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The centrist US political system will defeat Trump

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This is part of Marc H. Ellis’s “Exile and the Prophetic” feature for Mondoweiss. To read the entire series visit the archive page.

As the Trump administration enters its third week, it’s time to take stock. The sense that Trump himself and those surrounding him pose a threat to American democracy has been exaggerated. The push back on the streets and at the airports has been effective. Even more important are the institutions of American democracy. The federal judges stay of Trump’s Executive Order on immigration was crucial, as was the immediate implementation of the judge’s decision by Federal agencies. The generals Trump appointed may also function as a break on his power. As it turns out, the generals may not be all in.

The major lesson of these first weeks? The American political system is centrist. There are too many powerful vested interests to move it very far in any particular direction.

Hillary Clinton’s election debacle has been attributed to a variety of factors but it seems, in retrospect, that her defeat was quite ordinary. Systematically undermining a popular candidate from her own party and carrying extraordinarily negative ratings involving her own candidacy, Clinton handed a victory to an easily-defeated right-wing hotel developer and reality television star.

Clinton’s defeat is consequential in many ways; it may be the most consequential defeat in American history. But her defeat is not about the rise of authoritarian fascism. Rather it is about a return to a right-wing Republicanism that has the possibility of becoming mainstream.

Whatever the days ahead bring, including the possible downfall of Trump himself, the challenge to those on the Left is to realize the limits of political change in America. With all its substantial faults, America has never been a fascist state. America has never been a revolutionary state either. Even the American revolution can be a classified as a fairly centrist revolt.

America’s future lies somewhere else. Most likely the political and economic system as constructed over the last centuries will continue with minor shifts in conservative and progressive directions. With all of his faults, President Obama, as a progressive centrist, was most likely the best kind of president America is likely to see for the foreseeable future.

Though the candidacy of Bernie Sanders seemed to promise much more than President Obama, it is doubtful that his stated policies would have been implemented in full. Besides, “our revolution” as Sanders views it, wasn’t revolutionary at all. Importantly but with severe limitations, it promised an extension of President Obama’s policies, with some upgrades. How much of this vision would have been implemented is a question mark. Still, there is no doubt he would have defeated Trump decisively. Herein lies Sanders’s significance. Clinton’s destruction of Sanders and his movement remains unforgivable.

For those who want more, much more, from the American political order, another form of politics needs to be thought-through and acted-upon. This is true across the board. On the Middle East for example, the policies of Trump, Clinton and Sanders seem poles apart. The details of these policies and how they could be passed and implemented bring them much closer together. Would the Israel-Palestine situation look much different after four years of Trump, Clinton or Sanders? As with the American economy, the details of these policies, especially with their possible implementation, bear too great a resemblance.

In the weeks ahead the struggle will continue. As we struggle, we should be grateful for the limitations of the American political system. In a time of crisis it will save us from the worst of the worst. Yet the limitations themselves pose as great a challenge as the emergency itself.

Now, we need serious political, economic and religious thinkers to chart a course forward for our nation. Outrage about Trump, so necessary, is not enough.

Marc H. Ellis
About Marc H. Ellis

Marc H. Ellis is Professor of History and Jewish Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of the Global Prophetic. His latest book is Finding Our Voice: Embodying the Prophetic and Other Misadventures.

Other posts by .


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50 Responses

  1. Mooser
    Mooser
    February 6, 2017, 12:35 pm

    “Now, we need serious political, economic and religious thinkers to chart a course forward for our nation.”

    Oh, you bet Prof. Ellis! That’s what we need.

    • JLewisDickerson
      JLewisDickerson
      February 6, 2017, 1:49 pm

      Algorithms: can’t live with ’em; can’t live without ’em! ! !

      Published on Nov 25, 2012
      View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/kevin-slavi

      Kevin Slavin argues that we’re living in a world designed for — and increasingly controlled by — algorithms. In this riveting talk from TEDGlobal, he shows how these complex computer programs determine espionage tactics, stock prices, movie scripts, and architecture. Slavin also warns that we are writing code we can’t understand with implications we can’t control.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 6, 2017, 2:40 pm

        See, there I go again, pretending I understand the higher mathematics, like “algorithims”. (I thought that was how Beyonce’ keeps her figure so, well, bouncy). It is so much more complicated than I thought.

