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In new era of cooperation, Israeli drone kills ‘5 jihadis’ in Egypt

Israel/Palestine

From the AP. We are in a new era of cooperation between Israel and Egypt. Israel launches a drone strike in the Sinai and kills “five jihadis,” according to Egyptian news agency. This is very close to Gaza, which has experienced a crackdown from Egypt since the coup.

EL-ARISH, Egypt — An Israeli drone strike inside Egypt killed five suspected Islamic militants and destroyed a rocket launcher Friday, two senior Egyptian security officials said, marking a rare Israeli operation carried out in its Arab neighbor’s territory….

The strike, coming after a warning from Egypt caused Israel to briefly close an airport Thursday, potentially signals a significant new level of cooperation between the two former foes over security matters in the largely lawless Sinai Peninsula after a military coup ousted Egypt’s president. Egypt long has maintained that it wouldn’t allow other countries to use its territories as hotbed to launch attacks against other countries.

….A statement later posted on the official Facebook page of Col. Ahmed Mohammed Ali, an Egyptian military spokesman, said there had been two explosions in el-Agra, south of Rafah, and that security forces were investigating. Egypt’s official MENA news agency said an explosion destroyed a rocket launcher set near the border to launch attacks against Israel. The agency said at least five jihadis were killed….

…While Egypt signed a peace deal with Israel in 1979, the country has long been suspicious of the Jewish state’s intentions while annually celebrating its own military exploits against Israel in the Sinai. Allowing an Israeli drone strike inside its own territory represents military cooperation otherwise never seen before.

Ed Moloney sent this to me. I asked him about my belief that there was broad support in Egyptian society for the coup. He said:

“Anti-Morsi Egyptians had their very valid reasons to unseat the MB but what would their reaction have been had they known that out of sight, as now seems more than credible, the Obama White House, the upper crust of the Egyptian military and Israel were embarking on the same mission for very different reasons, using a feigned concern for the wellbeing of ordinary Egyptians to advance their own narrow interests? Would they have said, ‘that’s fine, go ahead. as long as we get rid of Morsi nothing else matters?’ I wonder.

“And anyway, notwithstanding the answer to that question, I think what we in this country need to know is what role, if any, did the US and Israel play in these events? Since it is more than likely that the US, Israel and the Egyptian military had their own fish to fry in that unfortunate country, I think an incident like this raises all the obvious and necessary questions.”

 

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125 Responses

  1. Justpassingby
    Justpassingby
    August 9, 2013, 3:37 pm

    What do you expect? The military hasnt been changed since Mubarak.

    When will people get a grip and understand that the coup benefitted Israel?! And still we hear people, even writers on this site, justifying the coup!

    Now go figure why US refused to call this a coup.

    • yrn
      yrn
      August 10, 2013, 3:07 am

      How Typical for writers in this blog.
      WHO CARES ABOUT THE COUP, WHO CARES ABOUT EGYPT.
      if Israel benefits that’s what’s important for writers here, let Egypt blow up……
      What I call great Humanists.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 13, 2013, 8:47 pm

        WHO CARES ABOUT THE COUP, WHO CARES ABOUT EGYPT.

        I know I do. I among others, was ecstatic when Mubarak was overthrown, but this event is not going to benefit Egypt in the slightest.

        if Israel benefits that’s what’s important for writers here, let Egypt blow up……

        That’s certainly always been the the Israeli centric POV. When Mubarak was being removed, countless talking head on cable news were saying democracy was OK except if it inconveniences Israel.

  2. Maximus Decimus Meridius
    Maximus Decimus Meridius
    August 9, 2013, 3:58 pm

    That Israel should enter an Arab country’s airspace and murder its citizens is nothing new.

    That Egypt should openly admit to allowing it most certainly is new. And not in a good way.

    • August 10, 2013, 1:25 am

      And for US entering somebody elses airspace and murdering suspected terrorists is OK? Like recently in Yemen? And UK in …stan? France in Mali? Russia in anywhere?

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 13, 2013, 8:48 pm

        And for US entering somebody elses airspace and murdering suspected terrorists is OK?

        No. Next stupid question?

  3. Shingo
    Shingo
    August 9, 2013, 5:30 pm

    I can’t wait to hear how the supporters of the coup are gong to explain how this proves Egypt has moved outside the nett of Israeki control.

    It looks like Egypt has joined Yemen, Somalia and Pakistan as the new Waahington/Israeli punching bag.

    • Taxi
      Taxi
      August 10, 2013, 1:14 am

      Yeah right shingo, that you expect any army to just stand by and allow islamist terrorism to AGAIN hijack a popular REVOLUTION is a bucket full of naive. That you think if israel and Egypt have the same enemy in islamists puts “no sunlight” between Egypt and the israelis, is even a bigger bucket of naive. Ever heard of geopolitical realpolitiking? Obviously not. Ever heard of the bad blood between the Egyptian army and the idf? Ever heard of the expression: all in good time? Do you even know the difference in policy between the islamists in Yemen and the islamists in Syria or in Egypt? Obviously not.

      At the end of the day, the only ones who are going to get ‘punched’ stupid in the middle east are the islamists, the zionists and the yanks. Till that happens, do carry on with your half-baked understanding of the wider middle east.

      • Justpassingby
        Justpassingby
        August 11, 2013, 4:53 am

        You are right Shingo, the supporters now use the rhetoric that Israel usually does.

        Just take this quote:


        “..that you expect any army to just stand by and allow islamist terrorism to AGAIN hijack a popular REVOLUTION”

        Not only factually incorrect but highly islamophobic, he even use the “term” terrorism!

      • OlegR
        OlegR
        August 11, 2013, 9:51 am

        /all in good time? /

        Taxi you are so adorable …

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 14, 2013, 3:02 am

        “Taxi you are so adorable…”- OlegR.

        More than you can ever imagine! And I’m gonna be even more adorable when Apartheid israel is history.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 11:39 pm

        that you expect any army to just stand by and allow islamist terrorism to AGAIN hijack a popular REVOLUTION is a bucket full of naive.

        How did they hijack a popular REVOLUTION? By voting in a democratic and free election?
        I guess you share the same notion of democracy as Israel and the US. It only counts when your team wins.

        That you think if israel and Egypt have the same enemy in islamists puts “no sunlight” between Egypt and the israelis, is even a bigger bucket of naive. Ever heard of geopolitical realpolitiking?

        Yes, that’s been the status quo between Israel and Egypt for at least 30 years and it’s resulted in Egypt being submissive to Israel’s wishes.

        Ever heard of the bad blood between the Egyptian army and the idf?

        You’d be amazed what 1.5 billion every 12 months does for bad blood.

        Ever heard of the bad blood between the Egyptian army and the Ever heard of the expression: all in good time?

        Such as? What are you suggesting Taxi? That the Egyptian military is just biding it’s time to lay a sucker punch on the Israelis? OK. it’s only been what, 40 years since the last stoush. Any day now right? ;-)

        Do you even know the difference in policy between the islamists in Yemen and the islamists in Syria or in Egypt? Obviously not.

        You’re the one referring to them all as one collective Taxi, now me.

        At the end of the day, the only ones who are going to get ‘punched’ stupid in the middle east are the islamists, the zionists and the yanks.

        Really? Who’s going to do that and how are they going to do it? When can we expect the fact cats running Egypts military and economy going to give up their Swiss bank accounts, hookers , sports cars, boats and palaces and lay it on the line?

  4. yrn
    yrn
    August 9, 2013, 5:49 pm

    Egypt’s largest news organisation,
    “Egyptian army spokesperson Ahmed Ali stressed that there’s no truth to media claims of an Israeli attack on Egyptian soil, nor to claims of Egyptian-Israeli coordination, requesting media to verify its information before publishing, especially on issues of national security. ”
    http://english.ahram.org.eg/News/78691.aspx

    Well…………….Doesn’t work for you in the last weeks.

    • piotr
      piotr
      August 10, 2013, 12:12 pm

      Is Denial the main (the only?) river in Egypt? Denial by an official spokesperson does not prove it one way or another. Al Ahram has a story that “officials told AP unofficially” that there was a drone strike coordinated with Egyptian military, and that the official spokesman of the military (perhaps the same person who contacted AP unofficially) denied. Mind you, Al Ahram is owned by the government of Egypt.

  5. ToivoS
    ToivoS
    August 9, 2013, 6:23 pm

    I hope that many of the pro-Palestinian leftists that supported the coup against Morsi come to their senses soon.

    In another piece of news Mahmud Badr of the Tamarrud (that was the Egyptian popular movement that organized the ‘street’ to back the coup) is currently visiting the Gulf monarchies praising and thanking them for all of their help.

    • August 9, 2013, 7:03 pm

      Just to understand – so you suggest that leftist liberals shuold support MB because of what? Because that would be worse for Israel that the present situation? Is this correct? Is it?

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        August 9, 2013, 10:46 pm

        @fnlevit Just to explain – they should support the existence of an elected government and work like hell to defeat it in the next election. Or is that too democratically nuanced a view for you to understand? :)

      • August 10, 2013, 5:40 pm

        Well, what can you expect from a poor physics prof. at Weizmann.

        If permitted to say (most humbly) – this standard democratic pattern does not seem to work in certain countries lacking established democratic traditions. Take Putin in Russia or Erdogan in Turkey or Hamas in Gaza, etc. They were all elected democratically and then quickly used their power to assure that next time they will be surely elected. (well Hamas simply physically exterminated its opponents by various exotic means like throwing them from the roof of a 14th floor building, etc). MB in Egypt fit this ticket exactly.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 13, 2013, 8:45 pm

        this standard democratic pattern does not seem to work in certain countries lacking established democratic traditions.

