Jews are safer in Israel than U.S. because our kids drop their M-16s on the sofa — NYT op-ed

US Politics
on 48 Comments

The New York Times once again has offered a platform to a militant American-Israeli Zionist to argue that Jews are only safe when they oppress Palestinians.

The subject is Charlottesville, and the rise of neo-Nazis. Israel-promoter Daniel Gordis is granted an op-ed to say that Jews are safer in Israel than America, because in America, Jewish kids don’t know how to play with guns. Here’s the heart of the piece:

Israel has a military draft, and all of our kids served. Those years of service, of coming home on weekends with M-16s that we had to remind them not to leave on the sofas, inculcated in them a confidence about the world that I never had at their age.

Of course Gordis doesn’t tell us where those kids served. The occupied territories, surely, making certain that Palestinians who are resisting their lack of rights for 50 years stay fairly quiet.

Gordis doesn’t care about Palestinians. The word doesn’t appear in this homily. He cares about Jews, and about how Israel has “cured” Jews of their weaknesses. He tells a (questionable) anecdote about how Israel has turned mice into men:

I had the students — a highly knowledgeable group of undergraduates — watch video footage of Charlottesville. They sat stunned as they watched the parade of the torches, an image they understood. When I explained that the men with flak jackets, helmets and semiautomatic weapons were the protesters, not the police, they were incredulous. When the Nazi flags appeared, the room was silent except for the sounds of the protesters onscreen.

Then the video cut to one of the marchers, who explained their “republican principles.” The first was the supremacy of “white culture.” The students listened, disgusted. The second was free-market capitalism. Still, they were quiet. Then, the third principle, the protester said, was “killing Jews.” The entire class burst into laughter.

Stunned, I paused the video. Even with the video stilled, they were chuckling. I asked them what they found so amusing. Finally, one student said: “What, does this guy believe that in today’s world you can just go out and kill Jews? It’s funny, that’s all.”…

The conclusion of the article hammers home the point about Israel being safer for Jews than the U.S. He quotes his son wondering whether the day has arrived when America will not “be there” for Jews, as it was during the Holocaust:

Has it? I pray not, though it is too early to tell. But here is what we do know. The tiny, embattled country our family now calls home has raised a generation of young people to understand that ultimately, the only people who can be fully trusted to safeguard the safety of the Jews are the Jews. For having afforded our children a chance to grow up with no sense of the vulnerability that we knew growing up in America, we owe Israel and its founders a profound debt of gratitude.

Gordis and I grew up in the same Baltimore academic Jewish community (I attended a seder or two at his parents’ house) and from my standpoint, this view of America is bullshit. I am a few years older than Gordis; yet I never felt unsafe, I never felt vulnerable. I felt welcome and included. My high school had fewer than ten Jews in it, out of a couple thousand students. I was proudly Jewish, bar mitzvah’d at the old Chizuk Amuno in the inner city, I rode public buses everywhere in the city, worked nights at the stadium, enjoyed a great diversity of friendships, and had pleasures and challenges and setbacks, the proportions of which had no connection to my religion.

Gordis’s dark view of America is of a piece with Michael Oren’s fantasy of a pogrom in West Orange, NJ, 1971; and I believe it is a product of indoctrination.

When will the New York Times publish anti-Zionist or even non-Zionist Jewish views of our society?

PS. More about those M-16s. Why can’t the New York Times publish what Tony Klug wrote about the guns in 1977 and repeated last March at J Street:

While Israel continues to rule over the West Bank, there are bound to be ever more frequent and more intensive acts of resistance by a population that is feeling encroached upon by a spreading pattern of Jewish colonization and whose yearning for independence is no less than was that of the Palestinian Jews in the early months of 1948. As long as Israel continues to govern that territory, she will have little choice but to retaliate in an increasingly oppressive fashion just to keep order. The moral appeal of Israel’s case will consequently suffer and this will further erode her level of international support, although probably not among organized opinion within the Jewish Diaspora.

About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

Other posts by .


Posted In:

48 Responses

  1. eljay
    August 21, 2017, 12:17 pm

    … The first was the supremacy of “white culture.” The students listened, disgusted. …

    Would they be similarly disgusted by the supremacy of “Jewish culture”? Probably not. Hypocrites.

    … Israel has a military draft, and all of our kids served. Those years of service, of coming home on weekends with M-16s that we had to remind them not to leave on the sofas, inculcated in them a confidence about the world that I never had at their age. …

    It’s the kind of confidence that enables Jewish supremacists to do unto others acts of injustice and immorality (ethnic cleansing, military occupation, colonialism, oppression, torture, murder) they would not have others do unto them.

