US Embassy to American in trouble in Israel: ‘You’re not Jewish? Then we can’t do anything to help you’

divestmentsigns
Sandra Tamari, right, at the 2012 United Methodist General Conference, alongside Rabbi Lynn Gottlieb

Sandra Tamari is a Palestinian-American Quaker who lives outside St. Louis. She is is a member of the St. Louis Palestine Solidarity Committee and has worked on divestment, as you can see in the picture above. 

Last week she was deported from Israel and the American embassy asked if she was Jewish and then said it couldn’t help her.

The press release from her supporters:

Sandra Tamari, a Quaker, mother of two, and member of the St. Louis Palestine Solidarity Committee, was detained at Tel Aviv’s Ben Gurion airport last week and aggressively questioned for over eight hours before being taken to a detention center and deported back to the United States. During questioning, Israeli security demanded she open her personal email account and accused her of being a terrorist.

Requesting help from the US Embassy, Tamari – a US citizen – was immediately asked if she is Jewish. When told that she was Palestinian, Tamari was advised they could do nothing for her.

“I found it curious that the first question the U.S. Embassy staff asked me is, ‘Are you Jewish?’ It gave me the impression that the support they could provide to me was based on my answer. When I told the Embassy that I was a Palestinian American with family in the West Bank, they told me they could do nothing to help me. Has the U.S. adopted Israel’s racial and religious profiling tactics to discriminate against Arabs and Muslims?”

Thank God for Matt Lee of the Associated Press. Here’s the State Department briefing by Mark Toner from two days back. Lee asks:

back in the Middle East. One is, are you familiar with the case of this – a woman from St. Louis who’s a Palestinian American, who was deported from Israel, I believe several days ago, maybe even last week, who called the Embassy in Tel Aviv for assistance and was asked if she was Jewish? When she said that she was not, when she was Palestinian, they said that they couldn’t help her.

MR. TONER: Matt, I have no idea.

QUESTION: Okay. I sent –

MR. TONER: I’ll take the question.

QUESTION: Okay. I sent something about this, not to you.

MR. TONER: Yeah. I apologize. I didn’t see it.

More info from the press release:

Tamari, a vocal advocate for Palestinian rights and the ending of Israel’s occupation of Palestinian territory, was attempting to travel to Israel and the occupied West Bank to participate in an interfaith delegation involving Palestinians and Israelis working for peace and coexistence. She was recently involved in the campaign urging the United Methodist church to adopt selective divestment from companies that profit from the occupation, co-authoring a widely circulated op-ed in the Tampa Bay Times last month during the United Methodists’ General Conference. It seems clear that Israel’s treatment of Tamari is related to her work on behalf of Palestinian rights. 

Israel regularly discriminates against Palestinian Americans attempting to enter Israel and the West Bank, denying them entry while allowing Jews from the US and elsewhere to travel freely. The St. Louis Palestine Solidarity Committee urges the State Department and elected US officials to address this blatant discrimination based on religion and ethnicity with their Israeli counterparts. 

Tamari will be addressing her deportation this week with the offices of Rep. John Shimkus, Senator Richard J. Durbin, and Senator Mark Kirk.

Did Tamari get deported because of her divestment work? She wrote this pro-divestment piece for the Tampa Bay Times–along with Michael Berg (Jewish American) and Hala Abdelaziz (Palestinian-American). The trio wrote a similar piece for the Tampa Tribune. Excerpt:

Tragically, the Israeli occupation continues to strangle Palestinian society. Israeli political and religious leaders threaten Palestinians with transfer out of their homeland, enforce the occupation of the West Bank with incredible violence, and continue the naval blockade of Gaza which keeps the people there in dangerous deprivation. In the last 20 years, illegal Jewish-only settlements in the West Bank have increased from 241,500 inhabitants to some 500,000, including East Jerusalem.

Israel’s occupation practices impose severe hardships on residents. Palestinians routinely find themselves trapped by barriers and the Israeli separation wall — unable to visit family members, friends, schools, businesses and places of worship. Death, injury or arrest is a distinct possibility, even for nonviolent protesters demonstrating against home demolitions or land confiscation.

About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.
Posted in Israel/Palestine, US Policy in the Middle East | Tagged

{ 192 comments... read them below or add one }

  1. Woody Tanaka says:

    This is disgusting. The US is a whore.

    • seafoid says:

      The US is an empire with an influential minority running certain operations at the court of the emperor.

    • The US is a whore.

      Or a pimp, depending on how you look at it.

      • Elisabeth says:

        This is not very on topic, but nevertheless:

        When I was about 11 years old, I heard the father of my best friend explain to her what ‘prostitutes’ were (‘women who sell their bodies for money’). It annoyed me and I wanted to say: “They do not SELL their bodies, because they get them back afterwards. Sell is forever. They RENT their bodies out.”

        (You see, my mother had explained to me in very gentle but clear terms what prostitution was really about, and she did not use such pompous and abstract terms, which do not explain anything.)

        At the time I was too respectful of older people to correct him of course.

    • Danaa says:

      Not quite the right word, Woody. A ‘whore’ sells her body for money. What’s the word for someone who gives it away for free? and is there a word for one who does it and kisses too?

      • right on danaa for the *collective* US. through hasbara and the MSM we have a one-way love affair with israel for many americans.

        but the ones driving policy are *whores*, under the abusive israeli pimp (they do have a good sex trade going in israel as well…)

        the politicians take chump change, in exchange for voting against the best interests of the US and sending money to israel.

        and the israeli pimp will smack them down if they try to leave their master (AIPAC et al will unseat them for even thinking about getting out of line).

        and what was the lavon affair, the USS liberty, and other “events”? this israeli pimp is not afraid to use extreme violence to get its way.

        • and i want to say something more PC about actual whores. in montreal, they have have some saying like “don’t like us? we were here first. leave.”

          it is the oldest profession in the world, and will likely always exist, in some form. it is quite often benign and should be legalized imho. it is a contract between two people, and when entered into voluntarily, affects only those two people.

          in the case of the whores in our media and political elite? they ef us all over, including *israelis*. this type of whoring us all out involuntarily, to everyone’s collective detriment, is vile. they take the cash and the professional or political position, while we all get raped in various ways. for some people it results in death, dispossession, or who knows what.

          throw the whores out.

        • even further, if we cannot the the whores out, and if collective jewry continually enables this insanity, we will see blind rage in time. antisemitism has roots in actual grievances, at least in the US today. the whores go, else the collective mob will turn on the pimps- by looking at anyone who is of the pimps ideology/religion/race. not fair, but it will be a form of rationalized “self-defense”.

      • Sumud says:

        What’s the word for someone who gives it away for free?

        That doesn’t cover it either, since the US actually pays the john, Israel. More than $3 billion a year.

        Not even an ounce of dignity in what the US government does for Israel.

  2. Sandra Tamari is a stellar person, absolutely stellar.

  3. American says:

    Good going. Piss off the Quakers too.
    This ‘official’ privileging of “Jewish’ by the US gets more bizarre and more reminiscent of nazis identifying Jewish vr Ayran.
    I was going to say we should start a list of everyone Isr’merica has pissed off with this kind of stuff but a list of who they havent’ pissed off would be shorter.

  4. seafoid says:

    “You’re not Jewish? Then we can’t do anything to help you”

    That more or less sums up US policy on Israel/Palestine
    Israeli Jews are really going to miss that sort of political love when it drains away.

  5. seafoid says:

    During questioning, Israeli security demanded she open her personal email account and accused her of being a terrorist.

    The other appropriate Zionist responses available to airport staff were, of course :

    1. During questioning, Israeli security demanded she open her personal email account and built a 2 metre wall topped with barbed wire and sensors around her

    2. During questioning, Israeli security demanded she open her personal email account and accused her of responsibility for the Holocaust

  6. gazacalling says:

    Wow, amazing story. Craziness in Ben Gurion Airport is to be expected, but from the American Embassy? I’ve never heard of that before.

    • American says:

      Well Obama appointed a US zionist supremist , Dan Shapiro, as Amb to Israel so what do we expect? And it’s not unusual…goes on with everything in US government involving Jews. Contrast the coniptions the US State Dept and congress have had over a single Jew being arrested in Cuba with the stone cold silence of US government and even approval of most of congress in the Israeli killings of peace activist Americans.
      I feel like I am looking into some kind of funhouse mirror of early nazi Germany with just the ‘privilaged positions’ reversed.
      I’m telling you ….we, the US and the Jews, are so,so,so cruising for a bruising by making the US the agent/enforcer for the Zionist Jewish privilage demand.

      • Denis says:

        American: Contrast the coniptions the US State Dept and congress have had over a single Jew being arrested in Cuba with the stone cold silence of US government and even approval of most of congress in the Israeli killings of peace activist Americans.

        Bingo. 2 years ago last Thurs the IDF executed 19 year-old US citizen Furkan Dogan as he lay unconscious on the deck of the Mavi Marmara, as was found by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

        Uh . . . hello? Furkan Dogan?? Never heard of him.

        This kid was an American hero and it’s like he never existed. Did the US State Dept even complain about his killing?

        Rachel Corrie? Who?

        The USS Liberty?

        Americans should be ashamed of themselves b/c in a democracy they are the ones responsible for the way their country is run.

    • Mooser says:

      “I’ve never heard of that before.”

      A quick perusal of “gazacalling’s” comment archive will show you pretty much what he has and hasn’t heard of. And what a proponent of women’s rights this man is!

