‘Brown Man’s Burden’ of 1899 was prescient

Every once in a while, I return to Henry Labouchère’s poem, ‘The Brown Man’s Burden.’  It was written in 1899 and a response to another, much more famous poem.  To read it with the conflict of the last seventy or eighty years in mind (and for that matter, the Second Iraq War) is an interesting experience.  An anti-colonial piece, it is eerily prophetic of the shape that arguments and justifications put forth by Zionists have taken.

This is important to keep in mind, too, because there are constant attempts by Zionists to frame the conflict between Zionists and non-Zionists in the Middle East as one between the West and Islam (since all Palestinians are Muslims), or between Reason and Irrationality, or between Life Affirming and Nihilistic worldviews.  But this piece was written before Sayyid Qutb was born, before even Hasan al-Banna was born.  It was written less than 2 decades after the First Aliyah and when there was still an Ottoman Sultan ruling in Istanbul.  Jaffa was still the Bride of Palestine and Tel Aviv had not even been founded.  

And it was not even written about the Arab-Israeli conflict.  Which makes the anti-colonial critique of the Zionist enterprise and the discourse it has spawned to justify its behavior all the more fitting and appropriate.  

Written 111 years ago, it might easily have been written today.  There really is nothing new under the sun.  

The Brown Man’s Burden

Pile on the brown man’s burden
To gratify your greed;
Go, clear away the "niggers"
Who progress would impede;
Be very stern, for truly
‘Tis useless to be mild
With new-caught, sullen peoples,
Half devil and half child.

Pile on the brown man’s burden;
And, if ye rouse his hate,
Meet his old-fashioned reasons
With Maxims up to date.
With shells and dumdum bullets
A hundred times made plain
The brown man’s loss must ever
Imply the white man’s gain.

Pile on the brown man’s burden,
compel him to be free;
Let all your manifestoes
Reek with philanthropy.
And if with heathen folly
He dares your will dispute,
Then, in the name of freedom,
Don’t hesitate to shoot.

Pile on the brown man’s burden,
And if his cry be sore,
That surely need not irk you–
Ye’ve driven slaves before.
Seize on his ports and pastures,
The fields his people tread;
Go make from them your living,
And mark them with his dead.

Pile on the brown man’s burden,
And through the world proclaim
That ye are Freedom’s agent–
There’s no more paying game!
And, should your own past history
Straight in your teeth be thrown,
Retort that independence
Is good for whites alone.

About Boulos

i'm a perpetual student.
Posted in Beyondoweiss, Israel/Palestine

{ 78 comments... read them below or add one }

  1. Keith says:

    History continues to repeat itself because societies continue to be run by men of ambition whose primary objective is to acquire power, regardless of the consequences to others. Essentially, they are sociopaths whose lust for power is all consuming. Their true nature is hidden from the mass of people by intellectuals who earn their living misrepresenting reality in service to power. Nothing is ever going to change until people become aware that the greatest threat to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are the people running the show. Only when organizational changes occur which limit the concentration of power will there be any hope for liberty and justice for all in a peaceful and sustainable society.

  2. syvanen says:

    Boulos, thanks for sharing that with us. I never saw it before. It is a great anti-colonial piece that captures much of US policy against Iraq, Afghanistan, Vietnam but also our actions against Latin America (not to mention the main subject of this site).

  3. Israeli society includes those of all colors and nationalities in a pluralistic manner.

    • Citizen says:

      Right, minimalistNarrative, and there is no institutional discrimination
      within Israel.

      • not a in any amount that would constitute comparisons with the “brown man’s burden of 1899″

        You may not see this comment because my words are censored.

        • Avi says:

          not a in any amount that would constitute comparisons with the “brown man’s burden of 1899″

          That’s just factually inaccurate.

          In short, the Brown Man’s Burden speaks of the inherent disregard the ‘white man’ has for the ‘natives’, the ‘Brown Man’.

          In Israel’s case, the examples are all too apparent. The Ethiopian Jewish community faces blatant and overt discrimination. The Palestinian citizens of Israel face house demolitions, those who dare criticize the state face false charges of treason. Economically, Jewish farmers are subsided by the state, while non-Jewish farmers must struggle to sell their produce at a profit. The state education system grants Jews 8 times the funding that it grants non-Jewish schools. The same applies to the non-Jewish (Palestinian) municipalities in Israel. The list is long and the comparisons are all too numerous and depressing.

        • David Samel says:

          maximal, just curious. When you wrote “You may not see this comment because my words are censored,” whom was that intended for?

        • Avi says:

          I should also add that in 2000, Israeli police shot and killed 8 Palestinian citizens of Israel in demonstrations throughout the state. The Or Commission later absolved the police of any wrong doing.

          Then there is the massacre of Kufur Qassem when in 1956, 49 residents of the village were shot dead by Israeli forces on their way home from work. The reason given by the Israeli army was that the residents were in violation of the curfew imposed on the village.