    • Elizabeth Block
      August 22, 2017, 10:25 am

      Miko Peled was here in Toronto a few years ago on a book tour. I asked him: “People tell me that Israeli Jews don’t know what’s going on in the Occupied Territories. How can that be? They all serve in the army. They see it. They do it.”
      He replied, “They know. They just think it’s okay.”

  2. festus
    August 21, 2017, 1:27 pm

    Just when you thought the delusion could sink no deeper……the narrative that Jews are unsafe in America knocks you back some.

    • Mooser
      August 21, 2017, 2:51 pm

      … knocks you back some.

      All the way back to 1790.

      • Emory Riddle
        August 22, 2017, 8:40 am

        What happened in 1790?

      • eljay
        August 22, 2017, 9:28 am

        … State General Treasurer Seth Magaziner, who who also spoke, recalled the first time he experienced anti-Semitism. He was a college student waiting at a train station in Springfield, Illinois, when a drunken man approached him and asked him, “Are you a Jew?” …

        That’s anti-Semitism? No wonder Zionists like hophmi see it everywhere they turn.

      • Keith
        August 22, 2017, 10:31 am

        ELJAY- “That’s anti-Semitism?”

        Yes! A perfect example of the new anti-Semitism. The Gentile drunk was being uppity.

      • Mooser
        August 22, 2017, 12:08 pm

        “What happened in 1790?”

        Washington told the Jews in America (and in no uncertain terms) that they should expect nothing from the US government! They were to be denied the recognition as a people they received in Europe.

      • Jack Green
        August 22, 2017, 8:03 pm

        eljay

        Fifty-six incidents were assaults, the most violent anti-Semitic category

      • eljay
        August 22, 2017, 8:20 pm

        || Jack Green: eljay … ||

        Jack.

        || … Fifty-six incidents were assaults, the most violent anti-Semitic category ||

        Did you recently suffer a blow to the head? Mr. Magaziner described one incident, not fifty-six incidents. He likened the incident – a question posed to him by a drunken man – to anti-Semitism. The incident he described did not involve assault of any category.

      • festus
        August 24, 2017, 1:26 pm

        “Washington told the Jews in America (and in no uncertain terms) that they should expect nothing from the US government! They were to be denied the recognition as a people they received in Europe.”

        I looked into this and your characterization of what Washington said seems to be 180 degrees off.

        In his letter to the Jewish community in 1790, former U.S. President George Washington paved the way for Jews to live with religious liberty.

        In a letter to the president of the Touro synagogue in Newport, George Washington famously wrote that the U.S. government “gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance.”
        A few weeks ago, my synagogue had a program at the new Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia. It is a wonderful museum, with many important artifacts of Jewish life in America over the last few centuries. As I perused the exhibits, I found myself meditating on the famous letter that former U.S. President George Washington wrote to the Jewish community of Newport, RI in August 1790. This letter became well known for its succinct articulation of religious liberty in the new nation of America. And, as we mark Presidents’ Day here in the U.S., it is an appropriate time to reflect on its message.
        Upon receiving a letter of congratulations from the Jewish community of Newport, the new president responded as follows:

        “It is now no more that toleration is spoken of, as if it were by the indulgence of one class of people, that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For, happily, the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens, in giving it on all occasions their effectual support”
        For 18th century Jewish immigrants from Europe, whose greatest hope was not for freedom, but “toleration,” this letter signaled a new paradigm. America would not just tolerate its Jews, but it would give them freedom to practice as they wished. Washington articulated a vision of a nation whose founders valued religious liberty for all people. Of course, this value has not always been achieved, but simply holding it up as a goal was extremely significant. The first president of the United States went on to write:

        “May the children of the stock of Abraham who dwell in this land continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other inhabitants; – while every one shall sit in safety under his own vine and fig tree and there shall be none to make him afraid.”

      • catalan
        August 24, 2017, 1:46 pm

        “They were to be denied the recognition as a people they received in Europe.” festus
        I think you are missing mooser’s sense of humor here, his sarcasm. In “Orange is the new black” one of the characters says “Where is this famous Muslim sense of humor?” To paraphrase, “Where is the famous anti-Zionist sense of humor?” Could it be that one can get more with humor than fire and brimstone? Who knows? Perhaps making people like you would be more effective than buying icecream not from Ben and Jerry’s?!

