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Goldberg slams Kerry for mentioning boycott– though he saluted it as ‘smart strategy’

Israel/Palestine
on 62 Comments

Last week Jeffrey Goldberg had sharp words for John Kerry, rebuking the secretary of state for mentioning “talk of boycotts” as a looming threat if Israel fails to allow the creation of a Palestinian state. But Goldberg himself saluted boycott last October, saying it was among a group of “smarter strategies, and probably should have been used all along” by Palestinians.

Here’s his Bloomberg piece the other day, “Kerry’s Boycott Talk Will Backfire”:

Kerry makes the argument that Israel will face new, and intensified, boycott pressure if peace talks fail, and he may be right. But by publicly discussing this possibility, he is providing fuel to the forces aligned against Israel… He is also terrifying Israelis, and terrified Israelis are not the sort of people who will make dangerous compromises for peace…

I was sitting in the audience as Kerry said this, and I suddenly felt queasy. I imagine it was more the setting than his actual words. Germany, and Munich, in particular, is not the best place to raise the threat of a boycott that targets Jews. Munich is certainly the right place to discuss the essential perniciousness of such boycotts, but Kerry didn’t denounce the notion, he analyzed it.

But last October, Jeffrey Goldberg didn’t just analyze the boycott movement, he praised it.
He gave a lecture at a temple in Stamford, CT. At 40:00 or so, he addresses the importance of Israel allowing the creation of a Palestinian state.

A third intifada hasn’t happened yet. The second intifada obviously was disastrous for Israel from a human standpoint, but it was as disastrous for the Palestinians from a political standpoint. You know, if you were a right wing Israeli, you have to be worried about the Palestinian Authority and the movement, because as they move toward more sophisticated strategies, like international delegitimization, or seeking recognition in the U.N., or boycott and divestment, rather than blowing up buses– these are smarter strategies, and probably should have been used all along. If you were Palestinian, you know, you can probably look back on the last 20 years and say that didn’t really work out, so we’re going to find something else.

I think Goldberg’s double standard reflects the fact that it’s OK to be Jewish and saying these things to a Jewish audience– a lot of straight talk falls into that special category. It’s the reason Haaretz is so much more forthright about Palestinian human rights than the American press. Pro-Israel Jews in the media don’t want to discuss some things in front of people who might reach the wrong conclusion.

P.S. Speaking of double standards, notice Goldberg’s assertion that the Second Intifada was not disastrous to Palestinians from a human standpoint. This B’Tselem study lists casualty figures as 3200 Palestinians, 650 Israeli civilians. Pretty painful to a lot of humans.

Goldberg is subscribing to the Old South’s standards on counting bodies. Here’s Huckleberry Finn, talking to Tom Sawyer’s aunt about why his steamboat was late.

[Huck] “It warn’t the grounding — that didn’t keep us back but a little. We blowed out a cylinder-head.”

[Sally Phelps] “Good gracious! anybody hurt?”

“No’m. Killed a n—–.”

“Well, it’s lucky; because sometimes people do get hurt.”

philweiss
About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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62 Responses

  1. Justpassingby
    Justpassingby
    February 15, 2014, 1:32 pm

    Phil:

    A bit OT but any chance that Mondoweiss will start selling merchandise (tshirts, muggs, keybands, stickers, etc you name it with the Mondoweiss logo on it) in way to get more funding to this site?

    • philweiss
      philweiss
      February 15, 2014, 1:44 pm

      Yes. Thanks. We’ve been mulling it for a long time…

      • amigo
        amigo
        February 15, 2014, 1:54 pm

        I would like to see some T-Shirts.They stand out much better and can be a means of igniting discussion on the I/P subject.

        Can you put up an image of what they might look like when you get one and have the time

        Would the image include what MW is about so those interested in the I/P conflict would be more likely to approach.

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        February 15, 2014, 2:26 pm

        Aye, amigo. And bumper stickers.

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        February 15, 2014, 2:24 pm

        1 Mug, 1 T here.

      • MRW
        MRW
        February 17, 2014, 1:52 pm

        Weel then, mull a T-shirt with MONDOWEISS on the front and WEISSWORLD on the back.

  2. Justpassingby
    Justpassingby
    February 15, 2014, 1:33 pm

    But Goldberg support boycot of Iran, palestinians, Hezbollah?
    Goldberg, an obviously very confused and old man.

    • Donald
      Donald
      February 15, 2014, 5:20 pm

      “But Goldberg support boycot of Iran, palestinians, Hezbollah?”

      Bingo. It’s not just Goldberg–it’s mainstream American thinking.

      You can sanction Iran, Gaza and in the past, Iraq, with a severity that actually causes deaths and that’s perfectly acceptable, but boycotting Israeli companies brings out comparisons to Hitler.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        February 16, 2014, 7:00 am

        You can sanction Iran, Gaza and in the past, Iraq, with a severity that actually causes deaths and that’s perfectly acceptable, but boycotting Israeli companies brings out comparisons to Hitler.

        They usually avoid that question altogether by the way they control the narrative. Iran, Gaza and Hezbollah are demonized and un disputable the bad guys so sanctions and boycott are appropriate.