      • Pamela Olson says:

        It was standard knowledge when I lived in Palestine: If you’re not Jewish and have any history of dissent with any of Israel’s policies, the US embassy doesn’t have time for you. It’s like you don’t exist, or as if you get temporarily stripped of your US citizenship as long as they suspect Israel wouldn’t like them to help you. It’s very clear, no secret at all, to any non-Zionist American who’s spent time there.

        If you ask the American embassy for help, you’re not just a second-class citizen — it’s like you’re not a citizen at all. Chilling — but sadly, like many other outrages that become the ordinary course of day to day life, people tend to get used to it and figure out ways to work around it if they can. Often they can’t, though.

  7. Fredblogs says:

    Of course they asked if she was Jewish, that’s like a lawyer asking his client if he is underage (it matters to the court so it matters to the lawyer). It matters to the people doing the deporting, so it matters to the embassy. There is no right to be in a country of which you are not a citizen, if they want to deport you for any reason or for no reason at all, they can. The embassy is certainly aware of that so they know they can’t stop a deportation unless Israel is willing to stop it and they aren’t going to change their minds about deporting someone unless that person is Jewish.

    • eljay says:

      >> Of course they asked if she was Jewish, that’s like a lawyer asking his client if he is underage (it matters to the court so it matters to the lawyer).

      Right, and if a Jewish American were to find himself in trouble in Saudi Arabia, the American embassy would be right to ask him “Are you Muslim?” and to deny him assistance if it turns out he’s not.

      The Fraudulence continues…

      • Woody Tanaka says:

        “The Fraudulence continues…”

        That should be “Fredulence”

      • Fredblogs says:

        She wasn’t looking for general assistance, she was looking for them to stop Israel from deporting her, which they couldn’t help her with.

        • she was looking for them to stop Israel from deporting her

          she may have been looking for more than that!

          aggressively questioned for over eight hours before being taken to a detention center and deported back to the United States. During questioning, Israeli security demanded she open her personal email account and accused her of being a terrorist.

        • OlegR says:

          Annie had they arrested her instead of deporting than she indeed
          would have had the right to expect help from the Embassy
          but deportation is the prerogative of the state.Just like the US can
          deport me for whatever they like maybe some clerk didn’t like
          my looks and i would have no help from the Israeli embassy whatsoever
          and wouldn’t expect one either.

        • perhaps you misunderstood me oleg. my comment was not directed at the deportation.

        • eljay says:

          >> … deportation is the prerogative of the state.

          Leave it to Zio-supremacists to support hateful and immoral deportations based solely on a person’s non-Jewishness or unappealing appearance (“You have too many pimples – you must leave the country!”).

          But since Israel does have the right whimsically to deport any individuals they wish to deport, there was no reason for the American embassy official to ask Ms. Tamari whether or not she’s Jewish. The bias demonstrated by that unnecessary and irrelevant question is telling, and to any American it should be thoroughly insulting.

        • Ellen says:

          Oleg, that is quite wrong. Very wrong. An American citizen was held in detention against her will by authorities of another country. The US state department is required to, and almost always does, step in with assistance where possible on behalf of the US citizen. These things happen all the time. Their purpose among other things is to provide assistance to Americans who find themselves in this and similar situations.

          It is extremely questionable as to why she did not get immediate aid in this circumstance after contacting the embassy. It would be interesting to hear the State Department’s version of events and cause for inaction.

          If you were held in detention by US authorities for whatever reason, and against you will while visiting the US, you can be sure the Israeli Embassy would offer you assistance.

        • Hostage says:

          >> … deportation is the prerogative of the state.

          In international law it always takes at least two to Tango, the sending and the receiving state.

          If you plan on using rights of transit, remember that the EU placed an absolute ban on deportations or “renditions” of accused terrorists to the United States or other countries that practice torture. So your actual mileage may vary when you try to exercise that “prerogative”. link to icon.oxfordjournals.org

        • Denis says:

          I 100% agree, Ellen. This whole line of argument, started by Fredblogs, that the US embassy cannot assist in a deportation situation is based on sheer ignorance.

          If a US citizen is barred from entering Israel and/or is held in a deportation center and interrogated, the US embassy should certainly assist the citizen — that’s what they’re getting paid for. Whether or not the US citizen is a Jew has nothing to do with it b/c the embassy’s obligations are to the US citizen first, not to Israel. Of course, if the ambassador is an Israel-firster, priorities get pooped around.

          Clearly the US embassy has no power to countermand an Israeli deportation order, but if the order is not based on reasonable grounds, the embassy can object and report the incident to State Dept., with the implication that Israel’s citizens may be denied entry into the US should the practice continue.

          (Ha, ha, ha . . . that last line is so ridiculous it’s funny, as if the US State Dept could care less if a US citizen of Palestinian descent is barred from Israel. They’re all Israel-firsters at State — in the whole Administration — in Congress. So I’m just talking theoretical. I wonder if Tamari took any steps to challenge the deportation administratively or in court — that is one way the embassy could help.)

        • dbroncos says:

          “Just like the US can deport me for whatever they like…”

          How about for being Jewish, Oleg. You would be fine with that?

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “Whether or not the US citizen is a Jew has nothing to do with it b/c the embassy’s obligations are to the US citizen first, not to Israel.”

          Yeah, but when the US’s supposed ambassador is a dual-loyalty Israeli firster like Shapiro, what you can expect is the same kind of bigotry that his country of loyalty (Israel) demonstrates. Time to get Shapiro out of the ambassador’s residence (I would replace him with a Palestinian-American just for the laughs watching the zio’s heads explode) and the zionist money out of Washington.

        • Fredblogs says:

          Thank you Ellen. You said the magic words “where possible”. If a country doesn’t want to let you in, there is nothing the embassy can do for you. In other words, “not possible”. Particularly if they have you on the next flight to your home country. What exactly would you have had the embassy do, that was actually in their power and could have lead to a different outcome? For a random American, you know we have 300 million of them right?

        • Hostage says:

          What exactly would you have had the embassy do, that was actually in their power and could have lead to a different outcome? For a random American, you know we have 300 million of them right?

          You’ve asked that stupid question twice now and its already been answered. They can lodge a protest over the “Arab vs American” line of questioning, they can provide a list of lawyers, they can arrange for loans, Arrange for medical care, and arrange for food under programs that are authorized by US statute. The likelihood that the US Consulate was busy servicing 300 million detainees is extremely remote.

          The fact remains that there are Courts in Israel that have entertained petitions from people who were denied entry and facing deportation, e.g. Deportation hearing set for Nobel laureate in Israel link to articles.cnn.com

    • ‘Of course they asked if she was Jewish, that’s like a lawyer asking his client if he is underage (it matters to the court so it matters to the lawyer). It matters to the people doing the deporting, so it matters to the embassy. There is no right to be in a country of which you are not a citizen, if they want to deport you for any reason or for no reason at all, they can….’

      Fredo, it should be noted that being Jewish is not the same as being an Israeli citizen. The US State Department can ask if you are an Israeli citizen, but if you identify yourself as an American citizen to the US State Department they should not ask your ethnicity (are you Jewish, Irish, etc.) – that should be irrelevant – all rights and benefits of citizenship are fully yours within the USA or in any other nation, regardless of ethnicity.

      Believe me, you do not want the government asking who’s a Jew and who’s not.

      • Mooser says:

        “Believe me, you do not want the government asking who’s a Jew and who’s not.”

        C’mon now, you can’t expect Fredblogs to understand American principles of equality and rule-of-law. I mean, it’s not like he’ lives here, or has had an American education.

      • Fredblogs says:

        @John Smithson
        “All rights and benefits of [American] citizenship” do not include the right to stay in a country that wants to deport you. The embassy can’t stop a country from deporting its ambassador if the host country wants to. If that country made an exception for left-handed people, I’d expect the embassy to ask if the prospective deportee was left-handed. That’s not a question of your rights as an American, that’s a question of your privileges in the country that is about to deport you.

        • Theo says:

          Fredboy

          Are you that dim or just want to spread some hasbarah. By repeating the same nonsense doesn´t make it right.
          Arresting a person without due cause, interrogating her for eight hours and demading excess to her private e-mail is not what is done in a democratic country!!
          Pardon, I forgot about the Holocaust and the progroms in Russia during the 19th century!

        • Fredboy; “Are you that dim or just want to spread some hasbarah. By repeating the same nonsense doesn´t make it right”.

          Heres your answer, Theo.

        • Fredblogs says:

          @Theo
          Perhaps you haven’t traveled internationally. When you are trying to go into a country, including America, the border authorities don’t need probable cause to hold you. They don’t have to have a reasonable suspicion. An unreasonable suspicion will do. You, your papers, anything you have on you including your computer and any data files are subject to search at the whim of the customs agent. If you try to come into the U.S. they are within their rights to strip-search you and check your body cavities if they’d like to. And they can demand that you give up your passwords to your computer as well. Some lawmakers in America have tried to pass laws that would ban searching computers on your way into America, but as it stands now the courts have upheld even them confiscating computers for later analysis. With or even without reasonable suspicion.
          link to computerworld.com

          Lest you think that decision was a fluke:
          link to ezbordercrossing.com

          “To date, there have been no successful Fourth Amendment claims against this activity. U.S. Customs agents may also freely share the data from those computers — personal and business records, web-site visits, email – with other governmental entities.”

        • Theo says:

          Freddy

          ..” you have not travelled internationally…

          Now let´s see:
          I have visited following countries during the past 50 years:
          Argentina, Brasilia, Bermuda, Canada, Ireland, Great Britain, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Luxemburg, Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Kroatia, Slovenia, Greece, Turkey, Tunisia, Marocco, Kenia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Hong Kong, just to name a few places!!! Some of them dozens of times!!
          However, I only accounted a search when going into the old communist countries. Israel is moving on the same level.