        The same could be said of Israel, which tried to marry ethnic supremacy with democracy.

      • ToivoS
        ToivoS
        August 10, 2013, 12:17 am

        If you think there is only two sides in Egyptian politics you are a fool. I certainly did not support the MB nor a military fascist dictatorship. I suspect that Egypt would have been better off if the secular opposition had worked as an opposition party with the democratically elected Morsi government. It was clear from day one that Morsi did not have a majority but it had the largest plurality of any other party. The secular, nonmilitary parties, would have been in a position to influence policy.

        Instead, they threw their strength behind a military coup. It is not clear how they will benefit from this other than some of their leaders being invited to share the spoils.

      • American
        American
        August 10, 2013, 1:18 am

        It’s becoming clearer….

        Egypt’s generals urged to tighten their grip on power
        Exclusive: Former head of military intelligence is possible presidential candidate in the coming elections
        Alastair Beach
        Saturday, 10 August 2013

        As Egyptians were coming to terms with the chaos and bloodshed that blighted the holy month of Ramadan, a number of the country’s wealthiest businessmen sat down for a dinner of lamb kebabs and stuffed courgettes.
        Among them were two of Egypt’s most prominent television moguls; Mohamed el-Amin, head of the hugely popular CBC channel, and Ahmad Bahgat, the magnate behind Egypt’s first-ever private station, Dream TV. Hosting them all in his Cairo home was Hassan Rateb, another wealthy TV channel boss.

        But one of Mr Rateb’s invitees did not quite fit the profile of the assorted businessmen and anti-Islamist politicians who were present that evening – Murad Mowafy, Egypt’s former spy chief and the man who is now being courted by influential powerbrokers to become the country’s next president.

        According to a source who was present during the dinner, Mr Mowafy was on the guest list that evening because TV channel bosses were trying to persuade him to run for Egypt’s top job at the coming elections. “They were telling him to go for the presidency,” said the source, speaking to The Independent. “They were saying he would have their total support if he did.”

        contnued….http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/egypts-generals-urged-to-tighten-their-grip-on-power-8755154.html?printService=print

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 10, 2013, 1:40 am

        “Instead, they threw their strength behind a military coup”.

        I’d say it was the other way round, buddy.

        Let us retrace back, and plenty of documentation to support this: the streets swelled FIRST with millions of civilian protestors, then the army stepped in and supported their stance. It was NOT Egyptian soldiers who first took to the streets in their millions to protest against Morsi, with Egyptian civilians staying at home and cheering from their windows.

        And it don’t matter what anyone says anyway – the ‘protests’ ousted the islamist conman. You can go ahead and call it a coup and a shcoop till kingdom come and it won’t make one bit of iota to Egypt.

        I challenge anyone here who supported the popular ouster of Mubarak to tell me the difference between what happened to him and what happened to Morsi. I challenge anyone to explain how in a democracy, the will of the majority doesn’t count – be it in the first year or the last year of a dictatorial incumbent.

        Fact is, the majority of Egyptians and the majority of the region, see the ouster of Morsi as a continuation of the 25th January 2011 revolution. But that’s just ‘unacceptable’ to all the prissy westerners in faraway countries, all critiquing from the comfort of their 99 cent democracies.

      • August 10, 2013, 2:27 am

        Please dont assume that I think some primitive thoughts. I am trained not to. Certainly ousting Morsi was in many, many countries interest. Certainly western countries. Actually even in Iran’s. I fail to understand how Israel can be assumed to be so powerful as being directly actually behind the coup. But if it was – all the honor to its abilities.

        Second point – we do not know yet what the coup will lead to. For instance military in Turkey used to play a positive role in countering fundamentalism untill Erdogan managed to supress them. So it is religious fundamentalism (with all the feedoms supressed, you know) vs military controlling the situation and perhaps allowing for a more reasonable government. It is what is better of two evils….

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 10, 2013, 9:32 am

        Please dont assume that I think some primitive thoughts. I am trained not to.

        Given your inability to comprehend the asymmetry of the I/P conflict, it appears your training was very poor, and given your very poor comprehension of the history of the conflict, it is a safe assumption that your thoughts are indeed primitive and tribal.

        ertainly ousting Morsi was in many, many countries interest.

        No, it benefited the US, Saudi Arabia and Israel.

        Second point – we do not know yet what the coup will lead to.

        Yes we do, Mubarak Mark II. The military has a vice like grip on Egypt so there won’t be an Erdogan equivalent permitted to campaign in the elections.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 10, 2013, 9:39 am

        the streets swelled FIRST with millions of civilian protestors, then the army stepped in and supported their stance.

        That’s the Fox News headline version of events.

        The plot to get rid of Morsi started a soon as he took office and has been 12 months in the making. The so called millions of civilian protesters” – which was never counted – was a result fo that campaign.

        Your version is a bit like arguing that Mossadegh was removed by popular demonstrations, without addressing the fact that the CIA and the British started the chaos by paying thugs to set off bombs in Tehran.

        The ouster fo Morsi was financed and carried out by Saudi Arabia, Washington and the Egyptian Military.

        And it don’t matter what anyone says anyway – the ‘protests’ ousted the islamist conman.

        False. If the military had not stepped in, Morsi would still be in power, no matter how wishful your thinking.

        You can go ahead and call it a coup and a shcoop till kingdom come and it won’t make one bit of iota to Egypt.

        Not to the supporters no. Incidentally. the so called “liberal”supporters are calling for the military to tighten it’s grip on power and “liberal” factions that were quick to praise the coup are increasingly making it known that they welcome the idea of a military leader taking the office, and the next election, assuming it happens at all, seems likely to be dominated by the current military brass and former Mubarak-era security officials.
        http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/egypts-generals-urged-to-tighten-their-grip-on-power-8755154.html?printService=print

        Take a bow Taxi.

        I challenge anyone here who supported the popular ouster of Mubarak to tell me the difference between what happened to him and what happened to Morsi.

        That’s easy. The military did not get involved in the ouster of Mubarak, because unlike this coup, the ouster of Mubarak was a genuinely popular revolution. In fact, the reason Mubarak had to step down is because the military refused to get involved.

        So you see my dear, the two examples are as different as night and day.

        I challenge anyone to explain how in a democracy, the will of the majority doesn’t count – be it in the first year or the last year of a dictatorial incumbent.

        Who is arguing that the the will of the majority doesn’t count apart from supporters of the coup? Secondly, if it was indeed a majority who supported the ouster of Morsi, why didn’t they opt to remove him democratically, rather than militarily?

        Polls show that 63% of Egyptians do not support the coup.

        Fact is, the majority of Egyptians and the majority of the region, see the ouster of Morsi as a continuation of the 25th January 2011 revolution.

        That’s not a fact at all, because there is no evidence to support it. You’ve simply lost all reason, rationality and prescriptive Taxi.

      • Walid
        Walid
        August 10, 2013, 9:46 am

        “I challenge anyone here who supported the popular ouster of Mubarak to tell me the difference between what happened to him and what happened to Morsi. ”

        No difference, Taxi, both were choreographed by the US, including the initial move after Mubarak’s fall by which the US twisted the Egyptian military’s arm to allow the Brothers and the Salafists to run as political parties in the coming elections after an absence of about 60 years. It was known at the time that this would be a temporary move and that sooner or later these 2 parties would be returned to remaining underground. It happened much sooner than anyone anticipated.

        The majority of Egyptians were manipulated. The march to democracy had nothing to do with Mubarak’s and Morsis’s overthrow.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 10, 2013, 9:49 am

        But one of Mr Rateb’s invitees did not quite fit the profile of the assorted businessmen and anti-Islamist politicians who were present that evening – Murad Mowafy, Egypt’s former spy chief and the man who is now being courted by influential powerbrokers to become the country’s next president.

        Thanks American.

        It stinks to high heaven doesn’t it? Those media bosses played a crucial role in shaping public opinion against Morsi. The lies and propaganda they were broadcasting was outlandish.

        This new regime looks like it will make Mubarak look like a democratic reformer.

      • Justpassingby
        Justpassingby
        August 10, 2013, 10:19 am

        fnlevit

        You have really really missed something if you think that a coup by military dictators is equal to a democratically elected party.

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 10, 2013, 11:16 am

        “It’s becoming clearer….”

        No, it’s NOT “becoming clearer”, dear American. I can’t believe you’re posting such utter speculation based on no verifiable evidence whatsoever. Did you even notice the word “possibly” in the article’s teaser line? Good grief! How can “possibly” be a confirmation of the conspiracy theory you’re peddling? Your standards are down on this one, buddy.

        And even if for sure the TV bosses tried to “power broker” Mr. Mowafy (a dude you didn’t even bother to research to know his non-existant public profile, a dude so unimportant that the writer of the article didn’t even get his name right), why do you think they’re attempting to “broker” him? Did you ask yourself this? Did you know for instance that the majority of the protestors, who are economically struggling, are demanding a secular socialist government and not a secular capitalist government? Is the motive of the TV “moguls” clear to you now? The capitalists in Egypt are way behind in people’s support for their ‘vision’ of Egypt and they’re desperate for a tough ‘face’ to stick on their posters. Fat cat desperadoes dining together and “possibly” attempting to woo someone into their powerplay project is no frigging story – full stop.

        I never woulda thought you’d fall for a paparazzi gossip-page story. Man! So many people drowning in propaganda instead of doing a bit of research on published stories and sensibly WAITING OUT to see what happens at the next Egyptian elections.

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 11, 2013, 3:18 am

        “That’s the Fox News headline version of events.”