        See, (go ahead, laugh) I thought it had something to do with an arithmetical concept we learned about in Jr. High school, called “the lowest common denominator”. But that was before computers.

      • wondering jew
        wondering jew
        February 6, 2017, 3:00 pm

        Thanks jl dickerson. As Mr spock used to say, fascinating.

      • eljay
        eljay
        February 6, 2017, 3:20 pm

        Speaking of Mr. Spock… :-)

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 6, 2017, 3:51 pm

        “Thanks jl dickerson. As Mr spock used to say, fascinating”

        See “Yonah”? That was very nice. You can be a mensch when you try.

      • Keith
        Keith
        February 6, 2017, 8:03 pm

        JLEWISDICKERSON- “In this riveting talk from TEDGlobal….”

        Yes, it was fascinating. In regards to the stock market and high speed algorithms, it should be noted that this is one aspect of the financialization of the economy. The major gains in economic wealth have gone to those who manipulate financial instruments, essentially contributing nothing to the real economy. A casino economy where smart money speculates against the speculations of other financiers. More correctly, financial wealth is redistributed based upon who has the fastest best algorithm to electronically reshuffle the stacked deck, all out of sight and out of control. I say “stacked deck” because some of the major players engage in such questionable/illegal activities as “naked shorts” which occur so fast as to be undetectable.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        February 6, 2017, 11:16 pm

        ““naked shorts” which occur so fast as to be undetectable.”

        If they are undetectable, how do you know whether you are wearing them or not?

        For the sake of my fellow citizens, I’ll stick to the old style opaque shorts.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 7, 2017, 12:16 pm

        “For the sake of my fellow citizens, I’ll stick to the old style opaque shorts.”

        Boxers, with lucky patterns, from JC Pennys, two sizes too big. Only way to go. Except, of course, when riding, when comfort must give way to safety.

      • DaBakr
        DaBakr
        February 7, 2017, 12:25 pm

        @Kth

        I know about ‘naked shorts’. who doesn’t? but “financialization “? that is a new one. not particularly grosse in terms of grammar nor deductions or contributions withheld but in terms of
        expounding the theme it isn’t clear your turning the noun into an adjective or explaining a new action.
        anyway, as often occurs, when your responses are not focused on the i/p i agree with much of your suppositions. This capitalizing on the numbers is not as new as all that however. One can reference the strategy of numbers manipulation in MLBaseball, pop music, and even the much earlier , complex but rather brilliant concept of using the electoral college to offset sheer majority. I am only thinking that the more things change the more they seem to stay the same, just worse. i guess an optimist would tend to believe there may actually be a game changer some day and not just a turnover

      • Keith
        Keith
        February 7, 2017, 2:19 pm

        DABAKR- “but “financialization “? that is a new one.”

        The term has been around for over 20 years. Google “financialization” and you will get a lot of info. It basically refers to the separation of the financial system from the real economy such that it has become more profitable to trade and speculate on financial instruments rather than produce goods and services in the real economy. It is an inevitable consequence of the upward flow of income such that consumers are starved for funds whereas the fat-cats have excessive cash flows in relation to productive investment, hence, the money is “invested” in financial instruments such as stocks driving the prices upward in a financial bubble. The notional value of the derivatives market is many times that of the entire global asset base, with estimates ranging from $500 trillion to well over $1000 trillion.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 7, 2017, 4:49 pm

        “The term has been around for over 20 years.”

        Oh gosh, “Keith”, more like 200 years. Edmund Burke knew all about it, and warned of it’s dangers! And many people, not just Burke, were able to identify its locus.

      • Keith
        Keith
        February 7, 2017, 5:13 pm

        MOOSER- “Edmund Burke knew all about it, and warned of it’s dangers!”

        Gosh, I must have missed that. I don’t suppose you have a quote of Edmund Burke using the specific term “financialization”? I personally had never heard the term prior to 20-30 years ago. Apparently, neither did John Bellamy Foster.

