Israeli reporter admits suppressing images of ‘piles of bodies of civilians’ when Israel went ‘crazy’ in Gaza

Israel/Palestine
on 45 Comments

A staggering, doom-laden interview published by Haaretz with an Israeli television journalist suggests that the full truth of what happened in Gaza 4 years ago was suppressed not only when the United States and its author stomped the Goldstone Report– which alleged deliberate targeting of civilians– but suppressed by Israelis too. Shlomi Eldar was Gaza correspondent for Channel 10 news. Here is what he saw and could not live with but put in “an envelope” and has never published, awaiting a commission of inquiry that never has come:

“I came into possession of shocking material. The kind of material that sends you to a psychologist. I have never shown it. Children who were shot. Piles of bodies of civilians… I came into possession of material about very grim events relating to the idea that Israel was deliberately ‘going crazy.’ Testimonies, images and much more. So many people were killed there.”

Reflect that this was a slaughter initiated by a centrist government now perceived as center-left in Israeli politics. Reflect that a story that Eldar did report, a documentary called “Precious Life” about Israelis working to treat a Gaza infant born with an immune deficiency, was written up at great length by Tom Friedman in the New York Times, with a lecture to his readers that if they were going to criticize Israel, they should watch this video about the “real Middle East” so as to be “constructive.”

Haaretz: “Shlomi Eldar reflects on the live television report that profoundly changed the way he sees the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.” (Thanks to Annie Robbins.) Excerpt:

What, in your estimation, will happen in Gaza in terms of the next Israeli government?

I will surprise you by saying that Netanyahu behaved very responsibly toward Gaza throughout his term of office. In Operation Cast Lead, Olmert wanted to restore to himself the lost honor of the Second Lebanon War. He went on the rampage in Gaza. After Operation Cast Lead, when I was making my film, I came into possession of shocking material. The kind of material that sends you to a psychologist. I have never shown it. Children who were shot. Piles of bodies of civilians. In contrast, in Operation Pillar of Defense hardly any ambulances arrived at hospitals. People were killed, but there is absolutely no comparison.

…………….

Is it true to say “there is no partner”?

I revealed a few years ago that Meshal wanted to talk to Olmert and sent him messages via [Shin Bet chief Yuval] Diskin. Olmert not only refused, he failed to inform the top ranks of the defense establishment and led the country into an operation in Gaza. So maybe Meshal was a partner, but today I’m not sure he is. Can I make a comprehensive peace with him today, with the condition of Palestinian society? The answer is no.

So it’s a lost cause. There is no solution.

You are right: there is no solution. There is no solution because, even if there were Palestinian unity, Israeli society today is not ready to pay the price of peace. We are incapable of evacuating even one settler outpost, so how will we be capable of doing more?

Did the process you underwent, from being someone who photographed the “Welcome to Gaza” sign to being a friend, almost a member of the family there, make you despair or give you hope?

There was a period when I had hope.

And it ended?

Today I have no hope. That is the general feeling of the whole Israeli public, both on the right and the left.

You are in a state of despair.

Yes. Something bad is happening here: politically, in policy and especially in the realm of social welfare. Israeli society is turning into a dangerous place. Things are not going to be good.

………

You are very reserved.

I maintain reserve all the time.

As a defense mechanism?

Yes.

What does it defend you against?

I safeguard myself, and I need to safeguard myself against a host of things. I will tell you something I have never told anyone, and I hope I will not regret telling you. During Operation Cast Lead I came into possession of material about very grim events relating to the idea that Israel was deliberately “going crazy.” Testimonies, images and much more. So many people were killed there. I took it all and put it in an envelope. I told Reudar Benziman, who was CEO of Channel 10 News at the time, what I had. He told me, “Work on it.” I told him I couldn’t. Because that’s the truth − I couldn’t. If I had verified what I heard, I would not be able to live with it. I couldn’t have evoked the “rotten apples” metaphor. I still have the material in a closed room. I didn’t give it to anyone. When there was talk about a commission of inquiry, I said I would be ready to give them the material − let them check it out, not me. I’m not touching it. I’m not capable. I can’t. I, too, understand my limits.

45 Responses

  1. Avi_G.
    January 20, 2013, 1:20 pm

    And there you have it.

    • Hostage
      January 21, 2013, 6:49 am

      And there you have it.

      Amen.

      • Mooser
        January 21, 2013, 12:00 pm

        “And there you have it.”

