Israel should be deeply disturbed by the Brexit vote

Middle East
on 107 Comments

The common wisdom, following Britain’s referendum result announced on Friday, holds that the narrow vote in favor of leaving the European Union – so-called Brexit – is evidence of a troubling return across much of Europe to nationalism and isolationism. That wisdom is wrong, or at least far too simplistic.

The outcome, which surprised many observers, attests to the deeply flawed nature of the referendum campaign. That, in turn, reflected a key failing of modern politics, not only in Britain but in most of the developed world: the re-emergence of an unaccountable political class.

The most distinctive feature of the campaign was the lack of an identifiable ideological battlefield. This was not about a clash of worldviews, values or even arguments. Rather, it was a contest in who could fearmonger most effectively.

The Brexit leadership adopted the familiar “Little Englander” pose: the EU’s weak border controls, the influx into the UK of East Europeans driving down wages, and the threat of millions of refugees fleeing crisis-zones like Syria were creating a toxic brew that emptied of all meaning the UK’s status as a sceptred isle.

The heads of the Remain camp traded in a different kind of fear. Brexit would lead to the flight from the UK of capital and its associated economic elite. Sterling’s collapse would bankrupt the country and leave pensions worthless. Britain would stop being a player in the modern global economy.

In addition, those favoring the EU had another card up their sleeve. They accused Brexit’s supporters of being racists and xenophobes who preferred to blame immigrants than admit their own failings for their economic misfortune.

Pandora’s box

Set out like this – and it is hard to over-estimate how simplistically confrontational the arguments on both sides were – it is easier to understand why the Brexit camp won.

The EU referendum opened up a Pandora’s box of division rooted in class that many hoped had been closed in the post-war period with the temporary advance of the welfare state and social democratic policies.

However inadvertently, the Remain leaders championed the cause of a wealthy elite that included the bankers and hedge fund managers who had until recently been publicly vilified for their role in the financial crash of 2008.

That was a slap in the face both to the working class and to much of the middle class who paid the price for the economic elite’s reckless and self-serving profligacy and its subsequent demands for gargantuan bail-outs.

Those favoring the EU – who typically suffered least from the 2008 crash – only added insult to injury by labeling its victims as “racists” for demanding reassurances that politicians would again serve them, not an economic elite.

Economic pillage

There is an argument to be made that the EU is not chiefly responsible for the economic problems faced by British workers. Since the rise of Margaret Thatcher in the late 1970s, British figures from across the political spectrum have grown deeply in thrall to a neoliberal agenda that has clawed back hard-won workers’ rights.

It is revealing that some of the super-rich – including media moguls – lobbied for an exit. They clearly believe that, outside the EU, they will be able to rape and pillage the British economy at even greater speed, not constrained by EU regulations.

Nonetheless, the EU has become the fall guy for popular resentment at the neoliberal consensus – and not without good cause.

It is seen, correctly, as one of the key transnational institutions facilitating the enrichment of a global elite. And it has become a massive obstacle to member states reforming their economies along lines that do not entail austerity, as the Greeks painfully discovered.

This is the deeper cause of the alienation experienced by ordinary Brexiters. Unfortunately, however, no one in the leadership of either the Leave or Remain camps seriously articulated that frustration and anger or offered solutions that addressed such concerns. The Remainers dismissively rejected the other side’s fears as manifestations of racism.

This played straight into the hands of the Brexit leadership, led by far-right figures in the Conservative party like Boris Johnson and Michael Gove, as well as Nigel Farage of the Ukip party, Britain’s unwholesome version of Sarah Palin.

This millionaires’ club, of course, was not interested in the troubles of Britain’s new precariat – a working class permanently stuck in precarious economic straits. They only wanted their votes. Stoking fears about migrants was the easiest way to get them – and deflect attention from the fact that the millionaires were the real culprits behind ordinary people’s immiseration.

No love for EU

Support for Brexit was further strengthened by the lackluster performance of the heads of the Remain camp. The truth is that the two main party leaders, who were invested with the task of defending the EU, were barely persuaded of the merits of their own cause.

Prime minister David Cameron is a long-time Euro-sceptic who privately shares much of the distrust of the EU espoused by Johnson and Gove.

And the recently elected leader of the Labour opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, is no lover of the EU either, though for reasons very different from the right’s.

Corbyn is part of Labour’s old guard – relics of a democratic socialist wing of the post-war Labour party that was mostly purged under Tony Blair’s leadership. Labour under Blair became a lite version of the Conservative party.

And here we reach the crux of the problem with the referendum campaign.

There was a strong and responsible leftwing case for Brexit, based on social democratic and internationalist principles, that Corbyn was too afraid to espouse in public, fearing that it would tear apart his party. That opened the field to the rightwing Brexit leadership and their ugly fearmongering.

Left’s case for Brexit

The left’s case against the EU was frequently articulated by Tony Benn, a Labour minister in the 1960s and 1970s. At an Oxford Union debate in 2013, a year before he died, Benn observed: “The way that Europe has developed is that the bankers and multi-national corporations have got very powerful positions and, if you come in on their terms, they will tell you what you can and can’t do – and that is unacceptable.

“My view about the European Union has always been, not that I am hostile to foreigners but that I’m in favor of democracy. … I think they are building an empire there.”

Nearly 40 years earlier, in 1975, during a similar referendum on leaving what was then called the EEC, Benn pointed out that what was at stake was Britain’s parliamentary democracy. It alone “offered us the prospect of peaceful change; reduced the risk of civil strife; and bound us together by creating a national framework of consent for all the laws under which we were governed.”

His warning about “civil strife” now sounds eerily prophetic: the referendum campaign descended into the ugliest public political feuding in living memory.

For Bennites and the progressive left, internationalism is a vital component of the collective struggle for the rights of workers and the poor. The stronger workers are everywhere, they less easily they can be exploited by the rich through divide-and-rule policies.

Globalisation, on the other hand, is premised on a different and very narrow kind of internationalism: one that protects the rights of the super-rich to drive down wages and workers’ rights by demanding the free movement of labor, while giving this economic elite the freedom to hide away their own profits in remote tax-havens.

Globalisation, in other words, switched the battlefield of the class struggle from the nation state to the whole globe. It allowed the trans-national economic elite to stride the world taking advantage of every loophole they could find in the weakest nations’ laws and forcing other nations to follow suit. Meanwhile, the working and middle classes found themselves defenseless, largely trapped in their national and regional ghettoes, and turned against each other in a global free market.

Corbyn played safe

Corbyn could not say any of this because the Labour parliamentary party is still stuffed with Blairites who fervently support the EU and are desperate to oust him. Had he come out for Brexit, they would have had the perfect excuse to launch a coup. (Now, paradoxically, the Blairites have found a pretext to stab him in the back over the Remain camp’s failure.)

Instead Corbyn headed for what he thought would be the safe, middle ground: the UK must stay in the EU but try to reform it from within.

That was a doubly tragic mistake.

First, it meant there was no prominent figure making a progressive case for Brexit. Many ordinary voters know deep in their hearts that there is something profoundly wrong with the neoliberal consensus and global economic order, but it has been left to the far-right to offer them a lens through which to interpret their lived experience. By stepping aside, Corbyn and the real left allowed Johnson and Farage to forge the little Englander case for Brexit unchallenged.

Second, voters are ever more distrustful of politicians. Cameron and Corbyn’s failure to be candid about their views on Europe only underscored the reasons to assume the worst about the political class. In a choice between the uncomfortable and perfunctory posturing of the Remain leaders and the passionate conviction of Johnson and Farage, people preferred fervor.

Compromised politics

This is a much wider phenomenon. Corbyn’s appeasement of the Blairites is another example of the deeply tainted, lesser-evilism politics that requires Bernie Sanders to tell his supporters to vote for Hillary Clinton, warmonger-in-chief to the military-industrial complex, to stop a loud-mouth billionaire thug, Donald Trump.

Increasingly, people are sick of these endless compromises that perpetuate and intensify, rather than end, inequality and injustice. They simply don’t know what levers are left to them to change the ugly reality in front of them.

The result is an increasingly febrile and polarised politics. Outcomes are much less certain, whether it is Corbyn becoming Labour leader, Sanders chasing Clinton all the way to the Democratic convention, or Trump being on the cusp of becoming US president.

The old order is breaking down because it is so thoroughly discredited, and those who run it – a political and economic elite – are distrusted and despised like never before. The EU is very much part of the old order.

There is a genuine question whether, outside the EU, the UK can be repaired. Its first-past-the-post electoral system is so unrepresentative, it is unclear whether, even if a majority of the public voted for a new kind of politics, it could actually secure a majority of MPs.

But what is clear to most voters is that inside the EU it will be even harder to fix the UK. The union simply adds another layer of unaccountable bureaucrats and lobbyists in thrall to faceless billionaires, further distancing ordinary people from the centers of power.