      • Mooser
        August 24, 2017, 7:35 pm

        “May the children of the stock of Abraham who dwell in this land continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other inhabitants”

        We had the merit, baby!

  3. Citizen
    August 21, 2017, 1:40 pm

    SO, let’s see, how many Palestinian Americans are in the US Army? How many Jewish Americans? And, in banking, media, corporate HQ? Has the average US grunt ever met a single Jew or Palestinian? How about the average US taxpayer?

    • Jack Green
      August 22, 2017, 8:00 pm

      Mooser

      The Jews should not expect the American government to lock Jews up in ghettos.
      The Jews should not expect the American government to foment pogroms against them.
      The Jews should not expect the American government to have quotas restricting them.
      The Jews should not expect the American government to discriminate against them.

      • Mooser
        August 22, 2017, 10:08 pm

        You are right “Jack” The US government should only be expected to do those things to other people. Like Native Americans or African Americans.

  4. Balfour
    August 21, 2017, 1:44 pm

    If Israel seeks survival, have it sign a mutual defense treaty with the United States, otherwise, the USA has no business choosing sides in a politicized ethnic struggle that determines human rights based upon religion and state-defined ethnic identity.

    • Citizen
      August 21, 2017, 7:54 pm

      USA cannot sign a mutal defense treaty when Israel has no defined borders.

      • Balfour
        August 22, 2017, 2:18 pm

        And therein lies the conundrum, Citizen- establishing the necessary terms ensuring political ethnic survival vs. satisfying aspirational visions of entitled destiny.

  5. Ossinev
    August 21, 2017, 2:06 pm

    “Has it? I pray not, though it is too early to tell. But here is what we do know. The tiny, embattled country our family now calls home has raised a generation of young people to understand that ultimately, the only people who can be fully trusted to safeguard the safety of the Jews are the Jews. For having afforded our children a chance to grow up with no sense of the vulnerability that we knew growing up in America, we owe Israel and its founders a profound debt of gratitude”

    Complete and utter puke inducing Ziodrivel.And a classic inversion of logic thus Jews are “vulnerable” in America therefore they should move to Israel where they are “not vulnerable”. So HTF can they be considered ” embattled ” but “not vulnerable” at one and the same time.

    And what about the Palestinians ? Presumably this moron`s view is that being Untermenschen they are deserving of “being vulnerable” but have no rights whatsoever to feel vulnerable nor to address this vulnerability and protect themselves and their families by eg carrying M16`s left on the family sofa or otherwise.

    No doubt the Gordis family are still holding on to their American passports and will not renounce their American citizenship rights just in case they start to feel “vulnerable” in Bibliland to which they have such a passionate and all consuming
    commitment (while it suits).

    • Citizen
      August 21, 2017, 7:58 pm

      Does the average GI Joe today think of defending Jews as separate from defending fellow Americans who happen to be Jews? Does the average American Jew who joins the IDF think the same way?

  6. lonely rico
    August 21, 2017, 3:40 pm

    … an op-ed to say that Jews are safer in Israel than America

    If all the Jews move to the safety of Israel, who will be left in the USA to pay for the politicians? And if that happens, will the American manna continue to rain down on the only Jewish democracy in the Middle East? That’s $3.5+ billion less per annum for the Zionist state!
    Not a good move for Israel.

  7. mikeo
    August 21, 2017, 5:08 pm

    http://www.newstatesman.com/world-affairs/2013/01/why-are-there-so-many-israeli-ex-soldiers-india

    “Later on I met Moshe, a fresh-off-the boat IDF soldier from the West Bank, and asked him how he saw the natives. He told me that Indians were childlike and uncomprehending, “like a flock of sheep”.”

    Seems all that soldiering requires a bit of R&R afterwards to decompress.

    Pretty tough bossing women and children around…

  8. Keith
    August 21, 2017, 5:36 pm

    Perhaps Cordis should show more concern for the consequences of US support for the neo-fascists heirs to the Ustashe in the former Yugoslavia, and to the ongoing support for the neo-Nazis in the current Ukrainian government, something which Zionist Victoria Nuland was heavily involved in. Chickens coming home to roost is no joke. A quote to make a point.