        Or, to quote one of Mondo’s most knowledgeable commenters, able writers and a gitte neshomah into the bargain: “End of story”

  2. seafoid
    January 20, 2013, 1:47 pm

    “Something bad is happening here: politically, in policy and especially in the realm of social welfare. Israeli society is turning into a dangerous place. Things are not going to be good.”

    is the price of

    “There is no solution because, even if there were Palestinian unity, Israeli society today is not ready to pay the price of peace.”

    Dehumanisation processes also destroy the societies of the victimisers.

  3. American
    January 20, 2013, 2:49 pm

    Why is he coming forward now?
    To say Olmert, who is criticizing Bbibi, was worse than Bibi?
    Or is he truly scared to death of what’s happening in Israel?

    • Avi_G.
      January 20, 2013, 3:58 pm

      I safeguard myself, and I need to safeguard myself against a host of things […] When there was talk about a commission of inquiry, I said I would be ready to give them the material − let them check it out, not me. I’m not touching it. I’m not capable. I can’t. I, too, understand my limits.

      Well, you make an interesting point. On the one hand I get the sense that he is both scared and desperate. He was afraid to act lest he come to terms with the painful and gruesome truth; everything that was once safe, sheltered and protected would disappear, so much so that he would be looking over his shoulder every waking second.

      There’s a lot of pain in his writing so it goes well and beyond mere politics.

      On the other hand, however, it begs the question, Why now? And why does he suddenly feel safe to speak out? Perhaps he is simply desperate.

      I don’t know.

      • Annie Robbins
        January 20, 2013, 4:26 pm

        There’s a lot of pain in his writing so it goes well and beyond mere politics.

        On the other hand, however, it begs the question, Why now? And why does he suddenly feel safe to speak out? Perhaps he is simply desperate.

        Avi, this is an interview and the article is by Ayelett Shani. so he is speaking out which is a rather different circumstance in the course of an interview instead of writing something for publication..

        I will tell you something I have never told anyone, and I hope I will not regret telling you. During Operation Cast Lead I came into possession of …..

        it could very well be he did not intend to reveal this information at this time until he was prompted by Shani when she asked him

        What does it defend you against?

        but there’s a sign early in the interview when he references it too. so he could be at the end of his rope to a degree. the entire interview is really valuable.

  4. straightline
    January 20, 2013, 3:09 pm

    History did not spoil us with power, wealth, nor with broad territories or an enormous community lot, however, it did grant us the uncommon intellectual and moral virtue, and thus it is both a privilege and an obligation to be a “Light Unto the Nations” — David Ben-Gurion.

    • seafoid
      January 20, 2013, 4:55 pm

      Zionism really has blown a big hole under the waterline of the SS Judaism, hasn’t it ?

      Moral virtue is fine in opposition but in power it is very difficult and the bots failed miserably.

      • Mooser
        January 21, 2013, 12:02 pm

        “Moral virtue is fine in opposition…”

        Well, then, we know exactly where we should be to retain fine virtue.

    • Inanna
      January 20, 2013, 8:07 pm

      And there you have it. The delusion so many Israelis and Jews suffer from. Filled with essentialist claptrap and blanking out the destruction of another nation, expulsion of its people and theft of its land. If that’s intellectual and moral virtue, then it’s really a Brave New World.

    • Annie Robbins
      January 20, 2013, 10:55 pm

      just got home from watching ‘the law in these parts’. not seeing uncommon intellectual and moral virtue from any of these judges.

  5. jon s
    January 20, 2013, 4:50 pm

    The trailer of “Precious Life”:

  6. pabelmont
    January 20, 2013, 5:11 pm

    Phil — great article. Glad Eldar spoke out, glad Annie Robbins and you got this essay out.

    Eldar is sending out a cry for help! so is Ha’aretz. He didn’t have to reveal those piles of bodies. He wanted to! He realizes that the Israel he wants to live in needs help.

    So: it is absolutely true (as Eldar and most everyone else says) that Israel, left to itself, and even with the help of its (as I write: pre-Hagel, pre-Obama-2nd-term) lap-dog, the USA, CANNOT AND WILL NOT make peace, end the occupation, even (as the article says) shut down one settlement much less many or all of them.

    THIS ESSAY REPORTS AN ENCODED CRY FOR HELP.