        But Israel, with whom the US has no daylight in policy and morality, are the good guys. Thus any comparison, or suggestion of double standards and hypocrisy, is derided as absurd from the outset

  3. amigo
    amigo
    February 15, 2014, 1:46 pm

    “He is also terrifying Israelis, and terrified Israelis are not the sort of people who will make dangerous compromises for peace…”Goldberg

    What compromises have Israelis, (I think he means Israeli Jews) made, ever and if it makes them terrified , then bring on BDS in full strength.Nothing else has worked.

    Time for some real dangerous love.

    • American
      American
      February 15, 2014, 4:19 pm

      amigo says:
      February 15, 2014 at 1:46 pm
      “He is also terrifying Israelis, and terrified Israelis are not the sort of people who will make dangerous compromises for peace…”Goldberg

      What compromises have Israelis, (I think he means Israeli Jews) made, ever and if it makes them terrified , then bring on BDS in full strength.Nothing else has worked.
      Time for some real dangerous love.>>>>>

      I agree. Carrots dont work with Israel and zionist.
      If it were up to me I would have gone for the big fear …..’your US protected lives or the land you stole, your choice and your only choices’…….long ago and ended this. They would cave or see a mass exodus of Israelis out of Israel, so either way it would end it.

      • amigo
        amigo
        February 16, 2014, 9:04 am

        American,Haaretz is reporting that Portugal is likely to follow Spain,s intention to give Passports to Sephardi Jews.
        I was against this but if enough countries adopt this policy Israel could be given a hair cut, (Israel has circa 1.5 million of them) with very little blood assuming the zios feel the BDS sting and jump ship, I am all for it .It would certainly change the demographics significantly.

        The plot thickens.

        http://www.haaretz.com/jewish-world/jewish-world-news/.premium-1.574482

      • American
        American
        February 16, 2014, 6:57 pm

        amigo says..
        American,Haaretz is reporting that Portugal is likely to follow Spain,s intention to give Passports to Sephardi Jews.
        I was against this but if enough countries adopt this policy Israel could be given a hair cut, (Israel has circa 1.5 million of them) with very little blood assuming the zios feel the BDS sting and jump ship, I am all for it>>>>

        I would be too….bloodless way to drain Israel a bit.
        Yea, if it is a plot then the plot really is thickening…lol….I would like to think this is a plot by countries.

    • Maximus Decimus Meridius
      Maximus Decimus Meridius
      February 16, 2014, 6:15 am

      @amigo I agree completely. This argument about how we need to mollycoddle Israelis into ‘compromise’ and not scare them away just does not work. Israel is now ‘enjoying’ more total dominance over Palestinians than at perhaps any time in its history. Months can go by without there being a single Israeli casualty of Palestinian violence – though the reverse is not true at all. Yet, far from putting Israelis in a mood to ‘compromise’, this relative peace and security is making them even more right-wing and even more anti-Palestinian.

      Why are Israelis so precious and so sensitive that we have to tiptoe around them in case we ‘terrify’ them? Enough already, as the Americans might say. It’s time for a change – BDS and more BDS.

      • tear-stained uzi
        tear-stained uzi
        February 17, 2014, 9:53 pm

        Why are Israelis so precious and so sensitive that we have to tiptoe around them in case we ‘terrify’ them?

        LOL! As someone who worked with a number of Israeli colleagues in Silicon Valley, I can say: ‘precious’? Yes. Sensitive? Erm, no. (And they would be the first to agree!)

  4. ritzl
    ritzl
    February 15, 2014, 2:08 pm

    FWIW/IMHO, BDS is the third intifada. The fourth will likely be the coming 1S1P1V civil rights struggle, concurrent with BDS.

    Goldberg’s double standard also stems from the hermetic power cocoon he exists within. It’s also a sign of rapid BDS escalation and success. Even a year ago, it’s doubtful [obviously?] that he considered BDS a threat, therefore it was easy to casually reflect on it as something the Palestinians “should” have done, but clearly and only within the context of minimizing Israeli/Jewish pain. The zero-sum equation that is Zionism permitted this…then.

    Now, BDS is having effect and it must be taken seriously by Goldberg-types. But even/especially in the current context, they’re trapped. As Kerry showed, no one can now talk about BDS without furthering its exposure, discussion, and therefore, effect as a tactic. Goldberg-types can’t talk about it, and they can’t NOT talk about it. His attempt to keep it intra-Jewish is an attempt to minimize its exposure, but that’s closing the proverbial barn door.

    Tipping point achieved, methinks.

    Thanks for the article. Excellent, useful contrast.

    • Shingo
      Shingo
      February 15, 2014, 3:26 pm

      Even a year ago, it’s doubtful [obviously?] that he considered BDS a threat, therefore it was easy to casually reflect on it as something the Palestinians “should” have done, but clearly and only within the context of minimizing Israeli/Jewish pain. The zero-sum equation that is Zionism permitted this…then.

      Exactly.

      Non violent resistance is only permissible so long as it has little chance of succeeding.

      If we ever did more close to a 2ss, there would be a lot of “liberal Zionists” and 2sa supporters outing themselves as opposing it.

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        February 15, 2014, 6:24 pm

        Yeah, exactly right Shingo. My observational axiom on lib-Zionist behavior/argument on this issue is the closer it comes to actual resolution on the terms they have long espoused, in writing, on record, the further they must distance themselves from those terms. Always a buffer of “acceptability” there.