          Between 1948 and 1966, Israel imposed Military Rule on the Palestinians of Israel, those who currently constitute 20% of Israel’s population. The Military Rule was no different than Israel’s current military occupation of the West Bank, sans the wall, and the checkpoints.

        • Avi says:

          maximal, just curious. When you wrote “You may not see this comment because my words are censored,” whom was that intended for?

          I think he has ESP and was communicating with readers telepathically. I sure don’t have that ‘gift’, so it’s a good thing he posted that in writing.

        • David Samel says:

          Avi, it reminded me of my junior high school principal, who was worried that some classroom public address speakers were not working. He announced on the PA system, “If your speaker is not working and you can’t hear this, inform my office immediately.” It’s amazing I can remember something like that from 80 years ago.

        • Avi says:

          It’s amazing I can remember something like that from 80 years ago.

          Talk about a double take. I wasn’t sure I read that right the first time, but sure enough there was an “8″ and a “0″.

          Personally, I usually conclude my stories about past experiences with, “But, that’s ancient history”.

        • “When you wrote “You may not see this comment because my words are censored,” whom was that intended for?”

          Good catch, David!
          Reminds me of the line: “If you do not receive this letter it means that it has been lost on the way.”

          The stuff of morons!

        • David Samuel,

          As a disclaimer, my words are moderated and often censored due to my resistance against Anti-Semitic and Anti-Zionist views.

          There are two methods

          1) Delay my comments so the thread passes them by rendering them ineffective

          2) Censor them altogether

          The Palestine Lobby engages in the very tactics it claims to eschew.

        • azythos says:

          So fucking what?
          I’m censored too and I’m sure many othr people are.

          You don’t like it, you open a blog of your own, doesn’t cost anything, stop whining, get lost and report to your supervisor at the grosszionistische Propaganda-Abteilung that it’s soooo hard to do your job.

    • Danaa says:

      Go to Israel MN and see how well the melting pot is working over there. You can ask the Ethiopians, for example. Or just the “Brown” Mizrahi descendants. That before addressing the still browner Palestinian Israelis, who, I suspect, would find much to attune to in this poem.

  4. Thanks for sharing this, Boulos. Kipling’s poem could perfectly fit in contemporary mainstream media as well.

  5. Avi says:

    Math is a universal language. Music is immutable. And the above referenced poem is a chilling reminder of Colonialism’s perpetual depravity.

  6. David Samel says:

    Boulos, thanks for the poem, and the excellent analysis of its applicability to the I/P conflict. It reminds me of Mark Twain’s anti-imperialist writings, also stemming from the US butchery in the Philippines. There are numerous contemporary writings for and against this first major US imperial adventure, but even among the anti crowd, the whiff of racism was prevalent. Twain was a notable exception, whose clarity and just plain decency seem awfully advanced for his era. It’s nice to see he had company in Labouchere. It is awfully depressing that their sentiments still seem so relevant; by this time, they should seem dated in the distant past.

    • syvanen says:

      Avi I also thought of Twain and the Philippines when I read this poem. I loved his novels as a child but I had no idea then that he was such an anti colonialist or anti imperialist at that time. Just imagine what his position would be today.

    • MRW says:

      It reminds me of Mark Twain’s anti-imperialist writings, also stemming from the US butchery in the Philippines.

      David, Syvanen, one of the literary events I await this fall is the unabridged publication of Twain’s diaries — three volumes, I think — which he specifically ordered his daughter and heirs to hold back until the time was right, when his ideas would be more easily accepted. The estate waited 100 years. Twain dictated the majority of his diary entries over four years just before his death, and it is his conversational style that apparently gives the diaries great life and vigor.

      The NYT did a story on the upcoming volumes recently. Portions of Twain’s diaries have been printed before, but they were severely edited. The new volumes will be unexpurgated.

      • MRW says:

        I knew I got the definition of the form wrong. So I checked. It’s Mark Twain’s autobiography, not his diaries. Here’s how the NYT starts out in its July 9, 2010 article about it.
        link to nytimes.com

        Wry and cranky, droll and cantankerous — that’s the Mark Twain we think we know, thanks to reading “Huck Finn” and “Tom Sawyer” in high school. But in his unexpurgated autobiography, whose first volume is about to be published a century after his death, a very different Twain emerges, more pointedly political and willing to play the role of the angry prophet.

        Whether anguishing over American military interventions abroad or delivering jabs at Wall Street tycoons, this Twain is strikingly contemporary. Though the autobiography also contains its share of homespun tales, some of its observations about American life are so acerbic — at one point Twain refers to American soldiers as “uniformed assassins” — that his heirs and editors, as well as the writer himself, feared they would damage his reputation if not withheld.

        “From the first, second, third and fourth editions all sound and sane expressions of opinion must be left out,” Twain instructed them in 1906. “There may be a market for that kind of wares a century from now. There is no hurry. Wait and see.”