        “The origins of the term “financialization” are obscure, although it began to appear with increasing frequency in the early 1990s.” (John Bellamy Foster) http://monthlyreview.org/2007/04/01/the-financialization-of-capitalism/

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 7, 2017, 7:19 pm

        “I don’t suppose you have a quote of Edmund Burke using the specific term “financialization”?”

        It basically refers to the separation of the financial system from the real economy such that it has become more profitable to trade and speculate on financial instruments rather than produce goods and services in the real economy.”

        Yup, that sounds like it.

        Well, here’s Burke’s description of the process, concerning, in this case, land:

        “By this means the spirit of money-jobbing and speculation goes into the mass of land itself, and incorporates with it. By this kind of operation, that species of property becomes (as it were) volatilized; it assumes an unnatural and monstrous activity, and thereby throws into the hands of the several managers, principle and subordinate, urban and provincial, all the representatives of money”

        Certainly he knew of the process, if not that exact word.

  2. JLewisDickerson
    JLewisDickerson
    February 6, 2017, 1:41 pm

    ■ TRIPTYCH: The Three (Fascist) Amigos — ‎with ‎‎Benito Mussolini (Il Duce), ‎Benjamin Netanyahu – בנימין נתניהו‎‎ and Donald J. Trump‎.‎

    LINK – https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/16473018_10211190967506662_782118995559290735_n.jpg?oh=83c85a9ae26b06a6477de1e93b335669&oe=5943C463

    • JLewisDickerson
      JLewisDickerson
      February 6, 2017, 10:04 pm

      ■ Zizek — Is Trump literally Hitler? On Bernie Sanders and contemporary ultra-left deviations.

    • DaBakr
      DaBakr
      February 7, 2017, 12:35 pm

      @j

      so what? your saying netanyahu is an authoritarian ruler who has no countenance for liberal politics, lifestyles or policy?

      and while i will admit that certain expressions of facial movements and foolish countenance are similar between mussolini and trump i have yet to see any indication the US is in any danger of having a fascist and totalitarian leader take charge. if anything-it appears more like trump might have trouble controlling simply the cabinet members he himself [or whomever] has chosen let alone having a voting body of citizens , courts and judges go along with anything even close to fascistic. either you goofing around or you have lost your grip on reality.
      (and no, sorry, i did not click on the link if for some reason that explains the comment reasonably)

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 7, 2017, 1:43 pm

        There’s that low, resentful muttering again. Oh well, a few clicks on the scroll-wheel, and it stops.

      • JLewisDickerson
        JLewisDickerson
        February 8, 2017, 5:50 pm

        RE: “I have yet to see any indication the US is in any danger of having a fascist and totalitarian leader take charge” ~ DaBakr

        MY REPLY: You sound like a lot of Germans in the early 1930s: “There’s nothing to worry about! Things will take care of themselves.”

  3. sawah
    sawah
    February 6, 2017, 2:24 pm

    The problem is we need these ‘serious’ thinkers NOW

    Gorsuch had picked a Henry Kissinger quotation to caption his 1988 Columbia yearbook photograph: “The illegal we do immediately, the unconstitutional takes a little longer.”

    https://www.thenation.com/article/about-that-kissinger-quote-neil-gorsuch-likes/

    • JLewisDickerson
      JLewisDickerson
      February 6, 2017, 2:44 pm

      Gorsuch lacks the minimum requisite constitution to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court!

      MERRIAM-WEBSTER.COM:

      2.
      a : the physical makeup of the individual especially with respect to the health, strength, and appearance of the body <a hearty constitution>
      b : the structure, composition, physical makeup, or nature of something <the constitution of society>

      SOURCE – https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/constitution

      • JLewisDickerson
        JLewisDickerson
        February 6, 2017, 5:27 pm

        P.S. Orly Taitz (“The Queen Bee of Birthers”) for the U.S. Supreme Court! ! !