    “The impetus of that article was to critique the inherent danger of the Obama Administration’s cynical manipulation of right-wing elements in Ukraine to overthrow the democratically elected government of Viktor Yanukovych. Not only was it dangerous and predictably disastrous for the Ukrainian people, but because U.S. support for a neo-fascist movement in Ukraine took place within a context in which the political right was gaining legitimacy and strength across Europe. The political impact of the right gaining power in Ukraine could not be isolated from the growing power of the right elsewhere. Which meant that the Obama Admiration’s selfish, short-term objective to undermine Russia in Ukraine had the effect of empowering the right and shifting the balance of forces toward the right throughout Europe.
    ….
    The alt-right that showed up in Charlottesville this past weekend was mimicking the tactics of the frontline neo-fascist soldiers who orchestrated the coup in the Ukraine, yet everyone is saying this is a result of Trump. The objective fact is that the U.S. has become a dangerous right-wing society as a result of a steady shift to the right over the past four decades. The idea that Trump’s election somehow “created” the right cannot be taken seriously and cannot be reduced to the crude expressions of the alt-right.”
    (Ajamu Baraka) https://www.blackagendareport.com/story-charlottesville-was-written-blood-ukraine

  9. JosephA
    August 21, 2017, 7:23 pm

    Jews will always be safer in the USA than in Palestine/Israel.

    • eljay
      August 21, 2017, 8:37 pm

      || JosephA: Jews will always be safer in the USA than in Palestine/Israel. ||

      Maybe, but maybe not. A lot can change over the course of eternity.

      • Mooser
        August 22, 2017, 12:17 pm

        “Maybe, but maybe not. A lot can change over the course of eternity.”

        Oh no, here comes those crippling anxiety attacks again.

      • eljay
        August 22, 2017, 12:28 pm

        || Mooser: … Oh no, here comes those crippling anxiety attacks again. ||

        If you were a Zionist, I’d advise you to quickly don a pair of Captain Israel underpants to make you feel mighty. But I don’t know what advice to give to a Moose(r). :-(

      • JosephA
        August 22, 2017, 7:26 pm

        Sorry, I shouldn’t have said “always”. Should the modern state of Israel evolve into a democracy where all people have equal rights, at that time I believe Jews will be safer there vs here. I have lived in the United States (and in a predominantly Jewish area) my entire life, and oddly enough I have always felt safer while traveling in other countries.

      • oldgeezer
        August 22, 2017, 8:48 pm

        @eljay/Moose

        There are two general pieces of advice to give to Moose.

        1. Moose hunting season is not that time of year when Moose r permitted to hunt.

        2. Watch out for buses.

      • echinococcus
        August 23, 2017, 2:54 am

        JosephA,

        Should the modern state of Israel evolve into a democracy where all people have equal rights, at that time I believe Jews will be safer there vs here.

        At which, seeing that uninvited invaders (now on a so-called equal basis with the invaded) are safe, one cannot keep wondering what is happening for such an abnormal situation to develop.

        Invaders cannot have “equal” rights –they have taken the additional right of invading, stealing and getting away with it.

        And of course we are not talking about “Jews” in the current general sense but about Zionist invaders.

      • RoHa
        August 23, 2017, 4:08 am

        Mooser, a tip I learned from Dilbert

        http://www.thundershirt.com.au

        If you can get one in your size, that is.

      • Mooser
        August 23, 2017, 1:16 pm

        “If you can get one in your size, that is.”

        Thanx, “RoHa”, but I don’t think it will help. I worry about my dog all the time. Big, very active dog, big responsibility.

      • Jack Green
        August 23, 2017, 10:17 pm

        echinococcus

        Zionists started arriving in 1882.
        They were legal immigrants.
        We don’t call legal immigrants “invaders.”

  10. CigarGod
    August 21, 2017, 7:29 pm

    What does he mean: “…all of our kids served.”?
    Since Israel’s founding there have been many refusnik organizations; as well as noted celebrites who have refused to serve…Bar Rafaeli being a recent one. “…celebrities have other needs,” she said.

  11. yourstruly
    August 21, 2017, 7:57 pm

    And should Nazi militias take control of America, forcing heretofore reluctant American Jews to flee to Israel (assuming the American Nazis issue them exit permits) does Daniel Gordis actually believe that Israel will be the safe haven that it purports to be? Has he forgotten that Hitler ‘s intent was not only to establish a judenfrei Germany but a judenfrei world? But perhaps Daniel believes that them Nazis wouldn’t dare because Israel’s got Nukes?