  7. “Pile on the brown man’s burden,
    And if his cry be sore,
    That surely need not irk you–
    Ye’ve driven slaves before.
    Seize on his ports and pastures,
    The fields his people tread;
    Go make from them your living,
    And mark them with his dead.”

    Goosebumps!
    I better watch my serotonin levels, I’m getting too easily moved for my own good…..

    • Taxi says:

      Thankgod,

      You mean ‘dopamine’. Serotonin is a chemical the brain releases at the end of the day to slow you down, eventually to sleep.

      • Taxi brother, here’s the study :

        “Bit of a crybaby? Blame your serotonin levels”(New Scientist)

        NEXT time a sentimental movie makes you cry, blame your serotonin levels. Differences in the neurotransmitter might explain why some people are more prone to crying in emotional situations than others.

        Frederick van der Veen’s team at the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, gave 25 female volunteers a single dose of either paroxetine – a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) which briefly increases serotonin levels – or a placebo. Four hours later they were asked to watch one of two emotional movies: Brian’s Song, in which the hero dies of cancer, or Once Were Warriors, about domestic violence, and to indicate if, and to what extent certain scenes had made them cry.

        On another day, the women watched the second film with their treatments swapped over. “It didn’t matter which movie they saw, we saw a strong and consistent effect of paroxetine,” says van der Veen, who presented the results at the Forum of European Neuroscience in Amsterdam last week. “Higher serotonin levels lead to less crying.”

        Although SSRIs are used to treat depression, their mood-boosting effects do not normally show up for around six weeks. The women reported no change in mood in the current study. “We’re looking at the direct effect of a single dose of paroxetine,” says van der Veen, who adds that the findings might help explain why some people report blunted emotions when taking SSRIs.

        “Our understanding of the neurobiology of crying is fairly limited,” says Christopher Lowry, a serotonin researcher at the University of Boulder in Colorado. “It makes sense that it is tapping into circuitry involving serotonin.”

        Van der Veen now wants to find out whether genetic differences in serotonin production affect the tendency to cry.
        link to newscientist.com

        • Sorry I didn’t finish my post so here:
          The key sentence here is that Low serotonin levels makes one prone to crying..

          “Higher serotonin levels lead to less crying.”

        • Taxi says:

          Bwaaaaaah *sniffle*sniffle*blownoze*

          Okay thankgodi. Them hormones are making me sensitive too, bwaaaaah *sniffle*sniffle*blownoze*.

    • lyn117 says:

      I think you mean melatonin. But isn’t serotonin involved in making melatonin?

  8. hayate says:

    That’s a great poem, Boulos.

  9. hayate says:

    One to complement it:

    Revolution

    I come like a comet new born

    Like the sun that arises at morning

    I come like the furious tempest

    That follows a thundercloud’s warning

    I come like the fiery lava

    From cloud-covered mountains volcanic

    I come like a storm from the north

    That the oceans awake to in panic

    I come because tyranny planted

    My seed in the hot desert sand

    I come because masters have kindled

    My fury with every command

    I come because man cannot murder

    The life-giving seed in his veins

    I come because liberty cannot

    Forever be fettered by chains

    I come because tyrants imagine

    That mankind is only their throne

    I come because peace has been nourished

    By bullets and cannon alone

    I come because one world is two

    And we face one another with rage

    I come because guards have been posted

    To keep out the hope of the age

    From earliest times the oppressed

    Have awakened me and called me to lead them

    I guided them out of enslavement

    And brought them to high roads of freedom

    I marched at the head of their legions

    And hailed a new world at its birth

    And now I shall march with the peoples

    Until they unfetter the earth

    And you, all you sanctified moneybags

    Bandits anointed and crowned

    Your counterfeit towers of justice

    And ethics will crash to the ground

    I’ll send my good sword through your hearts

    That have drained the world’s blood in their lust

    Smash all your crowns and your sceptres

    And trample them into the dust

    I’ll rip off your rich purple garments

    And tear them to rags and to shreds

    Never again will their glitter

    Be able to turn people’s heads

    At last your cold world will be robbed of

    It’s proud hypocritical glow

    For we shall dissolve it as surely

    As sunlight dissolves the deep snow

    I’ll tear down your cobweb morality

    Shatter the old chain of lies

    Catch all your blackhooded preachers

    And choke them as though they were flies

    I’ll put a quick end to your heavens

    Your gods that are deaf to all prayer

    Scatter your futile old spirits

    And clean up the earth and the air

    And though you may choke me and shoot me

    And hang me your toil is in vain

    No dungeon, no gallows can scare me

    Nor will I be frightened by pain

    Each time I’ll arise from the earth

    And break through all your weapons of doom

    Until you are finished forever

    Until you are dust in the tomb

    Words : Joseph Bovshover / Music : Dick Gaughan

    Bovshover wrote that in the late 19th century, Gaughan put it to music in the 1980′s.

