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Beinart: Saving Israel took too much time away from my writing career

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Peter Beinart

Peter Beinart

Today Peter Beinart put up a long piece at Open Zion explaining why he’s closing the site. Short version: It took too much time away from his being a writer. Color me confused. I thought he cared about the liberal Zionist cause and about redeeming Jewish democracy, by creating a community that would save Israel. But the site– which started in spring 2012, coincidentally timed to the publication of his book– is closing down after just a year and a half, so he can expand his career, at the Atlantic and Haaretz.

Good for him, but is the word “dedication” in his dictionary? I recall that Noam Sheizaf, who started +972, once said that he wanted to be a film critic, but the occupation was too important, so he devoted himself to politics. Sheizaf’s made a ton of sacrifices to keep his site going.

When New York magazine did a nasty profile of Beinart as a greasy, overly-ambitious operator, I took his side. Now I get this joke from Jason Zengerle’s piece:

In talking to various Jewish journalists about Beinart over the past few months, I heard the words shmegegge and “Sammy Glick,” as well as this joke: “A yeshiva student goes to his rabbi and says, ‘Rabbi, I had a dream last night that I was the leader of a Hasidic court and I had 300 followers.’ The rabbi says, ‘When 300 Hasidim have a dream that you’re their leader, come back and we’ll talk.’ ” More than one called attention to the large picture of Beinart that greets viewers when they visit Open Zion.

Here’s part of Beinart’s explanation from his mea ambitio:

So why will Open Zion close at the end of the year? For only one reason: I want to be a writer again. Running the blog, which meant serving not only as editor but as publisher too—responsible for raising all our money—left little time to do much else besides teach. I couldn’t find the time to write for my own blog. I could barely squeeze out a weekly column for the Daily Beast, let alone write the several longer essays for which I’d been gathering string. I loved Open Zion but more and more felt that it was keeping me from what I wanted to do most.

When Atlantic Media offered me the chance to focus on writing again—via columns for theatlantic.com and essays for National Journal—it felt like a precious opportunity since no ideas-oriented magazine has better navigated transition from print to web. When Haaretz—which is making a major push into the American market—offered me a home for my Israel and Jewish writing as Senior Columnist, I knew I wouldn’t have to abandon the causes Open Zion championed. To work for an American magazine founded in 1857 as part of the struggle for abolition and an Israeli newspaper that has been championing a democratic Jewish state since 1919 fills me with awe.

As sad as I am that Open Zion will close at year’s end, I’d like to think we’re part of a tradition that began long before us and will endure long after. …

I’d like to believe that just as Breira made Open Zion possible, we will pave the way for others. And that one day, young American Jews will be able to plant themselves smack in the center of our community, ask the hardest, most fundamental questions, advocate fiercely for Palestinian rights and dignity, and be told by their elders what they already know in their hearts: That they are doing our people proud.

Beinart is an excellent analyst, and the piece includes this somewhat-irrelevant but superb description of Zionist pressure inside Jewish communal life:

there’s an inevitable tension between being part of a close-knit community and challenging what that community believes. As I began writing critically about Israel, I began to feel it. When I asked one friend to comment on the manuscript of my book, he at first replied that for the sake of our friendship, he would rather not. At the kosher for Passover resort where I had been a speaker for many years (and no longer am), one guest told the proprietors that he wanted a room that would allow him to walk to and from meals without ever laying eyes on me. One Saturday morning when I was walking to synagogue, a man asked me if I was Peter Beinart. When I said yes, he announced—loud enough for his kids and mine to hear—that “I think your politics are shit.”

I’d been expecting some of that. What I hadn’t expected was something else: The yeshiva student in Brooklyn who emailed me because he felt that his school’s depiction of Arabs was inhumane. The middle-aged employee of a right-wing Jewish group who told me she had grown so disturbed by the way her organization depicted Muslims that she began, literally, cold calling local Muslims so she could see for herself if they were as pathological as she had been told. The college student and Birthright alum who almost began to cry at a panel sponsored by the Jewish Federations of North America as she described feeling “betrayed” because what “I’ve been told growing up [about Israel]…a lot of it has not been honest and not been true.”

As these unusual experiences mounted, I began to wonder whether it might be possible to build a different sort of community, a group blog infused with Jewish commitment yet dedicated to a radically open conversation that included Palestinians. When I proposed calling the blog “Zion Square,” which later became “Open Zion,” some supporters said it was too parochial. But that was exactly the point. I didn’t want a purely universalist space, devoid of tribal commitment. I wanted to show that asking the hardest, most painful, questions about Israel could be a Jewish, even Zionist, act….

Right. Then he abandons that “hardest, most painful” building project a year and a half in? Jeez. I wonder if the negative energy got to him. Or if he saw that Israel was going off the edge and he didn’t want to find himself in the company of Max Blumenthal, David Samel, and Rebecca Vilkomerson.

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About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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88 Responses

  1. Ael
    Ael
    November 5, 2013, 1:12 pm

    The traditional response would be to find some other person and put them in charge whilst you make a dash for the exit.

    I wonder why this strategy was not employed.

    • Rusty Pipes
      Rusty Pipes
      November 5, 2013, 1:48 pm

      Tina Brown is leaving the Daily Beast. Beinart may not have been sure that the new management would support the blog under someone else’s leadership.

      I am curious to see what the dynamics at the Atlantic will be between Beinart and Reserve Corporal Goldberg.

      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 5, 2013, 2:14 pm

        Rusty – I disagree. There are all sorts of things he could have done or said had he wanted his project at Open Zion to continue. Instead, Beinart created it and Beinart is closing it down. From what he wrote in his closing essay it would appear that he needs to clear his reputation in his synagogue community and the broader Jewish community. For him to be forgiven, Open Zion needs to disappear and become just a historical footnote in his career.

      • philweiss
        philweiss
        November 5, 2013, 4:33 pm

        I find this comment fascinating, Elliot. I do wonder what he isn’t telling us about his efforts to keep OZ alive…

      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 5, 2013, 5:41 pm

        I do wonder what he isn’t telling us about his efforts to keep OZ alive…

        Phil, thanks.
        I was going off his headline: “Why Open Zion is Closing”
        and unequivocal lead: “Open Zion will be closing at the end of the year.”

