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‘Intense hatred of Israel is moving from margins to center of US politics’ — Howard Kohr of AIPAC

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The AIPAC policy conference in Washington began today on a defensive note, with the Israel lobby organization’s chief executive saying that Israel’s friends face a terrible new challenge, “the scurrilous charge of dual loyalty” and declaring, “The intense hatred of Israel is now creeping from the margins to the center of our politics.”

Howard Kohr addressed thousands at the Washington convention center after several non-Jewish warmup speakers pronounced, “I’m an American and I stand with Israel.”

AIPAC  (the American Israel Public Affairs Committee) is plainly responding to the decision by several Democratic presidential candidates to sidestep the conference as well as the controversy over Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar’s statement last month that some American supporters of Israel don’t know where their allegiance lies.

The theme of Kohr’s angry speech was that it is American as apple pie to support Israel, and building an even stronger relationship between the countries will make both countries better.

Kohr painted a dark portrait of those now attacking the Israel lobby.

We are being challenged in a way that’s new and far more aggressive. We have always had critics and detractors, and some have been particularly harsh. But today they are emboldened and energized, and their false claims are taken at face value by new and larger audiences. Those claims are not meant to inform or engage in legitimate debate. They are meant to isolate us and demonize us so they can undermine America’s historic support for Israel.

Kohr said that the critics have announced that “you can’t be a good campus leader and a supporter of Israel, they say you can’t be a good progressive and support Israel.” But now they’ve gone further.

Now they are saying, you can’t even be a good American and be a supporter of Israel.

This isn’t a “normal” debate, he said.

This is defamation… The scurrilous charge of dual loyalty is a signal, and that signal amplified by today’s social media — is now empowering people who have long opposed our cause, our movement, and, frankly, everything we have built.

The intense hatred of Israel is now creeping from the margins to the center of our politics. … to the very places where people gather to make decisions.

The other side is trying to isolate us from our friends, our neighbors and the other causes and coalitions we care so deeply about.

Their designs are plain to see. They want to starve Israel of America’s support. They want the Jewish state vulnerable and alone. For America’s sake we cannot let that happen. America needs a strong Israel.

The three-day AIPAC conference will draw top U.S. politicians from both parties and Israeli Jewish politicians. It will culminate with a speech by the rightwing Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu on Tuesday.

Kohr said that American support is based on mutual values. “America sees in Israel a young nation, a nation that believes its best days are ahead of it. A nation always striving to be better, more just and true to the message of its founders, a nation dedicated to freedom of religion for people of all faiths.”

Kohr also said, “We do our work for all to see.” And he painted AIPAC as the face of America.

What unites our pro-Israel movement is the passion for bringing American and Israel closer for the benefit of both and the benefit of all.

We look like America because we are America.

He closed by stating that over the years many others have attacked AIPAC’s “right” to lobby for Israel. “Each time we have mobilized,” he said. “When they tell us to move back, we move forward… When they tell us to sit down, we stand up. We stand up!”

Kohr, said to be the son of a Holocaust survivor, was reported to make $720,000 in 2017. He has headed AIPAC since 1996.

Note: My original quotations were from a rush transcript. I filled in with full quotations from Jewish Insider’s transcript.

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About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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68 Responses

  1. Maximus Decimus Meridius
    Maximus Decimus Meridius on March 24, 2019, 9:58 am

    “America sees in Israel a young nation, a nation that believes its best days are ahead of it. ”

    Lol! Israel’s ‘best days’ – such as they are – are well, well behind it. Its future looks bleak, superficial Trump facilitated ‘victories’ notwithstanding.

    And if the lobbyists are so confident that their opponents’ arguments are false, why not challenge them to an open debate, with audiences who may ask questions, to prove them wrong? That should settle it, shouldn’t it?

    • bcg
      bcg on March 24, 2019, 10:55 am

      It’s always mystified me that with all the turmoil going on re Israel and Israel-U.S. relations that the mainstream media hasn’t responded with some serious discussion – you know, an hour long academic debate on prime time tv – Finkelstein and Ali Abunimah vs Dershowitz and whoever else – there are certainly enough qualified scholars, historians and human rights activists to choose from. Why are we, as a society, incapable of at least having this discussion out in the open and not on twitter?

      • Maximus Decimus Meridius
        Maximus Decimus Meridius on March 24, 2019, 11:28 am

        Same on this side of the Atlantic. You can discuss just about anything…. but not Israel. Not in any real sense of the word ‘discussion’.

        You’d have to wonder why. Actually, no you don’t really need to wonder why.

      • CigarGod
        CigarGod on March 24, 2019, 12:56 pm

        Because Zionists know they will lose on every point.

      • Marnie
        Marnie on March 25, 2019, 10:03 am

        ‘Why are we, as a society, incapable of at least having this discussion out in the open and not on twitter?’

        Out in the open isn’t what liars, murderers, criminals and other assorted riff-raff specialize in. They like the dark, no lights, no cameras and no witnesses. But it’s a nice thought. But the first thing that came to mind was the scene in A Few Good Men where Jack Nicholson’s character explains ‘The truth? You couldn’t handle the truth!” But the truth needs to be told.

      • cypruswez
        cypruswez on March 25, 2019, 10:26 am

        The media, if not run by zionists, is owned by zionists. To gather together great minds who are critical of Israel would never happen. The BBC once a proud organisation with good news and current affairs coverage now stages blatantly right wing audience participation shows with right wing activists planted in the audience with well rehearsed scripts . Even the pre show warm up is used to slander left wing politicians and supporters.
        That is why you will be more likely to see unicorn racing on your tv, than a meaningful debate on the apartheid state.

    • JWalters
      JWalters on March 24, 2019, 11:17 pm

      Official AIPAC strategy, as revealed in The Lobby, is to ALWAYS AVOID direct debates. Instead, get indignant, perhaps stage a demonstration, and walk the hell out of there. Then get it on the evening news as an anti-Semitic incident if possible (Episode 1).

    • Misterioso
      Misterioso on March 25, 2019, 9:39 am

      Once again, Professor Davidson tells it like it is:

      “Israel’s Tragic But Predictable ‘Migration’ to the Right—An Analysis” (22 March 2019) by Professor Lawrence Davidson

      Part I—Israel’s Movement Right

      An article published in the Israeli news blog +972 on 19 November 2018 posed the question: Why does the right keep winning elections in Israel? The answer offered was “because Israelis are right wing.” Simple enough, and apparently, quite true. The article estimates that over half of Israeli Jews think of themselves as “right wing.” Self-defined centrists are about 25 percent, and those Israeli Jews who still cling to “leftist” ideals are now only about 15 percent of the population. The remainder are non-committal.

