Netanyahu for president? He’s been a citizen– twice!

US Politics
on 56 Comments

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has irritated some Americans by injecting himself into our debate over the Iran deal, though many Republicans have treated Netanyahu with more respect than the president.

Well, Netanyahu may have more standing than we thought. He has been an American citizen twice, and has twice renounced his citizenship, according to his former aide, Michael Oren.

Oren makes the statement in his new book, Ally, when he relates that he had to renounce his own citizenship to become Israeli ambassador to the U.S. in 2009 under Netanyahu:

By federal law, any American who officially served a foreign country had to renounce her or his U.S. citizenship. “It’s no fun, but you’ll live–I did,” Ron Dermer, a former American who acted as Israel’s economic attache in Washington, consoled me. Netanyahu, who lived for years in the United States, also pooh-poohed the process, assuring me that he had undergone it twice–the first time as a commando in the IDF [Israeli Defense Forces], and then, in America, as deputy chief of mission.

Oren is not a very reliable narrator. But this supposedly official Netanyahu website offers some backup for the assertion that Netanyahu is a revolving-door American citizen:

Netanyahu was born in Tel Aviv in 1949…. His high school years were spent in the U.S., where his father, historian Benzion Netanyahu, was conducting research.  Returning to Israel in 1967, Mr. Netanyahu enlisted in the IDF and served in the elite commando unit, Sayeret Matkal….

Netanyahu as an Israeli commando in late 60s.

Netanyahu as an Israeli commando in late 60s.

1972-1977… In the 1970s he returned to the U.S. to study at MIT. Between 1976 and 1982 Mr. Netanyahu worked in the private sector, first with the Boston Consulting Group, an international business consultancy…

In 1982, Mr. Netanyahu was appointed Deputy Chief of Mission at the Israeli Embassy in Washington, DC.

So maybe Netanyahu resumed his American citizenship in the 1970s to work in the investment banking business? This 1988 lawsuit by an American-Israeli suggests that the State Department does accept an individual’s revocation of the renunciation of citizenship. So what was restored once to Netanyahu can be restored again, huh? “Maybe he will run for president!” Scott McConnell said to me.

In 1996, Neve Gordon expressed the view that Netanyahu was still an American citizen, in the Washington Report on Middle East Affairs:

[In the 1970s] He held dual citizenship, which enabled him to travel freely between both countries, study in the U.S., receive federal loans to cover his education costs at MIT and work legally. Like every U.S. citizen, Netanyahu has a social security number, a credit account, and numerous other files in a variety of government offices….

Netanyahu claims that in 1982 he gave up his U.S. citizenship, yet he is unwilling to grant the press access to his file located in the U.S. Embassy in Tel-Aviv—the file which holds information regarding his citizenship. Interestingly, the status of his files in the U.S. has not changed, so according to U.S. law Netanyahu remains a U.S. citizen.

At US News, Alvin Felzenberg urged Netanyahu to run for president a couple of years ago.

P.S. Netanyahu shouldn’t let being born in Tel Aviv stop him. Ted Cruz was born in Canada.

Thanks to Alex Kane.

About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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56 Responses

  1. Citizen
    August 10, 2015, 9:59 am

    Anybody know when implementation of dual citizenship status first occurred? Or how it was justified?

    • Citizen
      August 10, 2015, 10:07 am

      Apparently the USA has the most liberal dual citizenship policy: http://cis.org/DualCitizenship-ImplicationsRisingDualCitizenship

      • RoHa
        August 10, 2015, 10:57 am

        What gives you that idea? Australia and Britain both seem to be much more liberal about dual citizenship.
        (I see that article makes a distinction between “nationality” and “citizenship”. That distinction does not exist in Australian law.)

      • amigo
        August 10, 2015, 11:30 am

        your link offers some interesting questions.

        “Is it possible to be a fully engaged and knowledgeable citizen of several countries? Is it possible to follow two or more very different cultural traditions? Is it possible to have two, possibly conflicting, core identifications and attachments? Assuming such things are possible, are they desirable?”cis.org

        It is not a good idea given the war mongering neocon,s desire to create wars everywhere they can.Many of those whose former countries would be targets would probably be likely to speak, act (most possibly rightly so) against American interference in their countries of birth.

        One can only serve one boss imho.