      • Gene
        Gene
        November 5, 2013, 9:20 pm

        I suspect family matters may also be involved here. I believe he has a kid (or kids). In his latest column, he goes over some of the awful stuff he has had to endure from his community. Truly sad! Perhaps he wants to protect his progeny from such ostracism.

        I want to keep some measure of optimism here. Who knows? He could still do good work at Haaretz.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        November 5, 2013, 10:48 pm

        Interesting thoughts. Think about the hits that Goldstone took for that UN report. If Beinart’s family is being harassed or threatened I would hope he would let that violent cat out of the bag. Staying silent about threats or being harassed is not wise.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        November 6, 2013, 12:58 am

        Staying silent about threats or being harassed is not wise.

        It is usually part of the cost of being allowed back into the fold.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        November 6, 2013, 1:02 am

        I believe he has a kid (or kids). In his latest column, he goes over some of the awful stuff he has had to endure from his community.

        That’s pretty much how they got to Goldstone too. Punishing his grandchildren.

      • Gene
        Gene
        November 6, 2013, 1:54 pm

        I didn’t mean to imply that he has been threatened or anything like that. There are times when no threats are required. One just knows where not to go, what not to do. Whereas it is possible for an individual to go beyond those limits, any consequence resulting from his or her actions/activism being borne by him or her alone, such is not the case when family, and especially children are involved. I know. That’s where I’m at myself. Hence the anonymity. I’m just scared, not for me but for them.

        Being at Haaretz will provide him and his family some protection.

        If that is part of the rationale that brought him to close Open Zion, I must say that it would be very hard for me to cast the first stone. And besides, as I wrote earlier, his move might turn out to be a good thing. He will certainly reach a larger Israeli audience than at Open Zion. A positive factor I would imagine.

      • Rusty Pipes
        Rusty Pipes
        November 6, 2013, 8:53 pm

        Then again, maybe the title should be, “Raising Money Took Too Much Time away from My Writing Career (and Kids).” If Beinart was having to raise money to keep Open Zion going, then the Daily Beast may not have been giving it much more support than bandwidth. He wouldn’t be the first person to dive into a project he loves, only to find that the majority of his time was consumed by fundraising. Paid gigs at the Atlantic and Ha’aretz could be tempting alternatives for his personal goals. If other Liberal Zionists, like JStreet, really value what he was doing at Open Zion, then some of them could step up to the plate and attempt to create and fund something similar.

  2. bangpound
    bangpound
    November 5, 2013, 1:16 pm

    Ambitions > principles.

    • piotr
      piotr
      November 5, 2013, 1:34 pm

      It is more “paid content” versus “free content”.

      The other problem is that Beinart is a Zionist heretic. And a moderate heretic at that. He is not an anti-Zionist, or post-Zionist, or a non-Zionist. And not a “proper, albeit liberal Zionist”. And less radical in his heresy than MJ Rosenberg. This is a rather narrow basis to find followers that would support his website.

      Just look at his favorite audience:

      The college student and Birthright alum who almost began to cry at a panel sponsored by the Jewish Federations of North America as she described feeling “betrayed” because what “I’ve been told growing up [about Israel]…a lot of it has not been honest and not been true.”

      Yeah, it is not just wicked pornographers who maintain that children are not brought to their parents by storks.

      • bangpound
        bangpound
        November 5, 2013, 2:21 pm

        It is more “paid content” versus “free content”.

        I don’t agree. Every other week, someone makes a big fuss about leaving mainstream journalism and becoming independent. He had gained Lisa Goldman as an editor, and she has experience enough to support an independent project outside the pressures of mainstream corporate journalism. Mondoweiss, The Electronic Intifada, 972mag and Alternet all survive on a mix of individual donations and grants.

        Going independent carries a lot of risks, but since Beinart already had mainstream credibility, there’s no reason to assume he couldn’t spent some of his capital on an independent project and make it successful and sustainable.

        The thing is that he didn’t really commit. He wasn’t fully engaged in his project.

        And that brings me to another thing: what happened to Zionist BDS? Isn’t Haaretz delivered to the settlements?

  3. Krauss
    Krauss
    November 5, 2013, 1:17 pm

    If you took his side too much last time, you bash him a bit too much this time.

    Yes, he has a side of craven careerism and he lacks the pure idealism you, Blumenthal and the other editors at this site have, not to mention heroes like David Sheen and others.

    He is still going to write about Jewish/Israeli issues on Haaretz.
    Look, he will always be a Zionist. He’ll denounce and denounce but he will never abandon, almost no matter how bad it gets. I’ve lost count how many times people like Brad Burston or Carlo Strenger have written a column where they essentially say that’s it, I’m giving up on Israel. Yet there they are next week, doing a new column. Beinart’s going down that path.

    In the fight over liberalism and Zionist, he will choose ethnic nationalism, every time. Also, he was the editor of the TNR once, you know, at a record young age. I guess he feels he should be a lot more important. Titles have a funny way of casting aside idealism for some people – even if they all rationalize it while it’s going on.

    In brief; Beinart’s one of the better Zionists. But of course, when your bar is Goldberg, Dershowitz and Chait, how hard is that? I think he’s a gifted writer. I enjoy his writing on politics in the American context as well, although it’s less original and less passionate than when he writes on Jewish/Israeli issues.

    • seafoid
      seafoid
      November 5, 2013, 5:22 pm

      “I’d like to believe that just as Breira made Open Zion possible, we will pave the way for others. And that one day, young American Jews will be able to plant themselves smack in the center of our community, ask the hardest, most fundamental questions, advocate fiercely for Palestinian rights and dignity, and be told by their elders what they already know in their hearts: That they are doing our people proud.”

      It’s sad that can’t happen today. Tikkun Olam thrown out in the rain.

      Maybe post crash it’ll be feasible.

    • Shingo
      Shingo
      November 5, 2013, 5:28 pm

      In the fight over liberalism and Zionist, he will choose ethnic nationalism, every time.

      I think you have hit the nail on the head Krauss. Beinart went a certain distance but is not willing to cross the line, and realizing that Israel is not going to reform itself, has chosen to submit to the status quo and retreat back into the fold. I think he started into Israel’s darkness, but is still in denial.