        Orly Taitz – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orly_Taitz

      • Boo
        Boo
        February 7, 2017, 1:22 pm

        Orly Taitz? Well, that was my ticket, all right: Taitz-Trump 2016! (In that order, mind you.)

        However, she’ll never serve on the Court, nor even be nominated — nosirree, not as long as Harriet Miers is still alive!

  4. Citizen
    Citizen
    February 6, 2017, 3:00 pm

    RE: “The American political system is centrist. There are too many powerful vested interests to move it very far in any particular direction.”

    Yes, I call it “the War Party,” and there indeed are too many special interests vested in it to move it away from its continuance. Support for Bernie and election of Trump reveal it is not popular with the masses. How many bases does The Empire have around the world? I don’t see this changing no matter who’s POTUS nor which party is in the saddle. Trump has dissed fraudulent “regime change,” e.g., in Iraq, Libya, wants to work with Putin defeating ISIS, but he seems on board with demonization of Iran, beating Netanyahu’s ancient drum for war against Iran, and his official statement on settlements is the most positive in behalf them ever made by a US regime, not to mention his call for moving embassy. Our leadership is always in the pocket of The Fed, Wall St, Big corporations, MIC, etc; any changes made always weak, and easily replaced.

    • DaBakr
      DaBakr
      February 7, 2017, 1:08 pm

      @ct

      i don’t see that much difference between the US system of ‘leadership’ you are complaining about (somewhat rightly) and any number of powerful nation states, empires etc throughout history. Leadership is always in somebodies pocket and except for short brief intervals (e.g. -the colonial congressional power circa 1770s thru washingtons stepping down after 2 terms) The best of these societies work to achieve checks on how much access to pockets there is and also how to check that leadership cannot run with one pack and not the other. i think trump just had his first lesson with that “so-called” judge the other day.

      as for netanyahu and his “war drums” for iran…you act as if israel is the only enemy of the tyrannical mullah regime. at 800+ miles israel and iran had no natural beef whatsoever until the mullahs decided they wanted to spread their ‘revolution’ through the lebanon(hezbollah) and then iraq(thanks GWB) , and syria to the med. sea. the mullahs and irg are hardly a benevolent regime. there is no love lost between russia and iran and iran has plenty of natural enemies in their own geographical region not including the very large % of educated and working class iranians that would love to dump the tyrants MUCH more then they feel the need to ‘liberate’ the already liberated jerusalem. i would bet your average iranian could care less about jerusalem and anything that involves entangling themselves in the affairs or conflicts of arab regimes.

  5. Keith
    Keith
    February 6, 2017, 5:27 pm

    MARC ELLIS- “The push back on the streets and at the airports has been effective.”

    Yes, the Soros/CIA orchestrated demonstrations were very effective in demonizing Trump while ignoring the reason for all of these refugees. Even Putin came in for additional bashing.

    MARC ELLIS- “The generals Trump appointed may also function as a break on his power.”

    What power? He has less effective power than any other President at this stage of the game. His tweets are a desperate attempt to get around a media that is uniformly opposed to him, his Presidential directives have dubious legal authority and appear to be a way around his likely inability to get anything passed in Congress. The upper echelons of the Republican Party hate him, being chided by Dick Cheney a telling example. He appears to be the target of a color revolution coup that may yet impeach him. All of this during the traditional Presidential “honeymoon”? His foreign policy positions appear to be entirely consistent with previous administrations. Will the Deep State have him impeached, or has the CIA already gotten control of his puppet strings?

    MARC ELLIS- “With all of his faults, President Obama, as a progressive centrist, was most likely the best kind of president America is likely to see for the foreseeable future.”

    Progressive? Surely you jest. But I agree that Obama was the most effective imperial President ever. He put the entire anti-war movement to sleep even as he implemented the neoliberal, warmongering plans of empire. He made “liberals” feel good about themselves so that they really didn’t care to know what was really happening.

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      February 6, 2017, 7:50 pm

      “Yes, the Soros/CIA orchestrated demonstrations…”

      Of course, who else? They forced those people out into the streets!