        • Theo says:

          I forgot France, Singapure and Senegal and probably a few more places.

        • Theo says:

          In the USA they search body cavities since Israel took over security at our airports and we became a laughing stock of the world.
          How many terrorists did they caught this way??? NONE!!!

        • Fredblogs says:

          Then you have A) not done your homework about what border security can and can’t do to you when you are traveling and B) have gotten lucky that none of them suspected you of anything.

          Your position is roughly that of someone who says “I’ve never gotten a speeding ticket and I speed all the time therefore police can’t give anybody a speeding ticket”.

        • Fredlog, you just make up any assertion that comes into your head, while ignoring the numerous corrections to your windbag claims. Pretty feeble stuff.

        • Blake says:

          Fred: You have obviously not traveled a lot and are indoctrinated TO NOTHING. The way you defend and stan for this evil pariah is utterly shameless.

        • Fredblogs says:

          @Miss Costello
          Well, that was pointless.

        • Hostage says:

          Then you have A) not done your homework about what border security can and can’t do to you when you are traveling

          Fred you seem to be claiming that our federal border officials aren’t creatures of the US Constitution or that our US State Department Consular officials can waive their legal obligations to a citizen based upon some sort of religious test.

          In fact the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Justice’s Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) have all been respondents in lawsuits about these very same questions. Spokesmen advise that CBP strictly prohibits profiling on the basis of race or religion in determining whether individuals are admissible into the United States, e.g. link to cnsnews.com

          The agencies claim that they strictly observe the prohibitions against stops, detention, or questioning on the basis of race or religion in line with Court decisions like United States v. Brignoni-Ponce, 422 U.S. 873, 878 (1975), United States v Montero-Camargo U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals (2000), and the guidance contained in the DOJs Guidance Regarding The Use of Race By Federal Law Enforcement Agencies. link to justice.gov

          In short: what you’ve been defending here is actually illegal under our domestic laws and Constitution.

        • Fredblogs says:

          Lawsuits which the people suing over their computers being searched have lost, because there is no fourth Amendment protection for your computer at the border.

          These entry denials weren’t done on the basis of race. Since as it turns out, neither this woman nor the others banned as described in the other thread were banned because they were Arabs. They were banned because they are members of anti-Israel organizations.

          Countries ban for all sorts of reasons. Heck, Canada bans people for non-felony DUI convictions.

          As for consular obligations, I’m saying that I think you are conflating two circumstances that don’t have the same obligations. I think you are talking about rights of people at deportation hearings once they are in foreign countries and that the same obligations don’t exist for people being denied initial entry to a country. There were no deportation hearings because they were being denied initial entry, not deported after entry.

          “This Court has long held that an alien seeking initial admission to the United States requests a privilege, and has no constitutional rights regarding his application, for the power to admit or exclude aliens is a sovereign prerogative.” Landon v. Plasencia, 459 U.S. 21 (1982)

        • “Well, that was pointless”.

          Not as pointless as you. This fool gets more attention than Obarmy and the Queen of England put together; and she’s celebrating her Diamond Jubilee right now.

        • Hostage says:

          These entry denials weren’t done on the basis of race. Since as it turns out, neither this woman nor the others banned as described in the other thread were banned because they were Arabs. They were banned because they are members of anti-Israel organizations.

          Please remember that Naomi Klein and Phil Weiss have both visited Israel and the West Bank; compared conditions they witnessed there to South African Apartheid; supported the findings of the Goldstone report; and support the BDS movement.

    • Woody Tanaka says:

      Wow, there really is no evil that is done on behalf of Israel (and it’s bought-and-paid-for pet, the US) that you won’t excuse. The fact is that there are other things that the embassy can and should do for US citizens, even if they are facing deportation. The fact that she was not a Jew is irrelevant to that, except, apparently on the watch of an Israel-Firster like Dan Shapiro.

      • Daniel Rich says:

        @ Woody Tanaka,

        34 US sailors have been patiently waiting for justice to be served for over 40 years now. As long as M.J. Rosenberg and the likes of him parade around as new-born Jews and nothing’s done to assure that the perpetrators are brought to justice, don’t expect anything [right] from that spineless creature widely referred to as the ‘US government/congress.’

        • American says:

          I wouldn’t be hard on MJ Daniel, he has come out guns blazing on AIPAC time and again. There may be some self interest (or Jewish concern ) in his declarations of being a ‘America first’ Jew, not an Israel firster but by what he does to expose a lot of zio crap I take him at his word.

        • Sumud says:

          +1 American.

          I don’t know what prompted Daniel Rich to mention MJR but he’s not responsible for Israel’s attack on the USS Liberty nor the US coverup of it.

          We need more MJs! >> Decent people who might start off on the wrong track, see the error of their ways and change. I’m sure there are other people who have left AIPAC in disgust, but not many who do a full 180 and now actively fight against it. Credit where credit is due.

        • Theo says:

          Yes, Daniel

          “We don´t forget and don´t forgive!!!

      • Fredblogs says:

        “Help, I’m being put on a plane in 10 minutes to be deported back to my home country”. Not something the embassy really needs to do anything about. The person is in no danger and doesn’t have the right to stay in the country that is deporting them anyway.

        • Sumud says:

          “Help, I’m being put on a plane in 10 minutes to be deported back to my home country”.

          Let’s deport some Palestinian refugees back to their home country.

        • Shmuel says:

          Let’s deport some Palestinian refugees back to their home country.

          As Stephen Colbert said in his interview with Michael Oren: “The Palestinians should go back where they came from” :-)

        • Sumud says:

          That’s it Shmuel. Oren took the bait hook line and sinker.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “The person is in no danger ”

          You can never say that about israel. Those people murder and maim Americans on a regular basis.

        • Hostage says:

          “Help, I’m being put on a plane in 10 minutes to be deported back to my home country”.

          You’re kidding right? When the Consular Section is advised that an American has been arrested or detained for deportation, a consular officer is required to visit the American Citizen as soon as possible; provides information regarding the foreign legal system and a list of attorneys; and offers other assistance such as contacting family or friends on the prisoner’s behalf; arranges transfer of private funds for delivery to American prisoners, arranges dietary food supplements and/or medical care through a U.S. Government loan. All of those activities are prescribed by the US Code on Foreign Relations.

          The State of Israel purports to reserve the right to treat US citizens or nationals as “Palestinian” if their parents or grandparents ever lived in the West Bank or Gaza. If Israel is going to treat our citizens as “stateless” or worse still, as “citizens of an enemy power”, then a determination and deportation to the “home country” would require a hearing in a regular court in accordance with the minimum protections contained in Article 3 and 6 of the 4th Geneva Convention. Even if a Palestinian-American civilian were accused of being a “Palestinian terrorist”, they would still be a “protected person” once they are in the territory of a party to the armed conflict. The US supplies Israel with billions in military aid, so our citizens are not really subjects of an enemy or neutral power for GC IV purposes.

          In any event, Israel and the United States are both signatories of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations link to treaties.un.org

          Article 36 of that treaty permits the US Consul to arrange for legal representation of citizens who have been arrested or detained for any reason, including deportation proceedings. The international courts have ruled that the provisions of Article 36 create an enforceable individual right.

        • Hostage says:

          Let’s deport some Palestinian refugees back to their home country.

          Might as well. Although the Jews complain that the US closed it doors to refugees during the Holocaust, it actually admitted tens of thousands of refugees. The group the US has persecuted the most in that regard are the Palestinians. Our government freely admits that it normally does not admit them into our country and that it is only willing to accept one or two thousand that it displaced during the war in Iraq. link to ipsnews.net

        • Theo says:

          Hostage

          Perhaps you should e-mail this information to Hillary and ask for a comment on her people in TelAviv.

        • Hostage says:

          “The person is in no danger. The person is in no danger and doesn’t have the right to stay in the country that is deporting them anyway.” . . . You can never say that about israel.

          That goes double for turning over accused terrorists to the US. The European Court of Human Rights has prohibited deportations in the past because of the genuine risk they would be tortured or receive the death penalty.

        • “Help, I’m being put on a plane in 10 minutes to be deported back to my home country”.

          Dear God, if only…

        • “In any event, Israel and the United States are both signatories of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations link to treaties.un.org”

          Does isra-hel know that?

        • RoHa says:

          “You’re kidding right? …. an enforceable individual right.”

          C’mon, Hostage!

          Laws, rights, treaties, international agreements, duties of the US Government to its citizens, etc., etc.

          What have any of these things got to do with Israel?

        • Fredblogs says:

          Any actual murders that is. I figure there’s probably a few cases of Israeli soldiers violating orders and murdering or voluntarily manslaughtering people.

        • eljay says:

          >> “Help, I’m being put on a plane in 10 minutes to be deported back to my home country”. Not something the embassy really needs to do anything about.

          If the embassy can’t do anything, there was no need to ask Ms. Tamari whether she’s Jewish.

          But she was asked this question. Why? Does the American embassy treat people differently if they are Jewish? Is the American embassy able to halt arbitrary deportations by Israel if they can confirm and then vouch for a person’s Jewishness?

          If I were an American, I would be disturbed to know that Jewish Americans merit preferential treatment from American embassy officials than do non-Jewish Americans.

        • Fredblogs says:

          OK, well that’s just bizarre. You took out the post that made the post I’m replying to relevant. It was a challenge to Woody that for every actual murder of an American by an Israeli soldier or policeman I would find 2 murders of Americans by Palestinians. And that Rachel Corrie, Furgan Dorgan (sp?) and the liberty don’t count because none of them were murders. So please either put this one in or delete the one it is a reply to, because it doesn’t make sense out of context.