    The peace-nik side of Israel is saying (if you read between the lines) “we cannot make peace if left to ourselves. We need help! Help us do what we cannot do alone. PRESSURE US. TWIST OUR ARM! HARD. H*A*R*D. Force us to roll-back the settlements, to remove the settlers and the wall.”

    Of course, the settlers are not peace-niks. They believe they can (in the happy, obscene phrase of America’s Yuppie individualist hedonists) “have it all”, “no problemo”, blah. We live in a world of extremists. The settlers are not alone! (BIG OIL sees no problem with climate change, either.)

    And, until the nations ACT, the settlers are right!

    So, Phil, can you make THIS (the CRY FOR HELP) your new banner? RSVP!

  7. a blah chick
    January 20, 2013, 6:18 pm

    From the Friedman column:
    “If you convey to Israelis that you understand the world they’re living in, and then criticize, they’ll listen. Destructive criticism closes Israeli ears. It says to Israelis: There is no context that could explain your behavior, and your wrongs are so uniquely wrong that they overshadow all others.”

    He also pulls out the tried and true why-do-you -pick-on-Israel-when-there-are-much-worse-countries-on-the-planet trope.

    Okay, Tommy, I’ll go through this very carefully for you.

    No Syrian leader has ever gotten standing ovations from our legislature. No Turkish Prime Minister has ever been drooled over by TV interviewers. No Iranian politician is asked to write op-ed pieces for major American newspapers. There is no Palestinian-American pac that routinely funnels money and vets politicians. Lastly what other nation state is it claimed that there is no “daylight” between us and them.

    Hope that clears it up for you.

    • Kathleen
      January 20, 2013, 11:46 pm

      bingo

    • Carowhat
      January 22, 2013, 5:15 pm

      There’s another thing Friedman doesn’t seem to recognize. Israel controls our Mid-eastern foreign policy. There’s no other country in the world that could make us attack Iran, thereby destroying the American economy for an entire generation, killing tens of thousands of Americans and earning us the enmity of the rest of the world. Only Israel can do that. Americans have a right to have concerns about a country which is pushing non-stop to involve us in a ruinous war.

  8. Egbert
    January 20, 2013, 6:40 pm

    Now the IDF knows this information exists and where it is, or at least who has it. I hope Eldar has either taken a copy of it (which I doubt given his horror) or has it stored somewhere very safe and secure.

  9. peeesss
    January 20, 2013, 7:26 pm

    A cry for help indeed. Glad Eldar’s plea appears sincere, his belief in the Israeli narrative completely shattered. The racism, callousness , violence of the vast majority of Israeli’s toward Palestinians in which he participated and accepted for so many years , shattered, by the grotesque “Operation Cast Lead”. One can be cynical and ask why it took so long for Mr. Eldar to see the true face of Zionism and its implemention of its program toward the Palestinian people. But see it he does, belatedly. . One important fact in his plea. He shows what I consistently repeat, that so called liberal, labor, “peace” candidates, parties, individuals are as extreme in their views and policies toward the Palestinians. Starting with Ben-Gurion, to Peres, Golda Meir , Rabin, Livni, Ohlmert, Barak their policies, violence, contempt for the humanity of the Palestinians is as great if not greater than the so called right wing of the Israeli scene. There is no “peace”, “liberal” Zionism as it relates to Palestine and Palestinians.

    • eGuard
      January 20, 2013, 11:34 pm

      Sincere you say? This is what he says:
      I thought it was wrong to assassinate Ahmed Jabari [the head of Hamas’ military wing; November 2012]. Not because he didn’t deserve to die. He deserved to die. But the method of eliminating some top person and thinking someone better will replace him is wrong.

      So extrajudicial killings of political opponents are OK, but only to have a better (better for Israel) negotiator in place. I bet he is not-crying all his way to his bank.

      • Avi_G.
        January 21, 2013, 5:38 am

        eGuard,

        Now that you posted that, it seems that Eldar is not only egotistic, but a coward, to boot.

        I had a sneaking suspicion he wasn’t “touching” the massacre because it was all too convenient to file it away and forget about it. But, I was willing to give him the benefit of the doubt. I don’t know what came over me. Seriously. I fell for it.

        And now Eldar comes out and paints himself as some all-too-sensitive moral giant. Meh.

      • LeaNder
        January 21, 2013, 9:21 am

        I had a sneaking suspicion he wasn’t “touching” the massacre … But, I was willing to give him the benefit of the doubt. I don’t know what came over me. Seriously. I fell for it.