Disturbing trend for Israel

Finally, it is worth noting that the trends underpinning the Brexit vote should disturb Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, just as they already are troubling the political class in Europe and the US.

Like the EU, Israel too is vital pillar of the old global order. A “Jewish homeland” emerged under British protection while Britain still ran an empire and saw the Middle East as its playground.

After the European colonial powers went into abeyance following the Second World War, the role of patron shifted to the new global hegemon in Washington. The US has endlessly indulged Israel, guarded its back at the United Nations, and heavily subsidised Israel’s powerful military industries.

Whereas the US has propped up Israel diplomatically and militarily, the EU has underwritten Israel’s economic success. It has violated its own constitution to give Israel special trading status and thereby turned Europe into Israel’s largest export market. It has taken decades for Europe to even acknowledge – let alone remedy – the problem that it is also trading with illegal Jewish settlements in the West Bank.

If the EU starts to unravel, and US neoliberal hegemony weakens, Israel will be in trouble. It will be in desperate need of a new guarantor, one prepared to support a country that polls repeatedly show is mistrusted around the world.

But more immediately, Israel ought to fear the new climate of polarised, unpredictable politics that is becoming the norm.

In the US, in particular, a cross-party consensus about Israel is gradually breaking down. Concerns about local national interests – of the kind that exercised the Brexiters  – are gaining traction in the US too, as illustrated last year by the fallout over Israel’s stand-off with the White House over its Iran agreement.

Distrust of the political class is growing by the day, and Israel is an issue on which US politicians are supremely vulnerable. It is increasingly hard to defend Congress’ historic rock-solid support for Israel as truly in American interests.

In a world of diminishing resources, where the middle class is forever being required to belt-tighten, questions about why the US is planning to dramatically increase its aid to Israel – one of the few economies that has done well since the 2008 crash – are likely to prove ever-more discomfiting.

In the long term, none of this bodes well for Israel. Brexit is simply the warning siren.

About Jonathan Cook

Jonathan Cook won the Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism. His latest books are “Israel and the Clash of Civilisations: Iraq, Iran and the Plan to Remake the Middle East” (Pluto Press) and “Disappearing Palestine: Israel’s Experiments in Human Despair” (Zed Books). His new website is jonathan-cook.net.

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107 Responses

  1. Boris
    June 25, 2016, 12:25 pm

    EU is very hostile toward Israel. Just look at this week’s standing ovation in European Parliament for Mahmoud Abbas making wild accusations that Israeli rabbis calling for poisoning water Israel is supplying to Palestinians (he since recanted, but the damage remains).

    So, the cooked statement that “Israel ought to fear the new climate of polarized (sic), unpredictable politics” just does not hold water. It is the climate of predictable Israel bashing that is unproductive.

    • John O
      June 25, 2016, 1:14 pm

      Boris – you’ve just won the UK referendum and are tipped to become Prime Minister. You have more important things to worry about.

      • rosross
        June 25, 2016, 8:29 pm

        Israel does not represent Jews or Judaism so Jews are not in trouble, Israeli Zionists are in trouble.

        Having said that, the point was missed by many in regard to this vote that it represents a growing movement around the world against globalism, against capitalistic global domination, against that which removes control from the people and the nation.

        This is not nationalism, this is common sense. Capitalism and the global economy has filled the pockets of the rich and powerful, exploited the poor worldwide, and brought down wages, conditions and job opportunities in the Western world and the British know that.

        The global economy has been a failure for ordinary people and they know it. Nations need to be as self-sufficient as possible and to have as much autonomy as possible, while co-operating in the world at large.

        Sovereignty and a sense of national independence, is, to the nation, the same as the ego is to the individual. A healthy ego function which does not dominate or manifest in the extreme, enables optimal function and productivity.

        It is the power of the individuals in society, working together as individuals, which has enabled Western culture to advance as it has, albeit with mistakes, but still offering the best quality of life on average in the world today.

        That applies to nations and ordinary people can see and feel that even if the powers that be, cannot. Perhaps it is because most of those in power are feeding at the troughs of profit the ‘global economy’ creates, by omission and commission, and ordinary people are not.

        We are moving into a new era where self-sufficiency, national autonomy and independence and self-responsibility, will see the growth of a stronger and more functional world.

  2. traintosiberia
    June 25, 2016, 1:47 pm

    British and American approaches to land acquisition by Zionist are same . Under protection of British Imperial army ,Zionist kept on increasing the numbers of the immigrants . The British gated the information,news,and the facts to the advantages of Zionist. It periodically punished Atabs for rebellion ,revolts,and opposition. It created the myth of Hitler – Mufti nexus nor t challenged the Israeli provocations . It punished the liberal secular . It founded the Saudi Royals . It destroyed the Arab nationalism .
    America continues same . US protects and promotes militarily,diplomatically,and financially the land acquisition of Zionist. It ignores Israeli provocations. It gates the news censors Anti Zionist logic and reasonings, it suppress Israeli treachery ,illegal activities,and nefarious game plans . It doesn’t allow the dots to be connected from original imperialistic plans of Herzl and Ben Guiron to current activities of settler occupier religious fanatics Likud – Labor – Kadima
    chameleon. It labels anti Israelis as anti Semitic it labels nti Zionist as terrorist . It abuses UN just the way British abused their mandate and League of Nation roles .

  3. Ossinev
    June 25, 2016, 2:36 pm

    @Boris
    “EU is very hostile toward Israel”

    Yes those ” hostile ” EU/JSIL trade agreements are so unfair (sob). You should start a petition in the only democracy in the Levant to have them scrapped.

    • ritzl
      June 25, 2016, 3:32 pm

      Yup.

      “Even though it’s 99% for us, it’s 100% against us!”

      I’ll never be able to comprehend such a total lack of self-awareness.

  4. Jackdaw
    June 25, 2016, 2:49 pm

    “If the EU starts to unravel, and US neoliberal hegemony weakens, Israel will be in trouble.”

    The Jews have always been in trouble, and always will be. Jonathan doesn’t get that. Nor does he get that the Jews have always survived, and that Israel, the Jewish State, will survive.
    The Jews have been slowly building here for nearly two hundred years. One brick at a time. One generation following another.

    Good night.

    • Annie Robbins
      June 25, 2016, 3:00 pm

      Good night.

      where are you located jack?

      • Jackdaw
        June 25, 2016, 4:06 pm

        Central Israel. 23:06.

      • gamal
        June 25, 2016, 7:01 pm

        “where are you located jack?”

        on the Dark Side obviously

      • Jackdaw
        June 26, 2016, 1:03 am

        @gamal

        And where are you located, Gamal?

        *as he disappears into the tall grass*

    • Kay24
      June 25, 2016, 4:25 pm

      The Jews have always been in trouble eh? Maybe they might consider ending the occupation right now, and stop stealing lands for squatter abodes. We cannot change the past, but we certainly can change the present and the future. The Jews will never know peace until they stop trying to build on stolen lands and bombing civilians homes in Gaza. Never.

      • TonyRiley
        July 16, 2016, 7:18 am

        Surely you mean, bombing terrorists in Gaza, in retaliation for the missiles they fire into Israel, and building on land fairly captured from Jordan in 1967?

      • talknic
        July 16, 2016, 11:39 am

        @ TonyRiley

        “Surely you mean, bombing terrorists in Gaza, in retaliation for the missiles they fire into Israel …”

        A) The majority killed in Gaza have been civilians. B) The IDF Memorial site reveals that more Israeli military have been targeted, injured and killed than have Israeli civilians. C) The Zionist colonization of Palestine began in earnest circa 1897 and Jewish forces were already occupying non-Israeli territory the day Israel’s borders were proclaimed and recognized http://wp.me/pDB7k-Xk

        “… and building on land fairly captured from Jordan in 1967?”

        It has been inadmissible to acquire territory by war since at least 1945 under the UN Charter. Read UNSC res 242 et al.

        Go Ziopoop somewhere else

      • Mooser
        July 16, 2016, 12:20 pm

        “It has been inadmissible to acquire territory by war since at least 1945”

        200 million Jews, intent on regaining their ancestral homeland, are the ones who will determine what is “admissible” or not.

        How will you thwart the will of 200 million determined Jews?

      • TonyRiley
        July 18, 2016, 9:37 am

        Israel has returned 95% of the land it captured in a defensive war – ie a war started by Jordan, Syria and Egypt in June 1967,

        As you’re probably aware, Israel did offer to give all of the land away in return for peace, but the Khartoum Conference of the Arab League in 1967, refused point blank.

        Would you care to condemn those countries for capturing land in 1948 and then holding onto it until 1967?

        Ziopoop? Brilliant!

        That’s almost as good as me calling you out for being a complete Hamasshole.

        Can you reveal when Palestine was ever an independent nation state, maybe name a few of its kings and queens, and then tell us what the Palestinian currency was?

        Or not.