        Or conversely, the farther away a 2SS gets, the more latitude they/libzios have [are free] to insist on dire measures/previous anathema to bring it about. But, “never the twain shall meet.”

        It’s all pure argument.

        Something about goalposts and movement…and what’s real and/or most important.

  5. HarryLaw
    HarryLaw
    February 15, 2014, 2:41 pm

    What the BDS movement needs to do is what the UK Labor Party’s Chancellor of the Exchequer Dennis Healey said in relation to property speculators 36 years ago.. that we are going to “squeeze them till the pips squeak”.

  6. seafoid
    seafoid
    February 15, 2014, 3:15 pm

    Shalom tv ask is peace possible. You just can’t make stuff like that up.Imagine sex tv asking if the orgasm still works.

  7. American
    American
    February 15, 2014, 4:08 pm

    Goldberg was for boycott and BDS when he thought it wasnt powerful enough to really accomplish anything.
    Now that word ‘Boycott’ was uttered from a important US mouth Goldberg is against it.

  8. just
    just
    February 15, 2014, 5:39 pm

    Incroyable!

    “When Farida Trichine and 11 of her friends burst into a French supermarket in 2009 and began applying stickers with anti-Israel slogans to vegetables imported from the Jewish state, she expected to be escorted from the store by police.

    What she didn’t expect was to be convicted of inciting racial hatred and slapped with a $650 fine.

    Three months ago, a court in Colmar convicted the 12 activists under a French law that extended the definition of discrimination beyond the expected parameters of race, religion and sexual orientation to include members of national groups.

    What Trichine, who was wearing a “boycott Israel” shirt during the protest, saw as a protected act of political speech was being treated by the authorities like a hate crime.

    “It’s surprising that our actions are considered a crime when the real criminals are the colonists, the butchers of Gaza,” Trichine said in a video message in 2011, soon after her legal troubles began.

    Trichine, 54, is one of approximately 20 anti-Israel activists who have been convicted under France’s so-called Lellouche law. Named for the Jewish parliamentarian who introduced it in 2003, the law is among the world’s most potent legislative tools to fight the growing Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, or BDS, and has catapulted France to the forefront of efforts to counter the movement through legal means.

    “The French government and judiciary’s determination in fighting discrimination, and the Lellouche law especially, are exemplary for Belgium and other nations where discriminatory BDS is happening,” said Joel Rubinfeld, co-chair of the European Jewish Parliament and president of the Belgian League Against Anti-Semitism. ”

    http://www.haaretz.com/jewish-world/1.574361

    • traintosiberia
      traintosiberia
      February 15, 2014, 8:13 pm

      France is an interesting place where interior minister can think of removing the Roma en masse while condemning the comedians for antisemitism as manifested in ” anti Nazi” salute. It seems Europe has got rid of native nationalism and racism but has accepted a foreign version of the discarded idea as a legal frame of reference.

    • Walid
      Walid
      February 15, 2014, 10:43 pm

      Just, the full story is much worse than reported in Haaretz that most probably watered it down to lessen the actual anti-Jewish backlash it’s creating in France.

      The fine was not of 500 euros as Haaretz wrote but of 1000 euros/activist for each of the 2 times that the 12 activists created their boycotting brouhaha at the Carrefour Supermarket in Mulhouse in 2009 and again in 2010. The French court in 2012 had declared the 12 innocent of the charge of racial incitement but the prosecutors (most probably under pressure from the French Israel lobby Criff) appealed the verdict.

      On November 28, 2013, the Court of Appeals at Colmar overturned the judgement and condemned each of the 12 to pay a fine of 1000 euros for each time they created the disturbance (2009 and 2010), plus interest and court costs (32,000 euros collectively for the group of 12) plus a suspended sentence of 1 year in jail. The 32,000 fine is to be paid to an Israel-France anti-racism watchdog association.

      As to the $650 dollar fine mentioned by Haaretz, this was the amount each of another group of 7 activists were condemned to pay in another court case in September 2013 for a disturbance created at Alençon in 2010.

      About French National Assembly member Pierre Lellouche, a Tunisian-born Jew and his law, the name is most befitting. Le louche in English means shady, shifty, seedy, and dubious. The man is said to be among the worst racists having once remarked that homosexuals should be sterilized. It’s ironic that he proposed the anti-racism law in 2003.

      Story on a French Zionist site (that BTW asks for monthly donations of 26 euros to send food or clothing purchasing coupons to a foreign soldier serving in the IDF because they are not getting paid enough):

      http://alyaexpress-news.com/2013/12/la-justice-francaise-puni-un-groupe-anti-israelien-suite-aux-actions-de-boycott-dans-les-supermarches/

      Story as reported by BDS (Alsace)France:

      http://www.bdsfrance.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2797%3Acommunique-reda-verdict-de-la-cour-dappel-de-colmar-concernant-les-12-boycotteurs-mulhousiens&catid=49%3Aactualites&lang=fr

      • traintosiberia
        traintosiberia
        February 15, 2014, 11:15 pm

        This is why there is movement afoot to label BDS as Antisemitic and then prosecute the proponents as racially motivated . But this is not at all surprising when dominant platform within Zionism is that validity of any idea or concept could only be reached after it has been proven to serve or at least not hurt the Zionism in any form or shape .