        We have always to live with our “sneaking suspicions”, Avi.

        There are a couple of other points though that we can check. Did he speak out against Operation Cast Lead as he claims, and against the latest Operation Pillar? Or does he only claim now he was against it.

        He talks about, if I remember correctly, having just spoken with some members of the larger security apparatus? Could he get himself into troubles when he talks about more of the material. Besides, he claims he couldn’t face it leave alone check it. Or is something else on your mind concerning “the massacre”? Strictly I don’t agree with him that it is so much better to bomb the place and force the people into rebuilding under the given harsh economical circumstances.

        Doesn’t the security apparatus in Israel dominate everything, especially journalists? I never quite understand, how he can disclose the Meshal – Olmert affair in this context. On the other hand, yes, we have elections tomorrow. and that may be the ultimate source for our suspicions ;)

      • Hostage
        January 21, 2013, 7:03 am

        So extrajudicial killings of political opponents are OK

        No that doesn’t logically follow from what little he said on the subject. He said was the guy deserved to die, but that might only be a reference to Divine justice.

        Alternatively, he might be an opponent of extrajudicial killing, without objecting to Court-imposed capital punishment.

      • eGuard
        January 21, 2013, 7:49 am

        Hostage, he gave his “but” motivation. So he says: were his but-criterion met, the killing would be OK. No other conditions are mentioned. As for logic: case closed. Then you introduce two might be‘s that are not in the article. That is speculative only.

      • Hostage
        January 21, 2013, 8:43 am

        Hostage, he gave his “but” motivation. . . . No other conditions are mentioned.

        Correction: He said that he thought it was wrong to assassinate Ahmed Jabari. Full stop. Then he mentioned “the method of eliminating” him (by assassination) as an integral part of the “but” statement.

      • LeaNder
        January 21, 2013, 9:24 am

        He said was the guy deserved to die, but that might only be a reference to Divine justice.

        Or the necessary nod to the Israeli mainstream?

        I don’t know much about this guy, but I think Americans hardly know who is killed in their name either.

        If I may speculate a little too. ;) Who seriously wants to be called a terrorism sympathizer in Israel?

      • eGuard
        January 21, 2013, 7:42 pm

        Hostage: Correction: He said that he thought it was wrong to assassinate Ahmed Jabari. Full stop.

        No, not full stop. He said But ….

      • Hostage
        January 22, 2013, 1:37 am

        No, not full stop. He said But ….

        You keep pretending that “but” was an endorsement. It wasn’t. It was a another condemnation of the motives of those responsible which still explicitly included both the method of assassination and the false assumptions or wishful thinking on the part of the parties who employ that method.

      • seafoid
        January 21, 2013, 9:14 am

        “So extrajudicial killings of political opponents are OK, but only to have a better (better for Israel) negotiator in place. I bet he is not-crying all his way to his bank.”

        Did you read the whole article? He knows Zionism is not going to make it. He knows there is no extrajudicial killing that can make things better.

        “All the decisions of the political leadership are made ad hoc, and aimed at putting out fires.”

        ” We look at the other side and see people without faces. It is part of the dehumanization [process] we are undergoing.”

        “One of the events that influenced me most in my life was a report I did for Channel 1 about the children of the intifada. For the first time we saw children who were killed by IDF gunfire. We hadn’t known anything about that. That gave me an additional angle of vision − you could call it humane − namely, that there are human beings behind the masks they wore. ”

        “He informed the army that he did not intend to give them the shrapnel, and a few days later army personnel came to the hospital and asked Abuelaish to pardon them. They admitted they had been wrong. This was after they tried to say that he had [combat] materials and weapons in his house and posted factually incorrect photos on Facebook. That would not have happened if they’d known he had the shrapnel”

        “You know, I was with the coproducers of my film, Ehud Bleiberg and Yoav Ze’evi, during the screening at a festival in Colorado. The part about the firing of rockets on Sderot came on. We’re sitting in the mountains of Colorado, paradise on earth, and I start to cry. I look to my right and see Ehud wipe away a tear, and I look to my left and see Yoav wiping away a tear, too. And it was at this trivial moment – not at the place where everyone cries when they see the film. I asked them, “Why did we cry?” And Ehud replied, “We cried at our situation.” “

  10. W.Jones
    January 20, 2013, 9:07 pm

    One of the things the State’s proponents claim is that a strong number of the casualties were Hamas militants. To back this up, they pointed to a claim by Hamas on the number of militants Hamas lost in the 2009 attack on Gaza (I forget- it might have been 2/3 of all casualties). The conclusion was that Hamas reported the same thing.