  10. hayate says:

    Another;

    Song of Choice

    Early every year the seeds are growing
    Unseen, unheard they lie beneath the ground
    Would you know before their leaves are showing
    That with weeds all your garden will abound ?

    If you close your eyes, stop your ears
    Shut your mouth then how can you know ?
    For seeds you cannot hear may not be there
    Seeds you cannot see may never grow

    In January you’ve still got the choice
    You can cut the weeds before they start to bud
    If you leave them to grow high they’ll silence your voice
    And in December you may pay with your blood

    So close your eyes, stop your ears,
    Shut your mouth and take it slow
    Let others take the lead and you bring up the rear
    And later you can say you didn’t know

    Every day another vulture takes flight
    There’s another danger born every morning
    In the darkness of your blindness the beast will learn to bite
    How can you fight if you can’t recognise a warning ?

    Today you may earn a living wage
    Tomorrow you may be on the dole
    Though there’s millions going hungry you needn’t disengage
    For it’s them, not you, that’s fallen in the hole

    It’s alright for you if you run with the pack
    It’s alright if you agree with all they do
    If fascism is slowly climbing back
    It’s not here yet so what’s it got to do with you ?

    The weeds are all around us and they’re growing
    It’ll soon be too late for the knife
    If you leave them on the wind that around the world is blowing
    You may pay for your silence with your life

    So close your eyes, stop your ears,
    Shut your mouth and never dare
    And if it happens here they’ll never come for you
    Because they’ll know you really didn’t care

    Peggy Seeger

  11. hayate says:

    You sit there handing down orders,
    You examine the terms of the deal,
    A car is always waiting,
    Other hands turn the wheel,
    The doors slide open before you,
    The doors slide shut behind,
    Other hands carry your luggage,
    Weighty important matters engage your mind.

    You take the gold out of the earth,
    You throw the corpses in,
    One crop is as good as another,
    As long as the cash keeps pouring in,
    The wheels must never stop turning,
    The machine must be obeyed,
    The future has got to be fueled,
    And there’s a price to be paid.

    Black like the dust,
    Brown like the earth,
    This is our land,
    The land of our birth,
    Silently digging,
    Digging our graves,
    Choking our bodies,
    Choking our lives,
    Living on scraps,
    Dying in debt,
    Digging in darkness,
    So our children can eat.

    Once we were free,
    Greeting the sun,
    Sharing the earth,
    Giving thanks to the (?)
    Sang with the water,
    Sang with the wind,
    Danced with a drum,
    Circle without end.

    Now we are silent,
    They’ve taken our tongues,
    They’ve taken our pride,
    They have taken our souls,
    Only our bodies,
    Only our eyes,
    Burn with a memory,
    Of the old ways.

    Brown like the earth,
    Black like the dust,
    Who can we turn to,
    Who can we trust.

    You’ve got no patience with failure,
    You’ve got no time for delay,
    Certainty points to the future,
    Straight lines carve out the way,
    You never make moral judgements,
    Only one creed to defend,
    Money must be free to make money,
    That’s all there is in the end.

    You take the diamonds out of the earth,
    You throw the corpses in,
    One crop is as good as another,
    As long as the cash keeps pouring in,
    The wheels must never stop turning,
    The machine must be obeyed,
    The future has got to be fueled,
    And there’s a price to be paid.

    Brown like the earth,
    Black like the dust,
    Who can we turn to,
    Who can we trust.
    The gun is their god,
    They have taken our land,
    They take what we dig,
    They take with our hands,

    We drown in the dust,
    We choke with the heat,
    Our skin grows sores,
    Our lungs rot.

    Still we remember,
    The cold clear air,
    Waking at dawn,
    With a morning star,
    Still we remember,
    The sound of the flute,
    The feel of the grass,
    Under our feet.

    Death may come quickly,
    If the mine floods,
    If the rock talks,
    If the gas explodes,
    Mostly we linger,
    On death’s cold bed,
    Flushing for air,
    Coughing up blood.
    Nobody cares,
    Nobody sees,
    We make no headlines,
    Dying by degrees.

    A thousand shapes wait to attend you,
    The ones who drive your cars,
    Who reserve your place at the table,
    Who order your daily cigars,
    Who silently guard your privacy,
    Who make sure your ties are new,
    Who remind you of your appoinments,
    You know that they all depend on you.

    You take the uranium out of the earth,
    You throw the corpses in,
    One crop is as good as another,
    As long as the cash keeps pouring in,
    The wheels must never stop turning,
    The machine must be obeyed,
    The future has got to be fueled,
    And there’s a price to be paid.

    Nobody cares,
    Nobody sees,
    We make no headlines,
    Dying by degrees.
    What choice do we have,
    They have taken our home,
    We wait in silence,
    Our time will come.

    They tear from the earth,
    They leave nothing behind,
    Only raw scars,
    On a wasteland.

    Someday, and soon,
    The mountains will shake,
    The drum will sound,
    The sun will turn black,
    And from out of the dust,
    And from under the earth,
    We will arrive,
    Proclaiming this truth.