      This movement to the right is often blamed on the Palestinians, but that is largely an evasion. As the story goes, it was the Second Intifada (occurring from late 2000 to early 2005) that so scared a majority of Israeli Jews that it “led to a migration of left-wingers to the … political center… [and] centrists [to the] right, causing the percentage of Jewish right-wingers to drift upward over the decade.” While the “migration to the right” has certainly taken place, it is better understood as follows: under Palestinian pressure for democratic reforms and justice, along with corresponding resistance to oppression, Israeli Jews who could not face the prospect of real democracy had nowhere politically to go than to the right—what should properly be described as the racist right. And, so they went. From this point on there was no more obfuscation—Israeli “security” is now clearly a stand-in phrase for the maintenance of Israeli Jewish domination over non-Jews.

      Part II—Enter the Fascists

      The present shifting about on Israel’s political landscape prior to its April 2019 elections confirms this basically right wing racist scene. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu affirmed that Israel is “the national state, not of all its citizens, but only of the Jewish people.” A minority of Israeli Jews might denounce such racism, but Israel’s recently adopted nationality law states that the right of national self-determination in Israel is “unique to the Jewish people.” And whether the “left” acknowledges the fact or not, this law is in perfect sync with Zionist ideology.

      It should be noted that the prime minister’s personal preference is not for “the Jewish people” as a whole. Indeed, in his eyes, if you are an anti-Zionist Jew you are an anti-Semitic Jew—whatever that might mean. The prime minister is more comfortable with Jews of the fascist, racist right, with whom he has so much in common. This is the kind of Jew he has politically allied with. What in the world is a fascist Jew? Well, in this case, it is someone who uses violent methods to realize the logical consequences of Zionism—if Israel is a “Jewish state,” then non-Jews must go. How they ultimately go has been left an open-ended question, though Israel is engaged in a continuous effort to destroy Palestinian infrastructure. Fascist Jews advocate expulsion of all Palestinians and sometimes engage in direct violence—akin to classic pogroms—in an effort to fulfill this goal.

      You might shake your head in wonderment at the notion of Jewish fascists, but they have always been an important element in Zionist history. You can trace their activity from Vladimir Jabotinsky and his notion of an “iron wall” (1923) that would force the Palestinians to acquiesce in Zionist domination, right up to Meir Kahane, an advocate of expulsion, and his Kach Party (1971-1990). It is Kahane’s followers who now are political partners of Netanyahu. The “migration” of Israeli Jews to the right has narrowed the gap between the majority of “ordinary” citizens and the fascists. So, back into favor come the Kahanists.

      Part III—What Is an Israeli Centrist?

      Nor should we look for anti-racist activism among the 25 percent who see themselves as centrists. Presently, those who seek to capture the centrist vote are Benny Gantz and Yair Lapid. Gantz is former chief-of-staff and a man who is being sued for war crimes. He is leader of the Israeli Resilience Party (Hosen Israel). That party has allied with Yair Lapid, a former TV celebrity, and his There is a future Party (Yesh Atid).

      Both of these politicians call themselves “new centrists” and concentrate their platforms on “socio-economic issues such as the cost of living.” However, when it comes to the Palestinians, neither of them are interested in a democratic Israel that would afford non-Jews equal rights—nothing particularly “new” here for “centrists.” Gantz is the classic military maven so prevalent in Israeli politics. Here is his view of where “resilience” should take Israel relative to the Palestinians: “The Jordan Valley will remain our eastern security border,” Gantz declared. “We will maintain security in the entire Land of Israel … we will not allow the millions of Palestinians living beyond the separation fence to endanger our security and our identity as a Jewish state.” For someone who is campaigning on the theme that, under its present government, “Israel has lost its way,” Gantz’s intentions in this regard are remarkably similar to those of Benjamin Netanyahu.

      Yair Lapid’s position on the Palestinians is little different from that of Gantz. He says that “we need to separate from the Palestinians,” as if Israeli Jews haven’t been doing just that for the past 71 years. He goes on to demand that all issues of security have to “stay in Israel’s hands,” there is no such thing as a “right of return,” and Jerusalem will not be divided into two capitals.

      On the Palestinian issue—the one that now divides Israel from increasing numbers of citizens in the democratic world—there is little difference between the Israeli rightists and the centrists except that the latter do not publicly talk about the forceful expulsion.

      Part IV—Conclusion

      That approximately 85 percent of Israeli Jews should end up unwilling to grant equal rights to the 20 percent of Palestinians who are their segregated neighbors; that they should support, or at best not act against the relentless, vicious process of illegal settlement in the Occupied Territories; and finally that they should react to Palestinian resistance to Zionist oppression by “migrating” to the right, is both tragic and predictable.

      It must be realized that any country that allows racism to rule its public sphere cannot pass itself off as a democracy. It is simply a contradiction. The Zionist experiment looking toward a democratic Jewish state might have gone differently if it had been tried somewhere devoid of a non-Jewish population (like the moon), but then, in the end, the Zionists became obsessed with Palestine, fell in with the colonial mentality still prevalent during the first half of the twentieth century, and have never progressed beyond it.

      To this point, I beg the reader’s patience as I repeat an argument I have made more than once in past analyses: It is impossible to create a state exclusively for one people (call them people A) in a territory already populated by another people (call them people B) without the eventual adoption of racist policies by A and eventual resistance on the part of B. Under such circumstances, for A, there can be no real security, nor can there be anything like a healthy national culture.

      Indeed, unless a majority of Israeli Jews are willing to go the route of South Africa and renounce their program of discriminatory dominion over millions of non-Jews, they have nowhere else to go but head-first into the hell that is the racist right. With 85 percent sharing, or at least acquiescing, in the views of Netanyahu, Gantz, and Lapid, the chances for redemption do not look good. In fact, it is probably the case that the “light unto the nations” has long since gone out.

      Lawrence Davidson
      [email protected]

      Blog: http://www.tothepointanalyses.com

    • Misterioso
      Misterioso on March 25, 2019, 9:42 am

      “Israel’s Tragic But Predictable ‘Migration’ to the Right—An Analysis” (22 March 2019) by Professor Lawrence Davidson

      Part I—Israel’s Movement Right

      An article published in the Israeli news blog +972 on 19 November 2018 posed the question: Why does the right keep winning elections in Israel? The answer offered was “because Israelis are right wing.” Simple enough, and apparently, quite true. The article estimates that over half of Israeli Jews think of themselves as “right wing.” Self-defined centrists are about 25 percent, and those Israeli Jews who still cling to “leftist” ideals are now only about 15 percent of the population. The remainder are non-committal.