      • Citizen
        August 10, 2015, 12:33 pm

        Also interesting is Israel does not recognize an Israeli nationality. Wonder why they didn’t call it Judah?

      • ziusudra
        August 11, 2015, 6:49 am

        Greetings Citizen,
        …wonder why they didn’t call it Judah ( instead of Israel)……

        Jacob, who became Israel, was the progenitor of 12 sons , who became the leaders of the 12 Shem Semite Tribes.

        More intriging is the ?, why did the Religion become known as Judaism?

        Of the 12 tribes, 10 disappeared! The 2 remaining were the Benjamin & Judah. Judah got the flower pot. Truly ‘Jew’ came out as a Subject of their last Kingdom.
        Judaism was deemed because of the ‘belief’ of the 3 Patriachs: Abraham, Isaac & Israel, which in itself is a murky defination.
        ziusudra

    • JLewisDickerson
      August 10, 2015, 10:30 am

      FROM WIKIPEDIA [Afroyim v. Rusk]:

      [EXCERPT] Afroyim v. Rusk, 387 U.S. 253 (1967), is a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that citizens of the United States may not be deprived of their citizenship involuntarily.[1][2] The U.S. government had attempted to revoke the citizenship of Beys Afroyim, a man who had voted in an Israeli election after becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen, but the Supreme Court ruled that Afroyim’s right to retain his citizenship was guaranteed by the Citizenship Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. In so doing, the Court overruled one of its own precedents, Perez v. Brownell (1958), in which it had upheld loss of citizenship under similar circumstances less than a decade earlier.
      The Afroyim decision opened the way for a wider acceptance of multiple citizenship in United States law.[3] A series of treaties in place between the United States and other nations (the Bancroft Treaties), which had sought to limit dual citizenship following naturalization, were eventually abandoned after the Carter administration concluded that Afroyim and other Supreme Court decisions had rendered them unenforceable. . .

      SOURCE – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afroyim_v._Rusk

      • Boomer
        August 10, 2015, 11:40 am

        An unfortunate Supreme Court decision, though we would still have problems even without it. I wonder how far they considered the implications of the decision. Not that it matters. As usual, the Supremes are not accountable. It is almost impossible to amend the Constitution, except for de facto amendments by Supreme Court decisions. The discussion does show how fluid are the boundaries, how conflicted the loyalties, and how open we are in today’s world. Add to that, the ease of travel, computer hacking, and the role of money in our polity . . . it’s a strange new world.

      • JLewisDickerson
        August 10, 2015, 10:35 pm

        FROM WIKIPEDIA [Afroyim v. Rusk]:

        [EXCERPT] . . . Political scientist P. Allan Dionisopoulos wrote that “it is doubtful that any [Supreme Court decision] created a more complex problem for the United States than Afroyim v. Rusk“, a decision which he believed had “since become a source of embarrassment for the United States in its relationships with the Arab world” because of the way it facilitated dual U.S.–Israeli citizenship and participation by Americans in Israel’s armed forces.[91] . . .

        SOURCE – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afroyim_v._Rusk

    • amigo
      August 10, 2015, 11:17 am

      “Anybody know when implementation of dual citizenship status first occurred? Or how it was justified? – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/08/netanyahu-president-citizen/comment-page-1#comment-788824” Citizen.

      As far as I recall , sometime in the mid 80,s there was a change in the law regarding US citizenship.Prior to that a person seeking citizenship was required to renounce their own citizenship to gain US citizenship.That applied to Irish people and others whom I cannot list for you at this time.

      • MRW
        August 10, 2015, 12:57 pm

        Canadians, too. Only Israelis got a pass.

      • JLewisDickerson
        August 10, 2015, 10:22 pm

        RE: “As far as I recall , sometime in the mid 80,s there was a change in the law regarding US citizenship.” ~ amigo

        FROM WIKIPEDIA [Afroyim v. Rusk]:

        [EXCERPT] . . . Although Afroyim [i.e., Afroyim v. Rusk, decided in 1967 – J.L.D.] appeared to rule out any involuntary revocation of a person’s citizenship, the government continued for the most part to pursue loss-of-citizenship cases when an American had acted in a way believed to imply an intent to give up citizenship—especially when an American had become a naturalized citizen of another country.[82] In a 1980 case, however—Vance v. Terrazas[83]—the Supreme Court ruled that intent to relinquish citizenship needed to be proved by itself, and not simply inferred from an individual’s having voluntarily performed an action designated by Congress as being incompatible with an intent to keep one’s citizenship.[84][85]
        The concept of dual citizenship, which previously had been strongly opposed by the U.S. government, has become more accepted in the years since Afroyim.[3] In 1980, the administration of President Jimmy Carter concluded that the Bancroft Treaties—a series of bilateral agreements, formulated between 1868 and 1937, which provided for automatic loss of citizenship upon foreign naturalization of a U.S. citizen—were no longer enforceable, due in part to Afroyim, and gave notice terminating these treaties.[86] In 1990, the State Department adopted new guidelines for evaluating potential loss-of-citizenship cases,[87] under which the government now assumes in almost all situations that Americans do not in fact intend to give up their citizenship unless they explicitly indicate to U.S. officials that this is their intention.[88] As explained by Peter J. Spiro, “In the long run, Afroyim‘s vision of an absolute right to retain citizenship has been largely, if quietly, vindicated. As a matter of practice, it is now virtually impossible to lose American citizenship without formally and expressly renouncing it.”[4]
        While acknowledging that “American citizenship enjoys strong protection against loss under Afroyim and Terrazas“, retired journalist Henry S. Matteo[89] suggested, “It would have been more equitable … had the Supreme Court relied on the Eighth Amendment, which adds a moral tone as well as a firmer constitutional basis, than the Fourteenth.” Matteo also said, “Under Afroyim there is a lack of balance between rights and protections on one hand, and obligations and responsibilities on the other, all four elements of which have been an integral part of the concept of citizenship, as history shows.”[90] Political scientist P. Allan Dionisopoulos wrote that “it is doubtful that any [Supreme Court decision] created a more complex problem for the United States than Afroyim v. Rusk“, a decision which he believed had “since become a source of embarrassment for the United States in its relationships with the Arab world” because of the way it facilitated dual U.S.–Israeli citizenship and participation by Americans in Israel’s armed forces.[91] . . .

        SOURCE – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afroyim_v._Rusk

      • ziusudra
        August 11, 2015, 6:54 am

        Greetings amigo,
        We remember:
        Schwartzenegger for President?
        King Bibi & he were both born in other countries.
        Foreign born cannot become President.
        ziusudra
        PS Not even aipac can pull that one off.

    • Hostage
      August 11, 2015, 11:34 pm

      Anybody know when implementation of dual citizenship status first occurred? Or how it was justified?

      It was illegal in this country when Kletter v Dulles was decided. That was a case involving the Mandated State of Palestine http://law.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/FSupp/111/593/1816098/

      The case that turned the tide was a case involving Israel, Afroyim v. Rusk. https://www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/387/253

      The Court decided that the 14th Amendment kept states from revoking anyone’s citizenship and that it wasn’t a power that was explicitly or implicitly delegated to the Congress either.

  2. JLewisDickerson
    August 10, 2015, 10:51 am

    RE: “At US News, Alvin Felzenberg urged Netanyahu to run for president a couple of years ago.” ~ Weiss

    SARA NETANYAHU: “He [i.e., Binyamin Netanyahu] is one of the most veteran leaders in the world. In the United States they say that if he had been born in the US, he’d have been elected president there</b..” *

    * SEE: “Phone transcript reveals Sara Netanyahu rant at political rival’s wife” – http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/feb/27/phone-transcript-reveals-sara-netanyahu-rant-at-political-rivals-wife

  3. amigo
    August 10, 2015, 10:55 am

    Correct me if I am wrong but I always thought that only a person born in America or born of a parent who is an American citizen . albeit in another country ,could be the president.Netanyahu,s Father was born in Poland and his mother in Israel (Palestine in 1913) , so my understanding is he cannot run.

    Am I missing something??.

    Please tell me I am right.It,s bad enough he has his hands on 200 plus nukes.What would he do if he had the key to the US nuke arsenal.

    • Kay24
      August 10, 2015, 11:15 am

      Netanyahu has spent many years in the US on and off, even when he was with his parents.
      Perhaps he got his citizenship through naturalization. Right now, just like Israel, he uses his connections to the US for his benefit. I wonder if he paid taxes while a citizen.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Netanyahu

      I did not know he was married 3 times:

      Netanyahu has been married three times. Netanyahu’s first marriage was to Miriam Weizmann, whom he met in Israel. Weizmann lived near Yonatan Netanyahu’s apartment in Jerusalem, where Netanyahu was based during his military service. By the time Netanyahu’s service was finished, Weizmann had completed her own military service and a degree in chemistry from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In 1972, they both left to study in the United States, where she enrolled in Brandeis University, while Netanyahu studied at MIT. They married soon afterward. The couple had one daughter, Noa (born 29 April 1978).