    All life is sacred,
    All life is one,
    From the rocks on the mountain,
    To the children unborn,
    And the walls will topple,
    And the fences will fall,
    And the scars will be healed,
    And the earth will be whole.

    This is our land,
    The land of our birth,
    Black like the dust,
    Brown like the earth.

    You never carry money,
    You like your life ordered and clean,
    You make out checks to charity,
    No one can call you mean,
    Through your double-locked gateways,
    Only the priviledged come,
    And my your taste and elegance,
    Marvels of marble and silver and glass.

    You take the earth out of the earth,
    You throw the corpses in,
    One crop is as good as another,
    As long as the cash keeps pouring in,
    The wheels must never stop turning,
    The machine must be obeyed,
    The future has got to be fueled,
    And there’s a price to be paid.

    Dying By Degrees
    Leon Rossellson

  12. hayate says:

    If I Had a Rocket Launcher

    Bruce Cockburn

    here comes the helicopter — second time today
    everybody scatters and hopes it goes away
    how many kids they’ve murdered only god can say

    if i had a rocket launcher
    if i had a rocket launcher
    if i had a rocket launcher
    …i’d make somebody pay.

    i don’t believe in guarded borders and i don’t believe in hate
    i don’t believe in generals or their stinking torture states
    and when i talk with the survivors of things too sickening to relate

    if i had a rocket launcher
    if i had a rocket launcher
    if i had a rocket launcher
    …i would retaliate

    on the rio lacantun one hundred thousand wait
    to fall down from starvation — or some less humane fate.
    cry for guatemala, with a corpse in every gate

    if i had a rocket launcher
    if i had a rocket launcher
    if i had a rocket launcher
    …i would not hesitate

    i want to raise every voice — at least i’ve got to try.
    every time i think about it water rises to my eyes.
    situation desperate echoes of the victims cry

    if i had a rocket launcher
    if i had a rocket launcher
    if i had a rocket launcher
    …some sonofabitch would die

    (CHIAPAS, MEXICO AND TORONTO — FEBRUARY AND APRIL 1983)

  13. there is something about the truth
    it has a certain ring to it
    sort of like crystal

    it is easily heard
    impossible to deny
    once it makes that sound

    so much better
    than speaking a lie
    and knowing it

    catastrophic
    for the teller
    devastating
    for the recipients

    ‘always tell the truth
    it’s so much easier
    than remembering
    a lie”

    and
    enough with this
    warring based on
    lies lies and more lies

  14. Leigh says:

    Here is one that applies particularly well to the Israeli-Palestinian case. It was an anti-apartheid song written and sung by a South African group. It’s haunting, because parts of it are sung with the melody of Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika in the background. And it was written against the backdrop of the whites’ fear of the black South African population and their violence on us. It captures Itamar’s point from yesterday powerfully.

    Bright Blue: Weaping.

    I knew a man who lived in fear,
    It was huge, it was angry, it was drawing near;
    Behind his house, a secret place,
    Was the shaddow of the demon he could never face;
    He built a wall of steel and flame,
    And men with guns to keep it tame;
    Then standing back, he made it plain,
    That the nightmare would never ever rise again,
    But the fear and the fire and the guns remain.

    It doesn’t matter now,
    It’s over anyhow,
    He tells the world that it’s sleeping;
    But as the night came round,
    I heard it slowly sound,
    It wasn’t roaring, it was weeping.

    And then one day the neighbours came,
    They were curious to know about the smoke and flame;
    They stood around outside the wall,
    But of course there was nothing to be heard at all;
    My friends, he said, we’ve reached our goal,
    The threat is under firm control;
    As long as peace and order reign,
    I’ll be damned if I can see a reason to explain,
    Why the fear and the fire and the guns remain.

    It doesn’t matter now,
    It’s over anyhow,
    He tells the world that it’s sleeping;
    But as the night came round,
    I heard it slowly sound,
    It wasn’t roaring, it was weeping,
    It wasn’t roaring, it was weeping.

  15. Leigh says:

    Here is the website of the guy who wrote weeping. It has a video and some other stuff.

    link to weeping.info

  16. Colin Murray says:

    This is a very fine piece, Boulos. However, I would like to point out that not all Palestinians are Muslim.

    While I’ve seen different estimates over the years, it appears that about 5% of Palestinians currently under Israeli occupation are Christian. The percentage in the Palestinian diaspora is purportedly higher because Israelis have been more successful at ethnically cleansing Christians, not necessarily because they have been targeted more than Muslims, but because they tend (Palestinian readers please correct errors) to have more financial, educational, and social advantages facilitating emigration.

    • “This is a very fine piece, Boulos. However, I would like to point out that not all Palestinians are Muslim.”

      Hmm, Colin…Boulos is a Christian Palestinian..Boulos means Paul..