      This movement to the right is often blamed on the Palestinians, but that is largely an evasion. As the story goes, it was the Second Intifada (occurring from late 2000 to early 2005) that so scared a majority of Israeli Jews that it “led to a migration of left-wingers to the … political center… [and] centrists [to the] right, causing the percentage of Jewish right-wingers to drift upward over the decade.” While the “migration to the right” has certainly taken place, it is better understood as follows: under Palestinian pressure for democratic reforms and justice, along with corresponding resistance to oppression, Israeli Jews who could not face the prospect of real democracy had nowhere politically to go than to the right—what should properly be described as the racist right. And, so they went. From this point on there was no more obfuscation—Israeli “security” is now clearly a stand-in phrase for the maintenance of Israeli Jewish domination over non-Jews.

      Part II—Enter the Fascists
      The present shifting about on Israel’s political landscape prior to its April 2019 elections confirms this basically right wing racist scene. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu affirmed that Israel is “the national state, not of all its citizens, but only of the Jewish people.” A minority of Israeli Jews might denounce such racism, but Israel’s recently adopted nationality law states that the right of national self-determination in Israel is “unique to the Jewish people.” And whether the “left” acknowledges the fact or not, this law is in perfect sync with Zionist ideology.

      It should be noted that the prime minister’s personal preference is not for “the Jewish people” as a whole. Indeed, in his eyes, if you are an anti-Zionist Jew you are an anti-Semitic Jew—whatever that might mean. The prime minister is more comfortable with Jews of the fascist, racist right, with whom he has so much in common. This is the kind of Jew he has politically allied with. What in the world is a fascist Jew? Well, in this case, it is someone who uses violent methods to realize the logical consequences of Zionism—if Israel is a “Jewish state,” then non-Jews must go. How they ultimately go has been left an open-ended question, though Israel is engaged in a continuous effort to destroy Palestinian infrastructure. Fascist Jews advocate expulsion of all Palestinians and sometimes engage in direct violence—akin to classic pogroms—in an effort to fulfill this goal.

      You might shake your head in wonderment at the notion of Jewish fascists, but they have always been an important element in Zionist history. You can trace their activity from Vladimir Jabotinsky and his notion of an “iron wall” (1923) that would force the Palestinians to acquiesce in Zionist domination, right up to Meir Kahane, an advocate of expulsion, and his Kach Party (1971-1990). It is Kahane’s followers who now are political partners of Netanyahu. The “migration” of Israeli Jews to the right has narrowed the gap between the majority of “ordinary” citizens and the fascists. So, back into favor come the Kahanists.

      Part III—What Is an Israeli Centrist?
      Nor should we look for anti-racist activism among the 25 percent who see themselves as centrists. Presently, those who seek to capture the centrist vote are Benny Gantz and Yair Lapid. Gantz is former chief-of-staff and a man who is being sued for war crimes. He is leader of the Israeli Resilience Party (Hosen Israel). That party has allied with Yair Lapid, a former TV celebrity, and his There is a future Party (Yesh Atid).

      Both of these politicians call themselves “new centrists” and concentrate their platforms on “socio-economic issues such as the cost of living.” However, when it comes to the Palestinians, neither of them are interested in a democratic Israel that would afford non-Jews equal rights—nothing particularly “new” here for “centrists.” Gantz is the classic military maven so prevalent in Israeli politics. Here is his view of where “resilience” should take Israel relative to the Palestinians: “The Jordan Valley will remain our eastern security border,” Gantz declared. “We will maintain security in the entire Land of Israel … we will not allow the millions of Palestinians living beyond the separation fence to endanger our security and our identity as a Jewish state.” For someone who is campaigning on the theme that, under its present government, “Israel has lost its way,” Gantz’s intentions in this regard are remarkably similar to those of Benjamin Netanyahu.

      Yair Lapid’s position on the Palestinians is little different from that of Gantz. He says that “we need to separate from the Palestinians,” as if Israeli Jews haven’t been doing just that for the past 71 years. He goes on to demand that all issues of security have to “stay in Israel’s hands,” there is no such thing as a “right of return,” and Jerusalem will not be divided into two capitals.

      On the Palestinian issue—the one that now divides Israel from increasing numbers of citizens in the democratic world—there is little difference between the Israeli rightists and the centrists except that the latter do not publicly talk about the forceful expulsion.

      Part IV—Conclusion
      That approximately 85 percent of Israeli Jews should end up unwilling to grant equal rights to the 20 percent of Palestinians who are their segregated neighbors; that they should support, or at best not act against the relentless, vicious process of illegal settlement in the Occupied Territories; and finally that they should react to Palestinian resistance to Zionist oppression by “migrating” to the right, is both tragic and predictable.

      It must be realized that any country that allows racism to rule its public sphere cannot pass itself off as a democracy. It is simply a contradiction. The Zionist experiment looking toward a democratic Jewish state might have gone differently if it had been tried somewhere devoid of a non-Jewish population (like the moon), but then, in the end, the Zionists became obsessed with Palestine, fell in with the colonial mentality still prevalent during the first half of the twentieth century, and have never progressed beyond it.

      To this point, I beg the reader’s patience as I repeat an argument I have made more than once in past analyses: It is impossible to create a state exclusively for one people (call them people A) in a territory already populated by another people (call them people B) without the eventual adoption of racist policies by A and eventual resistance on the part of B. Under such circumstances, for A, there can be no real security, nor can there be anything like a healthy national culture.

      Indeed, unless a majority of Israeli Jews are willing to go the route of South Africa and renounce their program of discriminatory dominion over millions of non-Jews, they have nowhere else to go but head-first into the hell that is the racist right. With 85 percent sharing, or at least acquiescing, in the views of Netanyahu, Gantz, and Lapid, the chances for redemption do not look good. In fact, it is probably the case that the “light unto the nations” has long since gone out.

      Lawrence Davidson
      [email protected]

      Blog: http://www.tothepointanalyses.com

    • Misterioso
      Misterioso on March 25, 2019, 10:11 am

      https://consortiumnews.com/2019/02/20/rule-of-the-rabbis-fuels-holy-war-in-israel/

      “Israel’s ‘Rule of the Rabbis’ Who Preach Genocide Fuels Holy War”

      “Palestinians, the secular and women all face a harsher environment as theocratic tendencies are entrenched, writes Jonathan Cook.”