      • kalithea
        kalithea
        February 16, 2014, 9:58 am

        Illegal laws are established to protect and make exception for the corrupt minority from laws that protect everyone equally without exception. Corrupt, draconian laws such as this “Louche” Law are the types of laws created by fascism, not democracy. Such exceptionalism is corrupt in every way because under its umbrella Zionist Jews are given a license to act with impunity denying justice to the Palestinians and others, even all of us. It is the corrupt nature of Zionism that has spawned the twisted precedent which is the basis for such draconian measures. That “Louche” law is not necessarily protecting Jews who are doing very well and are secure in the present, but it is in fact protecting crimes being committed by Zionist Jews against “others” from being prosecuted and even, merely protested. That law is flawed in every way including the way in which it stomps on the public’s freedom to protest injustice without exception.

        These draconian measures being enacted to protect Zionist injustice not only blur the lines between what is legal and illegal in the public’s perception, which is dangerous just on its own, but they create a dangerous precedent and threat to us all everywhere by diminishing our freedoms and right of recourse and should be fought vigorously in the courts wherever they arise. This is not only a fight for the rights of Palestinians, it is now becoming a fight for our own rights, and I knew all along it would evolve this way given the nature of Zionism.

      • American
        American
        February 16, 2014, 10:53 am

        That French heavy handed move is only going to add to the BDS and blacklash momentum. All the Zionist attempts at dominating the publics by having their own governments punish them in Israel behalf will only add more fuel to BDS and anti Israel.
        Keep going BDS’ers.

        ”European boycotts begin to bite, catching Israel’s attention
        For years, boycott efforts in Europe seemed to be only symbolic gestures. But several major efforts announced in the past year, including one by the EU, are raising alarm.”

        http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Middle-East/2014/0216/European-boycotts-begin-to-bite-catching-Israel-s-attention

        (snips)

        A Palestinian works in a date palm orchard in the Jordan Valley near the West Bank city of Jericho. Some Europeans are avoiding products from Israeli-occupied land.

        Drive down the steep road from Jerusalem to the Dead Sea, and as the desert hills unfold toward the Jordan River the eye meets hundreds of rows of lush palms laden with succulent dates.

        More than a third of the world’s Medjool dates are grown here in the Jordan Valley, a narrow strip of the West Bank where Israeli agriculture is flourishing. Nearly all Israeli grape exports, as well as abundant crops of peppers and herbs, also come from this arid region.

        The European Union, Israel’s No. 1 trading partner, accounts for about a third of its total trade, and was long the favored destination for Jordan Valley produce. But these fruits and vegetables are grown on land that Israel has occupied since 1967. For a growing number of European consumers, that’s a problem. They say that buying such produce is supporting the illegal confiscation and control of land and water resources that should be in Palestinian hands.

        The campaign is starting to bite. Last year, Jordan Valley farmers lost an estimated $29 million, or 14 percent of revenue, because they were forced to find alternative markets for their exports, such as Russia, where prices are 20 to 60 percent lower. Pepper exports to Western Europe have stopped completely, and grape exports are likely to be phased out this year because of consumer pressure, says David Elhayani, mayor of the Jordan Valley Regional Council and a farmer himself.

        Israeli leaders have for years scoffed at the notion that fewer dates or peppers in European shopping carts could put a dent in the Israeli economy. But in the past six months, a flurry of European banks, pension funds, engineering firms, and lawmakers have driven home their displeasure with Israeli settlements, and Israeli leaders are taking the threat more seriously.

        It’s not so much that their pocketbook is starting to feel the pressure – last year’s drop in Jordan Valley exports represents a mere 0.01 percent of total Israeli exports for 2013. But there’s concern that rising opposition to Israeli policies signals increasing displeasure with the very idea of Israel. “Sanctions are also what we Israelis should fear most – disenchantment of the world with the very idea that Jews are entitled to have a state of their own,” says Yitzchak Mayer, who served as the Israeli ambassador to Belgium and Switzerland in the 1990s.

        Discontent on the rise
        According to a 2013 BBC poll, public opinion of Israel is worsening. Favorability ratings dropped 8 percent in both Spain and Germany, to the single digits. Even in Britain, the first European country to formally support the establishment of a Jewish state, only 14 percent of citizens have a positive view of Israel today.

        EU citizens and lawmakers alike have long opposed Israeli policies, but popular discontent – cultivated by the Palestinian-led Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement since 2005 – is increasingly pressuring businesses and governments to take more concrete action.

        Dutchman David Ross says he supports such moves. “What it accomplishes is putting more focus on the problem,” he says. “People will ask, ‘What are we really doing there?’ It brings the problem to the streets.”

        “[The SodaStream boycott] has … led to mass education of the public everywhere about the illegality of Israel’s settlements, Israel’s denial of Palestinian rights, and, crucially, the need to boycott companies producing in settlements as a minimal measure of ending complicity in grave violations of human rights,” says human rights activist and BDS cofounder Omar Barghouti.

        Many of the nongovernmental organizations in Israel that challenge the government’s policies in the West Bank have long been funded by European governments, but the fact that lawmakers are now making their own moves ups the ante.