      In defense of Beinart, he’s stuck between a rock and a hard place. He’s ventured out to criticize Israel and question Zionism, but still refuses to let go. He tried to stand firm as a gatekeeper, but realized it was a lonely and futile pursuit.

      All he did was estrange himself from the left and the right.

    • Kathleen
      Kathleen
      November 5, 2013, 10:52 pm

      “better Zionist” if there can be such a “better” Can certainly buy that more than the “liberal zionist” aye yi yi

  4. pabelmont
    pabelmont
    November 5, 2013, 1:25 pm

    Has he succeeded, so he can quit?

    Has he failed, so he can quit?

    Has his goal (whatever it was, maybe giving “Liberal Zionism” a believable and intellectually supportable meaning) become impossible — you know, “you can’t get there from here”? or maybe the simpler goal, defending Israel as it is rather than as people once believed it was or hoped it would be? In which case he might as well give up Zion Square?

    Have the rulers of Israel and their AIPAC rooting section in USA become so distasteful that a person of taste and distinction wouldn’t touch them with a 10-foot pole?

    Has he taken down the Israeli flag in his children’s bedroom?

  5. seafoid
    seafoid
    November 5, 2013, 1:26 pm

    Israel is not his problem at the end of the day. Mother Israel drunk or sober and she’s drunk 24/7 on jewish victimhood. He’s probably right to walk way.

  6. Ellen
    Ellen
    November 5, 2013, 2:10 pm

    Overly ambitious operator or not, (that is irrelevant) one thing is very clear. Mr. Beinart is DEEPLY conflicted. And a conflicted and confused message has no chance in the marketplace of ideas.

    ….That they are doing our people proud….. I began to wonder whether it might be possible to build a different sort of community, a group blog infused with Jewish commitment yet dedicated to a radically open conversation that included Palestinians.

    On one side he wants to preserve and cling to the ideas of something like “our people” and on the other side include Palestinians in discussions about Zionism?? That never happened and cannot happen as the Zionist construct is exclusive and Palestinians remain in the way of the Zionist project.

    The expressed hope of a committed Zionist to “include Palestinians” is an absurdity. It is more than narcissistic, and blind to realities. In time Beinart`’s words will read like those of a fool.

    Why cannot Beinart be a mensch, a human motivated by love of the other over love of “our people.” That does not exclude being Jewish…but does exclude Zionism.

    • Xpat
      Xpat
      November 5, 2013, 2:40 pm

      Why cannot Beinart be a mensch, a human motivated by love of the other over love of “our people.” That does not exclude being Jewish…but does exclude Zionism.

      That is a MUCH bigger project. There is no Jewish community outside of Zionism. There may be niches, like the gay, Jewish community that have found a common bond with each other other than Zionism, but they are intinsically limited and are flawed in other ways (e.g. Phil’s piece today).
      Nobody has yet figured out on a global scale what it means to have a Jewish community without Zionism. Some are begining to figure out what being “Jewish” means without Zionism (Marc Ellis, Judith Butler and some rabbis), but the “Jewish community” bit is huge and uncharted.

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        November 5, 2013, 3:13 pm

        Thanks Elliot. Well said.

      • Ellen
        Ellen
        November 5, 2013, 4:02 pm

        Elliot, I do not understand. Can’t Jewish identity or Jewish faith/culture be enough to create a sense of Jewish Community for those who seek it? What does Zionism have to do with it?

        Can’t we have multiple communities, just like most of use have different circles of friends and communities with which we identify?

      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 5, 2013, 4:23 pm

        Can’t we have multiple communities, just like most of use have different circles of friends and communities with which we identify?

        I agree with that. That’s the way things are, or are going: JewBus (Jews who practice Buddhism), interfaith families and so on. And that is just one aspect of Jewish culture: religion. When you throw in cuisine, language, ethnic affiliation and so on, the multiple identities just grow.

        Can’t Jewish identity or Jewish faith/culture be enough to create a sense of Jewish Community for those who seek it?

        What does “Jewish” mean if it’s merged with everything else? There is no one thing that we can all agree on. Unlike Zionism, which we can all agree on is good. Holocaust commemoration worked for a while but it’s not going to last forever. Anyway, that is also opening up to be not being exclusively “Jewish.”
        There might be a path forward but is hasn’t been tested yet. In the meantime, many of us, for whom radical, Jewish politics on I/P are our passion, feel that Zionism has EVERYTHING to do with it. Every so often, just when I am beginning to get past this and feel that I am connected, some muckety-muck in the J community excommunicates me and my tribe of radicals. And the silent J majority stays mum.
        Where does that leave me?

      • Ellen
        Ellen
        November 5, 2013, 4:38 pm

        Elliot, we might be speaking over each other? But I still do not get it.

        Wouldn’t contemplating the universal teachings of Hillel, for example, be enough for collective Jewish identity. (Although his should be contemplated by non Jews as well!)

        Why Holocaustism and Zionism to define Judaism?

        So if you are a Jew that does not practice/teach Holocaustism and Zionism, but instead the universal teachings of Judaism, maybe that leaves you as a true Jew? One who is not confused.

      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 5, 2013, 4:52 pm

        I hope there are ways to flesh this out. The inherent challenge is that if you are universally universal, then what makes it “Jewish”?
        But for that to be a real option, it has to exist in the world. Sadly, it doesn’t yet. Critically, as long as ostracizing Mondoweiss, Jewish Voice for Peace continue to be respectable and mainstream, it doesn’t stand a chance.

      • Ellen
        Ellen
        November 5, 2013, 5:49 pm

        as long as ostracizing Mondoweiss, Jewish Voice for Peace continue to be respectable and mainstream, it doesn’t stand a chance.

        I think all movements and changes in social thought started out as fringe, with no chance. Think of the early Abolitionists in the USA?

        Imagine just 20 years ago the possibility and acceptability of civil unions or marriage between two women or two men? The idea would seem impossible, right?

        So on that note: how to start a movement and be on the inside/right side if your hurry

        http://www.ted.com/talks/derek_sivers_how_to_start_a_movement.html

        Tragically, the plight of the Palestinians may not be resolved, (And Judaism’s embrace of Zionism will haunt for a VERY long time,) but the messages of Mondoweiss, etc., is gaining momentum among the American people, if not yet the government.

