zionists are in it for the long haul.”

      So long as they think it’s a going concern and they don’t need to exercise their second citizenship.

  3. just
    April 1, 2016, 1:11 am

    … ““I was working and someone told me there were two guys killed in Tel Rumeida. “My brother called me and told me that my wife saw the pictures on Facebook and realized it was our son.”

    “I saw the pictures but didn’t know if it was my son or not because his face was covered. I tried to call Abdel Fattah. The phone rang but there was no answer. Then I tried to call my son but his phone was disconnected.”

    I thank Aziz al-Qasrawi for his time, give condolences and get up to leave. Still stoic, he thanks me.

    “Would you to eat with us?””

    – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2016/03/israeli-army-stations-dedicated-pr-officer-at-site-of-hebron-execution/#comment-164453

    Dan Cohen, you have had, and do have, my everlasting respect. Aziz al-Qasrawi IS Sumud. God only knows how Palestinians manage day in and day out to keep their spirit alive while being tortured by Israel and the West, East, North and South……

    I believe that it’s because all of their rights are inherent and their cause is entirely just. Who in the world would be so kind and gentle and generous in the face of such deliberate violence, theft and Occupation???

    RIP. May the Israeli murderers be punished, once and for all of the murdered and massacred. There will be no ‘peace’ without justice.

  4. a blah chick
    April 1, 2016, 7:42 am

    “Two of the the soldiers at the checkpoint were in full combat uniform, while a third was sitting on a concrete block in a form-fitting outfit.”

    ‘Nuff said.

  5. Talkback
    April 1, 2016, 9:18 am

    “I ask him what he thinks about the killing. He tells me about terror attacks. “I can understand why the soldier did it,” he adds.”

    He “understands” why a soldier executes a Palestinian who has been allready wounded. I wonder what other war crimes he can “understand”, as long as they are commited against Nonjews.

    This is state sponsored terrorism with genocidal intent. The Israeli goverment, its war criminals and supporters of war crimes have to be hold accountable.

    The US support of these politics clearly proofs that it is not ready to hold itself accountable for its own crimes against natives but hides behind Israel and uses its propaganda to whitewash them.

    Compare this to Germany in which people tend to support the Palestinians the more they know about this conflict:

    “The more Germans know about the Mideast, the more they root for the Palestinians
    A new study finds that most Germans who oppose Israel’s Palestinian policies are not anti-Semitic, but pro-peace and human rights.”
    http://www.haaretz.com/misc/article-print-page/the-more-germans-know-about-the-mideast-the-more-they-root-for-the-palestinians.premium-1.443938

    • eljay
      April 1, 2016, 9:28 am

      || Talkback: … I wonder what other war crimes he can “understand”, as long as they are commited against Nonjews. … ||

      Jews are entitled to do unto others acts of injustice and immorality they would not have others do unto them, this is Zio-supremacism, and the rest is commentary.

    • MHughes976
      April 1, 2016, 11:37 am

      I’m glad that many Germans are gaining this level of information and that some Isrselis are not calling them little Hitlers. But I’m still a bit shocked by the last conversation I had with a German, who felt prohibited from saying anything in any way against people who were Jewish. I tried to say that it was a question of being for the Palestinians, not about being against Jews. That got me nowhere.

      • Talkback
        April 2, 2016, 5:24 am

        MHughes976: “But I’m still a bit shocked by the last conversation I had with a German, who felt prohibited from saying anything in any way against people who were Jewish.”

        Why are you shocked? The Zionist’s hate crime of accusing pro-Palestinians to be antisemites is most effective in the country which has the most horrific past of hate crimes and crimes against humanity against Jews. And we all know that Zionists are not ashamed of using Jews as human shields. Especially not in Germany.

  6. Marnie
    April 1, 2016, 12:29 pm

    “My father will kill you”. Settler spawn. There’s a special place in hell for people who corrupt the young. What is the dinner table conversation in the homes of this trash? “His head went like this!”