      • gamal
        July 18, 2016, 10:10 am

        “Can you reveal when Palestine was ever an independent nation state, maybe name a few of its kings and queens, and then tell us what the Palestinian currency was?

        Or not.”

        why would anyone want to?

        however as al Muqadassi in Persia remarked (10th century)

        ” “One day I sat next to some builders in Shiraz; they were chiselling with poor picks and their stones were the thickness of clay. If the stone was even, they would draw a line with the pick and perhaps this would cause it to break. But if the line was straight, they would set it in place. I told them: ‘if you use a wedge, you can make a hole in the stone’. And I told them of the construction in Palestine and I engaged them in matters of construction.

        “The master stonecutter asked me: Are you Egyptian?

        “I said: No, I am Palestinian.

        “He said: I heard that you carve stones like you would carve wood.

        “I said: Yes.

        “He said: Your stones are malleable and your craft gentle” [6]. ”

        http://muslimheritage.com/article/al-muqaddasi-geographer-palestine

      • gamal
        July 18, 2016, 11:49 am

        anyone actually interested might like to read of the qays-yaman war, the watermelon war and in particular

        Yahya ibn Irmiya (john son of jermemiah) a Jew from Jund al-Urdun (Jordan), as opposed to Jund Filastin, who led an army of Arabs against other Arabs all in the 8th century,

        Qays-Yamani rivalry flared up quite recently mostly around Nablus, the designation Qaysi or Yamani being by now largely imaginary, I feel Qaysi because like Chiricahua the name is so pretty, Yamani eh ..

        why do Christians and Muslims from Bethlehem fly a white flag?

        while in Al-Khalil it is a red flag?

      • talknic
        July 18, 2016, 11:53 am

        @ TonyRiley July 18, 2016, 9:37 am

        “Israel has returned 95% of the land it captured in a defensive war – ie a war started by Jordan, Syria and Egypt in June 1967,”

        A) Israel has never returned ANY Palestinian territory.

        B) The war was started by who? When? Ever read UNSC resolution S/RES/228 (1966) of 25 November 1966? https://unispal.un.org/DPA/DPR/unispal.nsf/0/1A03C7BFB8D6C049852560C3004A4AAF

        “As you’re probably aware, Israel did offer to give all of the land away in return for peace, but the Khartoum Conference of the Arab League in 1967, refused point blank.”

        Of course they refused. The premise for their refusal was on a completely legal basis.

        2. The conference has agreed on the need to consolidate all efforts to eliminate the effects of the aggression on the basis that the occupied lands are Arab lands and that the burden of regaining these lands falls on all the Arab States.

        3. The Arab Heads of State have agreed to unite their political efforts at the international and diplomatic level to eliminate the effects of the aggression and to ensure the withdrawal of the aggressive Israeli forces from the Arab lands which have been occupied since the aggression of June 5. This will be done within the framework of the main principles by which the Arab States abide, namely, no peace with Israel, no recognition of Israel, no negotiations with it, and insistence on the rights of the Palestinian people in their own country.

        This is simply a reflection of UNSC res 476 1. Reaffirms the overriding necessity to end the prolonged occupation of Arab territories occupied by Israel since 1967, including Jerusalem;

        No peace with Israel: While territory sovereign to Egypt was under Israeli occupation the two states were technically at war. In the eventual Egypt Israel Peace Treaty Israel was first required and agreed to begin withdrawal before peaceful relations were assumed.

        No recognition of Israel: There is no legal basis for demanding recognition.
        A) States plead for recognition

        B) ” ..in the view of the United States, International Law does not require a state to recognize another state; it is a matter for the judgment of each state whether an entity merits recognition as a state. In reaching this judgment, the United States has traditionally looked of the establishment of certain facts. The United States has also taken into account whether the entity in question has attracted the recognition of the International community of states.” There are numerous UN Member states who do not recognize other UN Member States.

        All states are never the less required to show “respect for and acknowledgement of the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of every State and their right to live in peace within secure and recognized boundaries free from threats or acts of force”. This is reflected in UNSC res 242.

        No negotiations: Israel is in breach of numerous UNSC resolutions, International Law, the UN Charter, relative conventions. There is no legal requirement for negotiations.

        For example the words ‘negotiate’, ‘negotiations’ do not appear in UNSC res242 on which the Egypt Israel Peace Treaty is based. Israel was and still is required to adhere to the law, negotiations or not. Egypt and Jordan were correct in refusing negotiations while Israel was in breach of its legal obligations in respect to their sovereign territory.

        The signing of a peace treaty between Egypt and Israel was an act of recognition and; after Israeli agree to withdrawal peaceful relations were assumed. Likewise with Jordan. Both are examples of what UNSC res 242 was formulated to achieve. The end of hostilities between UN Member States.

        However, while Israel occupies non-Israeli territories in Palestine, the Golan Heights, Shebaa Farms, the Alghajar village UNSC res 425 and UNSC res 426, Israel is technically at war and those states have a right to “restore” sovereignty over their territories. Professor Stephen M. Schwebel / Elihu Lauterpacht

        The Palestinians meanwhile are under no legal obligation to sign a peace agreement with an Occupying Power, to recognize an Occupying Power or to negotiate with an Occupying Power. Negotiations mean only one thing, the Palestinians forgoing some of their legal rights so that Israel may keep non-Israeli territory illegally acquired by war, illegally annexed and illegally settled by Israel since 00:01 May 15th 1948 (ME time) (ibid)

        “Would you care to condemn those countries for capturing land in 1948 and then holding onto it until 1967?”

        Why? It was outside of Israel’s proclaimed and recognized borders! They didn’t create illegal settlements or enforce any blockades on the Palestinians.

        The West Bank as it is now officially named, was legally annexed at the request of representatives of the majority of the legitimate citizens of the territory. Jordan’s annexation was as a trustee only by demand of the other Arab states (Session: 12-II Date: May 1950) in keeping with the UN Charter Chapt XI

        “Ziopoop? Brilliant!

        That’s almost as good as me calling you out for being a complete Hamasshole”

        Problem … I’m not a supporter of Hamas (1987). BTW they’re a response to 90 years of Zionist Colonization which began in 1897 and in response to 39 years of Israeli occupying non-Israeli territories

        “Can you reveal when Palestine was ever an independent nation state, maybe name a few of its kings and queens, and then tell us what the Palestinian currency was?”

        A) Totally irrelevant to the legal status of Israel’s proclaimed and recognized territories <em(ibid) and the illegal actions the Jewish State has engaged in in non Israeli territories since Israel’s borders were proclaimed and recognized (ibid)

        B) Israel’s first currency until it introduced the Lira in August 1948, was the PALESTINIAN POUND

      • Mooser
        July 18, 2016, 2:14 pm

        “Tony” Van Winkle is here. Go back to sleep, “Tony.” You are years, decades behind.

      • MHughes976
        July 18, 2016, 4:56 pm

        As to the ancient Kingdom of Palestine and its King Taita, recorded c.1,000 BCE, long before ‘Israel’ is attested by inscription as the name of an actual kingdom, see Mark Weeden ‘After the Hittites’, SOAS research online 2013,,and consider Herodotus’ testimony that it had become the commonly accepted name of what is now Palestine by around 500. This was the time when coinage began to appear, the first mint quite likely being Palestinian/Philistine and, even when proclaiming its origin in the Persian province of Yehud, following the models of Athens, the leading commercial power, owls and all. That is why they are commonly called drachmas and obols. Neither the high antiquity nor the beauty of the name ‘Palestine’ – ‘land of hearth and home’, I think – should be forgotten.
        Not that there is any rationality in making human rights here and now dependent on coinage systems in 500 BCE nor on the ethnity claimed by royal personages in 1,000 BCE, is there really?

      • RoHa
        July 18, 2016, 10:49 pm

        “Can you reveal when Palestine was ever an independent nation state, maybe name a few of its kings and queens, and then tell us what the Palestinian currency was?”

        Can you please explain why this question of Palestinian statehood is so important to Zionists? You keep dragging it up, and yet it seems totally irrelevant to me.

        The territory of Palestine was invaded by a bunch of Europeans who wanted to take it over and create an ethnically-based state for themselves there. In the process, those Europeans and their descendants drove much of the native population out of their homes, businesses, and farms. The Europeans then stole those homes, farms, and businesses for their own use, and refused to allow the native owners to return. This seems prima facie wrong regardless of whether or not any Palestinian state existed.

    • eljay
      June 25, 2016, 5:05 pm

      || Jackdaw: The Jews have always been in trouble, and always will be. … ||

      The solution to acts of injustice and immorality committed against Jews was, is and will always be justice, accountability and equality.

      The solution to acts of injustice and immorality committed against Jews was not, is not and will never be:
      – acts of injustice and immorality committed by Jews; or
      – the establishment of a religion-supremacist “Jewish State”.

      || Jackdaw: … Israel, the Jewish State, will survive. … ||

      Yup, it’ll last Forever and a Thousand Years. Or not.

