Free to write

Israel/PalestineUS Politics
on 2 Comments

The revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya against the tyrants have been overwhelming. As these uprisings are filling many across the Middle East with inspiration, I wrote this poem.

Universal verse
Written with ink of blood
And chants of loving life

Ornamented with thrones of freedom
Roses spread on shrouds and cradles.

Rhymed by bullets defied with screams :
“It’s peaceful, peaceful, peaceful…”

Figures of hope, of love, of salvation
fill the beat with the rise of new generation

Chains breaking, the iron relenting
crack the tone with beautiful redemption

The tirades on screens
of tyrants who lost the feet
and chose to be
the omitted part of
a historic poetry

In universal verse,
I, you, we, is one
ours differences are metaphors united by love

Millions of lines
made poems of and for
death and life…
anger, despair
Night and day…
But today,
Revolutions
sparked inspiration
inflamed passions
and broke fragile façade of fear
and I am no longer written
I am No longer afraid to life
I am no longer afraid to die
I am free to write….

Al-Sharif, 22, studies English literature at the Islamic University in Gaza. She blogs at http://livefromgaza.wordpress.com/.

About Lina Al-Sharif

Lina Al-Sharif, a Palestinian blogger living in Doha-Qatar.

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2 Responses

  1. annie
    February 24, 2011, 2:13 pm

    this is an incredibly moving poem. thank you so much for sending it in Lina. the beginning middle and end…i love all of it.

  2. Les
    February 24, 2011, 2:59 pm

    Add Lebanon to the list of upcoming Arab hot spots according to this headline:”Lebanon youths revolt against confessional system”

    The confessional system was clearly designed to maintain the influence of powers outside of Lebanon, including those believing they could use the (shrinking) Christian minority as their power base.

    As for the young Lebanese calling for the March 6 mobilization, ‘Arab countries each have one dictator whereas we have at least seven or eight,’ he added, referring to the political leaders that rule in Lebanon and who represent the country’s various Christian and Muslim communities.”

    link to rawstory.com

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