    However, after reading this report on M.W., I am even more skeptical of this claim made by the State’s proponents.

    • Sumud
      January 21, 2013, 5:05 am

      That was total bunk W.Jones – the Hamas spokesperson mentioned somewhat casually that Hamas has lost a lot of people and then some hasbarat took that statement and implied this meant that they were all Hamas militant. They weren’t; for example the opening attack in the massacre was the bombing of a police training camp and in the next few days they killed about 250 policeman in Gaza – employed by Hamas but not actual Hamas militants…

      Kind of like implying that all the victims of 9/11 who were Republicans or law enforcement people were militants because Bush was in power when it happened – obvious rubbish.

      They simply replied on the fact that if you say ‘from Hamas’, most uniformed people will start shivering in their boots and assume this means jew-hating “terrorist”.

      • Castellio
        January 21, 2013, 1:46 pm

        To this day, the 250 policeman are accepted as Hamas militants in western figures.

      • W.Jones
        January 25, 2013, 8:32 pm

        wow

  11. eGuard
    January 20, 2013, 9:21 pm

    A doom-laden interview? The man is so full of himself, there is no place left for his ego. First thing he jetted to get more personality space was, long time ago, journalistic integrity.

    Nowhere in the Haartez interview does he actually show he profoundly changed the way he sees the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

    During cast lead Shlomi Eldar did the live telephone conversation with Izzeldin Abuelaish, a Gazan father who had just lost three daughters. After that he went on to make his feelgood movie “Precious Life” (Look how Israel helps children!). This is what he says now: You know, it took me two or three weeks to realize that people who saw that broadcast cried not because of the conversation, but because they saw my face.

    • eGuard
      January 21, 2013, 8:18 am

      As for the timeline: note that he got the material about very grim events relating to the idea that Israel was deliberately “going crazy.” […] Children who were shot. Piles of bodies of civilians during operation Cast Lead (2008/2009). He’s sitting on it for four years. He never thought that Channel 10 News (his employer) could “work on it”. Nor Haaretz. Did he offer it to Goldstone? The Israeli investigations? Nope. Instead, he went on to produce a hasbara promotinal movie.

      In the opening statement he says: [one can] simply tell the public what it wants to hear. But I always chose to tell the truth. […] I saw where it was all going, and said so.
      In the closing statement: I still have the material in a closed room. I didn’t give it to anyone.

      • Hostage
        January 21, 2013, 10:53 am

        He never thought that Channel 10 News (his employer) could “work on it”. Nor Haaretz. Did he offer it to Goldstone?

        He said he would be willing to give a commission of inquiry the material. The government of Israel refused to appoint an independent commission and the UN did not follow the recommendation contained in the Goldstone report to refer the situation to the ICC for investigation.

        Sadly:
        1) If you’re a member of the al-Simouni family, you’re probably looking for anyone, except Judge Goldstone and the Washington Post, to “work on” the investigation of the deaths of your 29 relatives during Operation Cast Lead.
        2) Israel has a military censor that can be deployed against either Haaretz or Channel 10.
        3) The Netanyahu government has shown that it can bring about the demise of Channel 10 and withdraw its licenses any time that it wants.
        4) The Anat Kamm – Uri Blau affair illustrate that people do have their limits and that Haaretz will cave under pressure.

      • eGuard
        January 21, 2013, 7:34 pm

        Hostage, a lame misquote you did. (To the reader: he left out … the Israeli investigations?.)

      • Hostage
        January 22, 2013, 2:12 am

        Hostage, a lame misquote you did. (To the reader: he left out … the Israeli investigations?.)

        LOL! That’s just a snippet I included so the readers would know which post was the subject of my reply.

        I addressed the fact that the government of Israel had refused to appoint an independent Commission of Inquiry to investigate Cast Lead. So while the senior prosecutors at the International Criminal Court in The Hague were considering criminal charges against the members of the Military Advocate General’s international law department, who had authorized the targets Israeli troops would strike before and during Operation Cast Lead, that same department of the IDF was the only branch of the government tasked with conducting the “Israeli investigations”. link to haaretz.com

        FYI the Israeli Military Censor works in the IDF Intelligence Directorate. The Israeli Karp Commission report, and drawers full of UN reports attest to the fact that the IDF routinely closes out cases involving serious crimes against Palestinians without gathering any evidence or conducting any serious investigations.