    Interesting article in Ha’aretz, am pretty sure it wasn’t an april fools day joke:
    Gidi Weitz | 
    Apr 01, 2016 11:48 AM
    Ben-Gurion in 1951: Only Death Penalty Will Deter Jews From Gratuitous Killing of Arabs

    ‘Until a Jewish soldier is hanged for murdering Arabs, these acts of murder won’t end,’ Israel’s first prime minister told his stunned cabinet 66 years ago, when Jewish murders of Arabs had become all too common.

    “I’m not the justice minister, I’m not the police minister and I don’t know all criminal acts committed here, but as defense minister I know some of the crimes, and I must say the situation is frightening in two areas: 1) acts of murder and 2) acts of rape.” So declared Prime Minister and Defense Minister David Ben-Gurion in 1951 before dropping a bombshell: “People in the [General] Staff tell me, and it’s my view as well, that until a Jewish soldier is hanged for murdering Arabs, these acts of murder won’t end.”

    Ben-Gurion was speaking at a cabinet meeting on abolishing the death penalty. Jewish-Arab tensions were high following the 1948 War of Independence, and there was also a problem with infiltrators: Arab refugees seeking to return to the homes and fields they left during the war. Consequently, Jewish murders of Arabs had proliferated, and some ministers considered the death penalty necessary to solve this problem.

    The cabinet discussion of 66 years ago is particularly interesting in light of this week’s very different cabinet discussion about a soldier who killed a wounded Palestinian terrorist in Hebron after he no longer posed a threat.

    “In general, those who have guns use them,” Ben-Gurion asserted, adding that some Israelis “think Jews are people but Arabs aren’t, so you can do anything to them. And some think it’s a mitzvah to kill Arabs, and that everything the government says against murdering Arabs isn’t serious, that it’s just a pretense that killing Arabs is forbidden, but in fact, it’s a blessing because there will be fewer Arabs here. As long as they think that, the murders won’t stop.”

    Ben-Gurion said he, too, would prefer fewer Arabs, but not at the price of murder. “Abolishing the death penalty will increase bloodshed,” he warned, especially between Jews and Arabs. “Soon, we won’t be able to show our faces to the world. Jews meet an Arab and murder him.”

    The cabinet first discussed abolishing the death penalty – a legacy of the British Mandate – in July 1949, at the urging of Justice Minister Pinhas Rosen. Ben-Gurion was dubious even then. He said he would support the bill, but was almost certain the death penalty would ultimately be reinstated, because abolishing it “will lead to a proliferation of murders.” After intense debate, the cabinet agreed to abolish the death sentence except for treason during a state of emergency.

    The cabinet first discussed abolishing the death penalty – a legacy of the British Mandate – in July 1949, at the urging of Justice Minister Pinhas Rosen. Ben-Gurion was dubious even then. He said he would support the bill, but was almost certain the death penalty would ultimately be reinstated, because abolishing it “will lead to a proliferation of murders.” After intense debate, the cabinet agreed to abolish the death sentence except for treason during a state of emergency.

    The bill then went to the Knesset, where the Constitution Committee held lengthy deliberations. A year later, Rosen presented the cabinet with a problem: Seven prisoners were on death row, but their executions were being delayed until the Knesset made up its mind about the death penalty.

    As the cabinet discussed this issue, Ben-Gurion stunned his colleagues by saying he no longer supported abolishing the death penalty, primarily due to an increase in killings of Arabs by Jewish soldiers.

    Foreign Minister Moshe Sharett, who in 1949 had supported abolishing the death penalty on the grounds that “Human society must aspire to a moral level at which it’s forbidden to take human life,” also unexpectedly reversed himself at this meeting.

    “With great regret I’ve become convinced that abolishing the death penalty is inconceivable,” he announced, noting that even countries “which are immeasurably more humane than we are – I’ve spent years there and I live here – maintain the death penalty.”

    The main reason for his U-turn, however, was “the crimes that have happened and are happening week after week, especially in the army,” including some that weren’t public knowledge. Sociopaths might not be deterred by the death penalty, Sharett admitted, “but that Jewish chap who kills two Arabs he met on the road, I’m not willing to say, without trying it first, that he’s a killer by nature and won’t fear the death penalty.”