        But it might be accepted, maybe in our lifetime.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        November 5, 2013, 6:00 pm

        @ Ellen
        Imagine just 20 years ago the possibility and acceptability of civil unions or marriage between two women or two men? The idea would seem impossible, right?

        Actually, that’s not right. Denmark introduced civil unions in 1989, and Norway in 1993.

      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 5, 2013, 6:20 pm

        Ellen – sure. I hope it will happen in my lifetime and I’m working to make it so. I don’t think that Beinart wants to hitch his cart to that horse. To continue the animal metaphors, he has smaller (or at least other) fish to fry.

      • Ellen
        Ellen
        November 5, 2013, 6:42 pm

        Elliot, The inherent challenge is that if you are universally universal, then what makes it “Jewish”?
        Ok, I’ve been thinking about this and now we are getting into deep territory. I might not be qualified to give a coherent answer, but here is my effort. Hope I do not go off the edge.

        Judaism was the beginning of monotheism. It took centuries and was a way of acting towards, thinking about and believing in a deity called Yahweh by various groups we call Israelites, “God the Father” by others and Allah by yet others. Whatever the name, it is the same deity worshiped by the three monotheistic faiths. All “Children of Abraham.” So here we are different communities who mingle and have shared interests… no tribes. The Bronze age is over.

        The faith is essentially the same, yet each community of believers evolved differently due to social conventions, politics, struggle for control over resources and each other, ethnic migrations, etc.

        In my mind, there is no more difference between Jews and “others” than there is between two neighboring families. Each household is distinguished within their walls by different rituals and feelings of what is important to daily life, different hobbies, etc.

        Creating false “isms,” seeking mythological identities (seems most all groups have a need to do that) dwelling on past and ancient crimes upon a people to create an identity today does not make a people, or a nation. (We just need to look at the dysfunction of the new Balkan nations to see where that leads.)

        So what makes it Jewish? If there is still a need for tribal identifiers to be Jewish, maybe a return to identifying with the absolute Universalism of a single deity and the symbolism of that which only early Judaism evolved and from which other communities evolved.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        November 5, 2013, 9:29 pm

        “Judaism was the beginning of monotheism.”

        Or maybe Atenism. Or Zoroastrianism.

        “Whatever the name, it is the same deity worshiped by the three monotheistic faiths.”

        Zoroastrianism, Babism, Baha’i, Sikhism, and the religions of the Igbo and the Himba are monotheistic. Cao Dai, Tenrikyo, Cheondogyo, Rastafarianism, and (by ‘eck) Eckankar seem to be monotheistic as well.

      • Ellen
        Ellen
        November 6, 2013, 6:01 am

        Zoroastrianism, right. I forgot about that. Very important. Don’t know of the others and I learn something everyday at MW.

        Back to Elliot’s question: if Universal, what makes it Jewish? Why does it matter? Isn’t the golden rule enough?

      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 6, 2013, 7:59 am

        It worked 2,000 years ago for the founders of Judaism and it worked 1,000 years later for Maimonides. Very different today. They had clear, strong internal and external Jewish markers. what is there today?

      • piotr
        piotr
        November 6, 2013, 8:27 pm

        I started to doubt that monotheism represented an improvement. Some Jews proudly compare their religion with politheism in Phoenicia and point out that the politheists practiced human sacrifice and monotheists did not. But a single G..d could be quite averse to animal rights, e.g. when the Israel was commanded to slay the Amelek with all the women, children and the cattle. I feel that the inclusion of the cattle was quite uncalled for.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        November 5, 2013, 10:55 pm

        Rabbi Weiss practices his Jewish faith and is not a Zionist. He claims that there are plenty of religious Jews like him. That they have a sizable community

      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 5, 2013, 11:25 pm

        Which Rabbi Weiss? If you mean Neturei Karta, then they are a tiny group, the married women (who are at least 18) shave off all the hair on their head. Generally, they to live in the 18th century, pre-Zionism and pre-Napoleon.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        November 6, 2013, 3:03 pm
      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 6, 2013, 3:18 pm

        Yup. That’s the one. How do you feel about his messianic dream?
        He’s about as relevant politically to everybody else as the Amish are to their countrymen.
        His vision of Judaism contra nationalism is great. Isaac Meyer Wise, the 19th century founder of American Reform Judaism would have liked that speech a whole lot more than the sermons of mealy-mouthed Jewish nationalists Reform rabbis today.

    • marc b.
      marc b.
      November 5, 2013, 3:00 pm

      ellen, I disagree. I don’t find beinart conflicted at all. blasé, half-hearted, is more like it. I think he just decided that what he was trying to do, wasn’t worth while. walking a tight rope with a mouth full of oatmeal, while finger painting the portrait of what Zionism could’ve, should’ve, would’ve been isn’t all that fulfilling. and even his mildly radical position within ‘zionism’ must have caused him further discomfort, beyond the bit about this gig undermining his justified ambitions. I disagree with Weiss as well, regarding Beinart’s analytical skills. his thumbnail sketch of the delusional psychology of the members of his community has been done a thousand times (including here), it just seems new and improved since the diagnosis never really sinks in. frankly, I still think the pathology strikes Weiss as a novelty emotionally, if not intellectually. (when someone is compelled to ‘cold call local muslims’ to evaluate their pathology – how does one prepare for and execute that enterprise? – you know that the battle for that group of minds was long lost.)

      • Ellen
        Ellen
        November 5, 2013, 4:10 pm

        marc b. maybe you are right. Maybe his gig was no longer fun and he found it too narrow (but in reality it is huge, seeping and very important.)

        Besides, his book is at it’s half life, so time to move on.

      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 5, 2013, 4:26 pm

        Amazon is selling The Crisis of Zionism brand new for $4.79.

      • MahaneYehude1
        MahaneYehude1
        November 5, 2013, 5:07 pm

        @Elliot: Very cheap book.

      • marc b.
        marc b.
        November 5, 2013, 5:16 pm

        $4.79? that’s a barometer of something, I guess. too confrontational and honest for Zionists, too timid and dishonest for the rest of us.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        November 5, 2013, 10:59 pm

        Tight rope walking between the 67 boundary and the situation on the ground now…which is the one state solution. Tough walk

    • Shingo
      Shingo
      November 5, 2013, 5:33 pm

      And a conflicted and confused message has no chance in the marketplace of ideas.