      In 1978, while Weizmann was pregnant, Netanyahu met a non-Jewish[244] British student named Fleur Cates at the university library, and began an affair. His marriage ended in divorce soon afterward, when his wife Miriam discovered the affair.[244] In 1981, Netanyahu married Cates, and she converted to Judaism, but the couple divorced in 1984.[245]

      Netanyahu met his third wife, Sara Ben-Artzi, while she was working as a flight attendant on an El Al flight from New York to Israel.[43][244] Sara was working as a flight attendant while she was completing a master’s degree in psychology.[246] The couple married in 1991 and has two sons: Yair, a former soldier in the IDF Spokesperson’s Unit,[247] and Avner, a national Bible champion and winner of the National Bible Quiz for Youth in Kiryat Shmona.[248]

      In 1993, Netanyahu confessed on live television to having had an affair with Ruth Bar, his public relations adviser, claiming that a political rival had planted a secret video camera that had recorded him in a sexually compromising position with Bar, and that he had been threatened with the release of the tape to the press unless he quit the Likud leadership race. Benjamin and Sara repaired their marriage, and Netanyahu was elected to the leadership of Likud. In 1996, there were media reports of his 20-year friendship with Katherine Price-Mondadori, an Italian-American woman.[244][249] During the 1990s, Netanyahu criticized this media intrusion into his private life, claiming that political rivals including David Levy had hired spies on him in order to try to gather evidence of alleged affairs, although it was noted that the Israeli public (like the French public) are generally not interested in their politician’s private lives and would prefer they remained private.[250]

      Netanyahu became a grandfather on 1 October 2009, when his daughter Noa Netanyahu-Roth (married to Daniel Roth) gave birth to a boy, Shmuel.[251][252] In 2011, Noa and her husband Daniel had a second son named David.[253]

      • RoHa
        August 10, 2015, 11:37 am

        “claiming that a political rival had planted a secret video camera that had recorded him in a sexually compromising position with Bar,”

        And all those US, etc., politicians and high officials who are taken on trips to Israel should check the hotel rooms for cameras before they start having fun.

      • Kay24
        August 10, 2015, 1:04 pm

        My thoughts exactly RoHa, I sometimes feel that may be going on. After all they have a great time (all freebees) wining and dining, and one was also caught skinny dipping in the Dead Sea!
        What an embarrassment to his constituents.

        There should be strict laws forbidding those we elect from accepting junket trips to nations our
        officials have deems the leading perpetrator of espionage against the US:

        “In a section of the document headed “Foreign Intelligence, Counterintelligence; Denial & Deception Activities: Countering Foreign Intelligence Threats,” Israel was listed as a leading perpetrator of “espionage/intelligence collection operations and manipulation/influence operations…against U.S. government, military, science & technology and Intelligence Community” organs.

        The term “manipulation/influence operations” refers to covert attempts by Israel to sway U.S. public opinion in its favor. In this, Israel has dubious company, according to the NSA: Other leading threats were listed as China, Russia, Cuba, Iran, Pakistan, North Korea, France, Venezuela and South Korea.”

        http://www.newsweek.com/israel-flagged-top-spy-threat-us-new-snowdennsa-document-262991

        And we keep sending them even more aid.

    • ckg
      August 10, 2015, 11:22 am

      amigo, that is my understanding too. There have of course been endless discussions in the media about whether McCain (born in Panama Canal Zone), Obama (supposedly Kenya), and Cruz (Canada) are natural born citizens. Edit: Obama was actually born in Hawaii. I know there has been talk of relaxing this requirement, perhaps to enable Arnold Schwarzenegger or Jennifer Granholm, but any change would probably require a constitutional ammendment.

      • amigo
        August 10, 2015, 11:46 am

        ckg, To add to your points.

