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  1. amigo
    amigo on October 21, 2015, 3:41 pm

    I questioned my own part in condemning Israel and wondered if I fit the profile of an antisemite which is someone who hates Jews.

    During Israel,s war of 67/73 I supported them 100% .Later, I began to question Israel,s motives and actions and came to the conclusion that I could no longer support a nation involved in land theft and ethnic cleansing.

    Nothing to do with Jews in either case.It could have been any other nation and my response would have been exactly the same.Tyranny and oppression must be condemned , regardless of who the perpetrator is.To not condemn Israel because Jews are involved , would be truly antisemitic.

    • JWalters
      JWalters on October 21, 2015, 6:39 pm

      Well put!

    • Blake
      Blake on October 24, 2015, 4:29 am

      Forgive me for asking this but did you only realise they were involved in ethnic cleansing post 1973 and not beforehand?

      • amigo
        amigo on October 24, 2015, 9:52 am

        “Forgive me for asking this but did you only realise they were involved in ethnic cleansing post 1973 and not beforehand? – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/10/criticizing-semitic-racist#comment-805157” Blake.

        The answer is , yes.Unlike contemporary news reports , we received very few details of the “conflict” and they usually described the Brave Jews fighting war hungry Arabs who wanted to kill all Jews .They provided zero balance, Also , I was in my early 20,s and had other diversions.However , a Palestinian friend and relative, (in law) entreated me to look deeper and hence my enlightenment began.It didn,t take long to convince me I had been hoodwinked.

        Hope that answers your question.

  2. JWalters
    JWalters on October 21, 2015, 6:38 pm

    An International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network is an extremely welcome development! The very name itself sends a powerful message to all who hear about it. My thanks to all those involved for their efforts on behalf of justice.

  3. tokyobk
    tokyobk on October 21, 2015, 8:19 pm

    You are certainly right that holding Jews to any different, even a lesser, standard would be a kind of anti-Semitism. And obviously, since you thought about it, you wanted to make sure you were not being bigoted towards Jews which is telling about your sincere intentions.

    I would only add that being against anti-Semitism is not being for Zionism (it should be obvious but its not).

    There are, unlike you obviously, some people for whom I/P is interesting precisely because of the Jewish aspect. And others who try to parse, minimise, contextualise or erase every expression of bigotry against Jews.

    • Mooser
      Mooser on October 21, 2015, 9:56 pm

      “There are, unlike you obviously, some people for whom I/P is interesting precisely because of the Jewish aspect. And others who try to parse, minimise, contextualise or erase every expression of bigotry against Jews.”

      That’s scary, “tokyobk”. Would you tell me who those “Some people” are? And who the “others” are? They sound like not-nice people people who “parse, minimise, contextualise or erase every expression of bigotry against Jews”
      What are their names? I want to be able to recognize them.

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk on October 22, 2015, 1:30 pm

        Mooser, I have something better to offer you. I’ll add 10$ to my MW donation each time you don’t respond to me. How about it? This way you could be part of actually contributing something meaningful.

      • eljay
        eljay on October 22, 2015, 1:43 pm

        || tokyobk: Mooser … I’ll add 10$ to my MW donation each time you don’t respond to me. How about it? … ||

        Each time he doesn’t respond…except for this one time, yes? ;-)

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 22, 2015, 3:29 pm

        “Mooser, I have something better to offer you. I’ll add 10$ to my MW donation each time you don’t respond to me.”

        I’ve got a much better idea. I’ll send Mondo $100 if you just name the “some people” and “the “others”. Why is that not a perfectly reasonable request?

        You said it, pal, not me. You made a very insinuating accusation, about “some people” and “others”. Now back it up. If you weren’t thinking of me, who was it?

        And by the way, “tokyobk” as far as I can see, this discussion is about Israel, not “the Jews”. Are they the same to you?

        And, just to know where we stand is the “every expression of bigotry against Jews” the attacks in Jerusalem?