      • Colin Murray says:

        I didn’t know that. I just thought that readers might get the wrong impression from “… attempts by Zionists to frame the conflict between Zionists and non-Zionists in the Middle East as one between the West and Islam (since all Palestinians are Muslims), …” in the second paragraph.

        • Colin..You’re right and I ticked when I first read it but I understood that he meant that people believed that is the case.. He should have put quotation marks..

        • Avi says:

          [...]but because they tend (Palestinian readers please correct errors) to have more financial, educational, and social advantages facilitating emigration.

          Colin,

          That’s a good point you bring up. Palestinian Christians have more opportunities overseas, than do Palestinian Muslims, as many European churches and charity organizations are geared toward assisting Christian refugees. That tends to encourage Palestinian Christians to leave the occupied territories.

  17. There were(few) instances where the zionists chose to allow the Christians to stay while expelling all the Muslims. From ” The Ethnic cleansing of Palestine”
    ” Maghar is still there, spread out within a scenic canyon in the descending valley that connects the lower Galilee with the lake of Tiberias. Here the Jewish occupying force was faced with a village where Christians, Muslims and Druze had coexisted for centuries. The military commander interpreted Plan Dalet as calling for the expulsion of only the Muslims. To make sure this was done swiftly, he executed several Muslims on the village’s piazza in front of all the villagers, which effectively ‘persuaded’ the rest to flee.”
    Ilan Pappe, “The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine” Page 151.

    • ” Many other villages in the Galilee were like Mghar in that they had mixed populations. Hence, from now on, the military commanders were given strict orders to leave the selection process that was to determine who could stay and who could not to the intelligence officers. The Druze were now collaborating with the Jews, and in villages that were partly Druze, Christians were generally spared expulsion.”
      Ilan Pappe, same source, same page..

  18. Eva Smagacz says:

    If you look at palestinian village of Imwas, it had both church and a mosque:

    link to main2.palestineremembered.com

    • Eva
      I checked the link and saw the beautiful photo of Imwas. What surprised me is that the photo dates from 1958 which means it was destroyed at a later stage. The pretext of the war in 1948 is often given to explain the destruction of villages and towns by the zionists. One has to wonder how can they explain the destruction of this village after 1958?

      • Eva Smagacz says:

        Village of ‘Imwas, dating back to biblical times under the name of Emmaus, was ethnically cleansed in 1968, levelled to the ground THE SAME YEAR, and later turned into “National Park”. Native people were not made refugees to house homeless and desperate after the WWII. Village was de-populated 1968 under Yitzhak Rabin which followed on the removal of 50000 to 70000 Arabs from al-Ramla district in 1948.

        It is a little known fact that pretext of six day War in 1968 was used to ethnic cleanse more Arabs from inside green line.

  19. Jim Holstun says:

    Hilaire Belloc, “The Modern Traveller”:

    Whatever happens, we have got
    The Maxim gun, and they have not.
    ______________________________
    Mark Twain on the First Aliyah, from Tom Sawyer Abroad (1894) (the rest is even better: see link to gutenberg.org)

    Well, we went out in the woods on the hill, and Tom told us what it was. It was a crusade.

    “What’s a crusade?” I says.

    He looked scornful, the way he’s always done when he was ashamed of a person, and says:

    “Huck Finn, do you mean to tell me you don’t know what a crusade is?”

    “No,” says I, “I don’t. And I don’t care to, nuther. I’ve lived till now and done without it, and had my health, too. But as soon as you tell me, I’ll know, and that’s soon enough. I don’t see any use in finding out things and clogging up my head with them when I mayn’t ever have any occasion to use ‘em. There was Lance Williams, he learned how to talk Choctaw here till one come and dug his grave for him. Now, then, what’s a crusade? But I can tell you one thing before you begin; if it’s a patent-right, there’s no money in it. Bill Thompson he—“

    “Patent-right!” says he. “I never see such an idiot. Why, a crusade is a kind of war.”

    I thought he must be losing his mind. But no, he was in real earnest, and went right on, perfectly ca’m.

    “A crusade is a war to recover the Holy Land from the paynim.”

    “Which Holy Land?”

    “Why, the Holy Land—there ain’t but one.”

    “What do we want of it?”

    “Why, can’t you understand? It’s in the hands of the paynim, and it’s our duty to take it away from them.”

    “How did we come to let them git hold of it?”

    “We didn’t come to let them git hold of it. They always had it.”

    “Why, Tom, then it must belong to them, don’t it?”

    “Why of course it does. Who said it didn’t?”

    I studied over it, but couldn’t seem to git at the right of it, no way. I says:

    “It’s too many for me, Tom Sawyer. If I had a farm and it was mine, and another person wanted it, would it be right for him to—“

    • Wonderful Jim..Just wonderful!
      “If I had a farm and it was mine, and another person wanted it, would it be right for him to—“

      Only if he’s a Zionist, Huck Finn!! Only HE can steal your farm with impunity..