        LOL dude. And the world didn’t see with their own eyes and with mouths open in surprise (including the WH, tel aviv and Riyadh), the sudden eruption of civilian street protests in Tahrir square. Suuuuuure. Just a small reminder:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SgjIgMdsEuk

        You think this lady in the video was paid by saudi/usa to start her rebellion? Or you think she’s an idiot who doesn’t know that she’s being controlled by foreign forces, getting brainwashed by them while she sleeps?

        Shingo has no respect for the Egyptian experience – he hates it that Egyptians want to be free. Free of Mubarak, Morsi, usa, saudi. He thinks that they should just be shtomp and stay under the boot for another 30 years. He think’s they’re ALL stupid impressionable people who don’t know anything about Egypt. He thinks that he knows better what’s good for them and how to go about getting it. He simply doesn’t believe a single word of what they say. 84 million idiots live in Egypt, right shingo?

        Just like the Pharaohs used to think of them.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 5:52 am

        And the world didn’t see with their own eyes and with mouths open in surprise (including the WH, tel aviv and Riyadh), the sudden eruption of civilian street protests in Tahrir square.

        Suuuuuure. Just a small reminder:

        That’s funny. I could have sworn you made the claim that “They have decided that it is better to be starving and free than starving and under the boot of a foreign entity ” , yet this lady says the Egyptians were demonstrating against hunger and poverty and have welcomed being under the boot of the Saudis.

        Ironic also that she complains that demonstrators were dismissed as psychopaths and that the ND demonstrators are now being dismissed as terrorists.

        You think this lady in the video was paid by saudi/usa to start her rebellion?

        Not at all. Then again, a lot of decent Syrian’s started the demonstrations against Assad before the movement were hijacked by foreign interests.

        You know as someone who is opposed to the jihadists movement in Syria, it strikes me as odd that you have no problem with the fact the Saudis have backed both movements in Syria and Egypt.

        Shingo has no respect for the Egyptian experience – he hates it that Egyptians want to be free. Free of Mubarak, Morsi, usa, saudi.

        That’s rubbish Taxi and you know it. We were both overjoyed at the 2011 revolution. We differ as to what this coup means, but we both want the same thing.

        Don’t you see, that while you claim the Egyptians want to be free of Mubarak, Morsi, USA and Saudi Arabia, the Egyptians went from being controlled by Morsi/USA to Mubarak, USA and Saudi Arabia?

        The reason I am so passionate about this coup is because it looks to me like a case of Egyptians jumping out of the frying pan into the fire.

        He think’s they’re ALL stupid impressionable people who don’t know anything about Egypt.

        All people are impressionable when and the power of the media in a country that is largely illiterate cannot be overstated. Those on the ground in Egypt who are familiar with media manipulation have noted how extreme the media attacks on Morsi have been over the last 12 months 24/7.

        84 million idiots live in Egypt, right shingo?

        Polls show that 63% of those 84 million disapprove of the coup.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 6:01 am

        Is the motive of the TV “moguls” clear to you now? The capitalists in Egypt are way behind in people’s support for their ‘vision’ of Egypt and they’re desperate for a tough ‘face’ to stick on their posters. Fat cat desperadoes dining together and “possibly” attempting to woo someone into their powerplay project is no frigging story – full stop.

        Their the ones with the money, the power and the arms. The Tahrirs are powerless against them. They had to turn to the military to remove Morsi and guess what, that same military that you are bestowing so much faith on was dinning together with the fat cat desperadoes.

        That is what you are refusing to comprehend. You are under the delusion that the military share the same motives as the Tahrirs, when in fact they do not. We can wait all you want but the outcome has already been decided.

        The Egyptians will never have freedom and democracy until they clean out the military and the deep state. Until that happens, the changes will simply be superficial.

      • just
        just
        August 11, 2013, 6:26 am

        Most of the suffering people of the world ARE manipulated by the US and our “allies”.

        It’s our “foreign policy”.

      • Walid
        Walid
        August 11, 2013, 7:04 am

        “Shingo has no respect for the Egyptian experience – he hates it that Egyptians want to be free. ”

        Sorry, Taxi, but Shingo is right on this one. Egyptians had no clue what they really wanted other than to get rid of Mubarak and to get a bit more free internet in exchange (that’s what most kids in Tahrire Sq said at the time). Same thing when they demonstrated to have Morsi removed on June 30th. They still don’t really know what it is that they want. The only thing they are sure of is that they feel more secure under the watchful eye of the military. All these millions you saw in the streets had nothing romantic or democratic about them; they were like lost sheep. Had it been about democracy as you keep insisting, they would not have banded together to oust the democratically-elected Morsi, no matter how much of a creep he turned out to be.

      • American
        American
        August 11, 2013, 2:19 pm

        “Good grief! How can “possibly” be a confirmation of the conspiracy theory you’re peddling? Your standards are down on this one, buddy….Taxi

        You need to slow down just a bit….. posting an article on what some elites are up to in Egypt is just *showing what some elites are up to*…nothing more.
        You’ve invested your whole arguement about this Egypt revolt vr coup vr whatever on the ‘Egyptian people being too smart to fool”.
        Well, any people anywhere can be fooled and minipulated–before-during and after–whatever they trying to do. That the Egyptian people ‘know more’ about Egypt than outsiders doesnt mean they cant be minipulated by special interest.
        The question here is since the first Egyptian revolt was mainly for the revolters about the *corruption* of the government and the failure to raise the living standards of the people and improve the economy—–so is this second one going to do that or return them to same elite dominated economy?
        If you follow this you should follow what the aid money is going towards in Egypt—-that will be a clue as to who will hold the power in Egypt. Will it revamp the economy for the people or the elites? Will the Egyptian military be cut out of their 40% slice of Egypt’s business so the civilan workers sector have a shot at that 40% or not?
        These are the questions.
        If the revolters only goal was getting rid of the MB Morsi and wiping out the MB as a political party then thats another story and has nothing to do with the Egyptians desiring ‘democracy.
        I dont think anyone here is fooled by ‘propaganda’ from any source. I am looking at what is said here,there and yonder by all involved parties and then looking at what is ‘happening’ and comparing any contridictions between what is being said and what is being done by all involved.
        Thats all that can be done until the final results are in on what kind of government comes out of this.
        So we all have a long 9 month or whatever wait to see what this rev-coup produces.

      • American
        American
        August 11, 2013, 3:04 pm

        @ Shingo

        “Those media bosses played a crucial role in shaping public opinion against Morsi. The lies and propaganda they were broadcasting was outlandish.””>>

        Absolutely. In addition to other ‘real’ evidence of minipulation like public utilites curtailed during Moris and ‘restored’ to 100% the day after he was removed……gee, what a miracle!
        There is something else also that I suspect—Morsi *did* pursue and make efforts to get WB and IMF loans to get Egypt’s economy going as soon as he assumed office—anyone can verify that effort by googling many news articles on it—-but it drug on and on was stalled because the lenders said they wanted to see signs of ‘stability first’—-obviously no stability was going to come without those loans—meanwhile several of the top stakeholders/business owners in Egypt had ‘scaled back’ their operations in protest of Morsi increasing their corp taxes by 10%—-dragging down the economy and employment in Egypt even more—–I think it would be reasonable to assume those top stakeholders were giving their ‘imput’ to any lenders looking at Egypt.
        So yes, imo the elites were after Morsi from day one and used all the tools and connections they had to get rid of him, not because he was an MB, but because he stepped on their $$ and power interest.
        Really, if this had been a who-done-it to Morsi mystery there were so many clues in the first half of the book we wouldn’t have needed to read the ending to figure out who done it.

      • Daniel Rich
        Daniel Rich
        August 11, 2013, 6:09 pm

        There’s a reason why I appreciate hopmi’s [et al] comments, because it’s [they’re] pretty straight forward and without all the sidetracking notions of jumping on the ‘Free Palestine’ bandwagon in order to protect Israel.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 11:48 pm

        In addition to other ‘real’ evidence of minipulation like public utilites curtailed during Moris and ‘restored’ to 100% the day after he was removed……gee, what a miracle!

        And don’t forget the fact that the police suddenly decided to go to work and start policing after 12 months of hiatus in protest against Morsi being elected.

        Of course, it was Morsi who was blamed for not maintaining law and order.

        As well as public utilities curtailed during Morsi, there were the bread and fuel shortages which also miraculously became less scarce the say Morsi was removed.

        And what about the decision of the army to charge Morsi for his effort to break of of jail in 2011 under Mubarak. Why did they wait 12 months to charge him?

        Nothing to see here, more right along. As Taxi will tell you, the Egyptian Military and saintly and good folks who wanne do the right thing by the average Egyptian.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 13, 2013, 8:37 pm

        They still don’t really know what it is that they want.

        I agree Walid. I think they know what they don’t want, though their opinion as to what the problem is has clearly been shaped and manipulated.

        Had it been about democracy as you keep insisting, they would not have banded together to oust the democratically-elected Morsi, no matter how much of a creep he turned out to be.

        Or more to the point, they would not have run to the military to do it for them.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 13, 2013, 8:41 pm

        You’ve invested your whole arguement about this Egypt revolt vr coup vr whatever on the ‘Egyptian people being too smart to fool”.

        Very well put American.

        There are so many examples of populations being hoodwinked, such as Iran in 1953. It’s such a tried and tested method – create the problem then pretend to have the solution.

        If the revolters only goal was getting rid of the MB Morsi and wiping out the MB as a political party then thats another story and has nothing to do with the Egyptians desiring ‘democracy.