      Consortium News, Feb. 20, 2019

      EXCERPT:
      “In which country did a senior, state-salaried cleric urge his followers last month to become ‘warriors,’ emulating a group of young men who had murdered a woman of another faith?

      “The cleric did so with impunity. In fact, he was only echoing other highly placed colleagues who have endorsed a book – again without penalty – urging their disciples to murder babies belonging to other religions.

      “Where can the head of the clergy call black people ‘monkeys’ and urge the expulsion of other religious communities?

      “Where does a clerical elite wield so much power that they alone decide who can marry or get divorced – and are backed by a law that can jail someone who tries to wed without their approval? They can even shut down the national railway system without notice.

      “Where are these holy men so feared that women are scrubbed from billboards, college campuses introduce gender segregation to appease them, and women find themselves literally pushed to the back of the bus?

      “Is the country Saudi Arabia? Or Myanmar? Or perhaps, Iran?

      “No. It is Israel, the world’s only self-declared Jewish state.

      “There is barely a politician in Washington seeking election who has not at some point declared an ‘unbreakable bond’ between the United States and Israel, or claimed the two uphold ‘shared values.’ Few, it seems, have any idea what values Israel really represents.

      “There are many grounds for criticizing Israel, including its brutal oppression of Palestinians under occupation and its system of institutionalized segregation and discrimination against the fifth of its population who are not Jewish – its Palestinian minority.

      “But largely ignored by critics have been Israel’s increasing theocratic tendencies.

      “This hasn’t simply proved regressive for Israel’s Jewish population, especially women, as the rabbis exert ever greater control over the lives of religious and secular Jews alike.

      “It also has alarming implications for Palestinians, both under occupation and those living in Israel, as a national conflict with familiar colonial origins is gradually transformed into a holy war, fuelled by extremist rabbis with the state’s implicit blessing.

      “Control of Personal Status
      “Despite Israel’s founding fathers being avowedly secular, the separation between church and state in Israel has always been flimsy at best – and it is now breaking down at an ever-accelerating rate.

      “After Israel’s establishment, David Ben Gurion, Israel’s first prime minister, decided to subordinate important areas of life for Israeli Jews to the jurisdiction of an Orthodox rabbinate, representing the strictest, most traditional and conservative stream of Judaism. Other, more liberal streams have no official standing in Israel to this day.

      “Ben Gurion’s decision in part reflected a desire to ensure his new state embraced two differing conceptions of Jewishness: both those who identified as Jews in a secular ethnic or cultural sense, and those who maintained the religious traditions of Judaism. He hoped to fuse the two into a new notion of a Jewish ‘nationality.’

      “For that reason, the Orthodox rabbis were given exclusive control over important parts of the public sphere – personal status matters, such as conversions, births, deaths and marriages.

      “Biblical Justifications
      Bolstering the rabbis’ power was the urgent need of Israel’s secular leaders to obscure the state’s settler-colonial origins. This could be achieved by using education to emphasize Biblical justifications for the usurpation by Jews of the lands of the native Palestinian population.

      “As the late peace activist Uri Avnery observed, the Zionist claim was ‘based on the Biblical history of the Exodus, the conquest of Canaan, the kingdoms of Saul, David and Solomon … Israeli schools teach the Bible as real history.’

      “Such indoctrination, combined with a much higher birth rate among religious Jews, has contributed to an explosion in the numbers identifying as religious. They now comprise half the population.

      “Today, about a quarter of Israeli Jews belong to the Orthodox stream, which reads the Torah literally, and one in seven belong to the ultra-Orthodox, or Haredim, the most fundamentalist of the Jewish religious streams. Forecasts suggest that in 40 years the latter will comprise a third of the country’s Jewish population.”

  2. Citizen
    Citizen on March 24, 2019, 11:03 am

    Israel = all real Jews & all real Americans. Got it.

  3. annie
    annie on March 24, 2019, 11:05 am

    We look like America because we are America.

    i wonder who his speechwriter is.

    their false charges are taken at face value by new and larger audiences.

    israel needs to stop slaughtering young palestinians.

    • Mooser
      Mooser on March 24, 2019, 3:08 pm

      My favorite part:

      “They want the Jewish state vulnerable and alone. For America’s sake we cannot let that happen. America needs a strong Israel.”

      And I thought Israel needed a strong America.

      • JLewisDickerson
        JLewisDickerson on March 24, 2019, 5:59 pm

        The U.S. has become Israel’s virtual metropole!

    • JWalters
      JWalters on March 24, 2019, 10:58 pm

      “We look like America because we are America.”

      Israel is very anti-America in one fundamental way. In the USA there is no official state religion, by design. And this has made the USA Jewish community the safest in the world. This approach works, pretty well. Improvements are always possible. The US should support other governments that spread this principle, that a person’s basic rights as a citizen do not depend on their religion or their race. A person who does not believe this is not a true American.

      Israel has institutionalized the very opposite approach from this bedrock principle of American government. US foreign policy would logically support countries that adopted this practice of universal rights. And it would logically penalize governments that worked against it. That would include Israel.

      Israel has been able to keep this reality pretty well concealed. But the internet arrived. A mass of information flow went around the censored corporate media. And a lot of information became available, and the word spread among those interested in such things. And you wind up with websites like, say Mondoweiss, cranking out the facts. Being called “Palestinian lovers” by AIPAC “warriors for Greater Israel”, who cite the Bible as the justification for their actions, in a general sort of way.

      Mr Kohr is desperate because he sees the information dam cracking, and that tidal wave of truth getting ready to engulf us all. Knowing he is helpless to stop it. The cover story is blown. Everybody now knows. It’s safe to talk about it.

  4. Argonne18
    Argonne18 on March 24, 2019, 11:39 am

    Not hatred. Revulsion. Well earned.

    • Talkback
      Talkback on March 24, 2019, 4:48 pm

      The ultimate pathological narcissism: Since I’m always right, criticism can’t be justified in any way. It can be only “hate”.

  5. scott9854958
    scott9854958 on March 24, 2019, 12:13 pm

    “This isn’t a “normal” debate, he said.”

    No, this certainly isn’t the AIPAC approved debate , which is great, though not nearly enough.

    It’s ok though. The Christian wackos will appear on stage and talk about how they stand with Israel. But they won’t say why they believe this. It’s because they think when Armageddon comes their souls will be saved by Space Jesus and they will achieve immortality. So it’s pure boomer selfishness, no different than an EST session or Baghwan’s sannyasin. When all the boomers die off, maybe there will be hope.

    • Mooser
      Mooser on March 24, 2019, 2:57 pm

      “So it’s pure boomer selfishness, no different than an EST session or Baghwan’s sannyasin.”

