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Fida Qishta’s Gaza documentary hit screens in northern California

Israel/Palestine
on 8 Comments

Finally. the Gaza documentary, Where Should the Birds Fly, along with its creator, Fida Qishta, are coming to California. Qishta has been touring the country, bringing Where Should the Birds Fly to film festivals.

The raw and powerful film features two impressive women, Qishta herself, who in the cauldron of Gaza resolves to be a filmmaker, even if it is going to kill her. And little Mona Samouni, who survives the massacre of her family during the Israeli onslaught and relates the story in stark detail.

Our site met Qishta and described her film here–clear-eyed, calm, and deeply-disturbing.

You can read Jane Adas’s compelling review at the Washington Report.

And here is Qishta’s upcoming schedule:

October 4, 2013 – 5:30pm
CineCulture
Leon and Pete Peters Educational Center
Fresno State University
5241 N. Maple Ave., Fresno, CA, 93740

October 4, 2013 – 2:00pm
Sponsored by the Fresno Center for Nonviolence
Fresno Center for Nonviolence
1584 N. Van Ness Ave.
Fresno, CA  93728

October 5, 2013 – 7:00pm
Co-Sponsors Arab Cultural and Community Center & SJP Berkeley
Arab Cultural and Community Center
2 Plaza St.
San Francisco, California 94116

October 6, 2013 – 1:30pm
Tri-City Peace & Justice
Castro Valley Library
3600 Norbridge Avenue, Castro Valley, CA 94546

October 6, 2013, 7:00pm
Keep Hope Alive, Gaza’s Ark, & 14 Friends of Palestine
72 Kensington Rd, San Anselmo, CA 94960
www.14friendsofpalestine.org

 

graphic for Where Should the Birds Fly

annie
About Annie Robbins

Annie Robbins is Editor at Large for Mondoweiss, a mother, a human rights activist and a ceramic artist. She lives in the SF bay area. Follow her on Twitter @anniefofani

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8 Responses

  1. ivri
    ivri
    October 4, 2013, 10:00 am

    The plain truth is that all these would have been more compelling if the entire region was not in flames – compared to which the troubles in Gaza pale so much as to actually look benign. After all troubles are not just political, for instance in a disadvantaged neighborhood in the US the people might feel hugely frustrated – and there are numerous other categories. In fact, when the Palestinians complained, even shortly rioted, about a prisoner who died from cancer claiming that it was because he didn`t get good enough medical care – to many it may have even sounded as a compliment to Isreal (if that is such a big issue against it….)

    • Woody Tanaka
      Woody Tanaka
      October 4, 2013, 12:59 pm

      “The plain truth is that all these would have been more compelling if the entire region was not in flames – compared to which the troubles in Gaza pale so much as to actually look benign.”

      Only if one is a sociopath.

      “After all troubles are not just political, for instance in a disadvantaged neighborhood in the US the people might feel hugely frustrated”

      People in the US’s underprivileged neighborhoods may suffer deprivation, but nothing on the scale of those faced by the Gazans, and not as a direct result of a racist state policy.

      “In fact, when the Palestinians complained, even shortly rioted, about a prisoner who died from cancer claiming that it was because he didn`t get good enough medical care – to many it may have even sounded as a compliment to Isreal”

      How is killing someone by imprisoning in a open-air prison until they die of cancer rather than letting them out to get treatment elsewhere “a compliment to [israel]”? It reads as an indictment to me, a national cruelty.

    • Bumblebye
      Bumblebye
      October 4, 2013, 1:09 pm

      What on earth are you wittering about? This is a doc about people who suffered the Gaza slaughter, not riots in an inner city.

    • justicewillprevail
      justicewillprevail
      October 4, 2013, 1:09 pm

      Wow, you really don’t get it at all, do you. A compliment to Israel – in your Alice in Wonderland universe maybe,. How convenient, you can divert to other places and absolve yourself of anything to do with it. What patronising, ill-informed callous ignorance – all in a day’s work supporting the occupation and destruction of the indigenous people, I guess.

    • talknic
      talknic
      October 4, 2013, 11:07 pm

      ivri “The plain truth is that all these would have been more compelling if the entire region was not in flames”

      So you agree with the basic premise…?

      “After all troubles are not just political, for instance in a disadvantaged neighborhood in the US..”

      Under occupation are they? Been dispossessed of US territory? Stateless? Not allowed to travel outside the US or not allowed to return if they do? Homes bulldozed? Been shot, riddled with fletchettes or bombed lately?

  2. Bumblebye
    Bumblebye
    October 4, 2013, 12:57 pm

    I can’t see the clip here, across the pond, but think I’ve seen bits elsewhere previously. Hope it comes to my town.
    I think this is good too:
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2013/oct/03/west-bank-garden-teargas-canisters-in-pictures#/?picture=4189337888index=0

    Bi’lin garden of teargas canisters. Would make a few great posters for the walls!

  3. JohnAdamTurnbull
    JohnAdamTurnbull
    October 4, 2013, 2:41 pm

    I also recommend “Al Helm: Martin Luther King in Palestine”. It’s the emotional side of resistance

    http://www.clarityfilms.org/mlk/

    • Henry Norr
      Henry Norr
      October 4, 2013, 8:01 pm

      Just to follow up on JohnAdamTurnbull’s post, for the benefit of readers in California, “Al Helm: Martin Luther King in Palestine” will be shown several times at two film festivals coming up this month:

      Mill Valley Film Festival

      Saturday October 12, 3:00pm
      Smith Rafael Film Center
      San Rafael, California

      Sunday October 13, 2:15pm
      CinéArts Sequoia
      Mill Valley, California

      Filmmaker Connie Field, whose previous credits include the classics “Freedom on My Mind” (about the 1960s civil rights struggle in Mississippi) and “Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter” and “Have You Heard from Johannesburg” (the extraordinary, Emmy Award-winning seven-part documentary on the global struggle against South African apartheid) is supposed to be on hand for both of those showings.

      Arab Film Festival

      Oct. 20, 2013 4:30 pm
      Harmony Gold, Los Angeles

      Oct. 27, 2013 9:00 pm
      Shattuck Cinema, Berkeley

      BTW, anyone interested in BDS and how such a movement can grow from beginnings among a handful of activists into a huge global surge should be sure to see “Have You Seen from Johannesburg,” especially the episodes “Fair Play” (about the international sports boycott), “From Selma To Soweto” (about the grassroots anti-apartheid movement here in the U.S.), and above all “The Bottom Line” (about economic boycotts and sanctions). Unfortunately, they’re not on Netflix, but you can stream those three episodes for a modest price from http://vod.clarityfilms.org
      or buy any or all of the seven episodes on DVD from http://www.clarityfilms.org/purchase.php

      Finally, just for the record, Annie wrote “Finally. the Gaza documentary, Where Should the Birds Fly, along with its creator, Fida Qishta, are coming to California,” but the upcoming showing are not actually the first in California: Fida presented it in Oakland, at least, last March. It’s great!

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