        Very true, in fact it’s little more than persecution and McCarthyism.

      • Woody Tanaka
        Woody Tanaka
        August 10, 2013, 11:51 am

        ” so you suggest that leftist liberals shuold support MB because of what? Because that would be worse for Israel that the present situation”

        Good enough for me. Zionism is one of the great evils in the world today. If this is what it takes to crush it, then it is worth having to deal with its consequences late, so long as the cancer is cut out.

    • American
      American
      August 10, 2013, 12:50 pm

      I have searched all over for some background on Mahmud Badr and cant find anything…does anyone have any info on him…family, connections, career, etc..?

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 10, 2013, 1:57 pm

        You can’t find “anything” on Mahmud Badr because, well… ehm, he simply doesn’t exist. The guy you surely mean is: Mahmoud Badr:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahmoud_Badr

        Copious amateur journalism going on and being swallowed with relish – tsk tsk tsk.

        Even the great ToivoS is lost in the fog of anti revolution propaganda, making claims without a link – because there is no such story anywhere on the net to link to: try googling and see for yourselves.

        Man! Mahmoud Badr is only MISTER REVOLUTION himself and you don’t even know his name and you’ve got the temerity to write post after post after post dissing and trashing an extraordinary event and its brave people – all out of sheer ignorance and knee-jerk arrogance.

        Mahmoud Badr can simply be described as a completely committed anti imperialist and an anti monarchist. That he would go to kiss the oily sheik’s ring would be part and parcel of the smear campaign to discredit his massive, massive, massive street power and cred. And should he deem it germane to ‘visit’ the gulfies, what makes anyone here an expert on him and his ideology to know what his agenda would be for making such a visit? You’re all drunk on fermented presumptions.

        If you BELIEVED the fake hype of the “coup” in the first place, then you’re already lost in the propaganda foggy maze by now. You guys are getting intellectually shafted and you’re not even feeling it.

        But I’m feeling it on your behalf: ouch ouch ouch!

        You guys are the best on the net when it comes to israel-Palestine, but I’m sorry to say you’re really not that good on Egypt.

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 10, 2013, 2:11 pm

        “The mass demonstrations that were launched on 30 June resulted in the military’s intervention on 2 July, ousting Morsi and suspending the constitution. Badr was among the figures who flanked army chief-of-staff Abdul Fatah al-Sisi when the latter announced Morsi’s removal from power. Prior to al-Sisi’s announcement, Badr, Ahmed el-Tayeb of al-Azhar Mosque, Coptic Pope Tawadros and others were invited to meet with military officials to find a solution to end the nationwide unrest. When al-Sisi suggested to Badr that Tamarod makes a compromise and allow for a referendum to be held on whether or not Morsi should be allowed to continue his term, Badr rejected the proposal, stating “I tell you, sir, you may be the general commander of the Egyptian army but the Egyptian people are your supreme commander, and they are immediately ordering you to side with their will and call an early presidential election”.”
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahmoud_Badr

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 10, 2013, 5:51 pm

        You can’t find “anything” on Mahmud Badr because, well… ehm, he simply doesn’t exist

        Alastair Beach of the Independent had no problem finding his Taxi.

        Copious amateur journalism going on and being swallowed with relish – tsk tsk tsk.

        While you’re swallowing the relish that there wasn’t a coup but a democratic process that overthrew Morsi, even though the military had to do it…but it wasn’t a coup right?

        you’ve got the temerity to write post after post after post dissing and trashing an extraordinary event and its brave people – all out of sheer ignorance and knee-jerk arrogance.

        There was nothing particularly brave about this events compared to Tahrir Square 2011, when the demonstrators did not know what the military would do and they had the Muabarak state police killing them. In this occasion, they had nothing to fear from the Muabarak military the US armed and funded military to do their bidding, and the Saudi’s dangling a pledge fo 12 billion for them to do it.

        That’s not brave, that’s just being part of a mob with nothing to fear.

        You can’t even explain the difference between the two events, yet you all the critics fo this coup ignorant.and knee-jerk arrogance.

        That he would go to kiss the oily sheik’s ring would be part and parcel of the smear campaign to discredit his massive, massive, massive street power and cred.

        It would also be part and parcel of the behavior of someone beholden to the Saudis.

        If you BELIEVED the fake hype of the “coup” in the first place, then you’re already lost in the propaganda foggy maze by now.

        Sorry Taxi, but you’ve lost touch with reality. While I am the first to admit that winning propaganda wars has nothing to do with truth, it is the coup that has lost the propaganda war. The whole world knows it was a coup and when the Saudis are having over brown paper bags of badly needed money, while the Washington are doing the same, then there is no other conclusion one can make other than the fact that Egypt has become Saudi Arabia’s bitch.

        You guys are the best on the net when it comes to israel-Palestine, but I’m sorry to say you’re really not that good on Egypt.

        You used to be great at both Taxi, now you are failing to made a convincing argument about Egypt and you are showing signs to switching to the dark side on Israel-Palestine.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 10, 2013, 5:54 pm

        Badr was among the figures who flanked army chief-of-staff Abdul Fatah al-Sisi when the latter announced Morsi’s removal from power.

        So he was part of the coup all along. El-Sis is the sleziets and most corrupt man in Egypt and Badr must be a close second.

        “I tell you, sir, you may be the general commander of the Egyptian army but the Egyptian people are your supreme commander, and they are immediately ordering you to side with their will and call an early presidential election”.”

        Reads nice a nicely censored and mythical account to try and market Badr as a man of the people.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 10, 2013, 7:50 pm

        Notice that taxi has had nothing to say about Gen Murad Mowafi, the head of intelligence , who is being groomed to be the next Prime Minister of Egypt.

        http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/9462646/Egypt-president-Mohammed-Morsi-sacks-intelligence-chief.html

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 11, 2013, 12:08 am

        Shingo,

        LOL dude – if a bus called truth ran you over, you wouldn’t even feel it.

        Nice bit of fascism to call peaceful protestors “mob”.

        LOL. I’m having to teach you even the NAMES of the movers and shakers in Egypt.

        Sure, sure, buddy, keep telling yourself you know it all. Wank away, why don’t you.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 1:15 am

        Nice bit of fascism to call peaceful protestors “mob”.

        As I said before, if it walks like a duck, looks like a duck and talks like a duck…

        I’m having to teach you even the NAMES of the movers and shakers in Egypt.

        I am always here to learn Taxi. In return, I am having to teach you what is really going on and why up is not down and time does not travel in reverse.

        Meanwhile, I am still awaiting your take on Mowafy….hehe.

        Wank away, why don’t you.

        Funny hearing that from someone who thinks they are on the winnign sidfe of the propaganda war when the universal consensus is that there was a coup in Egypt.

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 11, 2013, 2:19 am

        Shingo,

        Try and get the dude’s name right first of all – more Egypt amateurs on mw!

        Secondly, groomed shgroomed is all speculation and speculation is your department not mine. How about you wait and see IF he gets the job or not first?

        I’d rather comment on facts, not invent my own alarmist fiction.

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 11, 2013, 2:52 am

        “… universal consensus”.

        Right you are mister President of the Universe.

        Where’s your link to that sweeping statement? Oh I forgot, you can read the minds of the whole of humanity faster than a speeding bullet.

        I’m in Egypt for the weekend right now, attending the 60th birthday party of a friend. You’re advising me to reach out to you all the way in Australia to get news on Egypt? Funny bunny boy.

      • Justpassingby
        Justpassingby
        August 11, 2013, 4:55 am

        Are you in denial Ms Taxi? Do you deny that the coup was supported by the Gulf?

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 4:57 am

        Secondly, groomed shgroomed is all speculation and speculation is your department not mine. How about you wait and see IF he gets the job or not first?

        Taxi,

        Were you not the same “Taxi” that said the Egyptian foreign ministry was going to lift the blockade on Gaza, after they blocked it? Sounds like speculation to me.

        I’d rather comment on facts, not invent my own alarmist fiction.

        Then start with admitting the fact a coup took place in Egypt.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 5:00 am

        I’m in Egypt for the weekend right now, attending the 60th birthday party of a friend. You’re advising me to reach out to you all the way in Australia to get news on Egypt?

        Being in Egypt is not helping you making a coherent or convincing argument. You are failing miserably to convince anyone here, so it’s clearly not putting you at any advantage.

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 11, 2013, 9:53 am

        “you are showing signs to switching to the dark side on Israel-Palestine.”

        LOL – go ahead and call me a zionist terrorist why donthca?

        You can’t keep up with me on Egypt so you slyly try to play the Palestine card against me to discredit me. I don’t need to prove to you or anybody else on the planet where I earnestly stand on the issue of Palestine. My archives speak for themselves.

        * * * * * * * * * * * *

        Call it what you will, people, but summarized, here’s where I stand on Egypt:

        The largest civilian political protest in the history of mankind occurred in Egypt and resulted in the ouster of a democratically elected islamist dictator who wore a baseball cap embossed with star of David over his Qatari headscarf. The Egyptian army, fearing a real outbreak of sectarian bloodshed, asserted its presence on the streets in the name of national security. This is only to be expected in times of violent, mass civic unrest. There is an interim government in the meantime setting up for next elections in approx 6-9 months. I accept that others may have a different definition for what happened in Egypt (coup v revolution), but to me it remains a people’s revolt backed by the army. Yes I know the army is throwing its weight around on the streets of Egypt right now (they need to because of the threat of “rivers of blood” by the MB supporters), but there is zero evidence that the Egyptian army is interfering with the decisions of the interim government. The Egyptian army meeting with the interim government to discuss state affairs does not mean that the interim government is under the thumb of the army – they need to meet because they’re working together to stabilize their country.