    • Mooser
      June 25, 2016, 7:50 pm

      “Good night.”

      Wait a minute, there, boychik. You are in way to much trouble to do anything as dumb as close your eyes! We’ll sneak up on you.
      Nope, better stand watch…don’t fall asleep, you know what they do to the watch if he falls asleep?

      “One generation following another.”

      Wait, I know! “Laden with happiness, and tears!”

      (OK, this guy is for real, he loves musicals.)

      • Jackdaw
        June 26, 2016, 1:12 am

        Israeli Jewish couples living in Israel like having kids and have on average, three.
        Everyone here is taking their money and investing in real estate. Houses and apartments.
        These two facts suggest to me that Israelis are planning to stay here and build. Their future is in Israel.

        Mooser. How many kids do you have?

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2016, 4:18 pm

        “Israeli Jewish couples living in Israel like having kids and have on average, three.”

        Oh yes, commenter Mikhael told us all about it. Anotherwords, “Jackdaw” Israel is limping along at barely the replacement rate. And anybody with sense is running away from that debacle. Do you have any idea how high the birth rate would need to be to do what you want?

        And they’re “investing in real estate”? “Everyone is taking their money”? ROTFLMSJAO?

        “Mooser. How many kids do you have?”

        Huh? Are you anticipating a battle between Zionist and non-Zionist Jews? Or are you trying to show the large numbers of children Jews have? Don’t quite get your point for asking.

    • Mooser
      June 25, 2016, 8:42 pm

      “The Jews have always been in trouble, and always will be.”

      All of us? Gee, Jackdaw, I don’t feel like I am in a whole lot of trouble for being Jewish. What trouble am I in here in the US?

      Are you projecting Israel’s and Zionism’s troubles on to the rest of us? Please don’t. Hey, if we’re all in such trouble, why should we sacrifice to help you? I expect an answer.

      • Jackdaw
        June 26, 2016, 1:21 am

        @Mooser

        “What trouble am I in here in the US?”

        Uhh…assimilating yourselves out of existence, for starters.

      • eljay
        June 26, 2016, 2:43 pm

        || Jackdaw: @Mooser

        “What trouble am I in here in the US?”

        Uhh…assimilating yourselves out of existence, for starters. ||

        Trouble:

        transitive verb
        1  a : to agitate mentally or spiritually : worry, disturb
            b (1) archaic : mistreat, oppress (2) : to produce physical disorder in : afflict
            c : to put to exertion or inconvenience

        2 : to put into confused motion

        intransitive verb
        1 : to become mentally agitated : worry

        2 : to make an effort : be at pains

        Hmmm…nothing there about “assimilating yourselves out of existence”. Looks like another perfectly good English word has been re-defined by Zio-supremacism.

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2016, 5:10 pm

        “Uhh…assimilating yourselves out of existence, for starters.”

        He’s right!, Either we’re closing your eyes to a situation we do now wish to acknowledge
        Or we are not aware of the caliber of disaster indicated by the presence of a Jewish assimilation in our community!

        . America did not give the Jews any choice, “Jackdaw”!

        They just went ahead and assimilated, made full citizens, of Jews! Right from the start.
        They never asked a Rabbi about it, they never asked the“balebatisheh yiden” they just went ahead and did it!

        Even tho Constitution Hall in Philadelphia was besieged by weeping Jews, with signs reading “We have the right to live in ghettos!” or “Only haters assimilate!” or the heartbreaking cry: “Please, Mr. Washington, make us second-class citizens again!”, this had no effect, and we got assimilated. They “hardened their hearts against us”.

        And do I need to point out what happened to American Jews, when they were reduced to the level of ordinary citizens? We will draw the curtain of discretion over that cultural, economic, social and political abattoir, there may be children reading this.

        Of course, those anti-semitically assimilating Americans did leave us one thing, they’ve never prevented us from worshiping or living as we please. But what good does that do us? Does that stop out-marriage?
        Did it keep the young ones moral after schul? Our children’s children gonna have trouble!
        Jewish mothers of America, you must heed the warning before it’s too late!
        Watch for the tell-tale sign of corruption! The moment your son leaves the house,
        Does he rebuckle his knickerbockers below the knee? Is there a nicotine stain on his index finger? A dime novel hidden in the corn crib?
        Is he starting to memorize jokes from Capt.
        Billy’s Whiz Bang…

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2016, 8:38 pm

        “Uhh…assimilating yourselves out of existence, for starters.”

        American Jews assimilated themselves into existence.

      • RoHa
        June 26, 2016, 10:28 pm

        ““What trouble am I in here in the US?”

        Uhh…assimilating yourselves out of existence, for starters.”

        So if Mooser stops being a Jew he will cease to exist? I haven’t seen that happen to other ex-Jews . Why is he so delicate?

        But since you use the plural “yourselves”, I suspect that you mean American Jews in general. Suppose that they all do freely and happily give up Jewishness, and live and regard themselves as ordinary non-Jewish Americans. How would that count as trouble for them?

        Even in River City?

      • Mooser
        June 27, 2016, 10:32 am

        ” Suppose that they all do freely and happily give up Jewishness”

        Oh, that doesn’t bother him, “RoHa”.
        Haven’t you noticed these schmendricks get it backwards? They actually seem to think that the fewer people are Jewish, the more exclusive it is, the more Jewish and Israel for them!
        They are always trying to eliminate people from Judaism, like it was a zero-sum game.

        Anyway, there’s something much much worse than leaving Judaism.
        American Jews (and many others, gee, almost anyplace but Israel) can determine their own relationship with their religion, modify it, attenuate it, use it when and how they want, just like anybody else. We can relate our religion to politics in any way that pleases us, in any way we feel is good for all.
        That scares the crap out of them.
        So they like to pretend they have some determinate authority over what is Jewish. And that we have some obligation to go down the drain with them.

      • Mooser
        June 27, 2016, 11:55 am

        “Even in River City?”

        Perhaps I ought to give Iowa a try. They’ll be mighty glad to see me, even tho they may not ever mention it again.

      • Mooser
        July 1, 2016, 12:36 pm

        “So if Mooser stops being a Jew he will cease to exist?”

        And why on earth should I take that chance? Who knows what the consequences might be?

        “I haven’t seen that happen to other ex-Jews .”

        And I’ve never seen a toilet that swirls counter-clockwise, either. But I haven’t been to Australia. Things may be different there.

      • RoHa
        July 1, 2016, 10:29 pm

        Things are different in Australia. We say “anti-clockwise”.

        I’m an anti-clockwisite.

      • Mooser
        July 2, 2016, 6:42 pm

        “I’m an anti-clockwisite.”

        Ah, then we shall get along famously. You’re not the kind of person who gets me all wound up.

    • rosross
      June 25, 2016, 9:39 pm

      No, the Jews have not always been in trouble anymore than most other religions.

      Religions have no right to land and certainly no right to colonise as Israel does in Palestine.

      Some religions did not survive, many in fact, Judaism did and most Jews live very safely and peacefully, as equal citizens in dozens of countries around the world.

      The most dangerous place for Jews to live today is UN mandated Israel and Occupied Palestine, but the reasons for that are obvious – occupation, colonisation and apartheid generally makes for danger.

      Israel is not a Jewish State, it is a Zionist State and they have no more in common than for instance does the Ku Klux Klan have with Christianity.

      Most Israeli Jews are lapsed, non-practising and in fact as secular or atheist, not even Jews and a quarter of Israel’s population is not even Jewish, but Muslim, Christian and no doubt other religious persuasions.

      Israel does not represent followers of Judaism or the religion itself and that is a distinction more people around the world, including Jews, are making.

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2016, 1:14 pm

        “Israel is not a Jewish State…”

        “A” Jewish State? There are others, which show us what a real, good Jewish State is like?

        “Rosross” we can’t just wish it away, or use our Jewish privilege to declare it away.
        There it fucking is! Calling itself, and being, for all the world to see “THE Jewish State”.

        Deal with it. It’s inconvenient.

      • Mooser
        June 27, 2016, 11:59 am

        “Most Israeli Jews are lapsed, non-practising and in fact as secular or atheist, not even Jews and a quarter of Israel’s population is not even Jewish, but Muslim, Christian and no doubt other religious persuasions.”

        Of course! No wonder marriage is a completely civil affair in Israel, with religious figures (Rabbis) only involved as much and in the way the participants choose.

        And of course, there’s no difference in the laws and regulations applied to Muslims, Jews and Christians. Or are you talking about a different Israel?

    • amigo
      June 26, 2016, 11:13 am

      “If the EU starts to unravel, and US neoliberal hegemony weakens, Israel will be in trouble” .

      to which jackduh replies !!.

      “The Jews have always been in trouble, ”

      Why do you equate Jews with Israel.It is not the state of the Jews .It is the state of the Israeli people.