      • Citizen
        Citizen on October 22, 2015, 4:31 pm

        @ tokyobk

        @Mooser’s question poses the practical issue, how do you distinguish the two types of people, perhaps, as he suggests, by pointing to some examples of each and/or showing us the criteria that helps you make your distinction?

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 22, 2015, 4:48 pm

        “@Mooser’s question poses the practical issue, how do you distinguish the two types of people,”

        I think we can start by agreeing with “tokyobk” that “amigo” is not among these “some people” or even the “others”. Perfectly willing to start there. So “amigo” is out. That just leaves 6,999,999,999 to sort through.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 22, 2015, 6:49 pm

        . Why is that not a perfectly reasonable request?”

        And I just paid for it in advance, too.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 22, 2015, 7:32 pm

        “There are, unlike you obviously, some people for whom I/P is interesting precisely because of the Jewish aspect.”

        “tokyobk” if you can separate “the Jewish aspect” from Zionism, and Israel and Palestine you are a better man than me.
        I don’t like the fact that it’s there, but, well, there it is whether I like it or not.

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk on October 22, 2015, 7:45 pm

        Mooser, I was not thinking of you. I don’t think you are an anti-Semite at all. I agree with much of what you say in fact and appreciate your skepticism of organised religion including the one you and I were born into. My issue with you is that you seem to be here to tell jokes rather than exchange ideas, and that you twist my words often on purpose in the service of your priority. This is why back-and-fort with you is uninteresting to the point where I would rather contribute more to hear you less (best not at all on my posts). I have also accused you of egocentrism though, so interesting you thought I was thinking of you!

        There are several people among hundreds of commenters on this site that I think are attracted to the issue based on the Jewish aspect, and a few others others who minimise very case of anti-Semitism. When I have exchanged with them I mention this but I did not think it write to put personal names in that comment since none had commented.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 22, 2015, 8:07 pm

        “Mooser, I was not thinking of you. I don’t think you are an anti-Semite at all.”

        Wait a second “tokyobk”. You’re so bright tonight, you’re like spring tonight!
        You’re a rollicking, frollicking thing tonight! So disarming, soft and charming
        And you’re not thinking of me?

        Okay, romance is dead, on to commerce:

        There are several people among hundreds of commenters on this site that I think are attracted to the issue based on the Jewish aspect, and a few others others who minimise very case of anti-Semitism. When I have exchanged with them I mention this but I did not think it write to put personal names in that comment since none had commented.”

        A C-note doesn’t buy what it used to, I guess. Glad I did it anyway.

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak on October 23, 2015, 12:08 am

        Tokyobk; There are several people among hundreds of commenters on this site that I think are attracted to the issue based on the Jewish aspect, a few others others who minimise very case of anti-Semitism.
        ———–

        Let me put aside any discussion of commenters on this site and make some general comments.

        Sometimes anti-Jewishness (antisemitism) leads to a focus on anti-Zionism; alternately, anti-Zionism can lead to anti-Jewishness.

        In the first case, a person already has a full-fledged anti-Jewish worldview, and they approach the I/P issue with the intent of incorporating it into that pre-existing worldview. Someone like Clay Douglas, for example. He already believes in a “Protocols of the Elders of Zion” type global, transhistorical Jewish conspiracy and he brings in an anti-Zionist viewpoint like Alison Weir’s to reinforce that conspiratorial anti-Jewish worldview. Jewish Zionist misdeeds are construed as only the latest example in a long history of Jewish misdeeds.

        The number of these dyed-in-the wool antisemites is relatively small. The opposite case, though, is more important, imo: a person comes to the I/P issue out of humanitarian concern for the oppression of Palestinians and moral outrage at the actions of Zionists, and only after studying and thinking about the issue do they begin to embrace some kind of anti-Jewish ideology.