      That’s not just Beinart’s problem, it’s the problem that confronts all liberal Zionists. How to stay true to their humanism while supporting apartheid and ethnocentric ideals. How to support the struggle of the oppressed and disenfranchised while unconditionally standing by Israel as it oppressed and disenfranchises others.

      They try to argue that special considerations and exceptions apply to Israel, but at some point, they are forced to explain at what point can these special considerations no longer be justified.

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        November 5, 2013, 9:14 pm

        Shingo:

        [And a conflicted and confused message has no chance in the marketplace of ideas. ]

        That’s not just Beinart’s problem, it’s the problem that confronts all liberal Zionists.

        I couldn’t agree more. [Then again ALL Liberalism (the actually existing varieties) has been “conflicted”– involving a somewhat self-contradictory apologia for predatory capitalism/imperialism, going way back.]

  7. seafoid
    seafoid
    November 5, 2013, 2:35 pm

    Lou Reed first off

    http://www.uncut.co.uk/lou-reed-treated-in-hospital-for-severe-dehydration-news

    “The other day I was 19, I could fall down and get back up. Now if I fall down you are talking about nine months of physical therapy. Make sure you take your vitamins.”

    Israel hasn’t taken a vitamin since 1948

    Beinart thought the intellectual equivalent of extra vitamins would change things.
    He’s now like a drugstore assistant who recognises how widespread the cancer of Zionism has spread around the body of Israel and realises the vitamins aren’t going to do anything

    Walt said it well last March

    http://walt.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2013/03/25/empty_words

    “No matter how well-written or delivered, a speech cannot divert whole societies from a well-established course of action. Policies in motion tend to remain in motion; to change the trajectory of a deeply-entrenched set of initiatives requires the application of political forces of equal momentum “

  8. joemowrey
    joemowrey
    November 5, 2013, 2:39 pm

    “Beinart is an excellent analyst,…”

    In response to that remark, I’ll repeat what I said yesterday concerning Beinart.

    He was a cheerleader for the criminal war of aggression waged by the U.S. against Iraq. He made serious policy arguments in favor of a war based on blatant lies and driven by a media propaganda campaign so transparent that even a child could see through it. Myself and tens of millions of other thinking human beings around the world understood that a heinous crime was being committed against the people of Iraq. We had the courage to stand against it. Beinhart made his living promoting it.

    What Beinart is about is summed up in Phil’s remark concerning the timing of Beinart’s launch of Open Zion being “coincidentally timed to the publication of his book.”

    Again, I have to ask, why do we keep giving this arrogant punk an audience? He is “excellent” at managing his career to make as much money as possible spewing ideological nonsense, that’s for sure.

    • Sibiriak
      Sibiriak
      November 5, 2013, 9:22 pm

      joemowrey

      …Beinart. He was a cheerleader for the criminal war of aggression waged by the U.S. against Iraq. He made serious policy arguments in favor of a war based on blatant lies and driven by a media propaganda campaign so transparent that even a child could see through it.

      Well said!

    • Kathleen
      Kathleen
      November 5, 2013, 9:30 pm

      Bingo. Yet Phil has endlessly promoted Beinart’s self absorbed better late than never enlightenment about the conflict. For Beinart it is all about “saving Israel” His new stance has nothing to do with compassion for the Palestinians.

    • Xpat
      Xpat
      November 5, 2013, 10:18 pm

      Sure, Beinart has helped expand the camp of Israel critics, but wrt his career, weren’t his backing of the Iraq war and his Orthodox Jewishness significant in his success as a critic of Israel? “Even an authentic pro-war Jew says it!” So, now, he is being pulled back into the community that gave his views their legitimacy. Very much like Goldstone except that Goldstone didn’t yammer about how tough it was to grow up as a Jew in South Africa.

  9. Stogumber
    Stogumber
    November 5, 2013, 2:49 pm

    I’m just looking at his picture – and I suppose that he has burned out. And he needs some funnier things to do for to store up his fuels again. We shouldn’t ask too much from people.

  10. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    November 5, 2013, 2:57 pm

    Information doors closing down over at Huffington Post again. Tried to post a few pieces from Mondoweiss over there yesterday. Did not make it up. Here goes again

    “Now if only the U.S. would pull the funding of money, arms etc for the Syrian rebels to help end this proxy war that would be something.

    How do folks feel about the I lobby trying to determine our foreign policy with Iran? This is substantive information about Iran. I tried to post this piece from Mondoweiss under another Iranian thread but did not make it up. Six years ago this was standard for the moderators at Huff Po. Not allowing more substantive information from the UN website etc to go up at Huff Po. Then a real honest opening at Huff Po over the last three or so years with more relevant information going up as links. But now it seems the I lobby may be closing down Huff Po’s information doors again. Let’s see..this is about Iran.

    The lobby grants Obama a grace period on Iran
    Annie Robbins and Phil Weiss on November 3, 2013
    http://mondoweiss.net/2013/11/grants-grace-period.html

    So here is what pops up now which is new when I make comments over there
    “Due to the potentially sensitive nature of this article, your comment may take longer to appear publicly”

    This is the article I tried to post my comment on. For three or four years now these kinds of comments go right through the moderators. Five years ago not so much.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/05/iran-syria-withdrawal_n_4219977.html?utm_hp_ref=world

  11. ritzl
    ritzl
    November 5, 2013, 3:01 pm

    There might be some redemption (i.e. a re-up/ante of his/some commitment to making a difference) if Beinart, also, agreed to post here at MW. He’s on the cusp of this site’s mission (as I understand it) and would get nailed, but he’s a big boy and his points are not completely invalid. It would be additive, imho. Excluding the “not completely invalid” bit (Ellis raises great points), Marc Ellis from another direction.

    But then he’s apparently been “Goldstoned” into community acceptability as his enforced first principle, journalistically.

    With the masthead folks here providing leadership and reflective space, he could have contributed without (weak as this may be or sound) taking the personal hit. He could have even touted contributions and criticism here as a badge of honor among his circle, being a lonely counterpoint voice in the “War of Ideas.” Very similar to Burston and Strenger at Ha’aretz in one sense. Maybe Larry Derfner in another, similar but related, sense.