        “The language has become sharper, and the instruments are sharper,” says Gerald Steinberg, a political science professor at Bar Ilan University and president of NGO Monitor, which tracks European funding of NGOs with a critical eye. “Diplomatically Israel has lived without Europe for 15 years, if not longer. Militarily, Europe isn’t much of a power. So most of this is about economics.”

        Last summer the EU said it would refuse to provide funds from Horizon 2020 – the largest EU research and innovation program, with €80 billion ($109 billion) in funding over seven years – to entities operating in East Jerusalem or West Bank settlements.

        Then European institutions stepped up demands for verification and guarantees that none of their business was happening over settlement lines.

        One of the most significant moves came in January. A $200 billion Dutch pension firm, among the world’s largest, divested from five top Israeli banks. The fund, PGGM, said it would be almost impossible for the banks to “end their involvement in the financing of settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories.”

        In September a Dutch engineering firm, under pressure from the government, dropped plans to build a sewage treatment plant in East Jerusalem, and in December, a Dutch water company cut ties with Israel’s national water carrier over its operations in the West Bank.

        But it’s not just the Dutch. Germany announced in January that it would not renew research grants to Israeli companies that do business over the Green Line, the de facto border before Israel captured East Jerusalem and the West Bank in the 1967 war. That was the first move by an individual EU member to apply standards for academic research to the private sector. The liberal Israeli newspaper Haaretz called it “a significant escalation in European measures against the settlements.”

        Germany’s move prompted concern that if Israel’s best friend in Europe, still burdened by the guilt of the Holocaust, takes such steps, every other EU country could follow suit.

        “I think there is a danger that one should not underestimate, which is the snowball effect that once someone starts, the others begin to adopt the same kind of policy,” says Oded Eran, the Israeli ambassador to the EU from 2002 to 2007.

        Why now?
        For years Europe tried to use incentives on Israel, eliminating trade tariffs and enhancing cooperation in other areas. But Israel’s 2008-09 war against Hamas-run Gaza sparked demonstrations in Europe and pushed EU lawmakers to adjust, wrote Claire Spencer, head of the Middle East and North Africa Program at the London-based think tank Chatham House, in an April 2009 report. Still, last year, Israel was the only non-EU country invited to join Horizon 2020.

        Daniel Levy, director of the Middle East and North Africa Program at the European Council on Foreign Relations in London, says the flurry of activity of European firms is not a reaction to any specific Israeli action. Rather, it comes at a time when companies are more accountable to consumer and civil society groups, whether it’s human rights violations in Bangladeshi garment factories or logging in the Amazon.

        “What you are seeing is this slow accumulation of a sense that there are legal and reputational risks for companies to engage in business activities which involve the settlements,” he says.

        But retiree Pieter Duistermaat of Rotterdam, whose job in the chemicals industry took him to Israel a few times, says that his opinion of Israel has worsened over time because of Israeli actions toward Palestinians.

        “I don’t like their attitude,” he says. “No one deserves that.”

        Sacha Stawski, who runs a media watchdog called Honestly Concerned in Frankfurt, says some Germans are increasingly moving in an “extremely critical, if not anti-Israel” direction.

        Mr. Stawski says that he considers German Chancellor Angela Merkel – who is visiting the Jewish state on Feb. 24 – to be pro-Israel but says she’s surrounded by a new generation of politicians and voters who increasingly are trying to “rid themselves of their past.”

        “There is this new generation that is saying, ‘We have nothing to do with [the Holocaust].’ They are not understanding the relationship between guilt and responsibility. The new generation is not guilty, but they still have a responsibility to make sure nothing of the sort ever happens again.”

        “There is a risk that you will face increasing isolation [if talks fail],” EU Ambassador to Israel Lars Faaborg-Andersen told Israel’s Channel 2 recently. “Not necessarily as a result of European Union policy, but Israel has to realize that economic relations are established by private economic actors – be it consumers, be it companies – and we, as a government, have no influence on the private decisions that private citizens and companies are making.”

        continued

    • Sibiriak
      Sibiriak
      February 16, 2014, 12:04 am

      a French law that extended the definition of discrimination beyond the expected parameters of race, religion and sexual orientation to include members of national groups.

      Will this be applied to any other national group members besides Israelis?

      • Maximus Decimus Meridius
        Maximus Decimus Meridius
        February 17, 2014, 11:41 am

        Good question. Isn’t France fully signed up to the sanctions on Iran?

        And btw I don’t think BDS advocates a blanket ban on dealings with ALL Israelis (”members of national groups”). If an Israeli – Jew or Palestinian – is known to oppose the occupation they are usually welcomed by Palestinian solidarity groups. Certainly, that is the case in the Palestinian solidarity group I’m most familiar with – from time to time Israelis attend and speak at our meetings. I’d be interested to know how such a law would stand up under scrutiny by the French courts.

  9. DICKERSON3870
    DICKERSON3870
    February 16, 2014, 5:42 am

    RE: “He [Kerry] is also terrifying Israelis, and terrified Israelis are not the sort of people who will make dangerous compromises for peace…” ~ Jeffrey Goldberg

    MY COMMENT: I would very much like to know what “dangerous compromises” for peace Jeffrey Goldberg is referring to. Is he saying that any compromise Israel makes for peace is “dangerous”?
    By publicly calling such compromises “dangerous”, hasn’t he made it less likely that Israel will agree to such compromises for peace?