        For example, a person wonders, “how can this despicable Zionism have so much support in the U.S. and other countries”? That person then reads certain articles and books and comes to believe in an extremely powerful, treacherous, conspiratorial Jewish force, eg. “the Lobby”, that comes into a nation as an alien element, infecting and corrupting an otherwise healthy body politic. Then that person begins to see similar patterns across history: Jews living as aliens within a larger group, infecting and corrupting, using secretive and devious methods, conspiring to do harm to the “host nation”; Jews exploiting other vulnerable groups, exploiting peasants and workers, backed by corrupted power elites; Jews playing leading roles in totalitarian Communism and other pernicious movements; Jews controlling global capitalist finance and using that power to foment economic crises and wars; Jews involved in all sorts of nefarious activities that parallel the current nefarious activities of Zionist Jews.

        Then that person might naturally ask, “what is it about the Jewish people that constantly compels them to such misbehavior?” This then leads to an inquiry into Jewish religion and ideology. A study of certain texts leads to the idea that Jewish tribalism, Jewish “Chosenness”, Jewish anti-Gentilism, and Jewish racism are not only the essence of Judaism, but the essence of secular Jewish identity as well. And this negative, socially pathological essence ascribed to Jewishness is taken to be the essence of Zionism. Zionism=Jewishness. Interestingly, Zionism itself promulgates the same notion, Zionism=Jewishness. The only difference is the evaluation. For Zionists, Jewishness is wholly positive, for the “reverse Zionists,” it is almost wholly negative.

        All these ideas and others, in various forms and combinations, can coalesce into an anti-Jewish worldview that serves primarily to explain Zionism and Jewish misdeeds in Palestine, and only secondarily, perhaps, to explain other world problems and events (eg., the evils of predatory financialized capitalism, 9/11 and The global war on Terror, etc., wars in Iraq, Syria etc.), and world history.

        Furthermore, such a person can’t help but see that antisemitism accusations are routinely and unscrupulously used to suppress any and all critical discussion of Zionism and Jewishness and are used to viciously slander and calumniate honest, well-intentioned individuals. The awareness of ubiquitous false charges of antisemitism can naturally lead to the notion: if almost all the charges of antisemitism today are false, then perhaps many charges of antisemitism in the past were false or overblown, and perhaps past anti-Jewish sentiments were not reflective of reprehensible bigotry but rather reflective of justifiable indignation at Jewish misbehavior. One begins to doubt that unjustifiable anti-Jewish sentiment and ideology ever actually existed to any significant degree. In the extreme case that can lead to holocaust skepticism or denial.

    • amigo
      amigo on October 22, 2015, 10:38 am

      “There are, unlike you obviously, some people for whom I/P is interesting precisely because of the Jewish aspect. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/10/criticizing-semitic-racist#comment-804612” tokyobk

      The Jewish aspect is of no concern to me.I am interested in the “zionist ” aspect.Zionists fascinate me.The efforts they go to to self destruct are amazing.Why not just shoot themselves in the head and be done with it.Work smarter , not harder.It would save a lot of other people a lot of trouble , not least the Palestinian victims of the collective zionist suicidal phsyche .

    • Kris
      Kris on October 22, 2015, 7:12 pm

      @tokyobk: “There are, unlike you obviously, some people for whom I/P is interesting precisely because of the Jewish aspect. And others who try to parse, minimise, contextualise or erase every expression of bigotry against Jews.”

      Tokyobk, personality/behavior/attitude inventories are interesting and enjoyable, and are very popular in magazines and online. Please share the one you use to assign membership in these groups:

      (1) those to whom I/P is interesting precisely because of the Jewish aspect.

      (2)those who try to parse, minimise, contextualise or erase every expression of bigotry against Jews.

      (3) those like amigo who have “sincere intentions” and so can get away with criticizing Israel.

      It would be helpful if you would post a list of questions we could answer. You could call it the “Jewish-Aspect Attitude Blank,” and you could assign points to our responses. Using the scores to assign us to categories would make the exercise seem sort of scientific.

      For what it’s worth, when I was a teenager, I loved Leon Uris’s novel “Exodus,” I idolized Anne Frank, and I thought “Never again!” meant just that. My favorite movie is “Fiddler on the Roof,” though “Real Genius” and “What Would Jesus Buy?” are close seconds.

      I’m dying to know my category; what other info do you need? Please provide us with the complete “”Jewish-Aspect Attitude Blank” as soon as possible, so we can fill it out and discover where we fit in. Thanks.