        Millions are being spent on delegitimizing the Egyptian revolution – miraculously, tens and tens of books on the “coup” have suddenly turned up in bookstores overnight. Hundreds of articles per day in western media are attacking the Egyptian people and its army. People in the west are saying that the Egyptian people, who’ve been suffering hunger and humiliation under corrupt dictatorships since the 1970’s, are all stupid fools being led by the nose to another prison cell. Cynics are saying that usa, israel, saudi AND the Egyptian army, have together successfully conspired to hoodwink all 84 million Egyptians. Now, is this really possible? Did they put something weird in the waters of the Nile?

        Western media is citing polls claiming that 63% of Egyptians are against the so-called “coup”, but they’re not telling you that these polls were taken in MB neighborhoods. All the islamists combined in Egypt make up approximately between 20-25 percent of the population. There is plenty of infighting between them – saudi crew versus qatari crew – and the saudi crew were on the streets themselves protesting AGAINST Morsi. To me, the numbers just don’t add up. To me it’s all part of the campaign to cover up the diminishing hegemony of the usa and its bff’s in the mideast. They are doing everything in their power and more, including sending out copious amounts of foggy misinformation, to make both their friends and foes think that they’re still top dog in the mideast. Obama (and the democratic party) does not want to go down in history for having lost not just Iraq and Syria, but now Egypt too. The icey cold shoulder that McCain & Co got from the Egyptian interim government earlier on this week, well, we can deduce that now USA is holding Egypt not with two hands, but with only one. This is huge. And I’m here in Egypt this weekend and I’m hearing all about how the Egyptians intend to rap on the knuckles of the other clinging USA hand to free themselves from its derogatory influence.

        Mondofolks, ask yourself this: who benefits from this western-based media psyc-op against the Egyptian people desperate for their freedoms? Who would be threatened most by the Egyptian people being free? Who would benefit most from undercutting the Egyptian army, currently the strongest army in the Arab world? They got rid of the Iraqi army, they’re attempting to kill off the Syrian army with a thousand small cuts – and now the negative focus is on the Egyptian army. Get the picture?

        Contemplate on the above, please.

        And yes, go ahead and analyze and speculate on the current elbowing for power going on in Egypt at this time, but please, I ask you respectfully to hold final judgement till after the new Egyptian elections.

        What is going on in Egypt, is much, much bigger than just the ousting of Morsi.

      • MHughes976
        MHughes976
        August 11, 2013, 12:59 pm

        I’ve held your views in great respect for some years, Taxi. You know the ME with an intimacy that few of us could match, certainly not me. I would very much like to think that the new elections will lead to a new era. However, those opinion polls. The strongly pro-Morsi ones seem to come from the ‘Middle East Monitor’ – is that, in your view, not a trustworthy source?

      • ToivoS
        ToivoS
        August 11, 2013, 4:00 pm

        Taxi is trying to establish her expertise on the Egypt by correcting the spelling of “Mahmud” but she seems unaware that their does not seem to be an agreed upon method for transliterating Arab names in English. Mahmud is no more incorrect than Mahmoud.

        American this is a link to Mahmud Badr’s cavorting with Gulf royalty:

        http://angryarab.blogspot.com/2013/08/this-revolution-brought-to-you-byuae.html

      • OlegR
        OlegR
        August 11, 2013, 5:20 pm

        Taxi is a she ?

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 11, 2013, 5:51 pm

        ToivoS the great,

        I bet my farm that, not only did you not know how to spell that guys’ name till today, but you don’t even know how to pronounce his name properly either (Arab speakers will understand why I say this: there is no ‘h’ sound in the name Mahmoud, but a similar sounding Arab alphabet that is difficult for westerners to pronounce). That aside, your ‘transliteration’ excuse is a flippant joke, right? I mean the guy himself spells his name as ‘Mahmoud’ – it is on all his OFFICIAL I.D.’s. ‘Mahmoud’ IS his name, not ‘Mahmud’. I’m sorry to have to remind you here that only an amateur journalist/blogger will not check the correct spelling of the subjects of his article. It’s called due diligence, my dear. You’re usually good at it – what gives?

        And you posting a picture of Mahmoud Badr with Abdullah bin Zayid, son of the ruler of the UAE, is even a bigger joke! I mean, I have actually met Abdullah bin Zayid and a few other members of his family too (horrible true story) – I too have had more than one picture taken with them – does that make me a salivating ring-kisser too? Does that make me a slave of the royal Gulfie? I friggin hate the lotta them! LOL! Grow up will ya! You’re basing the conclusion of your WHOLE analysis on a picture, a picture and a rumor?! And let us, please, look closely at this incriminating picture: look at how uncomfortable Mahmoud looks, look at his half-sheepish, half forced grin – look at his uncomfortable shifting neck and body language – look at the scary giant hands of Abdullah bin Zayid on Mahmoud’s reluctant shoulders. WTF?! Does this picture look like it’s Miller Time for Rat Pack?! Do these people in the picture really look bonded to you? I dunno, TovoiS, to me they look artificially posed and hammy. What’s even sillier is that even the Angry Arab spelled his name wrong, and he too has severe allergies to anything royal – being the obsessed Marxists that he is.

        Rock stars get pulled in and grabbed from all directions and incessantly 24/7. Mahmoud is a famed revolutionary standing on the world stage at the young age of 28. He too is being pulled from all directions. Everybody wants to meet him, wants a piece of him. At his age, he is still learning and honing his leadership skills. He is learning pragmatism and statesmanship. Why shouldn’t he meet heads of states he disagrees with ideologically? Why shouldn’t he meet heads of states that are regional movers and shakers? What do you think is wrong with that? Everybody the whole world over does it – why aren’t you allowing him the same? Why shouldn’t he talk to his political adversaries when they reach out to him? Your smearing innuendo is based on absolute zilch, prejudice, and pre-determined judgement, and unless you can show PROOF that Mahmoud accepted compromising bribes from Abhullah bin Zayed when he met him, or in some other dirty despicable way, sold out his country to an evil foreign project, then you really haven’t got yourself a solid intellectual leg to stand on.

        You’re just mad cuz Mahmoud was majorly instrumental in ousting your favorite islamist puppet. You, who ludicrously thinks that Morsi shoulda stayed in power because he was giving israel a dose of hell – no other reason, as far as you’re concerned – never mind his incompetence as a leader and his anti democratic maneuvers. Never mind that Morsi ACTUALLY bowed to israel on the second day of his presidency, and stayed bowing to israel till his ouster.

        Ship of fools!

      • annie
        annie
        August 11, 2013, 5:59 pm

        of course oleg, pay attention!

      • OlegR
        OlegR
        August 11, 2013, 6:11 pm

        Why, it’s not really meaningful here online.
        I still think Taxi is the proponent of very right wing pan Arabic Nazerist nationalistic ideology that on the grounds of hatred towards Israel gets along with the generally leftist (and not in a good way) spirit of this site.
        Her writing style never indicated she was a women hence my surprise.
        Well i will withdraw my suggestion to her to pick up an AK and join the fray.

      • Daniel Rich
        Daniel Rich
        August 11, 2013, 6:18 pm

        @ Shingo,

        Q: You are failing miserably to convince anyone here

        R: Would you please not think you are representing me here on MW or act as if you are? Stick to the 101 for clarity. Much appreciated.

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 11, 2013, 6:22 pm

        “You are failing miserably to convince anyone here”.

        “anyone”. Mister universe sweepingly speaks on behalf of the universe again.

        And I ain’t here to “convince’, deary. I’m here to put out the Egyptian POV that you are shamelessly disrespecting.

        I’ll tell you what, I’m gonna leave ALL Egypt threads alone till after the election. I won’t bother commenting on the developing events between now and then. I wanna give the whole floor and microphone to all you Egypt know-it-alls. By jeez, I think I’ll go to Australia now and learn all about Egypt from there. I’ll be a while, so don’t wait up.

        Take it away maestro Shingo. Let’s see how interesting and dynamic your echo chamber gets.

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        August 11, 2013, 7:23 pm

        MHughes,

        I too have had respect and appreciation of your input on mw for years. Thank you.

        The problem is not with the Middle East Monitor, they’re merely reporting on a ‘Field Study’ done in Egypt. It’s the second one they’ve conducted since Morsi’s ouster. And they will conduct a third, a forth, and so on and so forth, in the build up to the next elections. This is how one ‘monitors’.

        Considering that they conducted the second field study from mainly lslamist neighborhoods, and considering that the second field study’s results are not fixed or permanent, well, I personally view it as interesting, but disposable information. The only time the picture will become perfectly clear in Egypt, is when the results of the new elections are announced. And if at that time, the Egyptian army purposely stirs strife only to declare Martial Law, then and only then, I would see that the ouster of Morsi was, in retrospect, a military coup. And if this does not happen, then Morsi’s ouster remains the doing of a popular revolt backed by the army.

        This is the last post from me on Egypt, MHughes, so I apologize upfront for not being able to engage further with you on this, should you have any further comments.

        But I have no doubt that plenty of other mw contributors will give you food for thought too. After all, some of them reckon themselves on Egypt more than even Egyptians themselves. I’m sure my insights and perspective will not be be missed, but bettered by all them Egyptoloshits out there.

        ;-)

      • ToivoS
        ToivoS
        August 11, 2013, 7:39 pm

        Taxi I do not know Arabic but I do know that Arab names can come in numerous transliterations. (Khadaffi anyone?). It has to do with transliterating different Arabic dialects, I believe, but I really don’t know. Asad Abu Khalil often has idiosyncratic transliterations.