      Let’s go out later and burn the Beatles white album. That might help.

      “When all the boomers die off, maybe there will be hope.”

      The US post-WW2 “baby boom” usually refers to births from 1946 to 1964. Someone born in 1950 would be 69 years old today. 1960 would be 59 yrs. old.
      I say we blame the Gen-Xers, instead (b.1961-1981).

      • RoHa
        RoHa on March 24, 2019, 9:36 pm

        “I say we blame the Gen-Xers, instead (b.1961-1981).”

        It’s all the fault of the younger generation, anyway.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on March 25, 2019, 12:43 am

        “It’s all the fault of the younger generation”

        A very discouraging problem is the younger generation. And soon there’ll be another one as well!
        At any event, when our out of hand sons are bringing up our grandsons, I hope our grandsons give their fathers hell!–Can’t wait to see it!–
        I hope our grandsons give their fathers hell!

    • Citizen
      Citizen on March 24, 2019, 4:35 pm

      CUFI has 3 million members. Total Christian Zionists in USA, what, 30 million? Definitely more of them than Arab-Americans, about 2/3rd of whom are recent immigrants.

      More: No Irony Here: @nytimes op-Ed The Case for @Aipac: It’s just another special interest group, like all the other lobbies that politicians always say they are going to get rid of & instead start supporting We The People. https://nyti.ms/2FsVBS1
      “As American as Apple Pie”—H Humphrey, in the old days.

  6. eljay
    eljay on March 24, 2019, 2:50 pm

    … Kohr said that American support is based on mutual values. “America sees in Israel a young nation, a nation that believes its best days are ahead of it. A nation always striving to be better, more just and true to the message of its founders, a nation dedicated to freedom of religion for people of all faiths.” …

    The message of the founders of Israel was Jewish supremacism in/and a religion-supremacist “Jewish State” in as much as possible of Palestine.

    The leaders of Israel and most Israelis seem to believe that Israel’s best days involve Jewish supremacism in/and a religion-supremacist “Jewish State” in as much as possible of Palestine.

    Israel does not strive to be better or more just, but it does strive to be:
    – not quite as bad as Saudi Arabia, Mali, African “hellholes”, etc.; and
    – true to the message of its founders, a nation dedicated to Jewish supremacism in/and a religion-supremacist “Jewish State” in as much as possible of Palestine.

    I don’t see how any of this reflects “mutual values” (or “shared common values”) with the average American.

  7. pabelmont
    pabelmont on March 24, 2019, 5:10 pm

    Notice — Howard Kohr decries hatred of Israel, not hatred of Jews. How could he slip off-message so badly? So, anti-Z’s not antisemitism any more? Ohh, sorry, for these bozos, I forgot, hatred of Israel *IS* antisemitism, and that goes without saying. (But will his audience know it if he doesn’t say it?)

  8. wondering jew
    wondering jew on March 24, 2019, 7:07 pm

    “Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar’s statement last month that some American supporters of Israel don’t know where their allegiance lies.”

    A nice vague term: “some American supporters”. Did Omar use this phrase? I do not recall it.

    When I suggested that Omar’s accusation was not merely against Aipac but against any American Jew who supports Israel in any way, I was called a liar and a smearer.

    But now, we hear from Phil Weiss that Ilhan Omar said, some American supporters of Israel don’t know where their allegiance lies. If this “some” includes people other than paid employees of Aipac, I assume that Phil Weiss is also a liar and a smearer of Ilhan Omar.

    I think the vagueness of the terminology should be clarified and if it cannot be clarified the accusations of smears should be rescinded and the name calling of liar should be apologized for.

    • eljay
      eljay on March 24, 2019, 7:45 pm

      || wondering jew: … “Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar’s statement last month that some American supporters of Israel don’t know where their allegiance lies.”

      A nice vague term: “some American supporters”. Did Omar use this phrase? I do not recall it.

      When I suggested that Omar’s accusation was not merely against Aipac but against any American Jew who supports Israel in any way, I was called a liar and a smearer. … ||

      Did Ms. Omar say “some American supporters” or “any American Jew”?

      If the latter, please link to a direct quote.

      If the former, yes, you are liar and a smearer.

      • wondering jew
        wondering jew on March 24, 2019, 10:46 pm

        Some supporters of Israel are guilty of dual loyalty. according to your and Phil Weiss’s interpretation of Ilhan Omar. Can you delineate which ones for me.

        Here is her actual statement:”I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is okay to push for allegiance to a foreign country,”

        There are three elements to this accusation: 1. political influence and connected to it 2. the push for the okay, and 3. the foreign allegiance. Her problem is with the lobby, but at the same time one cannot say that she is limiting her description of foreign allegiance merely to those pushing for the okay. The pushing for the okay is one thing and the foreign allegiance would seem to be a separate thing. So you could say that maybe all people who support Israel in fact have allegiance to a foreign country, only I, ilhan omar, am not speaking against them, because I am only worried about those who have political inflluence and feel it is okay to push for such allegiance.

        I do not think the statement is clear. I think you are right that one should avoid overstating what she said or didn’t say, but on the other hand clarity is kind of important in these cases. I kind of excuse her, because English is not her first language, but I don’t think she’s doing a service to the cause by being unclear.

        So I would ask her and you and Phil, which supporters of Israel are guilty of foreign allegiance. and which supporters are not guilty of foreign allegiance? If you can delineate that line for me that would be a step forward. if you can find such a delineation in her statements that would be a second step forward.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on March 24, 2019, 11:49 pm

        “her statements”

        No “Yonah” your claim of a remark, and your characterization of the remark, which you , as usual, are now pretending is an actual quote.

        That’s called lying and smearing.

      • annie
        annie on March 25, 2019, 12:11 am

        yonah, did you hear about steny hoyer’s speech at aipac. he said you could accuse him of dual loyalty. i think this is what she was talking about. and it’s not just congress, you can’t get a job in msm as a journalist if you’re not a zionist. at least i don’t know of any.

        https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/steny-hoyer-swipes-at-ilhan-omars-dual-loyalty-remarks-at-aipac-event

        “When someone accuses American supporters of Israel of dual loyalty, I say: Accuse me,” Hoyer said to applause.

        she wasn’t addressing her remarks at jews or jewish members of congress. but when he says it, it’s ok. everybody knows congress is supposed to be loyal to israel for heaven’s sakes. each and every one of them, and if you are not you get raked through the coals.

      • Keith
        Keith on March 25, 2019, 12:22 am

        ANNIE- “and it’s not just congress, you can’t get a job in msm as a journalist if you’re not a zionist.”