    Aside, it’s clear from Beinart’s rationalizing verbal navigation through this change that few have the courage, resiliency, and perseverance of the masthead folks here. In any venue, few have those characteristics. Acorns+, all of them…

    • German Lefty
      German Lefty
      November 5, 2013, 4:54 pm

      if Beinart, also, agreed to post here at MW

      No! A few Zionists in the comments section are okay. But as authors? No, thanks!

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        November 5, 2013, 5:15 pm

        Why not?

        We have the occasional article by Jerry Slater.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        November 5, 2013, 5:52 pm

        Shingo, if I wanted to read articles by Zionists, I would go to a Zionist website.

      • Shingo
        Shingo
        November 5, 2013, 6:19 pm

        That only leads to an echo chamber German Lefty. There’s no point preaching to the converted alone.

        If you simply go to a Zionist website, you’ll get shouted down and probably banned. The conversation needs to be opened up, not compartmentalized.

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        November 5, 2013, 5:22 pm

        To me, it’s a question of opportunity to point out flaws perchance to shed light and change minds, rather than to rigid-ize one particular outlook. The hasbarists here continually reiterate what most inside the Jewish community have heard and probably accepted as gospel. Connecting those known memes to actual reality rebuttal is crucial. Less thinking the better.

        I realize this is an ongoing debate here, but the zios that post here do in fact serve a valuable purpose. Most expose the hasbara for the inherent, self-serving (or worse) blather that it is.

        No counterpoint, dismissible echo chamber, imho. I think that the good-faith of providing avenue to a counterpoint is crucial to overall credibility.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        November 5, 2013, 5:34 pm

        @ ritzl
        Would you let an anti-Semite write articles for a Jewish rights blog, a homophobe for a gay rights blog, a slavery supporter for a black rights blog, a misogynist for a women’s rights blog?
        Let me quote Omar Barghouti again: “The most important right is the right of return for Palestinian refugees. Why is that the most important right? Simply because 68% of the Palestinian people are refugees. 50% of the Palestinian people live in exile, outside of historic Palestine. 12% are Palestinian citizens of Israel. And 38% are in the West Bank and Gaza, including East Jerusalem. This means that anyone who says ‘I support Palestinian rights and therefore I support ending the occupation.’ is only saying ‘I support SOME Palestinian rights for a MINORITY of the Palestinian people.’ 38% in fact. They are not addressing THE Palestinian people.”

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        November 5, 2013, 6:28 pm

        @GL First, the fragility of your/our viewpoint is directly proportionate to the willingness to allow opposing views to be expressed, imho.

        Second, yes I would allow it, not that Beinart’s views are in that hardened class you pose.

        Imho, he struggled within one slim vein of altruism on this issue. He did NOT dismiss all opposing views on the matter. OZ, and I agree with David Samel on this, did in fact routinely promote directly oppositional/”contrary” views. I myself had a column written there by a contributor/Suchorov in direct rebuttal to one, more or less adversarial comment I made (expand your political thinking, libzios…). Beinart, himself, editor, did strive to accommodate a variety of opinions. That is to be lauded, and is a demonstration of his character, editorially speaking. It’s also why I believe he would be a great addition to this site, even though his would be the contrary view here. A foil, like Derfner was at JP.

        He just couldn’t or wouldn’t sustain OZ, for whatever reason. He was weak, probably personally narrow, if not wrongheaded, though not editorially wrong. I think, as much as his PoV can and/or will be rebutted in his future endeavors, he offers the opportunity to shine light on the inherent flaws of even “reasonable” zionist thought, wherever he may ultimately call journalistic home. That’s an opportunity for the side of justice, imho, and not something to be avoided.

        Just thoughts. Beinart would likely never agree to posting here, but it’s an interesting thought exercise, and why I believe that MW is very different from most sites out there. Particularly sites that target the Jewish community on this issue. I think MW, to their great credit, might actually entertain inviting him to post here.

        Peace.

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        November 5, 2013, 7:26 pm

        PS. I’m absolute not dismissing your views, GL. They’re relevant and necessary. This is mostly just an attempt to see how a youtube vid comes across here.

        But, the danger that Emo Phillips points out, starting at 2:35, is insightful and relevant to any movement discussion.

        http://youtu.be/ZBKIyCbppfs?t=2m35s

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        November 5, 2013, 9:29 pm

        ritzl:

        The hasbarists here continually reiterate what most inside the Jewish community have heard and probably accepted as gospel. Connecting those known memes to actual reality rebuttal is crucial.

        I agree completely. Brilliant, fact-filled rebuttals have made this a site a great resource for budding anti-Hasbarists.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        November 6, 2013, 6:42 am

        @ ritzl & Shingo

        the fragility of your/our viewpoint is directly proportionate to the willingness to allow opposing views to be expressed
        Not necessarily. It depends on the reason why you don’t want to allow opposing views to be expressed on this site. The thing is that equal rights are NOT a matter of opinion. They are a basic requirement. There is no legitimate alternative to equal rights. Allowing Zionists to write articles for MW would give legitimacy to the idea of denying Palestinians SOME of their basic rights, i.e. the right of return for Palestinian refugees and equal rights for Palestinian Israelis. These rights should be regarded as non-negotiable.

        Beinart, himself, editor, did strive to accommodate a variety of opinions.
        Yes, but that’s probably only because he suffers from cognitive dissonance. Deep down inside he is aware of the fact that his own “liberal Zionist” perspective is deeply flawed and unjust.

        That is to be lauded, and is a demonstration of his character, editorially speaking.
        No. I think that by allowing anti-Zionists to post a few articles on OZ, Beinart just wants to silence his own guilty conscience. It’s a totally selfish reason.

        The danger that Emo Phillips points out, starting at 2:35, is insightful and relevant to any movement discussion.
        Well, I don’t want Zionists to die. It’s the Zionists who want Palestinians to die.

        That only leads to an echo chamber. There’s no point preaching to the converted alone.
        I think that MW is a great source of information. Before I came here, I had close to zero knowledge about the conflict. I pretty much only knew that it existed. MW helped me understand the reason for and the extent of the conflict. It opened my eyes. Therefore, MW is not just about preaching to the choir. It might look like that at first glance. However, you can’t know what kind of people READ the articles. You only know what kind of people COMMENT on the articles. The commenters are not necessarily representative of the readers. If MW started publishing more articles by Zionists, then the site would get spammed with Zionist misinformation and distortions. This would make it much more difficult to filter out the useful information that actually help people understand the conflict. The site’s quality would suffer.