        “In October 2013, the New York Post reported that Schwarzenegger was exploring a future run for president. The former California governor would face a constitutional hurdle; Article II, Section I, Clause V nominally prevents individuals who are not natural-born citizens of the United States from assuming the office. He has reportedly been lobbying legislators about a possible constitutional change, or filing a legal challenge to the provision. Columbia University law professor Michael Dorf observed that Schwarzenegger’s possible lawsuit could ultimately win him the right to run for the office, noting, “The law is very clear, but it’s not 100 percent clear that the courts would enforce that law rather than leave it to the political process.”[93]” wiki.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnold_Schwarzenegger#Governor_of_California

        scroll down to “Political ambitions”.

        “Leave it to the political process”–sure.The opposition would have a field day–dems or republicans.

      • ckg
        August 10, 2015, 12:07 pm

        But he could always serve as Secretary of State, as Kissinger did.

      • CigarGod
        August 11, 2015, 10:04 am

        What about next in line positioning to the WH?
        Could a non-native speaker of the house assend to the Presidency?

      • RoHa
        August 11, 2015, 12:12 pm

        From this list in the always trustworthy Wikipedia, it seems that a foreign born Speaker would be skipped over.

        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_line_of_succession#Current_order

    • David Doppler
      August 10, 2015, 12:50 pm

      Yeah, Amigo, the Constitution reads: Article II, section 1, pa. 5: “No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States.”

      The Constitution would appear to require amendment in order to change this barrier, on the plain reading of the Constitution, which all judges swear an oath to uphold and defend. Some have questioned whether courts might hesitate to overthrow an otherwise effective election of a non-natural born citizen, where that issue was widely known, on some grounds, such as not appropriate for courts to interfere in the political process, or inconsistent with equal rights of all citizens. McCain presented an unusual case, having been born outside the US to a US serviceman and wife on US military duty. I assume he was not required to be “naturalized” in order to become a US citizen, but do not know those details.

      • amigo
        August 10, 2015, 1:46 pm

        “McCain presented an unusual case, having been born outside the US to a US serviceman and wife on US military duty. I assume he was not required to be “naturalized” in order to become a US citizen, but do not know those details. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/08/netanyahu-president-citizen#sthash.kKCxKD1G.dpuf“David Doppler.

        This might answer that question.

        “A person in the United States may acquire multiple citizenships in any one of four ways. First, he or she may be born in the United States to immigrant parents: All children born in the United States are U.S. citizens regardless of the status of their parents (jus soli). Second, a person may be born outside the United States to one parent who is a U.S. citizen and another who is not. A child born to an American citizen and British citizen in the United Kingdom, for example, would be a citizen of both countries.”

        Same source as ckg provided above.

        http://cis.org/DualCitizenship-ImplicationsRisingDualCitizenship

      • ckg
        August 10, 2015, 2:08 pm

        The Mossad is adept at forging passports. I wonder how skilled they are at forging birth certificates.

    • RobertHenryEller
      August 11, 2015, 10:04 am

      “What would he do if he had the key to the US nuke arsenal.”

      What do you mean “if?”

    • Hostage
      August 11, 2015, 11:37 pm

      Am I missing something??.

      No, you are exactly right.

  4. amigo
    August 10, 2015, 11:10 am

    An afterthought to the above post!!.

    As president of the USA , Netanyahu would clean out the US treasury and give it all to Israel in militay aid and all the other handouts it gets.Poor dick and jane would be working for Israel not to mention fighting wars all over the planet.

    • Citizen
      August 10, 2015, 12:51 pm

      Dick and Jane are already either paying for Israel, or both that as tax payers, and fighting for Israel as part of the 1% volunteer US military.

      • amigo
        August 10, 2015, 1:55 pm

        “Dick and Jane are already either paying for Israel, or both that as tax payers, and fighting for Israel as part of the 1% volunteer US military. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/08/netanyahu-president-citizen/comment-page-1#comment-788880” Citizen.

        I know , I meant to say they would be working completely for the benefit of Israel and after Nutanyahu is done using America , he would renounce his US citizenship again and scarper back to Israel to be greeted as the greatest Israeli PM ever.The one who proved his own words, “America is easily moved” .(or something along those lines).

  5. eljay
    August 10, 2015, 11:41 am

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has irritated some Americans by injecting himself into our debate over the Iran deal, though many Republicans have treated Netanyahu with more respect than the president. Well, Netanyahu may have more standing than we thought. He has been an American citizen twice, and has twice renounced his citizenship, according to his former aide, Michael Oren.