      “His(Trump) foreign policy positions appear to be entirely consistent with previous administrations”

      You, and the Trump voters, were the only ones expecting anything different. Don’t blame us for Trump being exactly who he always was.

      • Keith
        Keith
        February 7, 2017, 1:04 am

        MOOSER- “Don’t blame us for Trump being exactly who he always was.”

        No one is. I blame you for failure to hold Obama, et al, accountable for what he/they did. The empire didn’t start with Trump, nor is it limited to Republican administrations. In fact, neoliberal globalization has been pushed much more effectively by the Democrats.

        MOOSER- “They forced those people out into the streets!”

        Forced? No. Funded, organized, encouraged, facilitated, motivated, etc., you better believe it. Do you really believe that all of this was some sort of spontaneous outpouring? Dream on. Are you really that oblivious to the forces behind this? Getting large crowds in the street takes money and organization. You may agree with the objectives of the demonstrations, but to deny the massive elite support that made it all possible is absurd. Is it possible that you are unaware of the dynamics of the Soros/CIA color revolutions in Eastern Europe and the Middle East? Time to get your head out of your you know what and take a breath of fresh air.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 7, 2017, 12:28 pm

        <i<", you better believe it”

        And I was hoping for a link or two. Oh well.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 7, 2017, 1:47 pm

        “Forced? No. Funded, organized, encouraged, facilitated, motivated, etc., you better believe it. Do you really believe that all of this was some sort of spontaneous outpouring?”

        There you go, folks. Now you know why you were out there.

    • DaBakr
      DaBakr
      February 7, 2017, 1:36 pm

      @K

      your second responsive paragraph is, unfortunately, comically tragic but with a definite ring of truth to it. trump has been rendered almost immediately impotent giving the illusion that somehow these ‘crowds’ of non-voting, non-registered ‘caring’ young folks really got things moving. i don’t remember a press this hungry , wild-eyed and energized since nixon-and thats without noting how far the press corps has fallen since the 60s in the first place.
      it is still quite a curious thing whatever the hell compelled trump to want the job in the 1st place? he;’s already be fleeing down to his palace in florida after a big 3 weeks. wait until he realizes he can call up air force 1 to scope out more golf courses.

      the person, it turns out, with the most integrity is melania who never wanted the spotlight, to be 1st lady, or to be bothered in her bubble at all. She is smart enough to stay as far away from her husband for as long as possible.
      and-i am definitely not alone in thinking he will be-probably not impeached-but otherwise forced to step down and then you have the pefect “centrist” republican mushroom- red lobster pence ready to convert all the gays back to the mid-western state of ‘normal’ and get on with ‘america’s centrist interests’ (at least until after he figures out how to close down hamilton for code violations or something like that.)

    • RoHa
      RoHa
      February 7, 2017, 9:27 pm

      I’m expecting even larger demonstrations against Trump’s inclination towards war with Iran.

      What colour hats should the demonstrators wear to show how much they care for the Iranians?

      • echinococcus
        echinococcus
        February 8, 2017, 12:23 am

        Color isn’t so relevant, perhaps the shape should be the major worry now, after the last big march? The shape should be easy to guess from the latter.

      • Keith
        Keith
        February 8, 2017, 11:09 am

        ROHA- “I’m expecting even larger demonstrations against Trump’s inclination towards war with Iran.”

        Really? If Trump pursues a Deep State driven policy towards Iran, I would expect no orchestrated demonstrations. I provide a partial quote and link to an excellent analysis by Andrew Korybko.

        “To proactively prevent the actualization of these forecasted multipolar transnational connective infrastructure projects across the Mideast, the US must either co-opt or destroy the Islamic Republic of Iran, with the former being what the Obama Administration dreamed of doing after the nuclear deal while the latter is its Hybrid War “backup plan” in case the first one fails. Washington’s strategic infiltration plot failed to seduce Tehran, so it appears likely that Iran might be targeted by the US’ retributive Hybrid War intrigues sometime in the near future. In fact, the US has already been working on the necessary preparations and is presently arranging its forces in anticipation of waging this sort of conflict during the upcoming Trump Presidency.” (Andrew Korybko) http://www.globalresearch.ca/breaking-iranian-media-trump-is-on-course-to-break-us/5571929

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        February 8, 2017, 5:11 pm

        “Really?”