      • LeaNder
        LeaNder
        November 6, 2013, 9:17 am

        ritzl, I didn’t know Eno Philips, good point.

        Also agree, Peter Beinhart would never publish here. So GL’s argument is pretty moot, a tempest in a teapot, but interesting nevertheless.

        Rosa Luxemburg:

        Freedom is always the freedom of those who think otherwise.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        November 6, 2013, 10:30 am

        GL’s argument is pretty moot
        Well, ritzl started this discussion about a hypothetical situation. So, don’t dismiss my points as moot. Besides, the discussion can also be applied to “liberal Zionists” other than Beinart.

        Freedom is always the freedom of those who think otherwise.
        This website exists because Zionists have too much freedom, not too little. Remember that the Palestinians are the oppressed and the Zionists the oppressors. Therefore, it’s the Palestinians’ freedom that must be defended, not the Zionists’ freedom.

      • kamanja
        kamanja
        November 7, 2013, 3:12 pm

        People’s views change over time largely through experience, a chance encounter with reality, being exposed to information with which they were unfamiliar… Coming from what used to be called the Modern Orthodox milieu, Beinart’s journey was long and is still not ended. The Right of Return’s a tough one, but he’s not incapable of getting there because he considers himself Zionist.

        “Would you let an anti-Semite write articles for a Jewish rights blog, a homophobe for a gay rights blog, a slavery supporter for a black rights blog, a misogynist for a women’s rights blog?”

        Part of Israel’s Declaration of Independence, written before the War of Independence-Nakba promises inter alia, equal rights for all who live within its borders. Innocents need not be consigned to purgatory for having taken that literally in their youth, or because they’ve had a hard time dismantling early brainwashing.

        Prof. Chaim Gans explores how Israel could effect the Palestinian right to return and accept its responsibility for the Nakba. http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~uctytho/PalIsrGans.html

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        November 7, 2013, 4:35 pm

        I don’t know, GL. Equal rights are, as you say, NOT a matter of opinion. But they ARE a matter of strategy, basic requirement or not. There’s always the decoupling of those two things to contend with to be effective. Particularly on this issue with its extreme power imbalance in the narrative.

        The good thing is that the narrative imbalance is way more offset by the fact/morality imbalance. So that weighs, to me, in favor of the foil function. Particularly with the commenters here.

        And yes, I was posing a hypothetical about Beinart posting here. The reason it would be good is exactly the reason he probably wouldn’t do so.

  12. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    November 5, 2013, 3:20 pm

    Check this out.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/05/colbert-trolls-fox-news-realhumanpraise_n_4218078.html

    cathleen

    Super User · 385 Fans
    Murdoch “world’s most powerful raisin” Classic
    Due to the potentially sensitive nature of this article, your comment may take longer to appear publicly.”

    DUE TO THE POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE NATURE OF THIS ARTICLE, YOUR COMMENT MAY TAKE LONGER TO APPEAR PUBLICLY.

    Now my comments over at Huff Po (usually try to spread info over there from Going to Tehran, Mondoweiss, Informed Comment) have this little alert coming up with all my comments. Wondering if my comments are being targeted because some post about the BDS movement in Colorado made it up (the woman who headed these events in Denver has been fired from her self employed job because JNF/I lobby went after her) Since post of mine about the BDS activities in Denver made it up. Have been successful at getting links to Mondoweiss, Going to Tehran, Informed Comment up over there for a good three years. Moderators would not let these go through four or so years ago. Looks like the doors may be closing over there again.

    Hope someone tries to post a link to Mondoweiss on one of the relevant threads on Iran etc over at Huff PO and see if it makes it up. Anyone willing to try? http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/05/iran-syria-withdrawal_n_4219977.html?utm_hp_ref=world

    • seafoid
      seafoid
      November 5, 2013, 3:47 pm

      I get a message at Guardian.com that my comments are pre moderated. Some bot must have reported something.

      • ritzl
        ritzl
        November 5, 2013, 4:30 pm

        You’re right, seafoid. The tighter the clamp/cram down, the bigger the explosion. Completely avoidable. Sad.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        November 5, 2013, 6:44 pm

        The woman who was the leader of all of the protest and bus ads in Denver against JNF a weekend ago was just fired from her job. She absolutely knows that it was pressure from the I lobby. She worked for a elderly Jewish couple as an in home health care person. They fired her just recently.

      • Xpat
        Xpat
        November 5, 2013, 7:15 pm

        Why not start a petition. I’ll sign. I’m sure others will too.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        November 5, 2013, 11:03 pm

        She was self employed by this older Jewish couple she feels she has no real recourse and also wants them to live in peace at 86 years old. I have encouraged her to challenge the firing but don’t think she will. Has only stirred her up more to push forward with the BDS Colorado actions.

        A petition is a good idea but would be up to her to do.

  13. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    November 5, 2013, 3:45 pm

    Going to see if this new comment makes it up over at Huff Po

    John Kerry Makes Mideast Trip To Reignite Israeli-Palestinian Peace Talks
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/05/kerry-mideast-peace-talks_n_4220619.html?utm_hp_ref=world

    When Israel continues to expand illegal settlements while peace talks are supposed to be taking place…sure does not look like there is much hope for a two state solution left. Netanyahu and team pushing towards a one state solution being the only solution
    ——————————————–

    Israelis plan new Colonies, Oil Drilling, on Palestinian Land during “Peace Talks”

    Posted on 11/04/2013 by Juan Cole

    http://www.juancole.com/2013/11/israelis-colonies-palestinian.html
    ————————————————————————————-

    Just entered over there. Will see if it makes it up. This notice popped up again

    “Due to the potentially sensitive nature of this article, your comment may take longer to appear publicly.”
    —————————————————————-

    cathleen

    Super User · 385 Fans
    When Israel continues to expand illegal settlements while peace talks are supposed to be taking place…sure does not look like there is much hope for a two state solution left. Netanyahu and team pushing towards a one state solution being the only solution

    Israelis plan new Colonies, Oil Drilling, on Palestinian Land during “Peace Talks”

    Posted on 11/04/2013 by Juan Cole

    http://www.juancole.com/2013/11/israelis-colonies-palestinian.html
    Due to the potentially sensitive nature of this article, your comment may take longer to appear publicly.