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk on October 22, 2015, 7:55 pm

        Only you know Kris, what is in your heart.

        I’ll just stand by my statements:

        –The author is correct of course that criticising Israel is not anti-Semitism.
        — Being vocally against anti-Semitism past and present is not Zionism (which should be obvious but is not)
        –I respect the way Amigo and the majority of people here and generally approach the issue.
        –For some, however, the attraction is the Jews.
        –For some, no occurrence of anti-Semitism past or present, escapes parsing, and contextualising for the purpose of minimising.

      • echinococcus
        echinococcus on October 22, 2015, 8:31 pm

        Tokyo,

        How about finally moving and writing down a clear, unequivocal definition of “antisemitism” according to you, and then perhaps people may talk to you?

      • Kris
        Kris on October 22, 2015, 8:31 pm

        @tokyobk:

        Only you know Kris, what is in your heart.

        I’ll just stand by my statements: …

        –For some, however, the attraction is the Jews.
        –For some, no occurrence of anti-Semitism past or present, escapes parsing, and contextualising for the purpose of minimising.

        If only the person knows what is in his heart, then how do you know when “the attraction is the Jews”? I haven’t seen anyone admit to this, and yet you are somehow aware of it? How do you do it?

        I’d like to learn to do this, too, and yet you won’t share your methodology. There has got to be a way to understand this. Why not share it?

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk on October 22, 2015, 9:00 pm

        Kris,

        You asked what category you are in. You were being snarky of course, as with your request I create a survey.

        But I don’t know. You tell me. Do you not like Jews? I have not followed your posts. You and I have never had a conversation. So, only you know what’s in your heart in this matter. If you say you are not anti-Jewish, fine with me.

        As for your question, and Citizen’s, it is valid to ask how to measure this. How does someone detect this particular bigotry?

        If you start telling me there is no such thing as anti-Semitism, its only a Jewish accusation, that anti-Semitism in Europe wasn’t really so bad, if your posts are always about Jewish power and never about Palestinians, if you use Jew to mean then, now forever, an unchanging group then I might think that you are more than just a critic of Israel (you might also be a Zionist in that last case though).

        My definition is actually quite narrow. For me, an anti-semite is someone for whom there has to be a Jew behind every problem, big or small, personal or global. No amount of factual reasoning will dissuade this person from Jewish malfeasance. Its someone who thinks Jews are a race, that Jewishness is an unchanging and malevolent force.

        How about you? How do you define anti-Semitism?

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 22, 2015, 9:07 pm

        “–For some, however, the attraction is the Jews.”

        Isn’t that always the way “some people” always are, “tokyobk”? And it’s so unfair when you consider the tiny, tiny minority of Jews involved in Zionism, and nobody ever mentions the fact that Jewish religious institutions have steadfastly refused to get involved with Zionism or condemn it as something not Jewish.

        But, you know how people are, they look for the most tenuous connections, and seem to see patterns in them. Sheesh!

      • Kris
        Kris on October 23, 2015, 12:36 pm

        Thanks for your reply, tokyobk, and for your definition of antisemitism:

        My definition is actually quite narrow. For me, an anti-semite is someone for whom there has to be a Jew behind every problem, big or small, personal or global. No amount of factual reasoning will dissuade this person from Jewish malfeasance. Its someone who thinks Jews are a race, that Jewishness is an unchanging and malevolent force.

        You and I seem to agree that Jews are not a race, which is what confuses me about “antisemitism,” because I always thought it was a kind of racism. How would you define “Jewishness”?

      • on October 23, 2015, 12:53 pm

        Hey before defining Jewishness, and I’m not trying to sound overly philosophical, but what is race itself and to whom? Is white a race? Is a blonde blue eyed Muslim Palestinian a white person, just as for example, Ann Coultour?

        I think race is highly problematic as there can be multiple conflicting definitions for it, especially in todays globalized world. For me, Jewishness is a religious choice in living your life. And since most religions are at the core very similar, its not really surprising there are confusion on who exactly is a Jew. At the end of day, its up to the person calling him or herself one to tell you that.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 23, 2015, 12:57 pm

        Ahh, there’s my e-mail receipt and thank-you from Mondo. It’s my pleasure.