    Some Jews, Sharett said, think “every Arab is a dog, a wild dog that it’s a mitzvah to kill.” And “to save them from killing human beings, it’s a mitzvah to have the death penalty here. As long as we don’t have it, these murders will continue, and we’ll be held accountable, and it will create moral corruption here.

    “I’ve giving a speech of repentance and confession here,” he continued. “I’ve learned from experience that in this country, the death penalty is necessary… We made a mistake when we stopped hanging… If all the crimes committed in this country were reported, terror would grip the public and lynchings would start. I’d shoot a Jewish chap who wanted to shoot an Arab passerby if that were the way to save him.”

    Sharett then described one case in which three Arabs were killed and a fourth saved only because a Jew threw him into a hut, and another case in which two Indian Jews were almost killed by fellow Jews who thought they were Arabs until they shouted “Israel.”

    Minister Dov Yosef backed Ben-Gurion and Sharett. “In principle, I’ve opposed hanging as a penalty all my life, but unfortunately, in this country and today’s situation,” it’s needed, he said.

    Minister Haim-Moshe Shapira concurred, saying he was especially horrified by group killings. He cited one in which “eight soldiers were present at the time of the murder. Surely they didn’t all murder, but they were all present at the time of the crime and not one member of this group stopped the crime.”

    “There have been worse cases,” Ben-Gurion responded.

    Ministers Golda Myerson (later Meir) and David Remez, in contrast, remained opposed to the death penalty, but agreed that much more must be done to prevent crimes against Arabs.

    In the end, the death penalty was abolished – but only three years later, in 1954. “

  7. MaxNarr
    April 1, 2016, 3:10 pm

    Hi guys, for some reason, I totally agree with you today! This innocent guy who tripped on a pebble and accidentally stabbed a soldier didn’t have it coming to him! He was on his way to boy scout camp. Oh and every single propaganda interview you do doesn’t come from a PR officer in disguise! I mean terrorists wear civilian clothes so why uniform a PR officer? But really, these articles have so much double speak and ommissions (1920’s Hebron Jewish homes anyone?) it’s like April fools every day.

    • eljay
      April 1, 2016, 9:43 pm

      || MaxNarr @ April 1, 2016, 3:10 pm ||

      Today’s about clever humour. You’re just a bad joke.

    • Talkback
      April 2, 2016, 5:44 am

      MaxNarr on his endless trip to dehumanize the victims of war crimes commited by Jews. A typical example of the Zionist supremacist culture of hate in which nobody will ever ask to hold Jews accountable in general.

    • talknic
      April 2, 2016, 6:44 am

      @ MaxNarr April 1, 2016, 3:10 pm

      Max does another great job of showing genuinely concerned readers the despicable types attracted to supporting illegal Israeli expansionism

      “(1920’s Hebron Jewish homes anyone?) “

      Still going on is it? Israel’s destruction of non-Jewish homes has been continual for over 67 years

  8. Jakeburbar
    April 2, 2016, 12:30 am

    If.a little Arab boy had said that “my father will kill you ” the entire world would say that it’s the only thing they hear and know. But when a little jew boy says the exact same thing !!!! That’s OK. When is the world going to wake up and stop this… the settlers are a bunch of murderers the state of Israel defends them for their actions because they’re also a bunch of murderers and the bunch of hypocrites

  9. Kay24
    April 2, 2016, 6:32 am

    Update: The scumbag Israeli soldier who executed an injured (and helpless) Palestinian gets “open detention”, while the so called debate goes on in that nation.
    Strange how God’s chosen keeps getting leniency for crimes unlike the Palestinians.
    As long as the victim is a Palestinian, everything is OKAY in apartheid land.

    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/04/israeli-soldier-released-open-detention-160401131931089.html

    • just
      April 2, 2016, 7:24 am

      “Scumbag” is about right, Kay24.

      Amira Hass tells it like it is, again:

      “Policy of Contempt for Palestinian Lives …

      As opposed to the IDF, the Beit Shemesh municipality refuses to cast E., the soldier from Hebron, out from society. It published his full name and picture under the title of “Hero of Israel” in a statement of support. Whenever the IDF is caught with its pants down, it turns its soldier into a loner, whether he will be put on trial or forgiven. This is a process of separating the individual from the collective and disconnecting from the facts, in which the soldier is the reflection of his army, and the army is the reflection of its government.