      Btw , ever asked yourself why some Jews are always in trouble.Cause and effect , perhaps.You don,t like being in trouble , then demand that your leaders stop the actions that place you in trouble.You deserve to be treated better by your chosen leaders and have a right to insist they not place you in constant danger by their actions.

    • traintosiberia
      June 26, 2016, 2:46 pm

      Narbonne in southern France didn’t survive . David and Solomon’s fiefdom did not . Khazar didnot . Jewish people did and would continue after State of Israel have given up trying to survive on American dole

    • Atlantaiconoclast
      June 28, 2016, 2:30 am

      till the US people learn the truth about Israel, then good luck with that bluster!

    • TonyRiley
      July 16, 2016, 7:17 am

      Cooky portrays himself as a Left Winger, but, like all of them, never gets into the awkward problem of Palestinians legally hanging Gays and carrying out the “honour killings” of women fleeing from forced marriages.

      A tad hypocritical.

      • talknic
        July 16, 2016, 11:44 am

        @ TonyRiley

        “… the awkward problem of Palestinians legally hanging Gays”

        Cite the law …thx

        ” and carrying out the “honour killings” of women fleeing from forced marriages”

        Honour killings happen in ALL societies

      • RoHa
        July 17, 2016, 12:10 am

        How are these issues relevant to the point Cook is making?

  5. ritzl
    June 25, 2016, 3:50 pm

    This was a vote against perpetual war in MENA as well (as a driver of millions of refugees heading toward the EU).

    Since some big wheel in Israeli intelligence just let slip that Israel wants ISIS to remain undefeated (perpetuating and expanding the refugee crisis in EU) this vote is a DIRECT refutation of Israel’s don’t-give-a-whit-about-ANYONE-else methods and policies whether the “Leavers” realize it or not.

    • Jackdaw
      June 25, 2016, 4:13 pm

      Thanks Ritzl!!!

      You made my point better than I could.
      I could give you a big kiss on the lips! Thanks, thanks, thanks!

      YES!!!

    • MHughes976
      June 25, 2016, 5:35 pm

      I really can’t see that, ritzl. The vote may express fear of refugees, though hardly any have come here from Syria. The major fear was of east euros arriving for economic reasons, causing us to lose control of our borders. I don’t recall any Brexit leader saying that it was all the fault of Israeli or imperialist wars. The entire discussion, as I heard it, was about our interests, our sovereignty and our money. The lead was taken by people whose plan is to cut taxes and reduce ‘workplace rights’.

      • ritzl
        June 25, 2016, 8:32 pm

        Fair enough, MHughes. You’re living it.

        My extrapolated political math from here is UKIP is a “Leave” driver and xenophobic. East Euros are the current “issue” in Britain for economic reasons. “Bad” enough, but TV has image after image of MENA refugees heading north. That wave hasn’t affected Britain yet, but with open borders/common policy of acceptance, it’s coming. It will compound the current economic problem. War is the source of the refugees. Enough.

        That may seem complicated, but I think the implications of more immigrants in Britain due to policy set in Brussels and implemented in Greece, Italy, and Turkey are immediately grasped and fold seamlessly into the whole “Leave” vote equation you lay out.

        That all these MENA destabilizations are fully supported by Israel as being in its best interests, the

        FWIW/anecdotal, but this got me going in this direction (Paul Craig Roberts):

        “Information continues to come in about the Brexit vote. A member of the British Army said that 90% of the lads in his unit voted to leave. They voted exit because they do not believe they should be involved in Washingtons wars. He said that his unit agreed that the wars are dictated by Washington, via Brussels, and not by the British people. …” http://www.paulcraigroberts.org/2016/06/24/more-on-brexit-paul-craig-roberts/

        That’s unattributed and probably self-selecting but it would be in

      • ritzl
        June 25, 2016, 8:41 pm

        Argh. Twitchy.

        To finish:

        That all these MENA destabilizations are fully supported by Israel as being in its best interests,… the vote represents, to me, a popular, though indirect, refutation of Israeli interests.

        That’s unattributed… and probably a self-selecting sample of one but it would be interesting to see a broader poll of British military on that specific topic.

      • ritzl
        June 25, 2016, 9:21 pm

        Hi MHughes,

        Didn’t see this before I wrote my original comment, but it shows how the economics and interventionism are intertwined. Michael Hudson on the Real News:

        https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=x-MraD1Ys3Q&feature=youtu.be

      • lysias
        June 26, 2016, 11:04 am

        That doesn’t sound like an army that the plutocrats can rely on to put down a popular uprising.

    • rosross
      June 25, 2016, 9:41 pm

      This was a vote for control of one’s country, no more, no less. It was not about immigrants as one can see from high votes in areas with minimal immigrant issues.

      • MHughes976
        June 26, 2016, 8:14 am

        I can only say that I really cannot believe Professor Hudson’s picture of in which a left-wing anti-NATO force was ‘as vocal’ as the forces on the fairly hard right. The campaign was led by Johnson, Gove and Farage and cheered on by the immensely influential Murdoch press and other equally right wing forces, newspapers especially, not effectively by anyone else. The questions of ‘taking control of one’s country’ and of immigration are closely linked. It’s true that the most prosperous areas are the most immigrant-dependent, and know it. It’s the less prosperous areas where immigrants are a source of worrying completion for every job.
        We seem to be debating both the idea that Brexit is a dire warning to Israel and also the idea that it’s a triumph for Israel. To me, with respect and all that, there is no evidence for the first of these, as I’ve been saying. As to the second, I agree that Brexit is bringing hardline Zionists to power, that Israel must be concerned about a growing Muslim voting bloc in Europe and that many Israelis will gloat over embarrassment to an institution that dared to label settlement goods. On the other hand, the EU has been quite useful and there has been talk of Israel’s wanting to join. Israel has a good hold over the Germans and over the Churches here, Catholic and Protestant.

      • Shmuel
        June 26, 2016, 9:17 am

        The questions of ‘taking control of one’s country’ and of immigration are closely linked.

        Or, to paraphrase the other blondish mophead, “Make Britain great again.”

      • echinococcus
        June 26, 2016, 11:58 am

        Rosross,

        What a vote is about is in each voter’s head. It varies. That exit won the referendum thanks to racism does not change the result for those who wanted out as a step against imperialist consolidation or as fight against monopoly capitalism, or the Europeans who want the US-spies-and-intruders out.

        Also observe that the founding member-nations, who had excluded the too-American British from the Treaty of Rome, demanded immediate implementation, while the newcomer countries, many of them ex-iron curtain, are meeting separately to explore a way to cancel or ignore the exit.

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2016, 12:29 pm

        “The questions of ‘taking control of one’s country’ and of immigration are closely linked.”

        But I’m not ready to take control of the country. Why, I’m hardly ‘the master of my domains’!

      • RoHa
        June 26, 2016, 10:54 pm

        I’ve seen a lot of hysterical claims, usually made by disappointed “Remainers”, about the role of racism and immigration in winning Brexit. I haven’t seen much substantiation of those claims.

        I also see a couple of assumptions, which are (a) resistance to immigration is a Bad Thing, and (b) resistance to immigration stems from racism. I haven’t seen much warrant for either of these.

        In support of (a), I will point out that, had the Palestinians been able to prevent European immigration in the first half of the twentieth century, I would not now be enjoying Mooser’s jokes. A Nakba is a small price to pay for such entertainment. Especially since I’m not the one paying it.

        But (b) is just tosh. The current concern in Britain is about Polish immigrants, whose suntans are no more impressive than those of the majority of Welshmen.

      • silamcuz
        June 27, 2016, 1:36 am

        RossRoss,

        I along with the vast majority of educated, progressive folks disagree with the assertion that Brexit had little to do with immigration and racism. If you read the Guardian, there are plenty of articles detailing how Brexit voters throughout the nation expressed contempt for immigrants and xenophobic tendencies as their motivation for their vote.

        There is absolutely no way these bunch of uneducated, brain-dead racists could figure out something so bad about Britain being part of a globalized European community that values cooperation, trust and freedom to travel that no progressive could’ve seen, to the point that leaving it is the best action to take.

        For me, Brexit only served to prove that giving stupid people the same options as intelligent people, and expecting them to make the right choice for sake of everyone is act of extreme malice. As such, my grievances are not with those underevolved racists who voted for Brexit, but is squarely with the politicians and officials that gave them means to allow Brexit to happen.