        • Hostage says:

          Laws, rights, treaties, international agreements, duties of the US Government to its citizens, etc., etc. . . . What have any of these things got to do with Israel?

          Our government is a creature of the Constitution. It can’t do anything overseas that’s prohibited by that document. If it claims the power and authority to murder civilians far away from any battlefield overseas, you can be sure that some lawyer in the DoJ has advised it has the Constitutional power and authority to do that at home. It views the international community of states as a collection of similarly empowered entities.

          So the United States has reached a new low point in its international relations and its respect for the fundamental rights of its own citizens. It has followed bad advice about waging the amorphous “war on terror”, the use of drones against civilians, & refusal to accept international adjudication from the likes of Bolton, Yoo, and Koh. That behavior has tended to destroy the international order and organizations that are intended to solve problems peacefully inside the framework of law and human rights, not wars. In fact, our elected leaders and courts almost pride themselves on their defiance of international institutions and their ability to game the system to achieve short-term goals and objectives. All of that comes at a tremendous cost to the rest of us.

          In the past, leaders in our own and other governments had spent the better part of a century trying to build-up a framework of international law. It placed emphasis on arbitration, and adjudication, not endless negotiations accompanied by the intermittent use of force. In fact, they sought to outlaw war and placed severe restrictions and prohibitions on the unilateral use of force and warfare starting with the 1899 Hague Convention for the pacific settlement of international disputes, the Hague Conventions of 1907 on the Laws and Customs of War, the Covenant of the League of Nations, the Montevideo Convention on the Rights and Duties of States, the Kellogg-Briand Pact, the UN Charter, the Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocols, and the all of the UN Covenants and Conventions on Human Rights. If respect for peaceful settlement of disputes, human rights, and humanitarian law threatens our “sovereignty”, what does that say about the purpose of sovereignty, and ultimately about us?

          The US is increasingly isolated and wasting its political capital trying to prop-up a few rogue states and defending perpetual wars. Glorifying Zionist wars, colonialism, and apartheid is just a symptom of the underlying problem of lawlessness and immorality in our own society. When governments deny the fundamental rights of others, they invariably end up destroying the fundamental rights of everyone.

        • Fredblogs says:

          Got a cite for any of that? Also something that says that being denied entry into a country is the same as being deported after having gained entrance. Because I don’t think you get to stay in a country that won’t let you in long enough to need a consular visit. It seems like that would be a huge waste of America’s time and resources if someone who wasn’t allowed into a country could just choose to stick around anyway while a long deportation process grinds on.

        • Hostage says:

          Got a cite for any of that? Also something that says that being denied entry into a country is the same as being deported after having gained entrance.

          Fred here is the standard State Department boiler plate. Please note that it does not say “There’s nothing we can do for you.”:

          Assistance in Case of Arrest or Incarceration

          American citizens are subject to local laws, which may differ significantly from those in the U.S. Consular officers can provide a list of attorneys and information about judicial procedures, notify relatives if requested, and forward requests for money and other aid to relatives and friends. U.S. embassies can also arrange for medical care and provide loans to destitute prisoners through the Emergency Medical/Dietary Assistance (EMDA-I) program. Consular officers will sometimes attend the trial and monitor the treatment of prisoners and protest abuse. Consular officers cannot demand the release of a U.S. citizen or represent a U.S. citizen at trial, give legal advice, pay legal fees, or represent a prisoner in court.

        • Fred)”I figure there’s probably a few cases of Israeli soldiers violating orders and murdering or voluntarily manslaughtering people”

          Aye, just a few Fred, Go ‘figure’ a bit more.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “And that Rachel Corrie, Furgan Dorgan (sp?) and the liberty don’t count because none of them were murders”

          It’s Furkan Doğan. And all of them count, because all of them were murdered by the israelis.

        • amigo says:

          Fred, I could have replied to any or all your posts but I just happened to spot pick this one.

          My observation is you are an unabashed simpleton.

          Have you no self respect.

          But I forget, you are an apologist for some of the most vile acts of this century and more than half of the last.

      • Woody lad, you wasting your time with this plonker.

        • MHughes976 says:

          I wish we could get the plonkers off our back but that is probably impossible anatomically.
          A passport is inherently a request from your own government that you be granted free passage by other governments, ie that you be not deported, stopped from doing business, secluded from your family and friends, forced to waste a lot of money. This formal request makes no sense unless the representatives of your government are prepared to back it up with suitable words, even angry words, if you are unreasonably treated. Accordingly discretionary powers, such as the power to deport, are unjust unless they are used with some show of reasonableness: ie with, among other things, the minimum of pettiness, humiliation and mockery. Not like here.
          Mind you, I don’t think that this sort of behaviour will be extended in any near time to normal tourists coming on organised parties, church trips etc.. Their states of mind – membership of the all but unshaken pro-Israel consensus among normal and sensible people in the West – are their passports and visas.

    • seafoid says:

      “if they want to deport you for any reason or for no reason at all, they can’.

      Was it kosher when Jews in Europe got that treatment Fred ?
      Or are Jews different somehow ?

      Do you understand Hebrew?

      This song is very sad. It always makes me think of how the soi disant Jewish state has been taken over by the darkness

      Ma yihyeh – what will be?

      • Fredblogs says:

        Always making cock and bull analogies about the Nazis huh seafoid?

        Hint, this woman was a U.S. citizen. It was well within the legitimate rights of the Germans to deport a U.S. citizen to the U.S. It was not within their legitimate rights to murder people, whether their own citizens or not.

        • seafoid says:

          Fred

          Why do have to bring the Nazis into it? I thought you knew the history of Sharansky. For years he was a political prisoner in the Soviet Union. Attempts by Israeli and American Jews to go to Moscow to help him ended in deportations. I thought you knew that.

          But obviously the Soviets could deport whoever they wanted and imprison whoever they wanted, right?

        • Hostage says:

          It was well within the legitimate rights of the Germans to deport a U.S. citizen to the U.S.

          LOL! Always reliving the golden age of Fascism eh Friedblogs? I seem to recall that the Nuremberg Charter (and the hangman’s noose) curtailed the boundless discretion of the Germans to deport civilians on the basis of race or religion. Those prohibitions were codified in the Geneva Conventions of 1949.

    • Empiricon says:

      You make a very good point, Fred, but that leaves the elephant in the room: Israel is an openly racist state, our government knows it, and not only does not care, it actively protects and subsidizes them. Sorry for stating the obvious, but thought it bore mentioning.

      • Fredblogs says:

        Religiousist, (if that were a word), not racist. They rescued Ethiopian Jews and Jews of any race are welcome in Israel.

        • Mooser says:

          “Religiousist, (if that were a word), not racist.”

          Oh, that makes it all-right! So as long as the USA deports all of its Jews on a religiousist (sic) and not a racist basis, you’re cool with it?
          And the Nazis would be perfectly all right as long as they excluded Jews from Germany on a religious rather than racial basis?

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “Religiousist, (if that were a word), not racist. They rescued Ethiopian Jews and Jews of any race are welcome in Israel.”

          How about atheists borne of a religious jewish mother… I guess it’s “ethnicist,” and not “religiouist”… walking awful close the dreaded aparteid word, eh, Fredo?

        • andrew r says:

          Religiousist is racist. Racism is any discrimination based on identity passed down at birth.

        • MRW says:

          “Jews of any race are welcome in Israel” unless they’re black.

        • Sumud says:

          “Jews of any race are welcome in Israel” unless they’re black, unless they’re Norman Finkelstein.

        • RoHa says:

          ” Jews of any race are welcome in Israel.”

          As long as they look Jewish.

        • Hostage says:

          “Jews of any race are welcome in Israel” unless they’re black, unless they’re Norman Finkelstein . . .

          . . . or Noam Chomsky, Richard Falk, Holocaust survivor Hedy Epstein, (Double Jeopardy! Round‎/Daily Double: Who are Phil and Adam?), et. al.

        • Sumud says:

          Israel the Some Jewish State™

        • seafoid says:

          Israel- the aliyah is finished State ™

        • Fredblogs says:

          Good question Woody. I’m not sure what the Israeli position is on people who are Jewish according to Jewish law (mother was Jewish) but not by choice (Atheists, converts, Jews-for-Jesus, etc.). Although, I imagine a Jewish born Atheist who was trying to get immigration status to Israel might not bring up his Atheism, just in case.

          I figure it is probably the same regardless of the race of the person (i.e., same for a child of a black Jewish mother as an Ashkenazim Jewish mother.)

        • Fredblogs says:

          @MRW
          Um, no. Not only are black Jews welcome in Israel, but years ago when black Jews in Ethiopia were being persecuted Israel airlifted them to Israel.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “Not only are black Jews welcome in Israel,”

          Yeah, in fact, just a few days ago in Tel Aviv, during the anti-African pogrom, they got a taste of just how welcoming, when the Ethiopian Jews made the horrible mistake of being too black and reminding the raging hordes of angry Jews of the Sudanese refugees they were looking to terrorize.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “I’m not sure what the Israeli position is on people who are Jewish according to Jewish law (mother was Jewish) but not by choice (Atheists, converts, Jews-for-Jesus, etc.).”

          I think you’re lying-for-israel, Fredo, as it is well known that such people are considered Jews and are permitted entry. Because the racism at work is not “religionist” as you suppose, but “ethno-religionist” by which the same type of ethnic discrimination enacted in South Africa during Apartheid day is done in israel.

        • Yawn. The linguistic contortionism of Zionists, again.