        Here is another link to your liberal fascist guru Mahmud Badr.

        http://angryarab.blogspot.com/2013/08/ha-ha-ha-mahmud-badr-founder-of.html

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 8:25 pm

        With all due respects Daniel,

        Unless you are telling me that Taxi has changed your mind about the events in Egypt, I think my position is a valid one. Perhaps you agree with Taxi, but that’s not the same as being convinced.

      • Djinn
        Djinn
        August 11, 2013, 9:40 pm

        Being physically present somewhere doesn’t necessarily bestow all the answers. Presumably Taxi, you dont believe that Obsidian and Oleg are better equipped to discuss Zionism than others here?

      • Djinn
        Djinn
        August 11, 2013, 9:52 pm

        Arab speakers will understand why I say this: there is no ‘h’ sound in the name Mahmoud, but a similar sounding Arab alphabet that is difficult for westerners to pronounce

        Huh, there may be no H sound technically but there most definitely is a ḥā’ sound and it’s pronounced. Its not pronounced Ma-mud. BTW I am an Arabic speaker.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        August 11, 2013, 10:13 pm

        “It has to do with transliterating different Arabic dialects,”

        That does have an effect. Add in that Arabic includes a large number of sounds that are not found in standard English, and that some transliteration systems have been devised by Frenchmen and Germans (who should really know better), and, worst of all, by Young People* who want to text in Arabic and know nothing of the standard systems.

        When using a normal Roman keyboard, probably the Qalam system is neatest (even with the oddity of capital letters in the middle of words), but the official version represents hamza as ‘ and 9ain as `, so many follow the widespread textbook practice of using 9 for 9ain. This gives the following for the alphabet:

        ‘ b t th j H kh d dh r z s sh S D T Z 9 gh f q l m n h w y

        Short vowels: a i u.
        Long vowels: aa ii uu.

        If that is not sufficiently confusing, try these Wiki articles.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanization_of_Arabic
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qalam
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_chat_alphabet

        (*I am old enough to know that everything young people do is wrong.)

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 11:07 pm

        There is an interim government in the meantime setting up for next elections in approx 6-9 months.

        Egypt had elections 12 months ago. In fact, they had at least elections.

        but to me it remains a people’s revolt backed by the army.

        You’re spin reminds me of Condi Rice trying to explain to the Senate that the surge was not going to be an escalation (which is what it was), but chose to describe it as an “segmentation” .

        Given the fact that 63% of Egyptians do not support what happened, it clearly was not a people’s revolt, but a military coup, by what it appears was in fact a minority.

        The Tahrir 2011 events on the other hand, was a legitimate people’s revolt, because it did not require the army to carry it out.

        It is this massive disconnect and contradiction that undermines your entire argument Taxi. Had Morsi stepped down, that would have been legitimate, but when a democratically elected leader has to be arrested, spirited away to a secret location, and then charged with offenses dating back to the Muabarak period, there is no clearer sign that this coup signaled a return to the Mubarak administration.

        After all, if Morsi’s felonies of 2011 were an issue, why did the military wait till July 2013 to charge him?

        It’s beyond pathetic and blatantly obvious Taxi and you know it.

        but there is zero evidence that the Egyptian army is interfering with the decisions of the interim government.

        Yeah sure Taxi, they only create it, but that doesn’t mean it’s under their thumb. never mind that the military just removed the previous , democratically elected government.

        They promise not to do it again right? Nothing to see here, move right along.

        Millions are being spent on delegitimizing the Egyptian revolution – miraculously, tens and tens of books on the “coup” have suddenly turned up in bookstores overnight.

        So having been rejecting the conspiracy theories, you come up with the mother of all conspiracies. So tell me Taxi, where were all those books trashing the 2011 overthrow of Mubarak? How do you explain that? Was Tahrir 2011 just a stages television event staged by the Zionists?

        That Gulfies, as you described them, just pledge 12 billion to legitimize the coup. So if it comes down to cash and you still can’t sell this coup as something other than a coup, then that stands as pretty strong evidence you are simply trying to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.

        Egyptian army, have together successfully conspired to hoodwink all 84 million Egyptians. Now, is this really possible?

        Again, it the demonstrators were not expressing the will of 84 million Egyptians. 63% of Egyptians disapprove of the coup.

        And secondly, the answer to your question is yes. More than 60 – 80 % of 300 million Americans were hoodwinked into supporting the Iraq war, so why not course 47% of Egyptians – if indeed it is that many.

        I too have had more than one picture taken with them – does that make me a salivating ring-kisser too?

        That depends on whether you were meeting them in the capacity as representative of a political movement.

        look at how uncomfortable Mahmoud looks, look at his half-sheepish, half forced grin

        You’re clutching at straws. That can be interpreted any way you chose. His reticence could also be read as sign that he is being forced to kiss the ring of his boss, in spite of his disdain. Think back to those award photo opps between Obams and Bibbi – did they signal to the world that Obama was honing his leadership skills in order to solve the IP conflict?

        No Taxi. That photo opp was created for Obama’s benefit and he was forced to backtrack with his tail between his legs every time since that took place. If Mahmoud is not a conspirator in this coup, he is a sock puppet.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 11:23 pm

        Yes Djin,

        The hypocrisy and irony in Taxi’s new defense is hard to miss. I guess the world had no right to comment on Amerca’s invasion of Iraq either.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 11:26 pm

        Her writing style never indicated she was a women hence my surprise.

        What style is a woman supposed to use?

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        August 11, 2013, 11:34 pm

        “a similar sounding Arab alphabet that is difficult for westerners to pronounce”

        Bollocks! Any human being (Western, Far Eastern, African, whatever) with a normal set of speech organs can easily pronounce any Arabic sound. (Or the sounds of any other human language.) They just need to learn how.

      • Inanna
        Inanna
        August 12, 2013, 12:01 am

        OMG Oleg I never thought that I would get so much pure unadulterated entertainment from the stupidity of zionists! You’ve plumbed new depths of ignorance here and the belly-laugh did me a world of good. How can I even begin to explain to you the ignorance and parochialism and misogyny that you reveal here (and not in a good way).

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        August 12, 2013, 8:01 pm

        “What style is a woman supposed to use?”

        Pink curlicued font, to start with.

  6. August 9, 2013, 6:49 pm

    Egypt Blockades Gaza! Where Are the Flotillas? Where are you, people to defend the Palestine? http://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/3923/egypt-blockades-gaza

    Hamas has finally admitted that it is the Egyptians, and not Israel, who have turned the Gaza Strip into a “big prison.”
    Ghazi Hamad, a senior official with the Hamas-controlled foreign ministry, was quoted this week as saying that the Gaza Strip has been turned into a “big prison as a result of the continued closure of the Rafah border crossing by the Egyptian authorities since June 30.”

    • Bumblebye
      Bumblebye
      August 9, 2013, 10:09 pm

      “Professor” of obfuscation?

    • ritzl
      ritzl
      August 9, 2013, 10:58 pm

      Well, Egypt sure closed the last door to the burning theater of Gaza. Israel already closed and chained the other doors. Plenty of blame to go around, and that does not include Hamas, imo.

      The flotilla movement is dead.

      The question is why does Egypt seal the tunnels and close Rafah, particularly for inbound traffic.

      Why does the Egyptian military subscribe to the collective deprivation and starvation of 1.5M people in Gaza?

      Are they true believers that if only there is enough death in Gaza that Hamas will moderate or cease to be a political factor in the area?

      How long can the Egyptian rulers deprive the people of Gaza, obviously a paramount Israeli interest, before it becomes politically destabilizing (i.e. a major and growing vortex in its own right) in Egypt’s embryonic new quest for “government that works?”

      • Daniel Rich
        Daniel Rich
        August 11, 2013, 6:20 pm

        @ ritzl,

        Q: Why does the Egyptian military subscribe to the collective deprivation and starvation of 1.5M people in Gaza?

        R: Who funds and arms the Egyptian army?

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 12, 2013, 1:50 am

        R: Who funds and arms the Egyptian army?

        But Taxi insists we’re supposed to ignore that because the Egyptian army is beholden to the Egyptian people.

        What am I missing here?

    • talknic
      talknic
      August 10, 2013, 12:08 am

      fnlevit “Hamas has finally admitted that it is the Egyptians, and not Israel, who have turned the Gaza Strip into a “big prison.””

      Nice try however, it has been known since 2005 that under the 2005 agreement Israel the Occupying Power over Gaza has the final say in what, when and who passes through ALL of Gaza’s crossings. Egypt closes the Rafah crossing at the Occupying Power’s request and as the crossing monitors living quarters are in Israel, whenever it wants Israel can simple stop them from reaching the crossings. No monitors, no passage.

      Furthermore under the Peace Treaty with Israel, Egypt is obliged to prevent any persons and/or materials Israel considers harmful to Israel from entering any territory via Egypt.

      • Reds
        Reds
        August 10, 2013, 12:38 am

        Khaled Abu Toameh the author of the piece

        “Khaled Abu Toameh is a Palestinian journalist, living in Jerusalem, who writes for the Jerusalem Post and the Jerusalem Report. Toameh appears as a commentator in Obsession, the anti-Islamic propaganda film. Abu Toameh is part of a group of Palestinians, Muslims or “former terrorists” who now have recanted or have become hostile to their own background/religion. People like Toameh, Walid Shoebat, Brigitte Gabriel, etc., are taken on tour of the United States to malign Palestinians or Muslims.”

        http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/Khaled_Abu_Toameh

        Events were Toameh spoke

        Some of the events where Khaled Abu Toameh has spoken: [4]

        2 March, 2006: Small Voices, Big Differences
        Israel Weekend in Halifax, Nova Scotia
        Sponsored by Hasbara Fellowships, NJCL, and the Canadian Federation of Jewish Students
        5 March, 2006: North East Regional Israel Conference
        Sponsored by Hasbara Fellowships, StandWithUs, The Israeli Consulate, USD Hagshama, and The David Project.