    • wondering jew
      wondering jew
      February 16, 2014, 6:07 am

      Dickerson- If you are trying to be humorous by poking fun of Goldberg’s reckoning of the needs of the Israeli public in order to facilitate a peace agreement, I will cease. But if you are seriously doubting whether it is dangerous to give up territory to Hamas Palestine (as differentiated from Utopian Liberal Palestine, which is of no danger to anyone), then you are acting (behaving) blind.

      • kalithea
        kalithea
        February 16, 2014, 8:50 am

        “But if you are seriously doubting whether it is dangerous to give up territory to Hamas Palestine…”

        On that pretext, the U.N. should have seriously considered the danger and consequences of giving up Palestinian land to IRGUN-DRIVEN ZIONISM which resulted in the Nakba, massive ethnic cleansing of Palestinians and the destruction of countless Palestinian villages and massacres of Palestinians under a campaign of Irgun Zionist terror.

      • American
        American
        February 16, 2014, 8:58 am

        @ yonah

        The needs of Israelis is no more important than the needs of the Palestines.
        Hamas is no more dangerous to Israelis than the Isr Gov is to Palestines….in fact less considering Isr is overloaded with weapons and Hamas has none to speak of.

  10. Maximus Decimus Meridius
    Maximus Decimus Meridius
    February 16, 2014, 6:22 am

    ”I think Goldberg’s double standard reflects the fact that it’s OK to be Jewish and saying these things to a Jewish audience– a lot of straight talk falls into that special category.”

    That’s certainly part of it, but not the whole story, imho.

    Rather, Goldberg is typical of those ‘liberal zionists’ (if such a label can be attached to a person who went out of his way to serve as an IDF prison guard) who for years have been wagging their fingers at Palestinians and telling them that, if only they went for non-violent resistance, they would enjoy so much more support and goodwill – even from the ‘liberal Zionists’ themselves. It wasn’t Palestinian resistance which these people objected to, it was Palestinian violence. Or so they wanted us – and perhaps themselves – to believe.

    But even in the few months since last October, BDS has become considerably more high-profile and mainstream. And all those ‘liberal Zionists’ who were happy to tell us they would support ‘non violent resistance’ when it was something vague and non-threatening, are now, to use Goldberg’s word, terrified. ‘Non-violent resistance’ was great when it was just another way to lecture Palestinians, but now that it’s a reality, and becoming more powerful almost by the day, they’re forced to dig out the old excuses about ‘targetting Jews’, with a nice bit of Holocaust emotional blackmail thrown in for good measure. In reality, these people don’t want Palestinians to resist occupation at all, in any way, shape or form. The success of BDS is forcing them to admit that, which is really no bad thing if it finally puts an end, once and for all, to the myth of ‘liberal Zionism’.

  11. kalithea
    kalithea
    February 16, 2014, 8:25 am

    We all know that in order for Zionism to justify itself in a world of laws, Zionists need to paint the Palestinians as sub-human by continuously demonizing them, and unfortunately they have been successful. We must hammer home that under the law all men are equal and deserving of justice.

    Regarding BDS, Zionists connivingly use the Anti-Semitic card as a cover for injustice. They allege that the Nazis boycotted Jewish businesses, but we must counter with the more forceful argument based in fact: Jews in the 1930s weren’t throwing Germans out of their homes, stealing their land (war crimes), arresting and abusing the rights of German children and inflicting oppressive apartheid measures against Germans (crimes against humanity) thus the boycotts against them were unjustified. Germans committed crimes against Jews based on fear and racism. Likewise today Zionist Jews are committing crimes against Palestinians based on fear and racism. So because Jews today are using Zionism as an excuse to violate the rights of Palestinians, because they are using unjust and cruel measures against others such as ethnic cleansing, land theft and abuse of the rights of children as well as a myriad of other crimes, and because the laws of that country aren’t protecting the rights of Palestinians, the world must act against such injustice with the best available means short of war in this case to force Zionists to respect laws established for ALL men without exception.

    Again, Zionists connivingly use the Anti-Semitic card to cover up the injustice they inflict and to bully those who rightfully see this strategy as a cover-up, an obstruction of justice and a crime against millions of Palestinians who are human beings and as such equal under law like everyone else.

    The Anti-Semitic card shouldn’t be used as a license to commit criminal acts with impunity! All men are equal under the law and the past cannot be used to justify crimes in the present. Example: two of the men who burned down a doctor’s house in Connecticut with his wife and children in it were repeatedly abused as children, but their tragic past used as a defense did not exonerate them and rightfully they will pay the highest price for their vicious crime. Likewise, these are not the 1930s, Zionists cannot plead past abuse as a justification or defense and Palestinians are EQUAL under the law. JUSTICE HAS A BLINDFOLD FOR A VERY GOOD REASON.

    • kalithea
      kalithea
      February 16, 2014, 1:16 pm

      Correction to above post. “They allege that the Nazis boycotted Jewish businesses and that BDS is being used as the Nazis used boycotting, but….”

    • RoHa
      RoHa
      February 16, 2014, 7:57 pm

      We must hammer home that Palestinians are human.