          Fred, maybe because you’re not a native speaker of English you don’t know the full scope of the definition of “race.” Please learn:

          Definition of RACE
          1
          : a breeding stock of animals
          2
          a : a family, tribe, people, or nation belonging to the same stock
          b : a class or kind of people unified by shared interests, habits, or characteristics

          Israel is a racist country, period.

        • not sure if i agree with this definition HB. where did it come from?

        • Merriam Webster’s, Annie. And the definition makes sense.

          The fact that one can theoretically enter a group does not mean that discrimination against non-belongers is not racism. Or was this Arab American offered the possibility to convert to Judaism at the airport to avoid deportation?

        • Fredblogs says:

          You would have a point, except that there are racists in every country. In America, we have the KKK. The fact that a country has criminal racists doesn’t mean the country as a whole is unwelcoming to minorities.

          Once again you prove my point about you by damning Israel for something that is wrong, but endemic to every country.

        • Fredblogs says:

          @”The Hasbara Buster”
          ROFLMAO So star trek fans are a race and it is racist to discriminate against Furries. LOL.

        • amigo says:

          “Um, no. Not only are black Jews welcome in Israel, but years ago when black Jews in Ethiopia were being persecuted Israel airlifted them to Israel.”freddy boy.

          Gee I don,t suppose they were useful to make up the numbers , eh fred.

          You are so full of it.

    • Sin Nombre says:

      Fredblogs wrote:

      “It matters to the people doing the deporting, so it matters to the embassy.”

      Yes, if the embassy is being run in such a fashion that being more concerned with the sensibilities of the “people doing the deporting” rather than the American citizens it is *supposed* to be concerned about.

      Disgusting; once again a pass given to an American official—our supposed Ambassador Shapiro—for screwing over an American for jewish interests. Even if it wasn’t on Shapiro’s direct orders, he’s responsible for everything the embassy does. If this was a matter of, say, an American ambassador with an Afrikaaner background to old South Africa screwing over some black American so as to kowtow to white South Africaneer sensibilities, the world would go apeshit and that ambassador would damn near be hung. But it’s okay here, huh Fredblogs? Gee I wonder why. Almost like some people are just Chosen.

      Ever since he got to Israel Shapiro has found it impossible to resist on every possible occasion sobbing out his cosmic love and devotion to Israel with nary a statement that I have read indicating even the most microscopic concern for this country or the fact that we may have interests that are deviate even a molecule from supporting Israel in every and any respect. (Much less, God forbid, that *he* would take the U.S.’s side in same.) And here you are when the point is made clear about whose sensibilities his embassy is really concerned about, churning out the typical instant, endless and cheap crapball dodges.

      And folks like you then are constantly bleating about how gee, anti-semitism is always just soooo inexplicable…. Are you *really* so blind as to believe it? Because it damn sure can seem just another cheap little verbal dodge, delivered as with so many others with the snarking up the sleeve sneering delivered full on.

      • Mooser says:

        “Are you *really* so blind as to believe it?”

        I have come to the conclusion that Zionists are in love with anti-Semitism. They consider it their greatest ally and friend. The only thing which scares them is that it is disappearing. But as Fred and the rest show us every day, they know what to do about it. If it isn’t there, they will just create it. It serves them two ways: 1) The more they can convince people that Jews are a breed apart, the worse relations between Jews and non-Jews will be, and they plan to reap the benefits.
        2) If anti-Semitism can be produced in big enough quantities, Jews may have no choice but to go to Israel. Than, as they did before, they can pick out the better “human material” among them, instead of having to dredge up people from Africa, who they don’t even like.

        • ” If anti-Semitism can be produced in big enough quantities”

          You could be onto something here, Mooser! I see a ‘gap in the market,’ big time. Partners in crime, ‘Netanyahu & Obarmy’, could market the stuff?? Is no doubt there’s a demand for it. Never a day goes by and I don’t sick up /come across the word SOMEWHERE. Can’t you just see it, hear it ! Roll up, roll up! ‘Get your Anti Semite here, folks. Cheapest in town, spread it around!!! Yes Siree, keep that ol’ Anti Semite live and kicking! Where WOULD we be without it?
          Right where you belong, Mister. In the shit!!!

    • Elliot says:

      The State Department prides itself on taking principled positions around the world. Think of the recent examples of Hillary Clinton speaking out in support of Aung San Suu Kyi in Myanmar/Burma and against the massacres in Houla. In both cases, the government in question wasn’t going to budge. But the US spoke out anyway.
      In this case, the US embassy’s refusal to act is more egregious because:
      1. it failed to protect a US citizen from you concede is a discriminatory – I’d say racist – policy.
      2. the “court” – to use your analogy – is funded by the “lawyer”.

      • Fredblogs says:

        @Elliot
        You’d be wrong. The U.S. embassy (assuming that this story is even true)
        was asking about religion, not race.

        I concede that Israel discriminates in favor of allowing Jews to immigrate to Israel. A justified discrimination since there are so many countries that discriminate against Jews immigrating to them.

        • Inanna says:

          So it’s okay to be bigoted but not ok to be racist?

          Ah the mind of a zionist is truly murky.

        • Mooser says:

          “A justified discrimination since there are so many countries that discriminate against Jews immigrating to them.”

          Jeez Fredblah, don’t stop there! Just a couple more tiny steps and Israel will be “justified” in gassing people, and slave labor camps. After all, at some point somebody has done all that to us.

        • Mooser says:

          And Fredblogs, thanks for including that well-cited list of countries which “discriminate against Jews immigrating to them.”

          Or maybe I should just take your word for it, considering that up til now (or heretofore, if you want to put it like that, which I do) not the slightest teeniest crack in you credibility has ever been exposed.

        • Mooser says:

          “I concede that Israel” Fredblogs

          And reality breaths a sigh of relief, knowing that Fredblogs concedes it exists. He was really worried about whether he could chage enough to conform to Fredblog’s expectations.

        • Hostage says:

          You’d be wrong. The U.S. embassy (assuming that this story is even true) was asking about religion, not race.

          Sorry, but treating the pacifists in The Religious Society of Friends like enemy terrorists is crossing a red line, even for the suck-ups in our US State Department.

          Besides, the US Consular advisories have long-since warned travelers that the Israeli authorities may consider US citizens born in the United States as “Palestinian” – without regard to any religion – so long as one of their parents or grandparents were either born in or lived in the West Bank or Gaza. That rule has never been applied to the descendants of a Palestinian Jew or an Israeli settler. So it is undoubtedly a case of ethnic or racial discrimination.

        • Kathleen says:

          I keep thinking about how Colonel Wright could not even get a response about this issue
          link to open.salon.com

        • Elliot says:

          Kathleen – This is shocking. The State Department denies a former colleague her rights as a citizen because of her principled stand on Iraq and Gaza.

    • Mooser says:

      Fredblogs, if you want to say that your idea of Israeli law is simply judgement-by-religion, don’t beat around the bush.

      But of course, I can understand perfectly why you won’t go there. You prefer Gentile justice and administration, even tho the Christmas lights remind you of concentration camps.

      • Fredblogs says:

        @Mooser
        Actually in this case it would be the U.S. embassy hoping that religion could grant an undeserved entrance to the country, rather than religion being the basis of the judgement in the first place. “Hi, I’m here to make trouble for your country, may I come in to your country” “um, nope”. Nothing religious in the decision, but the U.S. embassy was hoping the Israelis would allow a troublemaker in if she was Jewish. I don’t know whether they would have.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          And that, Fredo, is exactly the problem. If the US really were the “land of the free and the home of the brave,” the US embassy wouldn’t buy into the racist garbage with which israel treats American citizens, regardless of ethnicity. Rather, they should be fighting for US citizens against any kind of racism.

          But what do you expect when the US appoints a man like Shapiro, who, at the very least, has a dual loyalty to the country in which he is stationed (assuming he has loyalty to the US, that is) — a fact that is as clear as his statements on the country? You get a US embassy willing to be a co-conspirator in the racism, rather than fighting for the equal treatment of all Americans.

        • dbroncos says:

          Fred, tell us what the trouble is with Israel, that it would invite “troublemakers” like Sandra Tamari?

        • Fredblogs says:

          @Woody
          It’s not a matter of buying into it. It is (assuming her story is even true) a matter of having the power to possibly help if the person is someone the host country is willing to change their minds about admitting, but not having the power to help if the person isn’t someone the host country is going to change their mind about. Although frankly, I doubt whether a person being Jewish would get the Israeli authorities to change their minds about whether to admit someone to the country, once they have decided to keep them out.

          I propose an experiment. Have Mooser (he claims to be Jewish). Go over there and tell them he is with ISM and wants to help the Palestinians with their demonstrations. If they don’t let him in, see if his being Jewish gets them to change their minds.

        • seafoid says:

          Mooser is too much of a Mensch to be recognised as Jewish by the bots.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          “(assuming her story is even true)”

          Right. I forgot, you refuse to believe that a Jew can be anyting other than the purest of pure and never does anything wrong, cruel or even mean. So this woman MUST be a liar. Very Orwellian attitude you have there. Keep exercise that doublethink!

          Fredo, you keep returning to the question of what the Israelis did and whether the US could get them to change their minds. That’s not the issue. Even if it were a useless gesture (indeed, ESPECIALLY if it were a useless gesture), the US should have protested at the highest level and made it clear that no discrimination between American citizens will be tolerated. It should have refused to flatter the bigoted assumptions of zio-supremecism with the “are you a Jew?” question.

          Compare the racist acquiescence of Shapiro’s henchmen to israel’s antics to the acts of the British when one of theirs (Cat Stevens) was wrongly deported by the US. Say what you want about the UK, they didn’t say, “Oh, the Americans are incompetant Islamophobes, so that’s okay.” No, they protested at the highest level. I should expect that the US would do the same, except that zionists control the US, so it won’t.