  12. JLewisDickerson
    August 21, 2017, 8:45 pm

    RE: “Israel-promoter Daniel Gordis is granted an op-ed to say that Jews are safer in Israel than America, because in America, Jewish kids don’t know how to play with guns… The conclusion of the article hammers home the point about Israel being safer for Jews than the U.S. “ ~ Weiss

    SEE: “Signs of Fascism in Israel Reached New Peak During Gaza Op, Says Renowned Scholar” | by Gidi Weitz | August 13, 2014
    Israel Prize laureate and renowned scholar Zeev Sternhell fears the collapse of Israeli democracy, and compares the current atmosphere with that of 1940s’ France. The time we have left to reverse this frightening trend is running out, he warns

    [EXCERPTS] At 1 A.M. on a day in September 2008, Prof. Zeev Sternhell opened the door of his home on Agnon Street in Jerusalem, intending to enter an inner courtyard. As he turned the handle, a thunderous explosion rocked the building. Sternhell, who a few months earlier had received the Israel Prize in political science, was lightly wounded by a bomb hidden in a potted plant.

    A year later, the police apprehended the perpetrator of the attack: Yaakov (Jack) Teitel, a resident of a West Bank settlement. At one time, Teitel was an informer for the Jewish Department of the Shin Bet security service. In his interrogation, it turned out that his crimes included the murder of two Palestinians.

    “I chose Sternhell as a target because he is held in high regard, he’s a left-wing professor,” Teitel told the interrogators. “I didn’t want to kill him, because that would turn him into a martyr. I wanted to make a statement.” Teitel was sentenced to two life terms. After the assault, Sternhell said in the hospital that “the act in itself reveals the fragility of Israeli democracy.” . . .

    [Q.] Do you define yourself as a Zionist?

    [STERNHELL:] “I have remained a Zionist, certainly. Maybe foolishly. The aim of Zionism was to create a safe home for the Jews, but for many years we have been living in the most unsafe place in the world for Jews. Zionism aimed to build a safe home for the Jews. But also a home worthy of the name, a decent home that one can be proud of, a home in which you don’t step on anyone’s back or suppress anyone. Already in the 1920s it was understood that the Arabs don’t want us and that the fulfillment of Zionism cannot be dependent on their good will. We arrived at a state of war, we won the war and that was the end of that chapter and the start of a new one.

    “To go on with it for decades after the state’s establishment is the ruination of Zionism. What’s happening now in the territories is not Zionism, it’s a nightmare of Zionism. If the result is one state here, between the sea and the Jordan River, there will either be a devastating civil war or an apartheid state. In both cases, the Zionist state as I understand it and as I want it, will not exist. There will be something else here. My consolation is that I will not be around to see it.” . . .

    SOURCE – [http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-1.610368

    P.S. JAMES BALDWIN (1963): “By deciding that they were white. By opting for safety instead of life. By persuading themselves that a Black child’s life meant nothing compared with a white child’s life… In this debasement of and definition of Black people, they debased and defined themselves.”
    SOURCE – http://www.essence.com/james-baldwin-quotes#1081624

  13. yonah fredman
    August 22, 2017, 1:08 am

    If I would have to pick a year (from which to discuss Jewish fears in America) I would pick 1968, not because of the RFK MLK assassinations and the Nixon election, though those were the headlines, but because of the birth of the JDL by Meir Kahane. I moved to New York that year from Chicago, location of the famous Democratic convention and whereas in far north, almost suburban West Rogers Park, Chicago, the support for Democratic candidates, reflecting the politics at home, might have been called split between the adventurists who supported McCarthy or RFK, most kids supported LBJ, like their parents, or when he dropped out, HHH, Humphrey. One kid supported Wallace in theory and we thought he was nuts. He didn’t live in the far north, he lived in a mixed, changing neighborhood, Maxwell street and his views reflected Norm Podhoretz and His Negro Problem, a writing I discovered many years later.

    There were two fears I heard in 1968, a fear of George Wallace, (whose hatred of Jews was assumed to be something akin to George Lincoln rockwell) and a fear of blacks. 1968 was the riots in chicago in the aftermath of the MLK assassination, there were the riots that burnt down the old Jewish stores in the West Side, the old Jewish neighborhood and now the black neighborhood.) In the fall when I moved to Queens, almost half my class supported Nixon in Queens compared to the almost uniform democrats in Chicago. I would say that the Chicagoans in my class had been in America a generation longer than many of the kids in my class in Queens. The older the immigration the stronger the tendency to be liberal and to vote democratic. those whose parents came after the war were far more likely to vote for Nixon.