      E. and the rest of the soldiers, police officers and security guards who executed young women and men when it was possible to take them alive, were sent to carry out missions and they only followed orders: To guarantee the heart of Hebron remains empty of Palestinians. Let the settlements expand. Make the Palestinians behave well.

      And if something goes wrong (and is filmed), the brain forgets about the finger on the trigger. Low-ranking E. was exposed to a field court-martial, while the high-ranking Binyamin Brigade commander Yisrael Shomer, who shot a young Palestinian suspected of throwing rocks in the back, and in doing so executed him without trial, is exempt.

      A soldier who shot and killed a woman and her daughter in Gaza during Operation Cast Lead was put on trial, but the brigade commander who ordered to bombard a house, and in doing so, killed and injured dozens of members of the Samuni family, is absolved of any blame. The commander of the Air Force, who bombed dozens of homes with their inhabitants still inside and killed hundreds of women, elderly and children (the social censor erases the term “murder,” with all its derivatives, and replaces it with “killing”), is excused from answering any questions.

      In comparison, the Palestinian is automatically considered to be dangerous as an individual, because he is part of a threatening collective. That is why it is justified to kill, murder, eliminate and neutralize him. The Israeli fear of the Palestinian collective has a spark of sincerity: Admission that we are causing them systematic and organized injustice and it is only logical that they intend to harm us in return. But this candidness is short-lived. The preacher from the Al-Aqsa Mosque who called for butchering Jews was convicted of incitement to violence, and it did not help him when he said these are matters of Koranic law. But the Jewish authors of the book “The King’s Torah” (Torat Hamelech), which is a “Jewish religious law discussion of the conditions under which it is permissible to kill a goy,” were not put on trial. They, as everyone knows, are marginal individuals murmuring words of Torah into their beards.

      Separating between the fallen pants and the creased uniforms is an essential step in the army’s defensive shield against any possibility in which the military and its leaders in uniform and in civilian clothes will be accused of carrying out systematic and ongoing crimes as a policy.

      The policy amounts to contempt for the lives of Palestinians while they are put to death, killed or murdered. Contempt for life while they are still alive, by demolishing their houses and not allowing them to build their neighborhoods, in separating their families, in the slums in Jerusalem and Ramle and Lod, in erasing their history, the Suspension Bill, the undrinkable water, poverty rates and impoverishment.

      Focusing on the filmed soldiers or the hilltop youth, and the fluctuation between forgiving them as individuals, and rejecting them as individuals, causes us to forget that the cumulative results of the establishment’s actions against the Palestinians are more destructive and lethal than all the acts of the individuals.

      The facts that for 70 years have promoted contempt for the lives of Palestinians have been efficiently isolated from the legal concept of “intention.” We have no intention of doing them harm, God forbid. Everything is by accident. And without intention there is no guilt and no punishment. But the intention is formulated every day by the results. And Beit Shemesh knows better: The intention, not just the act, is that of the Jewish-Israeli collective.”

      read more: http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-1.711866

      Pretty damning indictment of the “Jewish- Israeli collective” and the PTB of the US and others continue to support, eh? It’s criminal and unfathomable, imho. April 15th is upon us and US and Western tax dollars support this grotesque and seemingly endless joint criminal enterprise …

      (Have a peek: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joint_criminal_enterprise)

      • Marnie
        April 2, 2016, 9:05 am

        And not a peep from the rogues gallery of zionists here, who can’t refute anything Ms. Haas writes and thankfully she does. Amira Haas and Gideon Levy are treasures.

  10. Ossinev
    April 2, 2016, 10:08 am

    @MaxNarr
    “But really, these articles have so much double speak and ommissions”

    Speaking of double speak there is only one “m” in “omissions”. For all I know there may well be only one “r ” in “Narr”.

    You seem to be an expert on “speak”. Can you advise. Is a “mitzvah” the same as a “fatwa” ?

    Since they both seem to be promulgated by doombrain religious fanatics in the Levant I thought that there might be some biblical type connection.

    KUTGW

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