    • Light says:

      Fredblogs, keep on posting. The more you write the easier it is for people to see the racism in Zionism.

      • Mooser says:

        “Fredblogs, keep on posting. The more you write the easier it is for people to see the racism in Zionism.”

        As I have suggested timidly once or twice, that’s exactly what he wants! First, there’s always the hope that non-Jews will see the racism, arrogance and tribal supremacism in Zionism and conclude it extends to all Jews, thus making them suspicious and fearful of Jews. That is music to their ears. Second, it’s a shout-out to any racists and bigots in the community, assuring them they will meet like-minded bigots in Zionism.
        So it’s a win-win!

      • “Fredblogs, keep on posting. The more you write the easier it is for people to see the racism in Zionism.”

        Or just maybe, people will think this is the ‘Fred Blogs Blog’. I’m one of them.

      • “Fredblogs, keep on posting.”

        The more he writes, the more people will think this is the ‘Fred Blogs Blog’. I’m one of them.

    • Hostage says:

      There is no right to be in a country of which you are not a citizen

      *The General Assembly has used that same rationale to demand the immediate and unconditional withdrawal of the IDF from the occupied Arab territories.
      –General Assembly Resolution ES-9/1 link to un.org
      –General Assembly resolution 39/146 link to un.org

      *Our Jerusalem Consular staff hasn’t always been so gutless in cases where the local authorities have attempted to deport US citizens:

      Though Jews belonging to other nationalities have been expelled from Jerusalem and Palestine, no American citizen has been expelled during my connection with this consulate. In all communications with the local authorities I have invariably and decidedly held the position that I could in no wise consent, much less render aid to expel from Palestine citizens of the United States who are Jews; that a fundamental principle of our Government was involved, which positively forbids any ‘discrimination made for or against American citizens on account of their race or religion.

      –http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi-bin/FRUS/FRUS-idx?type=goto&id=FRUS.FRUS188889v01p2&isize=M&submit=Go+to+page&page=1560

      *Jewish members of Congress have introduced legislation that would permit Israeli terrorists to infiltrate the United States and alter the character and demographic balance of our “Quaker State” without obtaining a visa. link to vosizneias.com

  8. Sin Nombre says:

    Well I don’t see why we shouldn’t feel a bit *prouder* of the U.S.

    Whereas before, that is, it seemed that the U.S. would do nothing for *any* of its citizens vis a vis Israel, right? Rachel Corrie, that fellow on the Mavi Mari….

    Now at least with the good Mr. Shapiro being our ambassador in Tel Aviv we know they are on the que vive for you if you’re jewish at least.

    2% down, only 98% to go! Keep it coming, Mr. Shapiro! I have no doubt you’re like an absolute tiger over there fighting for all our rights and interests.

  9. HarryLaw says:

    Could Sandra claim discrimination against this state dept official? and by vicarious responsibility Hillary Clinton, just a thought.

    • lysias says:

      Hillary Clinton is in Scandinavia these days. She arrived in Denmark yesterday, today is in Norway, where her visit has caused a bit of a flap: Clinton lands amid protocol conflict. She arrives in Stockholm for a one-day visit Sunday, just days after the British High Court approved Julian Assange’s extradition to Sweden.

    • Woody Tanaka says:

      No need to claim it; it is discrimination. The only question is whether she can succesfully sue on it.

    • Fredblogs says:

      Sovereign immunity would probably apply.

      • Hostage says:

        Sovereign immunity would probably apply.

        They say that all politics is local. The 11th Amendment does prevent Israel from suing Pennsylvania in federal court, but the Religious Society of Friends would never respond by expelling Jews from the Quaker State in the first place.

        FYI, the Congressional authorization to use necessary military force against terror organizations linked to the attacks on September 11, 2001 might be applicable to the Mossad or Urban Moving System, but blaming the Society of Friends would cross too many red lines in the Bible Belt during an election year. For example, the Friends were among the earliest settlers here in “Bloody Kansas”. They have descendants, meeting houses, camp grounds, and three university campuses scattered around the state. AIPAC couldn’t get Romney elected to the post of dog catcher in this red state if he or his Israeli friends were ever perceived to be hostile to the Methodists, Presbyterians, AND the Quakers too.

        The natives here already support BDS (Boeing Defense, Space, and Security). But Boeing has announced that the Boeing Defense, Space & Security (BDS) facility in Wichita is closing down after 60 years of operation due to cuts in domestic spending programs. link to boeing.mediaroom.com

        The move is required in order for Boeing to stay competitive with US taxpayer-subsidized Israeli firms, like Rafael Advanced Defense Systems that are allowed to bid on DoD contracts. Congress has increased support for Rafael’s Iron Dome system. So Israeli total military aid will be 4 billion this year instead of the projected 3.1 billion. Believe me, AIPAC’s candidates won’t be enjoying “sovereign immunity” at the ballot boxes here in Kansas.

  10. SimoHurtta says:

    During the cold war my country Finland was forced to lick the Soviet Unions ass in many ways of unhealthy “co-operation”. Politicians were forced to speak with ever increasing liturgy about our friendship. One Finnish high politician even suggested that Finland should choose a new independence day, the day when we signed a co-operation and defense treaty with the Soviet empire. This time period was called Finnladizierung. A period of which we Finns are not very proud of even it was obviously the only way Finland could remain as a almost sovereign country.

    But that was nothing compared with the present manifestations of relations / co-operation between Israel and USA. There should be made serious academic research of this Israelizierung, where a small country gets on many levels full control of a superpower’s political and governmental system.

  11. Rania says:

    Congratulations on your brand spankin’ new degree from Hollywood Upstairs Law College, Fredblogs. I thought your “understanding” of the first amendment was laughable, but it turns out your understanding of immigration law is even more preposterous. Kudos! The only question the U.S. Embassy needs to ask is if an individual is a citizen of the United States. If the answer is yes, the United States is obligated to assist that individual regardless of race or religion. I know that concept must be foreign to a bigot like you.

  12. lysias says:

    The MSM aren’t going to allow the 98% of Americans realize they are now second-class citizens. A Google News search for “Sandra Tamari” finds no hits for her.

  13. The thought that comes immediately to mind is what Ricky Gervais says when Karl Pilkington makes some sort of outrageous pronouncement; “Oh, f#ck me!”

  14. radii says:

    wait, wasn’t that our U.S. Congress just saying that?

  15. Daniel Rich says:

    I talked to this Polish lady, a devout nun, a long, long time ago. She’d been interned/locked up/jailed/set aside/fill in anything PC in one of the Auschwitz camps for two years. Despite the fact that she’d witnessed and been exposed to the same atrocities and heinous acts as her Jewish counterparts, after it was all over in ’45 she found out she couldn’t claim to have been part of the holocaust. Her suffering was somehow different.

    If anyone still likes the US and Israel as the lands of milk and honey, good for you.

    • Ellen says:

      Most all Americans do not know that the concentration camps were for many undesirables — gays, gypsies, handicapped, noisy priests, nuns protecting their charges, polish workers, denounced neighbors…..etc. they have all been forgotten.

      But there is a stone on Berlin with a plaque in memory of the Roma gypsies who succumbed the holocaust in Berlin.

      Gypsies were victims of the holocaust in massive numbers throughout Europe, but practically never mentioned. There is a reason for this.

      At least there is the stone in Berlin.

      link to memorialmuseums.org

      • Woody Tanaka says:

        Apropos of nothing, but I remember reading that they suffered more deaths, as a percentage of pre-war population, than the Jews, but has a much lower number of deaths because of their lower starting population.

      • RoHa says:

        “gays, gypsies, handicapped, noisy priests, nuns protecting their charges, polish workers, denounced neighbors…..etc. they have all been forgotten.”

        Communists, too, and slavische untermenschen.

        • Woody Tanaka says:

          Actually, I think that the largest group of forgotten victims of the Holocaust were Soviet POWs. Something like 3 million of them were killed in the war and hundreds of thousands in the camps.

          And to add insult to injury many of the survivors suffered further reprisals by the USSR after the war as it attached its own soldiers who had become POWs.

        • Ellen says:

          Not ever to diminish the suffering of a single person or group, but by erasing the reality that as a collective, the majority of those who were subjected to or perished in the concentration camps were not Jewish, their memories have been erased.

          But if by the holocaust, we mean all the pow camps, work camps, purges, etc…the further east, the more the populations suffered. Especially, gypsies, Jews, Poles and Russian farmers.

        • Theo says:

          Yes, Stalin took revenge on those POVs for giving up instead of dying defending the soviet paradise and many of them were sent to gulags where they died.
          By the way, our thanks for our soldiers is not much better.

        • American says:

          Here you go Woody…

          Russia
          Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic

          Alliance Soviet Union – Major Member Nation
          Entry into WW2 17 Sep 1939
          Population in 1939 109,300,000
          Military Deaths in WW2 10,700,000
          Civilian Deaths in WW2 12,500,000

          Some 3.3 million Soviet POWs died in Nazi custody, out of 5.7 million. This figure represents a total of 57% of all Soviet POWs and may be contrasted with only 8,300 out of 231,000 British and US prisoners, or 3.6%. Some estimates range as high as 5 million dead, including those killed immediately after surrendering (an indeterminate, although certainly very large number). Only 5% of the Soviet prisoners who died were of Jewish ethnicity. Among those who died was Stalin’s son, Yakov Dzhugashvili.
          The most deaths took place between June 1941 and January 1942, when the Germans killed an estimated 2.8 million Soviet POWs primarily through starvation, exposure, and summary execution, in what has been called, along with the Rwandan Genocide, an instance of “the most concentrated mass killing in human history eclipsing the most exterminatory months of the Jewish Holocaust’

          Case Study: Soviet Prisoners-of-War (POWs), 1941-42″. Genocide Watch.