      • Keith
        Keith on October 23, 2015, 8:26 pm

        TOKYOBK- “Its someone who thinks Jews are a race, that Jewishness is an unchanging and malevolent force.”

        I hope you realize that if you leave out “and malevolent,” you will be describing many of the founders of Zionism?

        TOKYOBK- “For some, no occurrence of anti-Semitism past or present, escapes parsing, and contextualising for the purpose of minimising.”

        Oh lord, here comes the straw man! So, you think that putting instances of historical anti-Semitism into historical context to assess both the situation and the relative degree of violence against Jews versus violence against other groups is anti-Semitic? An attempt to minimize the occurrence of anti-Semitism? And you don’t think that an exclusive focus on only Jewish suffering is Judeocentric? This is how you approach the study of history, by focusing exclusively on the perspective of a single group and ignoring other relevant facts and perspectives? Or is it just when it concerns Jews that you put your blinders on? Methinks that you are quite content with your gilded victimhood which you defend in a most unscholarly fashion.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 24, 2015, 11:36 am

        See, “Keith”! That’s exactly what “tokyobk” is talking about. People (mostly, thank God, “some people” and “others”) who comb through every nook and cranny trying to find some tenuous (and of course repudiated by Judaism) connection between Jews, Judaism and Zionism.

        Wasting their time on a dead-end research!

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 24, 2015, 12:03 pm

        “Tokyobk” don’t worry, it’ll be very easy to count up the number of your comments I don’t respond to at the end of the year. I’ll remind you then of the number, you can pay whatever it’s worth to you. See you last week in December!

  4. mijj
    mijj on October 21, 2015, 9:54 pm

    those who say, “Criticizing Israel is anti-Semitic” are anti-Semitic for implying that all of Judaism should be a mindless slave to Israel.

  5. Qualtrough
    Qualtrough on October 21, 2015, 11:17 pm

    That Zionism = Racism is the least bit controversial is sad.

  6. Boo
    Boo on October 22, 2015, 11:01 am

    To quote from the first of the graphics in the article, “Anti-Semitism is prejudice against and hatred of Jews”.

    This is accurate only in a limited context and correct only if one asserts that all Jews are Semites and all Semites are Jews. Both assertions are, of course, demonstrably untrue.

  7. tokyobk
    tokyobk on October 22, 2015, 1:33 pm

    I guess I am being anti-Semantic when I say, so what? We know what the term means, though inaccurate and in fact invented by someone who didn’t like Jews or Arabs)

    • michelle
      michelle on October 22, 2015, 4:39 pm

      .
      anti-semite
      by the measure of its ‘popular’ misuse the term initself is racist
      inthatit excludes/disregards all/any other Semite race
      and yet against base common sense logic and reason many cling to
      this/the popular misuse/racist use of the term
      if ‘we’ can’t correct such a simple wrong how can we hope toward justice/equality
      .
      G-d Bless
      .

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 22, 2015, 4:58 pm

        Michelle, I believe that the term “Semitic” and “Semite” is based on the fact that all of those peoples are the descendants of Shem, one of Noah’s sons. (Which that he is one of Noah’s sons I’m sure you know, of course.) He was a busy guy after The Flood.

      • michelle
        michelle on October 23, 2015, 3:32 am

        .
        hello dear Mooser
        i hope you’re well
        m
        .
        Semitic is a grouping of certain languages
        Semite is/are those who speak those languages
        .
        my issue is i can’t get on board with the current incorrect useage of the term no matter how popular/accepted but that’s just me nbd
        to accept it i would have to accept a lie
        i just can’t do it
        .
        G-d Bless
        .