      • Bumblebye
        June 27, 2016, 4:52 am

        Roha
        sadly there has been racism involved. Against both east Europeans and people of colour since the referendum – the latter being told they’re next. Obviously blaming immigrants is wrong – but here’s why: a very significant number of employers have decided they don’t want a British workforce and have been advertising exclusively abroad, in Poland, in Romania etc. This has happened a lot in fairly deprived areas, where employers can set up with EU subsidies, and then employ cheaper foreigners – so no gain for the locals from EU investment. None of the political parties, let alone the govt, have focussed on or addressed this issue, which has been a major driver of immigration. In a number of workplaces that have been ‘taken over’ by these workers, the few remaining brits have often felt discriminated against and forced to leave (to be replaced by one of the new workers friends or relatives). Again, as an issue it seems no part of the establishment will address it. Political kryptonite for some reason, maybe viewed as validating racism by acknowledging a problem. Therefore it remains on the anecdotal/can’t be touched level, causing huge upset to the people it affects adversely.

      • Shmuel
        June 27, 2016, 6:03 am

        Bumblebye,

        Certainly a problem for some, but far from the whole picture — without even mentioning all the jobs moved overseas (hint: not by immigrants), but “immigrants steal our jobs” seems to have a lot more zing to it than globalisation and greedy capitalists steal our jobs.

        See, e.g. http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/may/20/reality-check-are-eu-migrants-really-taking-british-jobs

        So, many are, I’m sure, actually convinced that immigration has increased British unemployment, based on the argument’s merits (although they might want to re-check their facts); some readily embrace the idea, because it confirms and reinforces their suspicion and dislike of foreigners; while others have simply fallen prey to the propaganda of actual racists and unscrupulous populists.

        It would be silly to claim that all who voted “leave” are racists, but it would be equally silly to claim that nativism and racism have played no part in the “leave” campaign, or that the “leave” victory has not strengthened racist forces and lent legitimacy to nativist and racist sentiment — whether that is what a majority of “leave” voters had in mind or not (likely not).

      • gamal
        June 27, 2016, 7:07 am

        “or that the “leave” victory has not strengthened racist forces and lent legitimacy to nativist and racist sentiment”

        “Nigel Farage’s anti-migrant poster reported to police”

        “Within hours, Twitter users had pointed out the image’s inadvertent similarity to Nazi propaganda footage of migrants shown in a BBC documentary from 2005.”

        “The archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, told MPs on the home affairs select committee this month that he utterly condemned Farage’s comment that sexual assaults by migrants were the “nuclear bomb” of the EU referendum.”

        http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/16/nigel-farage-defends-ukip-breaking-point-poster-queue-of-migrants

      • RoHa
        June 27, 2016, 10:49 pm

        I have no doubt that immigration was a major issue. (Quite rightly, too.) And I have no doubt that some nasty racist* attitudes have emerged.

        But it looks to me as though there is an attempt to portray the “leave” voters as irrational racists voting against immigrants, and deny that anyone could have any rational objections to membership of the EU.

        (Though this article at least looks at the class aspect. http://www.theguardian.com/politics/commentisfree/2016/jun/24/divided-britain-brexit-money-class-inequality-westminster)

        Let us note that the “leave” vote was strongest among older voters. They are the ones who have had the most experience of the EU and its alleged benefits. The oldest remember the promises of 1972, when Heath took Britain into the Common Market, and the promises of 1975**, when 67% voted “Yes” in the referendum on membership of the EEC. They have seen what those promises were worth, and many have clearly changed their minds.

        Some might think that Britain’s place is in the world, rather than tied to narrow Europe.

        Some of them might also have noted the economic difficulties of Spain, and the economic disaster of Greece at the hands of the EU bigwigs.

        Some might have resented being told what to do by a passing American. (There does seem to have been a steep rise in the “Leave” camp after Obama’s intervention.)

        Some may resent having laws imposed on them by a bunch of unelected parasites*** who live in luxury at British taxpayer expense.

        Some might have doubted the wisdom of trying to drag Ukraine, with its civil war and a non-existent economy, into the EU.

        And some probably just wanted to stick it to the smug bastards who run the show.

        So I think there were far more factors in play than just the immigration issue.

        (*Though to call white British rejection of white Poles “racist” seems like a misuse of the term.)
        (** Yes, I remember these. I was active on the “No” side of the 1975 referendum. I haven’t changed my mind.)
        (*** As distinct from the elected parasites that infest Westminster.)

      • RoHa
        June 27, 2016, 10:53 pm

        “Brexit only served to prove that giving stupid people the same options as intelligent people, and expecting them to make the right choice for sake of everyone is act of extreme malice. ”

        Exactly. Everyone should forget about this voting stuff and make me Supreme Leader of the World. And then shut up and do what I say.

      • ritzl
        June 28, 2016, 12:01 am

        @RoHa June 27, 2016, 10:49 pm…

        Great holistic comment. Thanks.

      • echinococcus
        June 28, 2016, 1:48 am

        RoHa,

        (*Though to call white British rejection of white Poles “racist” seems like a misuse of the term.)

        More than prescriptivism, this would be etymologic purism.
        I know current usage is not a huge influence on you, but still, the preponderance of it, at least in the circles I frequent, is for “racism” as group discrimination based on a person’s circumstances at birth, technically “accident of birth”.

      • Sibiriak
        June 28, 2016, 6:18 am

        Speaking truth to power? From Nigel Farage’s speech to the European Parliament:

        Isn’t it funny? When I came here 17 years ago and I said that I wanted to lead a campaign go get Britain out of the European Union, you all laughed at me. Well, I have to say, you’re not laughing now, are you?

        And the reason you’re so upset, the reason you’re so angry, has been perfectly clear from all the angry exchanges this morning. You, as a political project, are in denial. You are in denial that your currency is failing.

        [At this point Farage was jeered. He went on:]

        Well, just look at the Mediterranean. As a policy to impose poverty and the rest of the Mediterranean, you’ve done very well. And you are in denial over Mrs Merkel’s call last year for as many people as possible to cross the Mediterranean into the European Union. [It] has led to massive divisions within countries and between countries.

        But the biggest problem you’ve got, and the main reason the United Kingdom voted the way that it did, is that you have, by stealth, by deception, without ever telling the truth to the British or the rest of the people’s of Europe, you have imposed upon them a political union.

        And when the people in 2005 in the Netherlands and France voted against the political union, when they rejected the constitution, you simply ignored them and brought the Lisbon treaty in through the back door.

        * * *

        What happened last Thursday was a remarkable result. It was a seismic result, not just for British politics, but for European politics [and] perhaps even for global politics too. Because what the little people did, what the ordinary people did, what the people who have been oppressed over the last few years and who have seen their living standards go down [did], they rejected the multinationals, they rejected the merchant banks, they rejected big politics. And they said, actually, we want our country back. We want our fishing waters back. We want our borders back. And we want to be an independent, self-governing, normal nation and that is what we have done and that is what must happen.

        And in doing so we offer a beacon of hope to democrats across the rest of the European continent. I will make one prediction this morning; the United Kingdom will not be the last member state to leave the European Union.

        http://www.theguardian.com/politics/live/2016/jun/28/brexit-live-cameron-eu-leaders-brussels-corbyn-confidence

  6. Keith
    June 25, 2016, 5:09 pm

    JONATHAN COOK- “That, in turn, reflected a key failing of modern politics, not only in Britain but in most of the developed world: the re-emergence of an unaccountable political class.”

    Unaccountable to the citizenry but not to the Fat Cats who bankroll their election campaigns and provide other perks including future employment. This is capitalism and money rules, more so than ever. This notion that government is independent from the needs and demands of financial/economic power is an illusion.

    JONATHAN COOK- “The old order is breaking down because it is so thoroughly discredited, and those who run it – a political and economic elite – are distrusted and despised like never before.”

    Old order breaking down? You could have fooled me. The ongoing success of neoliberal globalization indicates that the global empire of elites is stronger than ever. The elites are transforming the global economy to create a rentier economy of debt servitude somewhat similar to modern feudalism, hence, neofeudalism. Currently, the global financial system holds the mortgage on the global economy and is foreclosing (privatizing). Of course, during this transition period, this system of fragile interdependencies could implode suddenly, however, that has nothing to do with a discredited old order breaking down. And if the new capitalist nobility is distrusted and despised, so what? We all need money to live and they control the purse strings.

    JONATHAN COOK- “If the EU starts to unravel, and US neoliberal hegemony weakens, Israel will be in trouble.”

    Yes, if the empire implodes, Israel will be affected. Who won’t be? The whole section on Israel reads like so much wishful thinking. As long as American Jewish Zionist elites support Israel, the U.S. will continue to support Israel. Additionally, as civil disturbance and turbulence increase globally, there will be an increasing demand by governments for the means to control their rebellious citizenry. As Jeff Halper indicates, Israel has positioned itself as the leader of the market for a matrix of control thanks to their expertise in controlling the Palestinians. In a neofeudal dystopia, the instruments and techniques of coercion will be in demand.

  7. silamcuz
    June 25, 2016, 5:28 pm

    I’m willing to bet that Israelis dissolution as a nation will take place after Americas own, and also the after the complete dismantling of the EU. I say good riddance to all of these white supremacist failed projects.