        Well, of course. If all those people got so worked up about a mere ninety day travel ban on Iranians, they are bound to be even more strongly opposed to a war against Iranians, aren’t they?

        And I bet they will wear really natty hats.

      • Keith
        Keith
        February 9, 2017, 4:38 pm

        ROHA- “If all those people got so worked up about a mere ninety day travel ban on Iranians, they are bound to be even more strongly opposed to a war against Iranians, aren’t they?”

        Not without instructions. The same people who manufacture consent also manufacture outrage. The demonstrations were primarily shows of solidarity. How many demonstrators protesting the treatment of refugees called for an end to US intervention in the Middle East, the primary cause of all of these Muslim refugees? How many protesters lambasted Obama for for the destruction of Libya, Syria and now Yemen? I seriously doubt that the demonstration organizers would tolerate such betrayals of Soros/CIA organized Democrat solidarity.

  6. gamal
    gamal
    February 6, 2017, 5:40 pm

    from the lineage of c wright mills “listen yankee”

    thomas frank started the baffler here lehman rejects your complacency

    “And now a fledgling administration composed mainly of antidemocratic thugs and amoral opportunists is mining the conflict-averse culture of mainstream American journalism for all its worth. Day in and day out, Donald Trump and his band of fascist clowns derides the press for its putative dishonesty, its elitism, its fatal bubble-fied out-of-touchness—in sum, its bald metaphysical wrongness. This is what White House strategist Steve Bannon, who assiduously wiped out any and all basic standards of journalist truth-telling during his tour as maximum leader of Breitbart News, was getting at when he sniped at a New York Times reporter that the press was now the White House’s “opposition party,” and should keep its collective mouth shut if it knew what was good for it.”

    https://thebaffler.com/blog/opposition-party-lehmann

    and even better the author of “listen liberal” and “whats the matter with kansas” thomas frank

    answers “what’s wrong with America”

    https://youtu.be/4fg2w7nV6XI

  7. RoHa
    RoHa
    February 6, 2017, 6:17 pm

    “Systematically undermining a popular candidate from her own party and carrying extraordinarily negative ratings involving her own candidacy, Clinton handed a victory to an easily-defeated right-wing hotel developer and reality television star. ”

    Easily defeated? I seem to recall that he succeeded in knocking out every other Republican contender in spite of opposition from his own party and the MSM.

    This is just another attempt at avoiding reality, only instead of blaming the Russians, it’s blaming Clinton.

    The reality is that a very large slice of America doesn’t like the tripe that “the Left” has been droning on about, and has seen no benefits from the policies. Deplorable they may be, but there are enough of them to elect a President.

  8. JWalters
    JWalters
    February 6, 2017, 9:13 pm

    How can professor Ellis write this article with no reference to the coup d’etat that has already taken place – the takeover of America’s financial system, media, and government by Israeli money? These facts are plainly proven by the absolute absence of any discussion by America’s pundits and politicians of Israel’s clear, consistent history of cruelty and crimes. What other plausible explanation is there?

    Israel’s financial control strings have been repeatedly documented, in Mondoweiss and elsewhere. The ommission of such centrally relevant information through thousands of media discussions cannot possibly be due to a freak of chance. It could only be due to an intentional directive. From whom? Who benefits? The answer is obvious. And yet everyone looks the other way. Including the professor.

    Ultimately, aversion to this criminal oligarchy is what fueled both Sanders’ and Trump’s campaigns.

    • Naftush
      Naftush
      February 7, 2017, 1:27 am

      Thank you JWalters for the refresher course in logical fallacy. From “These facts are plainly proven by the absolute absence of any discussion …” to the clincher: “What other plausible explanation is there?” As for the alleged takeover, Israel’s annual GDP adds up to about a week of turnover on the NYSE, three weeks of the US federal budget, perhaps a few months of media industry revenue. Financial control strings my potato, unless you’re including in Israel’s resources the Rothchilds, Adelson, and the dispossession of Egypt in the Book of Exodus. Why not? You said it yourself: “The ommission [sic] of such centrally relevant information […] cannot possibly be due to a freak of chance.”