      • MHughes976
        MHughes976 on October 23, 2015, 5:42 am

        Genesis 10, that splendid palaeo-geography, makes Shem slightly busier than his brother Ham, five sons to four, though Japheth, the proto-European, has seven – perhaps our tendency to breed like rabbits and intrude everywhere was foreseen. But the Semite nations seem to be a rather small and select group, centred on Iraq. The inhabitants of Palestine are Hamites.
        I disagree somewhat with Michelle. We are all free to define words, ie relate them to other words, as we choose – this does not involve truth or falsity, which arises only when we move on to description, relating words to world assertively – ‘shocking pink is very bright pink colour/’her dress was shocking pink’. We can define ‘unicorn’ even though there aren’t any unicorns. This means that there are no true or false, though there are customary and unusual, definitions. So inconsistency will sometimes enter customary usage, even in single words like ‘apology’ which can mean ‘defence of oneself’ or ‘exoression of regret’: we have to understand by context. Since we can do this there is little risk in this situation of departure from truth.
        The political influence/misinterpretation of Genesis 10 is discussed in ‘From Creation to Babel’, a lively book from Professor John Day of good old Oxford.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 23, 2015, 5:39 pm

        “hello dear Mooser
        i hope you’re well”

        Oh, you know how it is during fall, I’m in the same old rut. Thanks for your kind words. Best wishes to you, Michelle.

      • michelle
        michelle on October 23, 2015, 6:27 pm

        .
        A Semite is a member of any of various ancient and modern Semitic-speaking peoples, mostly originating in the Near East, including: Akkadians (Assyrians and Babylonians), Ammonites, Amorites, Arameans, Chaldeans, Canaanites (including Hebrews/Israelites/Jews/Palestinians/Samaritans and Phoenicians/Carthaginians), Eblaites, Dilmunites, Edomites, Amalekites, Turukku, Ethiopian Semites, Hyksos, Arabs, Nabateans, Maltese, Mandaeans, Mhallami, Moabites, Shebans, Meluhhans, Maganites, Ubarites, Sabians and Ugarites. It was proposed at first to refer to the languages related to Hebrew by Ludwig Schlözer, in Eichhorn’s “Repertorium”, vol. VIII (Leipzig, 1781), p. 161. Through Eichhorn the name then came into general usage (cf. his “Einleitung in das Alte Testament” (Leipzig, 1787), I, p. 45). In his “Geschichte der neuen Sprachenkunde”, pt. I (Göttingen, 1807) it had already become a fixed technical term.
        The word “Semitic” is derived from Shem, one of the three sons of Noah in Genesis 5:32, Genesis 6:10, Genesis 10:21, or more precisely from the Greek derivative of that name, namely Σημ (Sēm); the noun form referring to a person is Semite.
        The concept of “Semitic” peoples is derived from biblical accounts of the origins of the cultures known to the ancient Hebrews. In an effort to categorize the peoples known to them, those closest to them in culture and language were generally deemed to be descended from their supposed forefather Shem.
        In Genesis 10:21-31, Shem is described as the father of Aram, Ashur, and Arphaxad: the biblical ancestors of the Arabs, Aramaeans, Assyrians, Babylonians, Chaldeans, Sabaeans, and Hebrews, etc., all of whose languages are fairly closely related; the language family containing them was therefore named “Semitic” by linguists.
        .
        Main article: Antisemitism
        The word “Semite” and most uses of the word “Semitic” relate to any people whose native tongue is, or was historically, a member of the associated language family. The term “anti-Semite”, however, came by a circuitous route to refer most commonly to one hostile or discriminatory towards Jews in particular.
        Anthropologists of the 19th century such as Ernest Renan readily aligned linguistic groupings with ethnicity and culture, appealing to anecdote, science and folklore in their efforts to define racial character. Moritz Steinschneider, in his periodical of Jewish letters Hamaskir (3 (Berlin 1860), 16), discusses an article by Heymann Steinthal criticising Renan’s article “New Considerations on the General Character of the Semitic Peoples, In Particular Their Tendency to Monotheism”. Renan had acknowledged the importance of the ancient civilisations of Mesopotamia, Israel etc. but called the Semitic races inferior to the Aryan for their monotheism, which he held to arise from their supposed lustful, violent, unscrupulous and selfish racial instincts. Steinthal summed up these predispositions as “Semitism”, and so Steinschneider characterised Renan’s ideas as “anti-Semitic prejudice”.
        In 1879 the German journalist Wilhelm Marr, in a pamphlet called Der Weg zum Siege des Germanenthums über das Judenthum (“The Way to Victory of Germanicism over Judaism”), began the politicisation of the term by speaking of a struggle between Jews and Germans. He accused them of being liberals, a people without roots who had Judaized Germans beyond salvation. In 1879 Marr’s adherents founded the “League for Anti-Semitism” which concerned itself entirely with anti-Jewish political action.
        .
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semitic_people
        .
        G-d Is Complete/Absolute Truth
        seek that ye shall find
        .
        G-d Bless
        .