    • Annie Robbins
      June 26, 2016, 3:41 pm

      “willing to bet” — on an online forum? how very daring of you.

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2016, 5:20 pm

        “I’m willing to bet that Israelis dissolution as a nation will take place after Americas own, and also the after the complete dismantling of the EU..”

        I’m not taking that bet.
        I never bet a person who has all the inside information, and knows what minute the timer is set for.

  8. amigo
    June 25, 2016, 6:54 pm

    On the positive side of the Brexit outcome is the zionist (british friends of Israel) lobby will have one less advocate for Israel , twisting the arms of smaller EU member states and given the recent report that 28 member states supported unanimously the French proposal , future moves against the rogue state should experience less resistance.

    If more nations follow the UK,s decision , then Israel is truly in trouble. What is truly ironic , is that most Israeli Jews and their slavish supporters around the globe have openly stated their desire for the breakup of the EU .I guess zionits have never heard the axiom , “be careful what you ask for”.

    • yonah fredman
      June 25, 2016, 7:35 pm

      I read a fair amount of pro Zionist writers and this is the first that I’ve heard about this overwhelming support for breaking up the EU. I think the elites in Europe were running roughshod over the desires of the voters. I hope this does not give trump a boost. What percentage of brit voters are white and what was the racial breakdown of the vote? I’d venture that Trump will exceed the pro exit white vote, but will lose the election due to black and Hispanic votes.

      • amigo
        June 26, 2016, 7:20 am

        “I read a fair amount of pro Zionist writers and this is the first that I’ve heard about this overwhelming support for breaking up the EU.”YF

        You might want to broaden your media choices.Try reading the comments section at the . J Post , TOI, Y net, Israel hayom,Haaretz where the people who put Israel,s most right gov in power , air their views on “antisemitic ” EU and state with glee that it (EU ) is falling apart.

        ” What percentage of brit voters are white and what was the racial breakdown of the vote “. YF

        Suggest you do your own research.You can start here !!,

        http://time.com/4381878/brexit-generation-gap-older-younger-voters/

      • yonah fredman
        June 26, 2016, 11:23 am

        The next time Pew or Gallup or whatever pollster comes along and thinks of spending money to figure out what Israelis or their supporters are thinking, they oughta save their money and just read the comments on line. No need to spend a dime.

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2016, 12:36 pm

        “What percentage of brit voters are white…”

        “Yonah” my friend, you seem to be permanently in the midst of some kind of “racial breakdown”.
        Son, I think you’ve got a “seminal” ‘Negro Problem’

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2016, 1:03 pm

        “The next time Pew or Gallup or whatever pollster comes along and thinks of spending money to figure out what Israelis or their supporters are thinking, they oughta save their money and just read the comments on line.”

        “Yonah”, the Pew and Gallup polling companies aren’t that stupid. They are very well aware that online comments like those consist almost entirely of what the commenters want to convince other people they are thinking. (Or wish to convince themselves of, there’s that, too)

      • amigo
        June 26, 2016, 2:30 pm

        “The next time Pew or Gallup or whatever pollster comes along and thinks of spending money to figure out what Israelis or their supporters are thinking, they oughta save their money and just read the comments on line. ” YF

        Yonah , who said a word about polling Israelis.

        You claimed there was no overwhelming support for the break up of the EU in Israel .I pointed you to several sites where this sentiment is rife and especially ubiquitous at this time..That you choose to respond with pollsters such as Pew /Gallop is perhaps evidence that you lack the courage to visit the sites I mentioned .You might just be amazed at the hatred and fascist mindset that you will find there among those you lend your undying support to.

    • echinococcus
      June 25, 2016, 10:51 pm

      Exactly, Amigo. For all supporters of Palestinian resistance, the English are an American fifth column in Europe and its executioner; also for the policy of support to Zionism. The UK (rather, English) withdrawal can’t be bad.

      • amigo
        June 26, 2016, 8:28 am

        Exactly, Amigo. For all supporters of Palestinian resistance, the English are an American fifth column in Europe and its executioner; also for the policy of support to Zionism -“echinococcus

        I wouldn,t blame all English people , and I am sure you did not intend to.It,s their Gov , (as a member of the EU ) that lacks the courage to put pressure on Israel —ie –demand a cessation of the trade agreements until Israel ends the blockade of Gaza and ends the occupation.

        I just bet the zionits are enjoying all this mayhem in the EU. It offers a welcome diversion from their crimes.

      • echinococcus
        June 26, 2016, 11:16 am

        No, no one should be blaming the English people –people meant as those not in the governing class. But as always, a doubt: shouldn’t we sometimes think of holding majorities accountable when they collaborate by voting for it?

    • yonah fredman
      June 26, 2016, 3:35 pm

      Amigo- you wrote “most Israeli jews and their slavish supporters around the globe have openly stated their desire for the breakup of the EU”. Which is poppycock. What you meant to write was “many Israeli jews and their supporters have openly stated…”
      There is a difference between many and most. If you wish to write factual sentences, I bet you can. If you wish to write sentences that have zero basis in facts, I bet you will.

      • amigo
        June 26, 2016, 4:09 pm

        “There is a difference between many and most. If you wish to write factual sentences, I bet you can. If you wish to write sentences that have zero basis in facts, I bet you will. “YF

        I wrote what I meant to write. 51 out of 100 equals most.

        most

        1.
        greatest in amount or degree.

        https://www.google.ie/search?q=most+definition&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b&gws_rd=cr&ei=lTRwV67TJYuTgAa8_bvADw

      • amigo
        June 26, 2016, 4:35 pm

        YF , just to add a point.

        Keep tuned when the EU gets busy with the next part of the labeling of goods from the illegal squats and watch the level of anti EU sentiment coming from Israeli Jews. This out in the open.
        Just imagine what is said behind closed doors.

      • yonah fredman
        June 26, 2016, 5:22 pm

        As far as anti Europe attitude, any yehudi with a dime invested in history, has at least a vestige of such bias. See amira hass. But many Israelis are detached from the past and many more are attached with a future that includes a business mind, so those biases are mostly the loudmouth stupids, y know like commentators elsewhere. Many people are calmer and more practical than commentators.

  9. amigo
    June 26, 2016, 7:47 am

    Latest twist in the “Brexitgate ” affair.

    I just finished watching “Sunday Politics ” on BBC . One of the panel members pointed out , that the referendum was “non binding “and could be overturned by the Government.To further confuse the situation , the Scottish leader (sturgeon ) is claiming that the Scottish Gov can block the “exit”.The same claim is coming from Stormont (Northern Ireland.

    This turn of events is truly a Walter Scott moment.

    ““Oh, what a tangled web we weave…when first we practice to deceive.”

  10. amigo
    June 26, 2016, 7:14 pm

    An interesting article on Haaretz demonstrating the absolute hypocracy of Bernard -Henri Levy , Israel,s unabashed apologist.Here is one of his statements.He is referring to the brexit vote.

    “It is a victory for those who, in imitation of the unbelievable Donald braying “We will make America great again!” as his yellow pompadour snaps like a lasso, dream of building a wall between “the Muslims” and themselves.”

    No mention of the walls his beloved Israel builds to separate themselves from Muslims.

    and this !!

    “Either we emerge – through strong words matched by decisive action – from a crisis that is without precedent in the past 70 years, or, across the broad spectrum of modern pre-totalitarian languages, where grimaces vie with belches as forms of expression, incompetence with vulgarity, and love of the abyss with hate for the other, the worst of humanity will come surging back.”

    Hate for the other he says.this toad who shills for Israel .Too funny.

    Read more at !!,

    http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/1.727220

    • ritzl
      June 26, 2016, 9:45 pm

      Wow amigo.

      The Israelis really have totally accepted/self-justified their ugly morality as a civilized global norm. The arrogance (or is it simply that, after so many generations of visciously subjugating another people, the ugliness is invisible to them – like the green screen in a green screen visual effect?) that demands the rest of us accept that norm or we’re ironically labeled as “haters” (or as nasty green screen pointer-outers) is TRULY breathtaking.

      I mean I literally held my breath reading that article waiting for an Act III/the Prestige that never came. I thought it was all a setup to make a point. Heh.

      Thanks. A classic.

      • amigo
        June 27, 2016, 2:57 pm

        ritzl,

        Amazing how these people think we are all complete idiots or they really believe what they are putting out there.

        How can someone who is as intelligent as this guy obviously is , be so morally bankrupt.Beggars belief.

  11. Ossinev
    June 27, 2016, 7:48 am

    @amigo
    From another Haaretz article by this see only what I wan`t to see so called “philosopher”:
    “Israel represents an island which is actually a miracle of freedom, democracy and rejection of fascist ignorance.”
    http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/bernard-henri-levy-i-have-never-seen-an-army-as-democratic-as-the-idf-1.293087

    Unbelievable hypocritical crap.