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 7, 2017, 1:05 pm

        “Israel’s annual GDP adds up to about a week of turnover on the NYSE, three weeks of the US federal budget, perhaps a few months of media industry revenue.”

        That’s comforting to know, “Naftush”! So we won’t miss it Israel at all when it goes, plus, we won’t give Israel all those billions. Thanks.

        It’s like “Alice in Wonderland” isn’t it? One day we must fear Israel because it is so big and economically powerful and hi-tech. The next day we must pity and cosset Israel because it is so small and powerless, and poor, poor, poor.

        I read “Alice”. It’s where I got my answer to Zionists : “Eat me”!

      • JWalters
        JWalters
        February 7, 2017, 6:54 pm

        Naftush, why is the highly relevant Nakba NEVER mentioned in America’s MSM discussions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Over thousands of discussions over decades, this 100% blanket omission can not possibly be a coincidence. It can only be due to a human intention to omit it.

        I do consider the Adelson and Rothschild resources as part of Israel’s resources. They appear to be among those Jews who consider themselves Israelis first.

    • DaBakr
      DaBakr
      February 7, 2017, 1:48 pm

      @j

      you read too much mondowss and too much “elsewhere” . try reading an alternative point of view and you might actually come to understand how very very small not only the readership of anti-israeli hate blogs are but how much even smaller are the regular commenters on such sites. it almost feels like being stuck at a boring (read:red and yellow paperback hagada) seder with your shtty family. they all say the same old thing and especially the chronic a-hole ‘rebellious’ children who have to spoil everything with their vicious lies in support of that damn zionist entity surviving all these damn years starting with the obnoxious and eons old story (oops, i mean lie) of exodus

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        February 7, 2017, 1:54 pm

        Shorter “dabakr” ‘Mutter, mutter, mutter.’

        Does anybody know what he’s on about? Seems to be some dark hatred having to do with the Jewish religious ceremonies, but who can tell? I’m beginning to suspect “dabakr” is , well, a little “off”.

      • JWalters
        JWalters
        February 7, 2017, 6:56 pm

        DaBakr, sorry about your “being stuck at a boring seder … with your shitty family”.

        I do read alternate points of view, including yours. It seems to me yours is one of the shallower, less coherent ones.

  9. Elizabeth Block
    Elizabeth Block
    February 7, 2017, 10:21 am

    Centrist? But the center has moved way to the right.
    And the huge number of people, and the huge amount of time and energy, needed to get Trump to even that rightist center, may not be there forever.

  10. Boo
    Boo
    February 7, 2017, 1:49 pm

    “The American political system is centrist. There are too many powerful vested interests to move it very far in any particular direction.”

    This is the basis for the author’s argument, but it only stands up to scrutiny if one ignores that mass/momentum and balance are different things entirely.

    Mass and momentum do guarantee that it will take a fully laden supertanker several miles to go from normal speed to a complete stop, or to execute a 180-degree turn. But societies and governments aren’t necessarily “supertankers”.

    Consider the numerous “hanging” or “balanced” rocks that attract tourists in many areas of the world. Consider their great mass. Consider also their lack of momentum. But don’t neglect their delicate balance and the slenderness of the stone stem that holds them upright. It wouldn’t take much of an energy input to send them toppling — with disastrous results for anyone so unlucky as to be standing beneath them at the time.

    World history reveals more than one society or state that was toppled from its “tipping point” by a relatively trivial input. To cite but one example, the assassination of a petty-ass duke precipitated WW1 and toppled empires. We must beware of being lulled into a false sense of security by the “powerful vested interests” that seemingly keep America “centrist”.

    Trump is no centrist. The man himself has no coherent center — let’s not even mention his political philosophy, so-called. He’s allied himself, allowed himself to be unduly influenced, with and by Machiavellian forces who are far from centrist. There is good reason to suspect this won’t end well.

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