  12. eljay
    eljay
    February 16, 2014, 10:01 am

    >> Kerry makes the argument that Israel will face new, and intensified, boycott pressure if peace talks fail, and he may be right. But by publicly discussing this possibility, he is providing fuel to the forces aligned against Israel… He is also terrifying Israelis, and terrified Israelis are not the sort of people who will make dangerous compromises for peace…

    So f*cking what? Until only recently, when America talked about non-aggressor and nuclear-free Iran, it talked about “all options are on the table” large-scale military assaults on the country and regime change EVEN AS “intensified boycott pressure” was being applied to the country! And that, apparently, was perfectly acceptable. Terrified Iranians were supposed to suck it up and push their government to make peace or else!

    But when it comes to the nuclear-equipped, oppressive, colonialist, expansionist and supremacist “Jewish State” of Israel, the kid gloves come out, America gently wags a finger in admonition…and Zio-supremacists whine and wail about how meanly their supremacist state is being treated. :-(

  13. seafoid
    seafoid
    February 16, 2014, 12:17 pm

    Mondoweiss gets namechecked in the Guardian.

    Way to go, Mondo. The go-to place for real info on Israel .

    http://www.theguardian.com/theobserver/2014/feb/16/scarlett-johansson-israel-oxfam-hollywood

    A commentator on the opinions website Mondoweiss described this as Johansson not only extricating herself from a tricky position but “cynically and opportunistically… throwing Oxfam under the bus” by suggesting that she had been asked implicitly to boycott SodaStream, when, in fact, the charity only wanted her to refrain from promoting the firm. The Mondoweiss writer worried that this leaves Oxfam vulnerable to accusations that it supports a boycott of Israel, when, in fact, it does not express any opinion.

    • Kathleen
      Kathleen
      February 16, 2014, 12:47 pm

      Interesting paragraph at the end of that article:

      “If the SodaStream affair has taken a little of the fizz out of her persona, that shouldn’t diminish the artistic choices she has made. Hollywood stars are always pimping themselves out to brands and companies: that was one of the running gags of Lost in Translation. What makes Johansson different from most celebrities who shill for the highest bidder is that it doesn’t quite square with the coolness she has cultivated so far. She should be pleased about that. She might even take the furore as a bitter kind of compliment.”

      “a bitter kind of compliment” really?

    • annie
      annie
      February 17, 2014, 3:57 pm

      cool, i had not seen that seafoid. that was one of phan’s articles. here’s our johansson tag (scroll) http://mondoweiss.net/tag/scarlett-johansson

  14. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    February 16, 2014, 12:31 pm

    “I think Goldberg’s double standard reflects the fact that it’s OK to be Jewish and saying these things to a Jewish audience– a lot of straight talk falls into that special category” Yep

    “Goldberg is subscribing to the Old South’s standards on counting bodies.”
    Or the U.S. government and most Americans standards.. who do not seem to give a rats ass about the dead, injured, displaced in Iraq as a direct consequence of the invasion. Or those killed by U.S. drones. You know collateral damage.

    On top of it Kerry is really being a good friend to Israel…I really believe this. He really asked out loud…are you able to see the writing on the wall? Because most nations around the world can. One state, one vote or the apartheid state of Israel totally exposed not just leaking through the cracks in the wall.

  15. kalithea
    kalithea
    February 16, 2014, 1:44 pm

    I posted way before these last three comments and mine still don’t show up.

  16. piotr
    piotr
    February 16, 2014, 2:26 pm

    When you make blintzes/crepes, the pan temperature is the key.

    If it is not hot enough, batter sticks to the pan, and too hot, you will burn them.

    The heat under BDS pan is still too low.

    Using the same analogy, one could conclude that the heat under the pan with Iran sanction is fine, but concluding that in this case you can keep the pancake on the pan forever is very wrong, you have one minute to make it (one also has to flip etc. but I will try to avoid runaway analogy).

    • just
      just
      February 16, 2014, 2:42 pm

      I totally love your analogy!

      (btw– I was not in favor of the killing sanctions against Iran nor Iraq– they went far too far! All sticks and no carrots suck. On the other hand, Israel only gets solid gold carrots and nary a stick……..for forevah!)

      Madeleine Albright’s comments will never fail to disgust me:

      “Lesley Stahl on U.S. sanctions against Iraq: We have heard that a half million children have died. I mean, that’s more children than died in Hiroshima. And, you know, is the price worth it?
      Secretary of State Madeleine Albright: I think this is a very hard choice, but the price–we think the price is worth it.”

      http://fair.org/extra-online-articles/we-think-the-price-is-worth-it/

  17. Shingo
    Shingo
    February 17, 2014, 7:11 am

    OT but very important.

    The ABC Documentary on the occupation abuse of children by the IDF and Israeli police in the occupied territories is on Youtube.

    • Sumud
      Sumud
      February 17, 2014, 9:25 am

      hahaha Shingo, from the comments on YT:

      Did anyone else notice the tiny olive tree growing out of Daniella Weiss’ moustache?

    • Kathleen
      Kathleen
      February 17, 2014, 9:38 am

      Very important indeed…ABC. About half way through. Let’s make sure this goes viral. Let’s see if the USA Today of Blogs Huffington Post will allow it to go up. Spread this far and wide. Will be trying to put it up at you know that liberal social justice Rachel Maddow site…etc.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        February 17, 2014, 10:35 pm

        It’s on the ABC site.