    As for his views on the Brexit vote. Total bullshit and based on the other hat which he wears – the “British are natural racists unlike us sophisticated cultured French”.

    The Brexit vote was fuelled yes by the usual marginal element of “bloody foreigners coming over here etc” but what has not really been picked up in all of this IMHO is that a very significant element in the vote was a lot of ordinary and definitely non racist Brits looking at the relentless flood of Eastern Europeans coming into the UK and the impact on under resourced health services,social services,schools and housing and thinking someone has got to pull the plug on this – Cameron wouldn`t or couldn`t,Labour certainly wouldn`t and the EU well least said. And effectively being accused pre- referendum by the Remain camp of being racists and bigots for pointing out the blindingly obvious probably made them even more determined to vote out.

    Had the “honey pot” for Eastern Europeans been France and not the UK , had the relentless flood been into France and not the UK I expect that this so called philosopher would have been complementing his fellow French for being realistic and pragmatic in trying to do something to stem the tide.

    • Shmuel
      June 27, 2016, 9:48 am

      the relentless flood of Eastern Europeans coming into the UK and the impact on under resourced health services,social services,schools and housing and thinking someone has got to pull the plug on this

      Actually, the “flood” is not relentless but seems to have slowed and stabilised (see Guardian article I linked to above), and immigrants do pay taxes (according to the aforementioned article, more than they receive in benefits and services) and generate wealth with their labour. So if British governments decide not to invest in schools, public housing, social services or the NHS, that’s hardly the fault of immigrants. If the British want more of these services, they should elect governments that will prioritise them over say military spending and bank bailouts.

      Of course BHL is still an ass.

      • MHughes976
        June 27, 2016, 11:48 am

        Absolutely, Shmuel. This is an event remarkably short of redeeming features. The Archdeacon of Oxford, who leads interfaith efforts by the Church of England round here, has just been saying that there are many reports of racist graffiti – presumably in the spirit of ‘now we can say what we really think about you’ – appearing ‘in the streets’.
        Meanwhile, I think you cives Romani have just elected a mayor from what some say is the UKIP of Italy?
        The U.K. – Spain contrast is quite interesting – we had and embraced a bunch of right wing demagogues. Spain had a genuinely left wing, perhaps slightly demagogic, option but slid away from it.

      • Shmuel
        June 28, 2016, 2:39 pm

        Meanwhile, I think you cives Romani have just elected a mayor from what some say is the UKIP of Italy?

        Hi MHughes,

        Responding a little late, and this is really way off topic for this site, but if you’re interested in parallels with Italy, and the recent municipal elections (Rome, Turin, etc.) in particular, feel free to write to me privately. Let me just say that the 5 Star Movement is hardly “the UKIP of Italy”, despite some disturbing elements, including its relationship with Farage/UKIP and a number of other unsavoury “Eurosceptics” in Strasbourg.

    • ritzl
      June 27, 2016, 10:04 am

      Libraries will be written about this vote.

      There were probably a dozen major reasons to vote Leave or Remain, but the bottom line to me, 6000 miles away, is that the “system” taken as a whole wasn’t working for 52% of Brits and they voted to change something (whether Brexit was the right something or not is the stuff of more libraries).

      We kinda have the same choice to make here with Trump the “Leave” vote and Hills the “Remain” vote. The other EU countries are probably going to decide if the “system” as a whole is working for them as well although, as you point out Ossinev, for different motivating reasons.

    • Mooser
      June 27, 2016, 11:21 am

      ” the “British are natural racists unlike us sophisticated cultured French”.

      The Romans first with Julius Caesar came,
      Including all the nations of that name,
      Gauls, Greek, and Lombards; and, by computation,
      Auxiliaries and slaves of every nation…
      Thus from a mixture of all kinds began
      That heterogeneous thing, an Englishman:
      In eager rapes and furious lusts begot
      Between a painted Briton and a Scot;
      Where gendering offspring quickly learned to bow
      And yoke their heifers to the Roman plough;
      From whence a mongrel race there came
      With neither name nor nation, speech or fame.
      This nauseous brood directly did contain
      The well-extracted blood of Englishmen”

      I don’t remember what musical that is from.

    • amigo
      June 27, 2016, 3:06 pm

      0ssinev , seriously , I didn,t know whether to laugh or cry.The headline is enough to move to the next order of business.

      I had seen it previously .That time I checked to see if I had mistakenly picked up a copy of Punch or Charlie Hebdo.

  12. Ossinev
    June 27, 2016, 12:44 pm

    @Shmuel
    “Actually, the “flood” is not relentless but seems to have slowed and stabilised (see Guardian article I linked to above), and immigrants do pay taxes (according to the aforementioned article, more than they receive in benefits and services) and generate wealth with their labour. So if British governments decide not to invest in schools, public housing, social services or the NHS, that’s hardly the fault of immigrants. If the British want more of these services, they should elect governments that will prioritise them over say military spending and bank bailouts”

    With respect I think that you are missing the point which I was trying to make. This was that what I believe swung the vote to Brexit was that a significant group of voters resented the fact that there seemed to be no appreciation of the sheer volume of current and growing Eastern European immigration and its current and potential future impact on already severely overstretched health,welfare,schooling and housing resources. Cameron failed in his “new deal” negotiations on this. The Labour Party are and were in favour of unrestricted free movement. And of course the foundation stone of the EU was and continues to be free movement and the best that the EU was prepared to do was to offer Cameron a tepid agreement on a short welfare benefits as a sop to the Eurosceptics in his party and in effect to the Eurosceptic British citizen. The group of people I am referring to are not racists. They are not accusing Eastern Europeans of avoiding paying taxes. They are not accusing them of being work shy. They are not accusing them of being benefit scroungers . They are not accusing them of being unwilling to integrate. They are not accusing them of being culturally incompatible. They are not accusing them of anything. They are simply pointing out that the UK had become a magnet/honeypot for Eastern European migrants and that the central issue of unsustainable impact on the services I mentioned was simply not being addressed.
    What irritated them even further I believe was that in raising this issue they were being branded as racists bigots. This was not racism – it was realism.

  13. Anti-Bigot
    June 28, 2016, 12:21 am

    Israel is always deeply disturbed, it’s their way of life.

  14. neggy
    July 1, 2016, 1:31 am

    All of my British friends (in the Royal Commonwealth Society) voted to leave because they agreed that being part of the EU was preventing Britain from restoring her great Empire. Israel has nothing to worry about =].

    “When you return to your homes, when you return to your counties and your cities, you must tell to all those whom you can influence that the time is at hand, that, at least, it cannot be far distant, when England will have to decide between national and cosmopolitan principles. The issue is not a mean one. It is whether you will be content to be a comfortable England, modelled and moulded upon continental principles and meeting in due course an inevitable fate, or whether you will be a great country, – an imperial country – a country where your sons, when they rise, rise to paramount positions, and obtain not merely the esteem of their countrymen, but command the respect of the world.” – Benjamin Disraeli in 1872

    • Mooser
      July 1, 2016, 2:12 am

      “All of my British friends (in the Royal Commonwealth Society) voted to leave because they agreed that being part of the EU was preventing Britain from restoring her great Empire”

      Real smart friends you’ve got there.
      Brexit will assuredly enable Britain to reclaim her colonies again. Nobody doubts that

      • neggy
        July 1, 2016, 3:07 am

        It’s the beginning of movement in a new-old historical direction. Also, Corbyn self-destructed without us even helping it along. The far left (both Europeanist and Socialist) is now seeing the result of its overreach all over the world. Plus the anti-Muslim movements are growing all around the world, without even our involvement. Puahahahahaha.

      • amigo
        July 1, 2016, 11:21 am

        “Brexit will assuredly enable Britain to reclaim her colonies again. Nobody doubts that ” Mooser

        Once upon a time—The sun never set on the “Brempire” , now it rarely shines.i hear hundreds of thousands of british neo crusaders have headed east to sunnier climes —this time they have been invited.

      • Mooser
        July 1, 2016, 1:17 pm

        “i hear hundreds of thousands of british neo crusaders have headed east to sunnier climes —this time they have been invited”

        In that case they won’t be able to use the old “we seem, as it were, to have conquered half the world in a fit of absence of mind” excuse.

      • neggy
        July 1, 2016, 11:07 pm

        Who cares about the excuse? Excuses don’t matter when you have an empire.

      • RoHa
        July 2, 2016, 2:35 am

        “The far left (both Europeanist and Socialist) is now seeing the result of its overreach all over the world.”

        What fantasy world are you living in? The EU was dominated by and run by big corporations. This is true of much of the world, as well. Hardly a real socialist in sight these days.

  15. Atlantaiconoclast
    July 4, 2016, 1:13 pm

    As long as people are too afraid to expose Israel’s destructive impact on the US and our foreign policy, it will continue to treated even better than an American state. Certainly, it is bizarre that Israel gets billions more in US aid than many states in the US.

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