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 23, 2015, 6:59 pm

        “G-d Is Complete/Absolute Truth
        seek that ye shall find”

        Thanks, Michelle. There’s nothing like God’s word when you want the facts!

        And there’s no one like Noah’s boys when it comes to ‘natural increase’ since 5,000 BC. (the date of the Flood, of course)

      • michelle
        michelle on October 24, 2015, 3:43 am

        .
        hello Mooser
        may you and all you know be thrice Blessed
        m
        .
        seems like one would first need to truly understand the Word Of G-d
        .
        all blood is red
        .
        G-d Bless
        .

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 24, 2015, 12:09 pm

        “seems like one would first need to truly understand the Word Of G-d”

        Yes, and I’ve never been able to do that, gain that understanding. Probably because I am drenched in sin . (Don’t ask!) No, that’s cheap cologne.
        You are a very blessed person, to be granted that insight. From God’s mouth, into your ear.

        The poet Blake spoke of it: “There is” he said, “a great big mystery, and it sure is troubling me…”

      • michelle
        michelle on October 25, 2015, 8:22 pm

        .
        dear Mooser
        may your heart guide you to the place(s) you want to be
        m
        .
        as to understanding The Will/Word Of G-d
        i expect i’m more miss than hit
        though i haven’t found anything more worthwhile to guide my life
        .
        G-d Bless
        .

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 25, 2015, 9:00 pm

        “as to understanding The Will/Word Of G-d…/…to guide my life”

        Bless you, Michele, we must do our best, and trust that God is merciful.

    • YoniFalic
      YoniFalic on October 23, 2015, 9:38 am

      I guess I am being anti-Semantic when I say, so what? We know what the term means, though inaccurate and in fact invented by someone who didn’t like Jews or Arabs)

      Moritz Steinschneider invented the term, and Marr’s relationship with Jews was much more conflicted than indicated by superficial historical snippets.

  8. Ossinev
    Ossinev on October 22, 2015, 2:55 pm

    @tokyobk

    “I guess I am being anti-Semantic when I say, so what? We know what the term means, though inaccurate and in fact invented by someone who didn’t like Jews or Arabs)”

    At the risk of being accused of “semantics” I am assuming that the “term” referred to in your last sentence is “anti – semitic” . That being the case can you confirm the identity of the “someone”

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    BTW I promise to respond.

  9. Mooser
    Mooser on October 22, 2015, 3:38 pm

    and in fact invented by someone who didn’t like Jews or Arabs

    Ah, soWilhelm Marr had it in for the Arab’s , too? Didn’t know that.

  10. talknic
    talknic on October 22, 2015, 5:07 pm

    @ Mooser “Ah, soWilhelm Marr had it in for the Arab’s , too? Didn’t know that”

    Wlm Marr likely had it in for Arab Jews too

    E.g., Israel’s Arab population. By 1950 there were some 500,000 Arab Jewish refugees from the Arab states in Israel by 1950. The Arab population of Israel in 1948 was well in excess of 50%. A large number of Israeli Jews today are of Arabic descent. Arab DNA is deeply and inescapably embedded in the Jewish Israeli population.

  11. michelle
    michelle on October 22, 2015, 5:17 pm

    .
    seems like those who seek to exclude moreoftenthannot exclude themselves
    .
    G-d Bless
    .

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