        Even in the Flotilla case, the Turkel Commission report explained that it’s mandate did not allow it to question the members of the IDF who had seized computers, cameras, and other evidence from the Flotilla passengers. All of that evidence is still being suppressed by the IDF.

  12. Avi_G.
    January 21, 2013, 12:02 am

    Haaretz: “Shlomi Eldar reflects on the live television report that profoundly changed the way he sees the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.” (Thanks to Annie Robbins.) Excerpt:

    Great find, Annie. Good job.

  13. dbroncos
    January 21, 2013, 1:51 am

    Shlomi Eldar is yet another atheist who wants credit for being a believer – just in case. He wants us to believe that his “feelings” for the Palestinian civilians who were blown to bits and shot to pieces are proof enough that his humanity is intact even while he keeps his proof of Israel’s war crimes locked away. He’s not interested in protecting the innocent, he’s interested is in protecting Israel – like so many others.

    • Donald
      January 21, 2013, 11:30 am

      I think that’s overly harsh. People most often are neither pure heroes nor pure villains. Eldar strikes me as an ordinary human being who grew up in a society that (like many in the past and present) is based to a large extent on injustice, where one is taught to rationalize it in various ways. But his conscience is starting to gnaw at him. Some people would have reached this point long before and passed it–others would never get as far as he has.

      He’s no saint, but if more Israelis were like him, expressing their doubts, it’d be a big step forward.

      • dbroncos
        January 21, 2013, 6:13 pm

        @Donald

        “Eldar strikes me as an ordinary human being who grew up in a society that (like many in the past and present) is based to a large extent on injustice, where one is taught to rationalize it in various ways.”

        A good point, Donald. However, the fact remains that Eldar has kept his “material” evidence under lock and key for four years because he doesn’t have the stomach to deal with it. If that’s the case, and he’s truly interested in communicating Israel’s guilt as he indicated in the interview, then why didn’t he put that material in the hands of someone who could handle the job of delivering the message it contained to a wider world? As it is, if what he’s saying is true about the content of those envelopes, then he has succeeded only in exposing himself as someone who has hidden evidence of serious war crimes. As such he has also, no doubt, become a person of interest to the IDF. Given the sentiments he expressed in his interview what do you think the chances are that he is still in possession of that “shocking material”?

        He complains about being paralized in the face of savage injustice:

        “I, too, understand my limits.”

        Am I supposed to be sympathetic? What I believe is in his heart or what I believe about where he is on his journey towards seeing Israel in a different light is here nor there. The fact is that when he had his chance he kept his mouth shut. His shoulda coulda woulda confessional after the fact comes up way short.

  14. talknic
    January 21, 2013, 9:02 am

    “I’m not touching it. I’m not capable. I can’t. I, too, understand my limits”

    Limited by a fear of being ostracized by Jews or perhaps even a fear of being dead.

  15. iResistDe4iAm
    January 21, 2013, 9:34 pm

    Just another traumatised and conflicted coward.
    History is full of complicit cowards who deliberately turn a blind eye when it matters, then when history inevitably turns, go on to claim “they didn’t know” or “they were only following orders”.

    If this coward wanted to clear his conscience, he should have forwarded the “very grim material” to journalists/whistleblowers outside of Israel where the material won’t be censored. Instead he has issued a challenge to the same stormtroopers who “deliberately go crazy” to come to his closed room to confiscate and destroy his secret material.

    Another traumatised and conflicted coward who just cleared his conscience, and in the process, morphed into a traumatised “victim”.

  16. Hostage
    January 21, 2013, 9:55 pm

    A good point, Donald. However, the fact remains that Eldar has kept his “material” evidence under lock and key for four years because he doesn’t have the stomach to deal with it. If that’s the case, and he’s truly interested in communicating Israel’s guilt as he indicated in the interview, then why didn’t he put that material in the hands of someone who could handle the job of delivering the message it contained to a wider world?

    He did make his boss aware of the material and said he would be willing to turn it over to a Commission of Inquiry. If it’s a work done for hire, that is owned by Channel 10, then he can’t simply give it away to some other news organization that would profit from sensationalizing and capitalizing on it.

    The State of Israel has a known history of dealing very harshly with whistleblowers, like Mordechai Vanunu or Anat Kamm, who bypass the military censors and deliberately leak damaging information through the media.

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