        Thanks Roha, and that’s where I first watched it, but some others who tried to watch it from outside Australia reported being unable to access it.

        And there is this.

        Thanks again. What is most surprising is that John Lyon is a reporter with the Australian, which as you know is a pretty right wing paper. It’s refreshing to see a reporter putting the facts before the editorial ideology of the paper. Compare this guy with the hacks like Gregg Sheridan and it’s amazing they work for the same paper.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        February 18, 2014, 6:07 am

        “What is most surprising is that John Lyon is a reporter with the Australian”

        I’ve mentioned my surprise in earlier posts on this topic.

        ” Gregg Sheridan”

        Bleah!

  18. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    February 17, 2014, 10:23 am

    This documentary is huge…finally ABC.

    Also reporting about how Israeli soldiers and officials are interrogating Palestinian children to identify the non violent Palestinian protest leaders. Have heard that Israel has locked up specific non violent Palestinian leaders for decades. So that when people ask where is the Palestinian Gandhi, Martin Luther King…they have put in prison for years.

    The torture techniques used on Palestinian children and Palestinian adults and the night raids that Art Gish, CPT, Human Rights, UNICEF etc have been reporting about for several decades. Many of these Israeli torture techniques were reported to be allegedly taught to U.S. prison guards in Abu Gharib by Israeli agents. Not blaming alleged Israeli agents for what torture techniques the U.S. decided to use.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3863235.stm
    Brig Gen Janis Karpinski told the BBC she met an Israeli working as an interrogator at a secret intelligence centre in Baghdad

    Also that U.S. officials in the Bush administration from the (OLC) used Israeli agents to train U.S. guards at Gitmo.

    • Boomer
      Boomer
      February 17, 2014, 1:10 pm

      It is indeed worth watching, and ABC is indeed mainstream media in Australia, but I will be surprised to to it on any U.S. networks.

    • annie
      annie
      February 17, 2014, 4:00 pm

      This documentary is huge…finally ABC.

      kathleen ABC in australia is australian broadcasting company, like the bbc is british, it’s not the same as US ABC but it’s as big in australia as our ABC is here (if not bigger for all i know).

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        February 17, 2014, 5:47 pm

        kathleen ABC in australia is australian broadcasting company, like the bbc is british, it’s not the same as US ABC but it’s as big in australia as our ABC is here (if not bigger for all i know).

        Not sure if it’s bigger, but it still remains the most prestigious Australian news channel. They have an number of excellent programs such as this one (4 corners) and another excellent one called Q&A where high profile guests appear before a studio audience. It’s a bit like the Doha Debates.

        This past year they’ve had Omar Barghoutti and Illan Pappe. A few years ago on another program, Insight, they featured a member of the FSA who was opposed to Assad. members of the the audience including the the babelicious blogger Syrian Girl, were able to rip the guy’s BS to shreds.
        http://youtu.be/GrEPadG0pQk

        Another program, Foreign Correspondent, can be a bit hit and miss. They are affiliated with the BBC, and aired that pro Israeli propaganda BBC hatchet hob on the Mavi Maranara , but otherwise they are far ahead of the commercial networks who won’t even touch the subject.

  19. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    February 17, 2014, 10:37 am

    Shingo this MSM documentary is huge. Not that the information is anything we did not all ready know. But the fact that it is out of the MSM. Incredibly well done. We all need to spread far and wide

    Interviewer: In the 1970’s Daniella Weiss and Ariel Sharon would meet with the intentions to make sure illegal settlements would surge so that there would never be a Palestinian state.

    Daniella Weiss: “My many talks with Ariel Sharon and my work with Ariel Sharon there was a clear understanding a very clear planning of spreading the Jewish communities in the way there would be no option for a Palestinian state in Judea and Samaria.”

    One state, one person, one vote.

    • American
      American
      February 17, 2014, 12:07 pm

      kathleen,

      Has this aired in the US ?…I have not seen anything on this before.

      • just
        just
        February 17, 2014, 5:33 pm

        It aired in Australia……..it was linked by Sumud first and Henry yesterday (iirc) and was mentioned in Haaretz late last week.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        February 17, 2014, 6:31 pm

        Yep after watching the video did get it that it was ABC (Australian Broadcasting Company) . Also knew it was a MSM outlet. And yes I hope folks watch and share everywhere they can. Put it up on Rachel Maddow, Chris Matthews, Chris Hayes fb pages as well as at Informed Comment, Huffington Post (have not seen yet if it made it through), Going To Tehran, and my fb page. Nothing new in there but an important documentary to get out far and wide.

        Just checked Huff Po did not allow the short comment and link to the documentary up. Will try to get it up again later

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        February 17, 2014, 7:47 pm

        I only hope it stays up on YouTube long enough Kathleen. The original clip will always be available on the ABC web site , but as it appears those outside Australia cannot view it.

        I expect the ABC to come under pressure by the usual suspects to demand YouTube take it down and use the usual copyright violation excuses to do so.

  20. Shingo
    Shingo
    February 17, 2014, 6:10 pm

    The entire transcript can also be found on the ANC web site
    http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/stories/2014/02/10/3939266.htm

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