    If I were American, I wouldn’t want as president a man:
    – who has twice abandoned his and my country; and
    – who values Jews and Israel more than he values America and Americans.

    Thankfully, I’m not American, so I’m only stuck with a donkey-fellating Prime Minister.

  6. PeaceThroughJustice
    August 10, 2015, 12:40 pm

    From a 2007 Phil Weiss article on the subject–

    You used to forfeit your citizenship by voting in another country or fighting for one. The law on forfeiting citizenship ended in the late 60s on a 5-4 Supreme Court vote in a–you guessed it–Israel-based case, where a Jewish-American artist who had voted in Israel wanted to move back here. Thus a 200-year precedent crumbled.
    http://mondoweiss.net/2007/01/dual_loyalty_wh

    This was the infamous Afroyim v. Rusk case that JLewisDickerson linked to above, which “opened the way for a wider acceptance of multiple citizenship in United States law.”

    • Citizen
      August 10, 2015, 12:58 pm

      Israeli interests have changed America so it no longer is what it was, the best of what it was. And it gets worse by the day.

      • Sibiriak
        August 10, 2015, 1:20 pm

        Citizen: Israeli interests have changed America so it no longer is what it was, the best of what it was.
        ————————

        Yes, the U.S. was an anti-imperialist paradise, a shining city upon a hill– before Israeli interests came along and mucked things up. Oh, what a golden age that was!

  7. Interested Bystander
    August 10, 2015, 2:02 pm

    Some silliness here. 1) It’s undisputed that Netanyahu is NOT a natural born U.S. citizen–and thus would never be eligible to be President in the U.S. Neither of his parents had U.S. citizenship and he was born in Tel Aviv in 1949. And everyone seems to agree that as PM of Israel he would have had to renounce any U.S. citizenship he may have acquired while an adult in the U.S. So any talk of eligibility for President is really silly. 2) Noone has answered Citizens opening question: Is there in fact any authoritative information that Netanyahu applied for and was granted U.S. citizenship in the 70’s or 80’s? I’ve seen rumors that he obtained it while studying at MIT. But neither Gordon nor Oren, nor anyone else I’ve seen provides hard information on this. Social Security Cards, of course, are granted to resident aliens. It says nothing about citizenship.

  8. a blah chick
    August 10, 2015, 2:16 pm

    When I first saw that old picture of Netanyahu I thought it was a mug shot!

    A girl can dream.

  9. W.Jones
    August 10, 2015, 3:20 pm

    So there is still some lingering uncertainty about Cruz’s eligibility. That’s because the Supreme Court hasn’t ruled on the meaning of “natural born citizen,” which the Constitution doesn’t define.

    This is not the first time that a Republican presidential candidate faced such questions. As we have written before, John McCain, who was the Republican nominee in 2008, was born to U.S. citizens in the Panama Canal Zone, and Barry Goldwater, who was the party’s nominee in 1964, was born to U.S. citizens in Arizona before it was a state. George Romney, who was born to U.S. citizens in Mexico, ran for president in 1968, but did not win the nomination.

    Even Duggin, who wrote in her 2013 article that “a scholarly consensus is emerging … that anyone who acquires citizenship at birth is natural born for purposes of Article II,” acknowledges that the issue may not be settled.
    How can we have so many people running for President who were born outside the US? It seems so odd to me. Is someone trying to get them to run because their backers know that it will put them on the hook? It just seems strange.

    Personally, I don’t care that much about Obama’s birth certificate issue, and I think that some birthers are probably motivated by bias against Obama, but maybe there is something to the birthers’ claims after all.

    • Kay24
      August 10, 2015, 5:14 pm

      Obama was born in Hawaii, one of the United States of America. There is no doubt he is a hundred percent American. His mother and the grandparents who brought him up, were all American, his father was Kenyan, but Obama was born and raised in the US. I do not see any issue about that. Yes, there is bias against Obama, by elements who have tried to make his Presidency illegitimate, and some who simply cannot stand to have a black man be the leader of this country. Strange that John McCain did not get any grief – he was born in Panama, when it was under US control.

      • RoHa
        August 11, 2015, 3:50 am

        McCain was the privileged son of an Admiral. He got away with causing death and destruction on his own ship, and with aiding and abetting the enemy during the Vietnam War. Why would a little matter of foreign birth be held against him?