      • joer says:

        tgia:

        Zionists like to quote-I don’t know if it’s even in context=Twain’s impressions of Palestine when he traveled there. He seemed to think it was sort of sleepy, and they like to say, “see, nothing was going on there before the Zionists arrived.” The thing is they are on shaky ground because he was tough on everybody; he thought mankind is vain, greedy, dishonest, cruel, superstitious, and everything else-but he thought the meanest rottenest, but at the same time stupidest, people were powerful, usually white egomaniacs who inflict suffering on all the other poor slobs they share the planet with. But he would do it in a funny way, so people would laugh instead of go nuts on him. My point being; for every quote Zionists find of his poking sleepy Palestine, there are hundreds pillorying ambitious, vain, racist America.

        • Yes Joe..I’ve read these Twain’s quotes that zionists and their groupies just love to throw in our faces (remember Sweden 1975?) in order to prove that the land was a desolate, uncultivated place as to validate the view that it had no owners no carers and such but the thing is that it’s all misleading. Palestine Remembered has an article explaining the context of Twain’s quotes and visit to Palestine and they have quotes that show the contrary, that he observed other areas within the land that were extremely well cultivated and taken care of..I’ll try to find the link..

        • joer says:

          I’ve noticed they never quote from his essay “On the Jews”, which is actually very favorable, but it’s full of both positive and negative stereotypes. Maybe it’s because in the essay he mentions the then new movement called Zionism, and he is dead set against it-he thought it was a horrible idea-and his objection is based on a stereotype: That Jews are too smart to have their own state because they will become too powerful. I don’t know about all that, but I have noticed that Zionists never quote from that essay.

        • I hadn’t heard of that essay before. I’ll check it out, thanks..I can only observe that people (non-Jews and non- Arabs) can be either pro or anti zionists for reasons that have nothing to do with the notion of right and and wrong but for reasons totally different as in Twain’s case.

        • joer says:

          Here’s a link to his essay on the Jews:
          link to fordham.edu

          And the relevant quote:
          Speaking of concentration, Dr. Herzl has a clear insight into the value of that. Have you heard of his plan? He wishes to gather the Jews of the world together in Palestine, with a government of their own – under the suzerainty of the Sultan, I suppose. At the Convention of Berne, last year, there were delegates from everywhere, and the proposal was received with decided favor.

          I am not the Sultan, and I am not objecting; but if that concentration of the cunningest brains in the world were going to be made in a free country (bar Scotland), I think it would be politic to stop it. It will not be well to let the race find out its strength. If the horses knew theirs, we should not ride any more.

          I don’t understand why if Zionists love Twain so much, why they never quote that.

        • “but if that concentration of the cunningest brains in the world were going to be made in a free country (bar Scotland), I think it would be politic to stop it. It will not be well to let the race find out its strength. If the horses knew theirs, we should not ride any more.”

          OUCH!!

        • Keith says:

          “cunningest brains” Interesting choice of phraseology.

        • Citizen says:

          Yes, Keith; it’s not the same as “smartest brains.”

        • Citizen says:

          cunning [ˈkʌnɪŋ]
          adj
          1. crafty and shrewd, esp in deception; sly cunning as a fox
          2. made with or showing skill or cleverness; ingenious
          n
          1. craftiness, esp in deceiving; slyness
          2. cleverness, skill, or ingenuity

  20. Jim Holstun says:

    The Twain quote beloved of Joan Peters and Alan Dershowitz is from INNOCENTS ABROAD (1867); this one is from TOM SAWYER ABROAD, his continuation of HUCKLEBERRY FINN (1894), and I doubt that there has ever been a finer short satire of Zionists, Christian and Jewish, written by an American. Notice how Huckleberry Finn and Jim, the Missouri poor white and black, identify spontaneously with the poor Palestinian peasants, who even then were being evicted from their traditional landholdings to make way for the Zionist project.

    • Yes Jim..It’s interesting that you noted that early on, well before the 40s there was a clear attempt by the new Jewish immigrants to dispossess the locals. As soon as one acquired a farm, the Palestinian farmers working in it were systematically evicted..For the Palestinians witnessing the phenomenon this was a telling sign that the European immigrants were not in the business of blending in and cohabitating but acting like colonisers.

    • Bumblebye says:

      Innocents Abroad – he put my great-grandpa in that book (but not the serialisation)!

    • David Samel says:

      Jim, I woke up this morning and thought that while I mentioned Twain last night, I should have dug out that passage from Tom Sawyer, and noted how the Zionist narrative dishonestly uses his quote from Innocents Abroad. I see I don’t have to bother.

      btw, it was this quote from IA that was one of the primary sources for the plagiarism accusation against Dershowitz. Joan Peters used a quote, to which she added some typos and most significantly, a highly unusual ellipsis signifying a jump of scores of pages. Dersh put that exact quote in his book, without attribution to Peters, just citing Twain, as if he had made the exact choices and mistakes of Peters, but independently. Still, he managed to weasel out of the plagiarism charge.

  21. Jim Holstun says:

    TSA is 1894, not Hf.