        Hell’s Bells, you can’t even run for the California state assembly as a Democrat unless you support Israel without qualification.

        “But American congressmen were not the only “gatekeepers” through whose hands Hayden had to pass before being allowed to run for Congress. Other “certifiers” included “the elites, beginning with rabbis and heads of the multiple mainstream Jewish organizations,… the American-Israel Political Action Committee (AIPAC), …[and].. Israeli ambassadors, counsels general and other officials.“

        In fact, Hayden had to, in his words, be “declared ‘kosher’ by the ultimate source, the region’s representative of the state of Israel,” Benjamin Navon, Israel’s Counsul-general in Los Angeles.

        In other words, in this article Hayden was describing, in an unusually concrete way, how the state of Israel, through its state officials and their compliant American partners, was effectively managing—exercising veto power over Democratic Party candidates, at the very least—American elections down to the level of State Assembly. In any constituency “attuned to the question of Israel, even in local and state elections,” Hayden knew he “had to be certified ‘kosher,’ not once but over and over again.” (Jim Kavanagh) https://www.counterpunch.org/2016/10/27/tom-haydens-haunting/

      • annie
        annie on March 25, 2019, 12:25 am

        what do you mean I kind of excuse her, because English is not her first language, but I don’t think she’s doing a service to the cause by being unclear.

        maybe what’s unfair is applying the worst interpretation you can of a term instead of aiming for the one most applicable

        https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/allegiance

        : devotion or loyalty to a person, group, or cause
        allegiance to a political party

        what’s wrong with saying “”I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is okay to push for ‘devotion or loyalty’ to a foreign country,”

        obviously that is expected of congress. it’s like a no brainer. how many times have we hears “bernie is not a democrat!” allegiance to something doesn’t have to be “fidelity owed by a subject or citizen to a sovereign”.

        i think we all know what she meant. and there’s nothing wrong with her english.

        i was raised in America during an era israel wasn’t all up our a** on every FP issue. i wish we could go back to those days before aipac was writing so much legislation in state after state after state taking up our valuable resources.

        remember when michelle backmann announced her run for the presidency w/a 30 minute commercial about how devoted she was to israel?

      • eljay
        eljay on March 25, 2019, 7:29 am

        || wondering jew: … Here is her actual statement:”I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is okay to push for allegiance to a foreign country,” … So I would ask her and you and Phil, which supporters of Israel are guilty of foreign allegiance. and which supporters are not guilty of foreign allegiance? … ||

        I would ask you to address her actual comment – not the one you imagine she made – and with a straight face state that there is no political influence whatsoever in the U.S. which encourages or condones (“says it is okay to push for”) allegiance with Israel.

      • eljay
        eljay on March 25, 2019, 8:43 am

        || wondering jew: … Here is her actual statement:”I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is okay to push for allegiance to a foreign country,” … ||

        I don’t see anything in there about “any American Jew”. So you’re a liar and a smearer.

        || … I kind of excuse her, because English is not her first language … ||

        And a condescending ass.

      • wondering jew
        wondering jew on March 25, 2019, 12:10 pm

        I am pleased to be called a liar and a smearer. Not really, but it gives me a breather from being called a Nazi or a supporter of rapists.

        I will parse my statements and Ilhan Omar’s statements and the accusation of smearer and liar a different time. Ilhan Omar’s statements are on the record and important. My statements are on the record and unimportant. not even to me at this moment.

        Clarity regarding definitions are much more important moving forward, than anything that I said yesterday.

        Onto the question of dual loyalty. I am far more comfortable with a christian zionist or a nonjewish american zionist proclaiming that he has dual loyalty to America and to Israel than I am to a jewish zionist making the same claim.

        if a nonjewish american says, I think america should back israel in its conflict with the palestinians. it might not be the most logical policy but because of the bible or because of x, y or z, i favor israel and feel the US should favor Israel, that statement does not bother me. If a Jewish american says, I think america should back israel despite the fact that this hurts american foreign policy, that statement bothers me.

        here’s how i feel: I think america should clarify what is in its best interests and pursue those interests full speed ahead. I do not think that a 180 degree turnaround is in american best interests, so full speed ahead might not be appropriate. a slow gradual change might be more sensible if a new direction is considered the best interest.

        I have dual citizenship, so to accuse me of dual loyalty can be proven by my citizenships. if the US would make such dual citizenship illegal that would be one thing. but the law allows for dual citizenship.

        I do not know what america’s best interests are in the middle east. I think the Israeli occupation of the west bank and the siege of Gaza are wrongheaded and I would want some new people (Peter Beinart) to make Israeli decisions on these two fronts. I think the nation state bill was a mistake, and I would have someone like Bernard Avishai define Israeliness rather than give that definition into the hands of Netanyahu, Likud and their right wing coalition. I think a 180 degree turn regarding Israel vs Iran is wrongheaded as well.

      • eljay
        eljay on March 25, 2019, 1:01 pm

        || wondering jew: I am pleased to be called a liar and a smearer. Not really … ||

        In which case it’s really odd that you chose to lie and smear.

        || … Onto the question of dual loyalty. I am far more comfortable with a christian zionist or a nonjewish american zionist proclaiming that he has dual loyalty to America and to Israel than I am to a jewish zionist making the same claim. … ||

        It seems inappropriate for any American to pledge allegiance to any foreign country.

        It seems even more inappropriate when that American is neither a citizen of that foreign country nor someone up to n-generations removed from it.

        It seems most inappropriate when the foreign country to which that American is pledging allegiance is a deliberately and unapologetically colonialist, (war) criminal and religion-supremacist state.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on March 25, 2019, 4:35 pm

        “Some supporters of Israel are guilty of dual loyalty. according to your and Phil Weiss’s interpretation of Ilhan Omar. Can you delineate which ones for me.”

        No problem, “Yonah”! The ones(American Zionist supporters) who have made contributions to illegal settlements and outposts, the ones who have broken campaign finance laws, disclosure laws and FARA laws to advance the interests of Israel’s illegal occupation and/or crimes.

      • pabelmont
        pabelmont on March 26, 2019, 8:54 am

        I seem to recall that Rep. Omar was openly complaining about the pressure on Congress-people to be loyal to Israel, not about pressure on any other Americans — and no mention of “Jews” either as the purveyors or the objects of pressure.

        And this should be no surprise. Americans don’t need to be in lockstep because (even now, even after the start of the new progressive post-Bernie swing in America) “the people” are largely irrelevant to how Congress behaves w.r.t. matters controlled by big-money (including big-Zion). The “BIGS”: big-Banks, Oil, NRA, Pharma, Zion, you name it.