        “His mother and the grandparents who brought him up, were all American,”

        As it stands, that is wrong. Do you mean:

        “His mother and the grandparents who brought him up were all American,”

        or

        “His mother and his grandparents, who brought him up, were all American,”

        (They used to teach this stuff in schools, you know.

        http://blog.writeathome.com/index.php/2011/06/seven-ways-not-to-use-comma/)

      • Kay24
        August 11, 2015, 7:25 am

        Too late to teach me now Roha, I am sure you are smart enough to get the meaning. :))

    • ckg
      August 11, 2015, 3:31 pm

      Cruz’s eligibility may get increased scrutiny with the latest NBC poll putting him in second place behind birther Trump.

      • CigarGod
        August 11, 2015, 3:51 pm

        If not, the scotus knows what to do.

  10. Cal3bg
    August 10, 2015, 5:57 pm

    Netanyahoo pretty much grew up in a Philadelphia suburb when his father, who was born Benzion Mileikowsky, moved him there in 1963. He brought the American-style racism he learned during his time there with him to Israel as well apparently.

    Washington Post article: “Why Benjamin Netanyahu is so tough: He’s from Philadelphia”

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/03/03/why-benjamin-netanyahu-is-so-tough-hes-from-philadelphia/

    • bintbiba
      August 11, 2015, 7:59 am

      To Ro Ha

      Our dear ‘ house comma detective’ ….
      Brings to mind “Eats ‘ , ‘ shoots and leaves ” !!! :-))

      Keeping me ever on my toes vis à vis the controversial comma

      http://www.grammarly.com/handbook/punctuation/comma/
      “It could, for goodness’ sake, be mistaken for a smudge on the page. Yet, people get so fired up about comma use that it appears to be a matter of life or death.”

      Vive la ‘virgule ‘ !!

      • RoHa
        August 11, 2015, 8:24 am

        “Yet, people get so fired up about comma use”

        There should not be a comma after “yet”. It is permissible to start a sentence with a coordinating conjunction, but, if it is not followed immediately by some ancillary material, it should not be followed by a comma.

        *”So, we should all vote for the anarchists.”*

        Admirable sentiment. Bad grammar.

        “…that it appears to be a matter of life or death.”

        It’s much more important than that.

      • Mooser
        August 12, 2015, 12:15 pm

        RoHa and his commastomy bag.

    • RobertHenryEller
      August 11, 2015, 10:08 am

      Netanyahu learned his racism at his father’s knee. Benzion came to the U.S. a fully equipped racist.

      Father and son, in their own words and deeds:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benzion_Netanyahu#Zionist_activism

  11. chris o
    August 10, 2015, 9:40 pm

    Just to be clear: He can never be President!! No way, no how because of the Constitutional requirement of natural born citizenry. For instance, Arnold Schwarzennegar can’t be President, either. Some cases are arguable and the law is not totally clear regarding a child born outside the United States to one or more US-citizen parents.

  12. Mooser
    August 10, 2015, 11:10 pm

    Anyway one thing is clear Israel has a serious dual-loyalty problem. Always being pushed towards extremism by people who can leave if it blows up in their faces.

  13. RobertHenryEller
    August 11, 2015, 8:53 am

    “It’s no fun, but you’ll live–I did,” Ron Dermer

    And how many of your former fellow U.S. citizens have died for you, Dermer? How many have been maimed for you, Dermer? How many have been widowed and orphaned for you, Dermer?

    How many trillions of dollars have your ex-fellow U.S. gone into debt for, for your benefit, Dermer?

    Yeah. You’ll live, Dermer.

  14. oldgeezer
    August 12, 2015, 12:54 am

    I have always been against dual citizenship. I always will be. I don’t know the date it became accepted in my country although I can say it was during the period I was politically aware.

    It may not be reasonable (I am open to argument) to prohibit dual citizenship but the negative aspects of it can be defanged through heightened conflict of interest legislation.

    Should “A, a Member of government X, be permitted to vote on legislation affecting state Y, of which they are a citizen”. Should they be permitted if they were a citizen in the preceeding M years? Should they be liable for criminal conflict of interest charges if they reclaim citizenship in state Y, N years after their vote.

    My problem with dual citizenship is simply conflict of interest and it is not limited to Israel. You can possibly be loyal to two states but only insofar as the interests of both states coincide. At the first instance of even minor difference you can only be loyal to one or the other.

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