  16. Gypsies were victims of the holocaust in massive numbers throughout Europe, but practically never mentioned. There is a reason for this.

    I am curious about what that reason might be?

    • lysias says:

      For as long as Elie Wiesel was on the board of the United States Holocaust Museum, there was no commemoration of the genocide of the Gypsies at that museum, and there were no Gypsies on the board. That had to wait until after Wiesel had left the board.

    • lobewyper says:

      The reason:

      The gypsies were too poor and disorganized to buy a few members of the US Congress…

  17. stevelaudig says:

    I am left wondering if the US embassy in Israel has a list of questions it asks those seeking assistance which goes: Are you a US National? [If yes, proceed; If no, go to Asylum questions] Are you Jewish? [If yes, proceed with questions. If no, terminate interview.] I am not in a position to do a FOIA request for the ‘rules’.

  18. Avi_G. says:

    It is quite possible that the employee who took Sandra Tamari’s call thought she was Jewish — The last name “Tamari” is also a Jewish name. As a result, that employee may have at first thought that Sandra was a member of the tribe and was inclined to help her. When Sandra confirmed she was not, the employee decided to ‘ditch’ her. That is my sense of it.

    • The last name “Tamari” is also a Jewish name.

      avi, it is my understanding her husband is jewish. although it could be her maiden name. i never inquired.

      • Inanna says:

        Annie, her husband is not Jewish. Her husband’s family was ethnically cleansed from Jaffa in the Nakba. As for names being Jewish or not, it might be more appropriate to say ‘Semitic’ rather than Jewish. There are many names that are common to Jews, Muslims and Christians but are perceived as Jewish in the US since that is the only knowledge or exposure that many Americans have to those names.

        • oh, thanks inanna. for some reason i thought i recalled something she had said about that. wrt her children. my mistake.

        • “The last name “Tamari” is also a Jewish name.”
          ————
          Coming to think of it, Tamari doesn’t sound like an Arabic name to me. I could be mistaken of course but I never heard it before. So maybe she’s married to a Jew.

        • Shmuel says:

          Tamari doesn’t sound like an Arabic name to me.

          There’s Salim Tamari (family from Jaffa) of the Institute of Palestine Studies. As Inanna points out, there are many names common to Middle Eastern Muslims, Jews and Christians. Another one that comes to mind is Safadi.

        • Blake says:

          “Tamari doesn’t sound like an Arabic name to me”

          As many Palestinians would affirm they are not of Arabic origin, merely linguistically and culturally Arabized.

        • Theo says:

          Let´s not forget that a great percentage of jews in Europe and USA use german or polish names. What is jewish about Weiss, Schwartz, Goldstein, Goldberg, Dershowitz, Horowitz, etc., etc.
          I have a jewish friend from Hungary with the name of Lebowitz.
          Never judge a man by his name or place of birth or even religion.

        • Ellen says:

          When Eastern European and Slavic Jews emigrated to Prussian administered territories (including parts of Poland) in the 11th and 12th century, they did not come from traditions of family surnames. So instead they adopted names with imagery of beauty or strength from the German language:

          Goldbaum – gold tree
          Goldberg – gold mountain
          Goldwasser – gold water
          Rosenblum – rose blossom
          Rosenblatt – rose pedal
          Steinberg – stone mountain
          etc…..etc.

          Trivia on why the distinctive– and beautiful for German speakers — so-called “German Jewish” family names.

        • Shmuel says:

          they adopted names with imagery of beauty or strength from the German language

          Tell that to my former classmates Ellbogen and Schimmel.

        • Ellen says:

          Shmuel,

          Oh gosh! Maybe their great greats……had a great sense of humor!

        • Shmuel says:

          Maybe their great greats……had a great sense of humor!

          Or maybe they just pissed off a registrar. ‘But I asked for Schoenblumgarten …’

        • MRW says:

          @thankgodimatheist

          It’s also a soy sauce.

        • Theo says:

          Shmuel

          Boy, you sure made me laugh!!!

    • American says:

      Chances are the embassy employee who took call was Jewish herself.

  19. Inanna says:

    I’m sorry this happened to Sandra. What a horrific experience.

    • me too Inanna,but from a certain perspective, it couldn’t have happened to a ‘better’ person. this reminds of of Roqayah Chamseddine’s father Joseph and IHOP. they picked on the wrong person. i hope this gets lots and lots of attention. already this post has gotten almost 200 shares, the attention of the state department and hopefully the attention of the White House. she’s either not a radical, or she’s the new face of radicalism, a hardworking peace loving activist wife and mother. she’s an american and she’s being ignored because she’s palestinian. we need to throw a fit. this is an unfair and discriminatory response from our embassy.

      an excellent example of noura erakat’s Constructing the Prototypical Terrorist in America: Arab, Muslim, and Palestinian.

      link to mondoweiss.net

  20. kma says:

    the US never did anything to help anyone brutalized/jailed by Israel that I knew – and they were quite Jewish.

  21. Mooser says:

    Looks like some comments got deported, including some of mine in response.
    And I whole heartedly agree with your choice, thanks. Always willing to have my babies thrown out with the bathwater, if you think it best.

  22. lobewyper says:

    The failure of the US government to act on behalf of Ms. Tamari, an American citizen, is not merely diseriminatory but borders on the criminal. We should be demanding a congressional investigation of this incident!

  23. weindeb says:

    So much for a society based on ethnicity. And when it’s a religious ethnicity, then please consider membership in the local insane asylum, where folks are normal. You’ll be more comfortable unless, of course, your ethnicity was the right one all along.

  24. Linda J says:

    I am about to join Morris Berman link to morrisberman.blogspot.com and get the hell out of this place.

    Where is it easy to become a citizen?

  25. YoungMassJew says:

    lobewyper, I agree there should be a congressional investigation, sadly it almost certainly won’t even cross a congressperson’s mind to have an investigation as we all know they are bought by the lobby.

  26. Fredblogs says:

    Hostage has posted an uncited list of obligations for the U.S. Embassy for a U.S. Citizen facing deportation. Does anyone have a cite for a list of obligations for a U.S. citizen being denied initial entry to a country?

    • Hostage says:

      Hostage has posted an uncited list of obligations for the U.S. Embassy for a U.S. Citizen facing deportation. Does anyone have a cite for a list of obligations for a U.S. citizen being denied initial entry to a country?

      Emergency Assistance to U.S. Citizens Abroad includes arrest, detention, crime victimization, disappearance, and death.
      link to travel.state.gov

      Here is one of the many available citations that contains a summary of services provided: link to studentsabroad.state.gov

      More importantly I gave you a citation to an article about a Court date being set for a deportation hearing in a case involving someone who was initially denied entry and detained:

      An Israeli court will hold a deportation hearing Friday for an Irish Nobel Peace Prize winner, who was detained this week when she tried to visit the Jewish state and the Palestinian territories.

      Mairead Maguire was refused entry into Israel on Tuesday as she arrived with a delegation of other high-level women’s rights activists from around the world, the Israeli Foreign Ministry said.

      Maguire, along with fellow Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams and founders of the Nobel Women’s Initiative, was set to lead a delegation to Israel and the Palestinian territory over the next seven days. The delegation planned to travel to Jerusalem, Haifa, Nazareth, Ramallah, Hebron and Bil’in to learn from and highlight the work of female peace builders.

      link to articles.cnn.com

      So there is no prohibition in the local law against obtaining a list of lawyers from the US Consulate, obtaining emergency loans, etc., and petitioning the Court for a deportation hearing. Drop the stick and step away from the dead horse.

      • Fredblogs says:

        Deportation does not equal denial of entry. There is apparently no court date or hearing for most of the denied entry cases. I said a cite for your rights when denied entry, not for deportation. As for the deportation hearing for Maguire, I don’t know why the court decided to intervene in her case. Maybe they want to make some kind of point about people who have been deported before.

        • Hostage says:

          Deportation does not equal denial of entry. . . . As for the deportation hearing for Maguire

          The article specifically says she was denied entry and detained. So in this case deportation was the next step in the process that began with denial of entry.

        • Fredblogs says:

          As I said, it’s a weird one. Since in general people denied entry are just put on a plane back without a hearing.

  27. Blake says:

    I’m a “lucky” Palestinian: instead of being jailed, I’m subjected to racial profiling
    By Yara Hawari

    The new security routine at Ben Gurion airport attempts — but fails — to disguise racial profiling.

    As a Palestinian citizen of present-day Israel, I have an Israeli passport and am allowed to fly in and out of Ben Gurion airport in Tel Aviv. That is as far as Israeli courtesy has been extended to me. Each time I use this airport, I am subjected to racial profiling.

    When I was younger and lived in Jerusalem, we would often fly to the UK to visit my mother’s family. I still vividly remember the ordeal that we would go through at the airport.

    “Wrong” queue

    We would always have to leave for the airport ridiculously early to be sure that the extensive security checks wouldn’t make us miss our flight. When we arrived at the check-in area, there would be two queues for each flight. A queue for Israeli nationals and a queue for foreigners.

    Naturally we would stand in the Israeli national queue because despite our staunch Palestinian identity we wanted to be treated as equal citizens of the country. Airport security workers would make their way through the Israeli queue, checking passports and briefly questioning people about their luggage. When they reached us my father would address them in Hebrew (he has mastered the Israeli accent, after studying at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem).