    • oldgeezer
      oldgeezer on March 24, 2019, 8:53 pm

      @wj

      “If this “some” includes people other than paid employees of Aipac, I assume that Phil Weiss is also a liar and a smearer of Ilhan Omar. ”

      Drawing a conclusion out of rank speculation. Yeah that’s someone with an absolute inability to think either rationally or logically.

      You aren’t that stupid wj. Don’t pretend to be.

      • Misterioso
        Misterioso on March 25, 2019, 9:32 am

        @oldgeezer, et al

        It never ceases to amaze me how wondering jew can use so many words to say nothing.

      • oldgeezer
        oldgeezer on March 25, 2019, 11:42 am

        @Misterioso

        I do believe wj sees himself as a philosopher. smh. Either that or he just tries to bury people in verbiage.

      • RoHa
        RoHa on March 26, 2019, 12:49 am

        If he wants to be a philosopher, he needs to pay more attention to logic and learn the grammar of conditional sentences.

    • Elizabeth Block
      Elizabeth Block on March 25, 2019, 12:14 pm

      I am old enough to remember when American Catholics were accused of being more loyal to the Vatican than to the United States. John Kennedy had to explicitly deny this. It probably cost Al Smith the election in 1928.

  9. Stephen Shenfield
    Stephen Shenfield on March 24, 2019, 9:20 pm

    I couldn’t easily find out much about the bio of this guy apart from his work at AIPAC. But he was formerly a management fellow at the Department of Defense and there are indications that he has been involved in US-Israel military relations.

  10. RoHa
    RoHa on March 24, 2019, 9:34 pm

    “America needs a strong Israel.”

    For what?

    • eljay
      eljay on March 25, 2019, 8:15 am

      || RoHa: “America needs a strong Israel.”
      For what? ||

      Cherry tomatoes and traditional Israeli hummus (among other things).

  11. RoHa
    RoHa on March 24, 2019, 9:38 pm

    “America sees in Israel a young nation, a nation that …” blah, blah, blah.

    All that stuff could be said about Australia, as well. Where’s our three billion a year, plus free F35s?

    • Misterioso
      Misterioso on March 25, 2019, 9:46 am

      @RoHa

      “America sees in Israel a young nation, a nation that …”

      A “young nation” that is over 70 years old and still living off American taxpayers.

      • pabelmont
        pabelmont on March 26, 2019, 8:56 am

        Hey, Misterioso, unfair! Kids graduate from college and then live with their parents nowadays.

  12. Kay24
    Kay24 on March 25, 2019, 3:54 am

    Guess it is another opportunity for Crooked Beebs to impress his voters:

    “Israel rocket attack: Six wounded north of Tel Aviv
    Netanyahu cuts short US visit, vows forceful response after Israeli military says Gaza rocket hits near Tel Aviv.” Al Jazeera

    Israelis are lucky to not have these casualties:

    “B’TSELEM SAYS 290 PALESTINIANS KILLED BY IDF FIRE IN 2018

    Majority of Palestinians killed were in the Gaza Strip during weekly Great Return Marches protests.” Jerusalem Post

    The Palestinians deserve to have a “forceful response” too. “Forceful responses” are not only for one side.

    • Elizabeth Block
      Elizabeth Block on March 25, 2019, 12:18 pm

      Years ago I asked Margaret McMillan, the historian, whether she thought the Palestinians would have done better to adopt a policy of strictly non-violent protest. She said no. And when you think of how the only thing that gets any mainstream press coverage is violence – not Israeli violence towards Palestinians, but Palestinian violence – you have to admit that she was right.

      • Kay24
        Kay24 on March 25, 2019, 1:00 pm

        Unfortunately she is right, peaceful protests never worked, and the world simply ignores their plight. It is inhumane to expect them to simply grin and bear their suffering for so many decades. Even Ban Ki Moon said that it was a natural response to resist oppression, or something to that effect. Oppression and suffering will always lead to resistance, violence, and protests, which we see frequently. In some cases even extremism.

        These poor people have been deprived of freedom, their lands, even water. How are they supposed to bring their plight to the attention of the world? America has been sending them measly aid, to placate them, while sending billions of dollars, and weapons, to their occupier, to keep the occupation and land grabs going. I guess our politicians and leaders have no damn shame, or a conscience, when they see entire families being wiped out, and babies being pulled out of the rubble. Most of them being parents or grandparents.

        Israel has been always been disliked around the world, always at the bottom of the list, and it is all for good reason. However, they are masters at whining about how the world hates them, conveniently forgetting what it does, it’s crimes, and how it has always treated the Palestinians.

  13. Richard Baldwin Cook
    Richard Baldwin Cook on March 25, 2019, 8:19 am

    As usual, comments here elevate the conversation and set a high bar for responding but permit me to make a couple of suggestions directed toward an activist response:

    A recent New Yorker item reported that the Israeli government, not just Israeli activists, have insisted that every president since Bush #1 sign a letter of loyalty to Israel – and each had done so. Has anybody filed a FOIA to get copies of these letters?

    Former congresswoman Cynthia McKinney has recently stated that she had to sign an Israel loyalty “oath” in order to raise campaign funds. I have been asking my congressman, Elijah Cummings if he has ever signed an Israel loyalty statement. He’s ducking the question. Is there a way through this website to magnify that inquiry to include virtually all members of Congress?

  14. nelle
    nelle on March 25, 2019, 9:26 am

    I am Jewish. I am also 78 years of age. For the past 50 years, most of them as a journalist publishing in The Village Voice, Mother Jones, and other publications, I have stood against Israel’s occupation of the West Bank and Gaza – Palestine. Israel has long been a fascist state. Certainly, in “the occupied territories,” it has long been fascist. And the 1948 expulsion of 750,000 Palestinians and the bulldozing of their villages was a vicious and evil act of ethnic cleansing. There is nothing that can exonerate Israel of its savage cruelty towards the captive population of Gaza. There is nothing that can exonerate Israel of its steady and illegal (under that quaint anachronism, international law) takeover by settlements of the West Bank. Americans who swear their allegiance to Israel ARE expressing dual allegiance: Ilhan Omar is right. Some Jews, fortunately, mainly young, are no longer in thrall to the disgusting justification-through-invocation-of-the-holocaust, of Israel. Do recall, however, that Israel has nuclear weapons and is pushing the US under Trump to wage war against Iran – something that, given the malignant guidance of John Bolton and the war criminal Elliot Abrams, could take place, with devastating consequences none of us can imagine.