  22. Rudyard Kipling, The White Man’s Burden, 1899
    – I am surprised that no-one has mentioned this, probably the inspiration for Henry Labouchère’s ‘Brown Man’s’ version (copyright rules were not so strict in 1899).

    The US took over the Philippines from Spain in 1898, and promptly put down any local moves towards Philippine independence. Opposition to the war inspired Mark Twain to found the Anti-Imperialist League on June 15, 1898.

    The conflict began officially on June 2, 1899, when the Philippines declared war against the United States and it officially ended on July 4, 1902, after President Emilio Aguinaldo’s surrender. The Philippine-American War which ensued resulted in massive casualties.[7] Philippine president Emilio Aguinaldo was captured in 1901 and the U.S. government declared the conflict officially over in 1902.

    The Filipino leaders, for the most part, accepted that the Americans had won, but hostilities continued and only began to decline in 1913, leaving a total number of casualties on the Filipino side of more than one million dead, many of them civilians.

    The war and occupation by the United States would change the cultural landscape of the islands, as the people dealt with an estimated 34,000 – 1,000,000 casualties, disestablishment of the Catholic Church as the state religion, and the introduction of the English language as the primary language of government and some businesses. In 1916, the United States granted the Philippines autonomy and promised eventual self-government, which came in 1934. In 1946, following World War II, the Philippines was granted independence.
    link to en.wikipedia.org

    The parallels between this American enterprise and the Zionist one are striking:
    - The ‘official war’ didn’t take very long, and no natives were expelled from the Philippines.
    - The unoffical war lasted for another 10 years at least
    - The Philippines gained autonomy 34 years after the war, and gained independence finally 46 years after the war.
    The famous poem, written by Britain’s ‘imperial poet’, was a response to the American takeover of the Phillipines after the Spanish-American War. Kipling was not quite the celebrator of the British Empire that he is made out to be; read his stuff with an unprejudiced viewpoint.

    Take up the White Man’s burden–
    Send forth the best ye breed–
    Go bind your sons to exile
    To serve your captives’ need;
    To wait in heavy harness,
    On fluttered folk and wild–
    Your new-caught, sullen peoples,
    Half-devil and half-child.

    Take up the White Man’s burden–
    In patience to abide,
    To veil the threat of terror
    And check the show of pride;
    By open speech and simple,
    An hundred times made plain
    To seek another’s profit,
    And work another’s gain.

    Take up the White Man’s burden–
    The savage wars of peace–
    Fill full the mouth of Famine
    And bid the sickness cease;
    And when your goal is nearest
    The end for others sought,
    Watch sloth and heathen Folly
    Bring all your hopes to nought.

    Take up the White Man’s burden–
    No tawdry rule of kings,
    But toil of serf and sweeper–
    The tale of common things.
    The ports ye shall not enter,
    The roads ye shall not tread,
    Go mark them with your living,
    And mark them with your dead.

    Take up the White Man’s burden–
    And reap his old reward:
    The blame of those ye better,
    The hate of those ye guard–
    The cry of hosts ye humour
    (Ah, slowly!) toward the light:–
    “Why brought he us from bondage,
    Our loved Egyptian night?”

    Take up the White Man’s burden–
    Ye dare not stoop to less–
    Nor call too loud on Freedom
    To cloke your weariness;
    By all ye cry or whisper,
    By all ye leave or do,
    The silent, sullen peoples
    Shall weigh your gods and you.

    Take up the White Man’s burden–
    Have done with childish days–
    The lightly proferred laurel,
    The easy, ungrudged praise.
    Comes now, to search your manhood
    Through all the thankless years
    Cold, edged with dear-bought wisdom,
    The judgment of your peers!

    • Citizen says:

      Yep, the stooped irony in the poem is as heavy as a ton of lead.

      • Citizen – I don’t really understand the phrase ‘stooped irony’ and I don’t know whether your comment is positive or negative about Kipling.
        Can you enlighten me?
        By the way, a ton of lead is only as heavy as a ton of feathers.

    • Avi says:

      Take up the White Man’s burden–
      The savage wars of peace–
      Fill full the mouth of Famine
      And bid the sickness cease;
      And when your goal is nearest
      The end for others sought,
      Watch sloth and heathen Folly
      Bring all your hopes to nought.

      How depressingly prescient.

      The contrast between the beautiful prose and the content makes it all the more unnerving. I guess that’s a different way of saying what Citizen has already indicated.

      Thanks for posting this, Richard.

  23. Kipling is a much-maligned poet these days.

    He never celebrated the conquests of the British Empire (which were just past their full flow then; and we thought we were doing good by bringing ‘modern practices’ to ‘backward nations’. Just as the US sought to ‘bring democracy’ to Iraq in 2003.)

    The ‘Israel problem’ rests on its colonial implementation in 1946-9, just as the European and American authorities were giving up their colonial ‘properties’.

    It’s long past its sell-by date.