    Of course 68 was the year of the teachers strike and the time magazine cover posing blacks against Jews. I was interested in politics and read more than most 13 year olds, but when Rabbi Mandel, a young American born teacher said that the Jews might have to leave america soon, I scoffed. Maybe in 50 years, picking a number out of my hat. No, 5 or 10 years he said. Rabbi Mandel was influenced by the times and had lived all his life in New York. I had lived in Winnipeg and Chicago and the Kahane attitude was pretty new to me.

    I think Gordis imbibed the Kahane attitude of “it can happen here”. I think any move away from the security of America to the insecurity and change and unfamiliarity of Israel will involve some myth making and limited common sense in order to justify a move that is against the human tendency of seeking comfort and instead putting ideology first, it’s unusual and requires all sorts of self justifications. sour grapes sort of thing.

    Also: America has been very open to assimilationists from the git go, although Groucho’s daughter could not wade up to her knees and who was more assimlationist than groucho, despite his urban tone and occasional yiddish.

    but the assimilationist who’s eager to blend in, will have a different frame of mind than the Jew who is interested in what it means to be a Jew.

    oren and gordis became conscious of their Jewishness in the aftermath of Kahane, when the Shoah was very recent, and they didn’t flee to the world of christmas trees, but instead embraced Jewishness. unfortunately their Jewishness involved a dose of paranoia. I’d argue that the madeline albright lites, who have tossed judaism onto the ash heap have internalized the paranoia, ethnically self cleansed. and though the 1968 kahane paranoia was not real, i would not depend on the assimilated for my understanding of american jewry nor my understanding of david duke, nor for my understanding of donald trump and certainly not for my understanding of groucho marx or zionism.

    • Mooser
      August 22, 2017, 1:25 pm

      “his views reflected Norm Podhoretz and His Negro Problem, a writing I discovered many years later.”

      Yeah, it was “seminal”. Someone had given voice to the suppressed!

      Another chapter of “Yonah Fredman: My Testimony” in Mondoweiss. See “Yonah’s” archive for, oh, so many more just like it.

      • Mooser
        August 23, 2017, 1:28 pm

        “his views reflected Norm Podhoretz and His Negro Problem, a writing I discovered many years later.”

        “In 1963, he” (Norman Podhertz) “wrote the essay “My Negro Problem – And Ours” (linked to original seminal essay, read it and weep) in which he described the oppression he felt from African-Americans as a child, and ..” Wiki

        And if Norm Podhertz had “His Negro Problem” why, “yonah” is entitled to his own “Negro problem”, too!

  14. AddictionMyth
    August 22, 2017, 8:43 am

    I live in Jerusalem. I am far more terrified by a soldier with an M-16 (or whatever the hell they are) than any Palestinian. I have been threatened many times by Zionists and even worse is no one condemns them (e.g. on facebook) and even worse is that others pile on. It disgusts me to hear that it is for my ‘protection’.

    • Misterioso
      August 22, 2017, 10:36 am

      Food for thought:

      Indoctrinate them while they’re young, very young.

      http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/editorial/1.788573

      Editorial “Protecting Our Children” Haaretz, May 11/17

      EXCERPTS:

      “In wake of the case of Elor Azaria, it is particularly incomprehensible that the police would demonstrate shooting and confirming the death of a prostrate man.”

      “‘Has someone there lost his mind?’ wondered, justifiably, the father of a third-grader who attended a police community relations event in Ramat Hasharon that included a demonstration of a confirmed ‘kill’ of an ‘assailant.’ As hundreds of third- and fifth-graders from all of the town’s elementary schools looked on, four officers from the Special Patrol Unit rode up on motorcycles and began shooting at an ‘assailant.’ When he fell to the ground, they dismounted and continued firing at the supine ‘assailant,’ in order to ‘confirm the kill,’ as the children were told.”

    • Mooser
      August 22, 2017, 12:30 pm

      “I live in Jerusalem.”

      Jerusalem is a fair-sized place. I told you where I am, where are you staying in Jerusalem?

      • AddictionMyth
        August 22, 2017, 2:33 pm

        You frighten me too.

      • Mooser
        August 22, 2017, 3:52 pm

        “You frighten me too.”

        I may approach you with a reprimand. If I persist, a simple “Go away” usually works and if not then yelling at me will do the trick.

  15. RobertHenryEller
    August 22, 2017, 9:18 am

    When will the New York Times even allow its readers to comment on pro-Zionist pro-Israel op-ed pieces? They rarely if ever allow readers to respond to this propaganda.

Leave a Reply