    • Kay24
      Kay24 on March 25, 2019, 1:11 pm

      How can we forget Crooked Bibi’s comedic presentation at the UN, when he held up a cartoon bomb and said we will all be attacked by Iran within months? It has been years now, and no bombs coming our way. He also tried hard to sabotage Obama’s efforts at getting a nuclear agreement with Iran, which after difficult Obama did, and it was working fine, until the orange man who badly needs a lobotomy, was urged by Bibi to destroy that nuclear deal, tearing it apart.

      Netanyahu wants American to bomb yet another Muslim nation, and he keeps the fear going with doomsday scenarios. He wants American kids to shed blood for Israel, fight their wars, and in return Israel gives them fake intelligence, and logistical support. They kill Arabs with impunity, and we are expected to believe that they are the victims.

  15. Waterbuoy
    Waterbuoy on March 25, 2019, 9:58 am

    Trying to avoid “Intense hatred of Israel”
    I remind myself of the wonderful Israelis of B’Tselem, Breaking the Silence.il, and the Israelis who protested (and were abused by IOF) at the border fence in support of Palestinians. As well as several Israeli expat leaders in the human rights struggle.

    But it’s hard.

  16. James Canning
    James Canning on March 25, 2019, 11:03 am

    What is Kohr’s position on the Palestinians? Does he favor Israel’s endless occupation of the West Bank? Israel can thank Aipac for facilitating the endless Israeli occupation.

  17. Vera Gottlieb
    Vera Gottlieb on March 25, 2019, 12:11 pm

    I believe that what really upsets so many folks is the utter ‘chutzpah’-in your face attitude israel has taken for too long. As for myself, I most decidedly am anti Zionist – these people totally ignorant of what Hitler did to Jews and now doing it to Palestinians. Where is justice???

  18. Jejasalo
    Jejasalo on March 25, 2019, 1:51 pm

    Your point is a good – and old – one. There is more critical, open debate about Israel IN Israel than what is allowed in the US. It is so tiring and I think it ought to be something we push for more aggressively.

    But there is one other point that is, in my view, quite distressing. We expect there to be “Right’ and “Left” voices sparring with each other. Right now, however, the “Left” or “progressives” can’t unite long enough to tie their shoes.

    One glaring example is Norm Finkelstein, who has been virtually blackballed by the mainstream “pro-Palestine” activists for criticizing BDS. If we cannot have different opinions within our own movement that, at the same time, present our primary goal of universal human rights and self-determination for the Palestinians, how can we present a generally united front to the public?

    There are fierce backers of Palestinian human rights blacklisted from writing for the Electronic Intifada. There are speakers too radical or allegedly “anti-Semitic” who are unwelcome within Jewish Voice for Peace. There are dedicated writers and activists whose voices we never hear because they haven’t adopted the “correct” ideology. I’ve seen, over the years, bitter divisions within leftist activist groups.

    How disconcerting that people and groups within the Palestine human rights movement are turning around and silencing any criticism they get from within. It’s a disgrace and does our movement no service whatsoever other than divide and fracture it. What a perfect gift for the other side. If we want our ultimate goal to be realized we have to stop silencing each other.

    • echinococcus
      echinococcus on March 25, 2019, 2:20 pm

      “There are fierce backers of Palestinian human rights blacklisted from writing for the Electronic Intifada. There are speakers too radical or allegedly “anti-Semitic” who are unwelcome within Jewish Voice for Peace. There are dedicated writers and activists whose voices we never hear because they haven’t adopted the “correct” ideology”

      Bingo. The next question is, what are those among such organizations that discriminate among anti-Zionists on the basis of “antisemitism”, liberal-ness, Demopublican-ness and related BS intended for? Forget anyone’s statement, watch their hands: they are tools of the enemy, with the express objective of controlling opposition.

      • mondonut
        mondonut on March 25, 2019, 5:44 pm

        @echinococcus, they are tools of the enemy, with the express objective of controlling opposition.

        Too Funny. Only on Mondoweiss would the Electronic Intifada not be hateful enough and be judged as a tool of the enemy.

      • Talkback
        Talkback on March 25, 2019, 7:26 pm

        mondonut: “Only on Mondoweiss would the Electronic Intifada not be hateful enough and be judged as a tool of the enemy.”

        Yes, yes, different opinions irritates the Zionist hive mind a lot.

      • echinococcus
        echinococcus on March 26, 2019, 2:23 am

        The Nut’s opinion is, of course, valuable given that he has no vested interest in the survival of Zionist invaders. Yarright.

  19. wondering jew
    wondering jew on March 26, 2019, 12:06 am

    Re: Ilhan Omar. Trump will run against two people in 2020: the Democratic nominee and against Ilhan Omar. She has plenty of time to stick her foot in her mouth again. Or if you’d prefer: she has plenty of time to speak truth to power.

    In fact those that defend her by saying, all who oppose her are misogynists and Islamophobes are full of it.

    I cannot write her script. I do not consider her an ally. I guess I do not consider advocates of BDS as allies, I can’t think of one American that I can put in that category. There are Israeli supporters of BDS, who have special dispensation, but I can’t think of one American who I consider an ally re: Jews or re: Israel, who favors BDS.

    So it is natural to view Omar as an adversary. And that’s how I reacted to her after she came out in favor of BDS and before the publicity of hypnotize and before the benjamins and before the foreign allegiance. and i will let others parse her words.

    But for supporters of Israel who wish to see trump go down to defeat in 2020, she is no blessing.

    • RoHa
      RoHa on March 26, 2019, 10:11 pm

      I don’t know why you all get so upset about Trump.
      What did you think would happen if Americans were allowed to choose their own leaders?

  20. Maghlawatan
    Maghlawatan on March 26, 2019, 2:35 am

    Aipac does a lot of whining. The thing about power is that hegemony is never settled. Zionists still don’t understand power.

    Like Jason Robards says in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Magnolia, life isn’t short, it’s long. Everything is temporary. Everything.
    Including Zionism

    Israel is suffering a version of the cat problem. If you put the cat out by the door it will come in through the window. Israel insists that the Palestine question is settled. More and more people around the world say ´fuck Israel’. The injustice of the occupation is galling.
    AIPAC is loaded with groupthinkers. They never saw the problem. AIPAC used to be bipartisan. No daylight between DC and Israel. Now it’s GOP. Things fall apart.

  21. Qualtrough
    Qualtrough on March 28, 2019, 12:46 am

    ‘Intense hatred of Israel is moving from margins to center of US politics’ — Howard Kohr of AIPAC

    Please be true!

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