    But it wouldn’t take them long to register that he was, as they like to call us, an Israeli Arab. His name and place of registration (the village of Tarshiha in the Galilee) were obvious indicators, as was the fact that my mother, brother and I did not speak Hebrew. We would then be asked to move to the foreigners’ queue.

    I remember several occasions when my father made loud protests at this request and the people in the foreigners’ queue would back him up. The accusations of racism and apartheid were always ignored and so we would reluctantly have to stand in the foreigners’ queue.
    Designed to humiliate

    If this wasn’t unfair enough we would then be subjected to an intense “security check.” Our belongings would be taken out of our suitcases, displayed so the whole airport could see, and scrutinized. We would be asked questions that had nothing to done with flight security but rather were designed to humiliate and frustrate us.

    Our fellow Israeli passengers who witnessed our public security check would look on with a hostility that would continue on the actual flight. As children, my brother and I didn’t understand the gravity of our treatment; in fact, we considered it normal. The awareness of this racial profiling grew over the years, especially after using other airports where we were not subjected to anything like this.

    In more recent years, the Israeli authorities decided that the airport needed a massive facelift to accommodate an increased number of passengers. So in 2004 a new state-of-the-art terminal was opened. This terminal included a new security routine that attempted to disguise the racial profiling that is imbedded in Israeli society.

    Now Palestinian citizens of Israel are allowed to stand in the Israeli queue. They have a new system of security checks that lead to one being classified with numbers ranging from one to six, six being considered the highest security threat.

    When you are standing in a queue someone from the airport security team will check your passport and ask you a few basic security questions such as: Did you pack your bag yourself? Do you have anything sharp in your hand luggage?

    Then you will proceed to the x-ray machine for your bags. After this, you are either directed to the “security lab” — as I like to call it — or the check-in desks. Very few people make it straight to the check-in desks.

    This “security lab” consists of about nine stations which have surfaces for the suitcases and computer screens with the x-ray images of your luggage. The lab also has a variety of machines to detect residues of explosive substances, among other things. This is the standard procedure for all passengers flying out of Ben Gurion.
    Questions reserved for Arabs

    Let me now explain my experience as a Palestinian with an Israeli passport. In the queue, waiting for my bags to be x-rayed, I am approached by a member of Israeli airport security. The member of staff begins speaking to me in Hebrew and I explain that I don’t speak Hebrew, much to his or her confusion. The staff member then opens my passport, noticing my name.

    Then I get the “special” questions reserved only for Arabs:

    “What were you doing here?” Visiting family.

    “Where do your family live?” Tarshiha.

    “What are their names?” What, all of their names? I have a very big family.

    “Some of their names.” Haneen, Abed, Fadi, Majd, Mayse …

    “That’s fine. Where do you live?” Oxford, England.

    “But you used to live here?” Yes. “OK, wait here.”

    The staff member then goes to speak to the head of security who tends to be milling around. Some pointing at me ensues, along with a nod of the head. They come back and put stickers on my bags. They discreetly give me a level six, reserved only for those who are considered a potential security check. I get my bags x-rayed and proceed to the lab where I am assigned two members of the security team (everyone else gets only one). They then proceed to go through everything in my suitcase, dirty clothes included. Every now and then, they ask me what this or that is, where I got it from, showing items to colleagues.

    To most tourists, my special treatment goes unnoticed as they are subjected to a very watered-down version of this procedure.

    After an hour or so, I am then asked to follow one of them to the “special room” for a body check. To my knowledge, most Arabs and Palestinians go into this room, and occasionally the odd foreigner as well. Despite Israeli insistence that this process is random, it is not. I have been going to the “special room” every time since I turned 15.

    This “special room” consists of cubicles where you are patted down and prodded to make sure you aren’t hiding anything. Recently, they have begun checking in between my toes and combing through my hair. The whole process is degrading and frustrating, especially when you know that most other passengers are not subjected to this.

    What’s worse is that during this procedure they continue to ask me questions but in a more off-the-record fashion. I am always asked why I don’t speak Hebrew and why I have an Israeli passport. As it isn’t enough that I have to sit in a dingy cubicle, essentially being felt up, I am subjected to ignorant questions about my identity.
    Nothing to do with security

    As with many security measures in Israel, the airport procedures are aimed at making life difficult for Palestinians and have little to do with security. On various occasions, I have notice lapses in their security which have confirmed my accusations of harassment for the sake of harassment.

    Once I was listening to my iPod as they rummaged through my stuff. When they finished, I closed all my bags, popping my iPod inside one of them and proceeded to the “special room” for my body search. The same happened with a book I was reading once.

    Both times I could have easily hidden an item considered as a security threat. I also noticed that many Israeli Jews can bypass the security lab. Are Israeli Jews incapable of any kind of threat?
    Remaining sane through resistance

    Throughout this treatment I am able to retain a bit of sanity by committing my own acts of resistance. For example when they are going through my luggage I like to read an appropriate book in front of them. Something on the Nakba (the systematic ethnic cleansing that led to Israel’s foundation) or Palestinian identity usually does the trick.

    Often when they open my suitcase, they’ll find a traditional checkered scarf — or kuffiyeh— and an “I love Palestine” t-shirt spread out on the top. Also, when they ask me for the names of family members, I have taken to reciting various different groups of people. Once it was the Rightly Guided Caliphs, last time it was Lebanese pop singers (Nancy, Elissa etc.). I think next time I’ll go for The Spice Girls.

    Despite these attempts to lighten the airport experience, it is still completely humiliating and upsetting. However, it is simply another thing the Palestinians endure on a day-to-day basis. The very fact that I get to fly out of Tel Aviv makes me one of the lucky ones.

    As I write, thousands of Palestinians are stuck in Israeli prisons without hope of being released — and even more are stuck in the great outdoor prisons of the West Bank and Gaza. Yes, I am one of the lucky ones. But how awful that I am considered as such when I have to go through such a public ordeal of racial profiling.

    Yara Hawari is a masters student in Palestine Studies at Exeter University (England) and will be commencing her PhD later this year. Her research focuses on Nakba memory and oral history inside historic Palestine. Yara is a Palestinian from the Galilee, and although she left Palestine ten years ago, she frequently visits family and conducts research back home.

    link to desertpeace.wordpress.com

    • Elliot says:

      am subjected to ignorant questions about my identity.
      Nothing to do with security

      Unfortunately, that is true in the U.S. too. In the early days of the TSA I was given a citation for carrying a knife in my hand luggage. There were no signprohibiting knives and anyway, I’d forgotten that I had it in my carry-on. The TSA officers and police got exercised over this. I was subjected to humiliating treatment that had nothing to do with security either. When I pointed out that since they had established that I was suspect, they should know that I had other items in my hand luggage that could easily be used as a weapon. They told me they weren’t interested in those.
      I think any security apparatus functions at one level like any other organization. They need to justify their existence. All these incidents look great in their reports.
      Secondly, they are given a ;egitimate outlet for petty nastiness.
      Thirdly, they act out the paranoia of their employers.

      Israel didn’t invent this stuff but they make excellent practitioners of the art of security.

  28. Kathleen says:

    Finkelstein has been banned from Israel. Gunter Grass has been banned. Noam Chomsky has been denied entry. I believe Archbishop Tutu was denied entry at one time

    • Hostage says:

      I believe Archbishop Tutu was denied entry at one time

      Yes, the UN Human Rights Council appointed him and Professor Christine Chinkin (lately of Goldstone Mission fame) to conduct a High Level Fact Finding Mission on the IDF shelling in Beit Hanun, Gaza Strip, which killed 19 Palestinian civilians. Israel always denies entry to anyone on mission from the UN with a mandate to conduct a fact finding and report on any human rights violations, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
      link to electronicintifada.net
      link to infosud.org

      The ever pleasant Abe Foxman and the ADL went into blitz mode and defamed the UN, Tutu, and Chinkin for trying to conduct a “Kangaroo Court”. link to haaretz.com

  29. charleston says:

    The US maintains an office in Jerusalem

    ” Serving U.S. Citizens in Jerusalem, the West Bank and Gaza
    The American Citizen Services Unit of U.S. Consulate General Jerusalem provides information and assistance to U.S. citizens in Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Gaza. U.S. citizens visiting or residing in Israel are served by the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv.”
    link to jerusalem.usconsulate.gov

    which will not assist Jewish Americans!

    • Hostage says:

      Serving U.S. Citizens in Jerusalem, . . . . which will not assist Jewish Americans!

      LOL! Okay which is it gonna be? The link you supplied says “Serving U.S. Citizens in Jerusalem” and nothing at all to support the claim that it won’t assist Jewish Americans.

      The current Consul General, Daniel Rubinstein, happens to be a Jewish American diplomat. His service area is exclusively geographical and it includes, wait for it, Serving American Citizens in Jerusalem!
      *http://jerusalem.usconsulate.gov/con_gen.html
      *http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/daniel_rubenstein.html

      FYI, there is every indication that he is a useless tool of oppression when it comes to helping Palestinians. See: “U.S.: We will stop aid to Palestinians if UN bid proceeds — U.S. Consul General in Jerusalem, Daniel Rubinstein, tells chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat U.S. ‘will take punitive measures’ against Palestinian Authority if it seeks to upgrade position at UN General Assembly.
      link to haaretz.com

  30. chrisrushlau says:

    As you know, Tom, The Secretary and the Prime Minister are fully on board with the notion that the US Ambassador to Israel and the Israeli Ambassador to the US should be the same person.

    • The Secretary and the Prime Minister are fully on board with the notion that the US Ambassador to Israel and the Israeli Ambassador to the US should be the same person.

      excuse me? do you have any supporting links? i’d love to read them.