      • piotr
        piotr
        August 10, 2013, 12:19 pm

        fnlevit clearly aims to dispel stereotypes that Jews have at least average intelligence. Clearly, some will be above average and some below. I wonder if children in the first grade would grasp the idea that if area A is surrounded by B and C, then cooperation of B and C is sufficient and necessary to blockade A.

        I think that if we make a children game with appropriate rules than even older preschool children would grasp the idea.

      • libra
        libra
        August 11, 2013, 4:17 pm

        piotr: I wonder if children in the first grade would grasp the idea that if area A is surrounded by B and C, then cooperation of B and C is sufficient and necessary to blockade A.

        I’d certainly hope the idea would be grasped by a Professor of Physics.

      • Daniel Rich
        Daniel Rich
        August 11, 2013, 6:31 pm

        ” Playing down Israel’s role in the missile strike, the source noted that in recent weeks Egypt has sent Apache helicopter gunships on patrol over Rafah. The choppers have strayed into Gazan airspace on occasion.

        On Sunday, Egyptian military sources said army helicopters killed 15 jihadis in overnight sorties elsewhere in Sinai…” LINK

    • Reds
      Reds
      August 10, 2013, 12:34 am

      Lol,

      Gatestone the Zionist rightwing rag who support such people like Geert Wilders and widely known for it’s dislike of Muslims.

      Ill pass.

    • just
      just
      August 10, 2013, 12:46 am

      And just what has Israel done to Palestinians since 1948?

      Please.

    • Walid
      Walid
      August 10, 2013, 4:57 am

      “Egypt Blockades Gaza! Where Are the Flotillas? Where are you, people to defend the Palestine?”

      2 good questions that don’t appear to be bothering anyone here. Good article on the Gatestone site but the people associated with this pro-Israel group (John Bolton and like people) give it a bad smell.

      • MHughes976
        MHughes976
        August 11, 2013, 4:48 pm

        Gaza is a prison basically of Israeli construction. Egypt has the keys to one of the doors, which creak open occasionally and which can be bypassed with a degree of Egyptian connivance. The confining nature of the prison increases when Egypt chooses to make a show of slamming its doors shut and sealing the other apertures. This has been going with, as far as I can see, only minor variations under Mubarak, Morsi and the new lot. There was an occasion a few years ago when an attempt was made to send not so much a flotilla as a caravan to Gaza via Egypt, which Mubarak more or less stymied. Like other attempts to end or reduce the isolation of Gaza this attempt received a lot of sympathy on Mondoweiss. I don’t think many of us view Egypt’s policy here without deep regret, though it is clear enough that Egypt’s freedom of action is very limited by the whole apparatus of alliances and subsidies which has been constructed ever since Kissinger intervened in the Sinai War. If I was an Egyptian I would scarcely know where to begin.

      • Inanna
        Inanna
        August 12, 2013, 12:06 am

        Speak for yourself Walid. It worries me plenty.

        Edited to add- it’s one reason I don’t totally buy Taxi’s view on Egypt. In their eagerness to be rid of Moris, the people of Egypt have put their trust in an institution which is just as bad.

      • Walid
        Walid
        August 12, 2013, 8:10 am

        “Speak for yourself Walid. It worries me plenty.”

        It worries many, but not enough to blame the Arabs for their share in the oppression of the Palestinians. Fnlevit asked a valid question about the gates at Rafah. A couple of answers came through but only to excuse Egypt for it because here it’s mostly about brickbats for Israel rather than about justice for the Palestinians. Palestinian stories involving Arab countries aren’t discussed. I don’t buy Taxi’s view on Egypt either; democracy never had anything to do with the ousting of Mubarak or Morsi.

      • yrn
        yrn
        August 12, 2013, 6:04 am

        Where Are the Flotillas?
        They were not for the Palestinians, they were Against Israel.
        Lets see those Flotillas playing arround with the Egyptians ????
        They know exactly what is going to happened to them.
        Si they don’t dare even raise it up

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 13, 2013, 8:35 pm

        Where Are the Flotillas?

        Israel kills flotilla passengers.

        They were not for the Palestinians, they were Against Israel.

        They can be both. One cold have been anti Nazi and pro Jewish in 1939 right?

    • Shingo
      Shingo
      August 10, 2013, 8:47 am

      Ghazi Hamad, a senior official with the Hamas-controlled foreign ministry, was quoted this week as saying that the Gaza Strip has been turned into a “big prison as a result of the continued closure of the Rafah border crossing by the Egyptian authorities since June 30.”

      Hasbara fail.

      The Egyptians 1.5 billion annual aid is conditional upon them acting as Israel’s enabler. That includes keeping the Rafah crossing blocked.

      One of the former Egyptian generals admitted that one of the reasons the removed Morsi was because he was too friendly with Hamas.

  7. wondering jew
    wondering jew
    August 9, 2013, 8:38 pm

    Regarding Sinai: I would assume you would agree that it is in Egypt’s interest that its military control the Sinai Peninsula and that chaos does not rule there. Just so we set up parameters of what is in the national interest of Egypt.

    • August 10, 2013, 2:10 am

      I am with you, yohah fredman. Israel interests or not but this is certainly in Egypt’s interests. At least something……

    • Justpassingby
      Justpassingby
      August 10, 2013, 3:52 am

      No people here dont agree that Israel should be allied with Egypt and bomb inside of Egypt.

    • OlegR
      OlegR
      August 10, 2013, 5:09 am

      Come on Yonah you know full well that most of the people on this site think in terms of what would be bad for Israel not what would be good to, whomever.

      • eljay
        eljay
        August 11, 2013, 4:23 pm

        >> Come on Yonah you know full well that most of the people on this site think in terms of what would be bad for Israel not what would be good to, whomever.

        Most people think in terms of what’s best for all citizens of Israel, Egypt and Palestine.

        Hateful and immoral Zio-supremacists, however, think only of what’s best for “the Jews” and the immoral, unjust, oppressive, colonialist, expansionist and supremacist “Jewish State”. Secular, democratic and egalitarian states are not part of that thinking.

    • Walid
      Walid
      August 10, 2013, 5:20 am

      Nobody can control the Sinai badlands that hold over 300,000 mostly brotherhood-leaning bedouins. Today, the army again denied Israeli involvement in the attack but Mayadeen TV interviewed residents of Sinai that confirmed that an Israeli helicopter had been buzzing the area for over an hour when the missile killed 3 people. The Egyptian military would probably be happy to have Israel police this uncontrollable area.

      • OlegR
        OlegR
        August 11, 2013, 9:55 am

        Israeli helicopter.

        Was it painted white and blue or had a big nose or something that identified it as Israeli.
        Egyptian army gets the same american hardware for it’s air force just in case you didn’t know…

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 11, 2013, 11:25 pm

        Egyptian army gets the same american hardware for it’s air force just in case you didn’t know…

        No it doesn’t, but nice try.

    • Shingo
      Shingo
      August 10, 2013, 8:48 am

      I would assume you would agree that it is in Egypt’s interest that its military control the Sinai Peninsula and that chaos does not rule there.

      The treaty with Israel forbids the Egyptians having any military in the Sinai without Israeli agreement.

      • OlegR
        OlegR
        August 11, 2013, 9:56 am

        How is it relevant ?
        The Egyptian national interest remains the same control over it’s territory.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        August 13, 2013, 8:28 pm

        The Egyptian national interest remains the same control over it’s territory.

        Egypt does not control the Sinai

    • just
      just
      August 10, 2013, 11:00 am

      Regarding Palestine: “I would assume you would agree that it is in Egypt’s interest that its military control the Sinai Peninsula and that chaos does not rule there. Just so we set up parameters of what is in the national interest of Egypt.” NOT Israel nor their drones???????????

      Israel, like us, violates international law all of the time, pretending that it does not exist.

      More trash talk. Deflect and divert is the normal now– blame everybody else! I We and our “allies” need to stop these assassinations and look into our own dark souls.

    • bilal a
      bilal a
      August 10, 2013, 11:37 am

      Who recruits, funds, and arms the militants in Sinai ?

      Re: The Lavon Affair refers to a failed Israeli covert operation, code named Operation Susannah, conducted in Egypt in the Summer of 1954. As part of the false flag operation,[1] a group of Egyptian Jews were recruited by Israeli military intelligence for plans to plant bombs inside Egyptian, American and British-owned civilian targets, cinema, library and American educational center. The attacks were to be blamed on the Muslim Brotherhood, Egyptian Communists, “unspecified malcontents” or “local nationalists” with the aim of creating a climate of sufficient violence and instability to induce the British government to retain its occupying troops in Egypt’s Suez Canal zone.[2] The operation caused no casualties, except for those members of the cell who committed suicide after being captured.

      The operation ultimately became known as the Lavon Affair after the Israeli defense minister Pinhas Lavon was forced to resign as a consequence of the incident. Before Lavon’s resignation, the incident had been euphemistically referred to in Israel as the “Unfortunate Affair” or “The Bad Business” (Hebrew: העסק הביש‎, HaEsek HaBish). After Israel publicly denied any involvement in the incident for 51 years, the surviving agents were officially honored in 2005 by being awarded certificates of appreciation by Israeli President Moshe Katzav.[3]
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavon_Affair

      • OlegR
        OlegR
        August 11, 2013, 9:58 am

        You should have just gone ahead and mentioned that crossing the Sea
        fiasco for the Egyptian army , you know the one …

    • Citizen
      Citizen
      August 10, 2013, 2:26 pm

      @ yonah fredman

      I think the Egyptian people in general have increasingly decided that it’s not in Egypt’s interest to go along with what the US and Israel want:

      Sat Aug 10, 2013 5:47PM GMT
      0
      2

      5

      Download | Embed
      There’s going to be a day, soon I think, when all of that comes to a head and the military itself, or the leadership of the [Egyptian] military itself, is swept away and the Egyptian people actualize the things they’ve been demanding for the last several years.”

      Don DeBar, American anti-war activist

      Related Interviews:
      ‘Saudi Arabia empowers al-Qaeda terror’
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      Al Saud morally, politically bankrupt
      An American anti-war activist and radio host says the Egyptian people are against the US policies towards the Palestinian people and the Syrian crisis.

      “The Egyptian people have been fairly clear about some very fundamental things in the course of their two-and-half year now ongoing revolution,” said Don DeBar in a phone interview with Press TV on Saturday.

      “One thing is that they stand in solidarity with the Palestinian people and they want their government to reflect that,” explained DeBar.

      “They stand with the people of Syria as well against the United States,” he added.

      DeBar also said that since the ouster of former dictator Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian people’s position on these two points has been a major factor “in any of the offered political constructs including the elected President Mohammed Morsi who sided with the United States on both issues against the Egyptian people.”

      In an article on Thursday, the Wall Street Journal reported how anti-US sentiment is ramping up across a broad range of factions in Egypt.

      The paper published a photo of opponents of ousted President Morsi in capital Cairo, sitting beneath anti-US banners reading “Obama, you can’t fool your people and the world any more, you finance and back terrorism!!!”

      Moreover, people in Egypt expressed their anger on social networking websites in response to the likely nomination of Robert Ford for US ambassador to Egypt.

      Egyptian media referred to Ford as the “Ambassador of Death” as he allegedly ran “death squads” in Iraq.

      DeBar told Press TV that the military that toppled Morsi “still stands with the US” and “there’s going to be a day, soon I think, when all of that comes to a head and the military itself, or the leadership of the military itself, is swept away and the Egyptian people actualize the things they’ve been demanding for the last several years.”

  8. maggielorraine
    maggielorraine
    August 9, 2013, 11:37 pm

    Isn’t whether the coup does or not benefit Israel sort of irrelevant from the standpoint of the Egyptian public? I’m still working out my feelings on the issue, and find it really hard to get to the bottom of things. But still, the primary criterion should be whether the changes in Egypt benefit people *in Egypt.* While Palestine is surely a salient issue in Egyptian politics, and Mubarak et al’s role in the siege of Gaza etc partly created the animus against him, it surely wasn’t the only or even the primary reason for the revolution. Undoubtedly Egyptians shouldn’t have to choose between hurting themselves or hurting Palestinians, but when it really comes down to it, the Egyptian people have their own internal politics to worry about first.

    Speaking against the coup primarily because it benefits Israel ignores the importance of ordinary Egyptians in their own politics, in the same way Israel-firsters speak of American politics only in terms of how they benefit Israel.

    The MB was not inherently worthy of support simply because it was ostensibly pro-Palestine for the same reason the military isn’t inherently worthy of animus because it is anti-Palestine.

    • MHughes976
      MHughes976
      August 11, 2013, 4:40 pm

      I very much share your sentiments, ML, and I too find it difficult to work things out here. And you’re quite right that it is not the primary function of an Egyptian government to help its neighbours, not even the Palestinians. I must say, though, that I would hold it to the credit of any Egyptian government if, other things being equal, they did give the Palestinians some help.

  9. Citizen
    Citizen
    August 10, 2013, 10:16 am

    I think the determining factors of what has gone down in Egypt may lie outside Egypt, that is, fear of the Arab Spring leaking in, by local Arab tyrant clique regimes, and US objective to aid whichever Egyptian faction seems most likely to keep kissing Israel:

    “As far back as March 2012, Burns met with MB General Guide Mohammad Badie and his deputy Khayrat Al-Shater. He offered that if the MB maintains the peace treaty with Israel the U.S. would help secure $20 Billion from the GCC countries to help Egypt’s economy. But Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Kuwait declined to offer any real help when Morsi was in power. However, within two days of the military coup, Burns’s promise was fulfilled, but to the coup leaders. The leaders of the three countries congratulated Gen. Sisi (not the puppet president installed by the military) for deposing Morsi and pledged to send a $12 Billion aid package as a gift to help stabilize the economy.

    Furthermore, Burns promised the coup leader that the US military aid will continue and that the stalled IMF loan that has been languishing for over two years would be promptly approved. In rejecting to call the overthrow of a freely elected president by the military a coup, the U.S. administration demonstrated, yet again, that lofty ideals and rhetoric are sacrificed at the alter of misplaced short term national interests.

    Perhaps one measure to assess the regional ramifications of the latest events is the reaction by Israel and the Palestinians. When Mubarak was deposed on February 11, 2011, the Palestinians were jubilant and dancing in the streets, while Israel was in mourning. But when Morsi was overthrown by the military on July 3 the roles were reversed.”

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-grand-scam-spinning-egypts-military-coup/5343280

  10. Shingo
    Shingo
    August 10, 2013, 10:27 am

    The latest news is that Egypt is now denying the drone attacks took place at all.
    http://www.timesofisrael.com/egypt-walks-the-wire-in-denying-israeli-attack-on-sinai/

    This military junta is getting worse by the day, and is set to make some serious mistakes.

  11. just
    just
    August 10, 2013, 12:22 pm

    btw, it’s time to boycott ‘Country Time’, ‘Kool Aid’ and ‘Crystal Light’ for associating with Sodastream.

    (drink H2O until climate change or outright theft makes that impossible……….)

  12. jon s
    jon s
    August 10, 2013, 12:39 pm

    The initial report was that an Israeli drone strike – carried out in cooperation with the Egyptian military – killed 5 jihadi terrorists who were preparing to fire a rocket at Israel.
    Then came a partial denial from the Egyptian side , saying that the strike was from an Egyptian helicopter, that 4 jihadis were killed and one got away, and that the intended target of the terrorists was one of the bridges over the Suez Canal.
    The third statement comes from a jihadi al Qaeda affiliate operating in Sinai, admitting that their guys had been killed, and vowing revenge.

    I have no additional information, but whatever version is correct, it’s good news: a terrorist attack was averted, Israel and Egypt may be cooperating against a mutual enemy and a bunch of jihadis are dead.

    • just
      just
      August 11, 2013, 5:40 am

      I’ll be “happy” when Egyptian and Israeli military “jihadis”, aka “terrorists” are brought to justice………….

      Where is the proof that the people murdered by the drones were ‘enemies’?

    • OlegR
      OlegR
      August 11, 2013, 10:00 am

      /I have no additional information, but whatever version is correct, it’s good news: a terrorist attack was averted, Israel and Egypt may be cooperating against a mutual enemy and a bunch of jihadis are dead./

      You do remember this is MW right ? :)

  13. piotr
    piotr
    August 10, 2013, 12:40 pm

    In the meantime, IDF soldiers risked their life and limb on the border with Lebanon: http://www.timesofisrael.com/explosion-that-hurt-troops-was-a-hezbollah-ambush/

    Why GoI decided to provide photo-ops for Hezbollah it can be only guessed.

    • just
      just
      August 10, 2013, 1:39 pm

      yep, piotr.

      You have great insight and acumen.

    • OlegR
      OlegR
      August 11, 2013, 10:04 am

      BS, proper IEDs would have led to casualties .
      I am guessing they stepped on an old land mine or something.
      Shit happens.

    • Daniel Rich
      Daniel Rich
      August 11, 2013, 6:48 pm

      @ piotr,

      your link: “Hezbollah prepared two IEDs, each consisting of four small containers filled with iron ball bearings, and detonated them 20 seconds apart as the soldiers crossed into Lebanese soil [and wounded 4 soldiers].”

      My thoughts: does that mean that the 2 suspected Boston bombers were more successful with their single pressure cooker [in comparison to 8 container loaded with ball bearings]?

  14. seafoid
    seafoid
    August 11, 2013, 9:27 am

    Egypt seems to be going the way of Pakistan. Army takes over every so often but does nothing to change the situation which is driven by overpopulation, a dying economy and growing climate issues . Crisis is permanent.

  15. Shingo
    Shingo
    August 12, 2013, 7:05 am

    The mask of the Egyptian military junta is slipping by the hour and the Zionist puppet is being revealed little by little.

    First, right after the Isreli drone strike that the Egyptian army confirmed was done in coordination with them, then denied it, the Egyptian army raidedthe Sinai Town of Sheik Zuweyid overnight, killing 12 suspects.
    http://www.haaretz.com/misc/article-print-page/1.540894?trailingPath=2.169%2C2.216%2C2.295%2C

    So we have the Israeli and Egyptian military working hand in glove for the first time.

    And then there is this little gem. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel urged restraint in a phone call with al-Sisi.

    Get that? Restraint!! The same weazel language they use every time Israel decides to kill Palestinians.
    http://www.adn.com/2013/08/07/3012015/what-egypt-tells-us-about-us-foreign.html#storylink=cpy

    But hey, let’s not jump to any conclusion. Taxi assures us that Egypt is steering it’s own ship – even if it looks like the Egyptian army has become a division of the IDF.

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