    —————————————-

    ok so this comment and link just made it up. Sorry to use your site to track this Phil but want witnesses to what I think is going on over at Huff po again. My comment on an Iran threat and then linking to Annie and Phil’s piece about I lobby meeting with Obama about Iran has not made it up yet.

    • annie
      annie
      November 5, 2013, 6:23 pm

      kathleen, maybe in the future if you posted them in a thread here that wasn’t off topic they’d blend more. and thanks for spreading our links of course!

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        November 5, 2013, 6:41 pm

        Sorry about that Annie but wanted to make sure I have witnesses to what I believe is a repeat of where Huff Po was about five years ago. Not allowing these links or comments. Have been spreading your links all over the place for years now and getting your name out on Cspan, Diane Rehm and some right wing radio outlets etc. Again thanks for your patience.

  14. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    November 5, 2013, 3:59 pm

    This comment and link over to Mondoweiss still being held up on this post at Huff Po. Only one person has made a comment and that person is me

    Iran Prepared To Call For Withdrawal Of Foreign Troops From Syria, Foreign Minister Javad Zarif Says

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/05/iran-syria-withdrawal_n_4219977.html?utm_hp_ref=world

    “cathleen

    Super User · 385 Fans
    Now if only the U.S. would pull the funding of money, arms etc for the Syrian rebels to help end this proxy war that would be something.

    How do folks feel about the I lobby trying to determine our foreign policy with Iran? This is substantive information about Iran. I tried to post this piece from Mondoweiss under another Iranian thread but did not make it up. Six years ago this was standard for the moderators at Huff Po. Not allowing more substantive information from the UN website etc to go up at Huff Po. Then a real honest opening at Huff Po over the last three or so years with more relevant information going up as links. But now it seems the I lobby may be closing down Huff Po’s information doors again. Let’s see..this is about Iran.

    The lobby grants Obama a grace period on Iran
    Annie Robbins and Phil Weiss on November 3, 2013
    http://mondoweiss.net/2013/11/grants-grace-period.html
    Due to the potentially sensitive nature of this article, your comment may take longer to appear publicly.

  15. RudyM
    RudyM
    November 5, 2013, 4:45 pm

    Is the Atlantic still the cheerleader for military intervention that I remember it being back when I paid more attention to it? It may have had honorable beginnings, but I don’t think much of its politics, from what I’ve seen of it.

  16. German Lefty
    German Lefty
    November 5, 2013, 5:07 pm

    I’d like to believe […] that one day, young American Jews will be able to […] advocate fiercely for Palestinian rights and dignity, and be told by their elders what they already know in their hearts: That they are doing our people proud.

    Strange. This sounds like in Beinart’s opinion pro-Palestinian activism is all about Jewish pride. As far as I’m concerned, I’d like to believe that one day fiercely advocating for Palestinian rights and dignity won’t be necessary anymore because they got them already.

    • pabelmont
      pabelmont
      November 5, 2013, 7:40 pm

      GL: I don’t read the remark that way. It is not about the Jews DOING what’s right. It is about the THAT, sure, but his focus is on the CHANGE he wants to see in the parental generation. Those parents are the ones who — he imagines — presently love Israel in the my-country-right-or-wrong manner, and he wants to see THEM reformed, maybe by their kids enthusiasm for doing what’s right.

      The kids who act that way will be doing it because it’s right, not because anyone is a Jew. their actions will not be “about Jews”. But he hopes that their bright leadership will change their parents’ hearts.

  17. wondering jew
    wondering jew
    November 6, 2013, 12:19 am

    It is sad to hear that Open Zion will be closing. Beinart’s decision is not puzzling, but the inability for Open Zion to continue without him is.

    I think Phil’s disappointment is because he saw Open Zion as a form of equivalent of MW and 972, with MW explicitly antiZionist (“explicit” might be too strong a word) and 972 with its preponderance of criticism of Israel, from Israel based writers and somehow Open Zion would open up a similar space for more middle of the road liberal Zionism.

    I think there is potential for a liberal Zionist point of view, which is currently primarily the domain of Haaretz, which Beinart is joining. Haaretz also has a smattering of right wingers (Moshe Arens for example) and its solid left wingers (Amira Hass and Gideon Levy). Open Zion was in addition to Haaretz and now Haaretz will have an opportunity to fill some of that need, but the niche will not be entirely filled by a newspaper and there will remain a need for a “magazine”/blog feel that OZ filled the last year or so.

    I think speculation in the past that Beinart will join the anti Zionist ranks was misplaced and I think speculation that he is retreating from his “J Street” positions is also misplaced.

    I don’t think Open Zion was key to the salvation of Israel, though I would be hard pressed to define what precisely will save Israel. I think a forum where critics of Israel policy who still imagine* a better Israel is important, and maybe the people from J Street can step in and offer to take over Open Zion.

    *(I am aware that imagining can be confused with refusal to view the reality as given. I mean imagining and building a better Israel. There are many people with a strong will to do good in Israel and a will to build a better future for Israel and the Palestinians. Though I realize that the vast majority of this minority do not measure up to the Marc Ellis standard, the process is not entirely hopeless and to label Israel a corpse, as Hedges does, is a disservice and does not offer these people any path. Open Zion was a place for ideas and its closure is not good news.)

  18. jewishgoyim
    jewishgoyim
    November 6, 2013, 1:07 am

    Or maybe Beinart has cheated on his wife and someone from the NSA or (its Israeli headquarters) told him to tone down the rhetoric or else they’d have to give her some hints.

    I think that in every case where people make surprising 180° turn nowadays, we have to envision this kind of foul play from our masters. It won’t be true every time but it will be true sometimes.

    • Kathleen
      Kathleen
      November 6, 2013, 9:56 am

      Scott Ritter

      • jewishgoyim
        jewishgoyim
        November 6, 2013, 4:39 pm

        David Petraeus.
        Elliot Spitzer.

        And a bunch we don’t know about but who have been threatened with satisfactory results…

  19. kayq
    kayq
    November 6, 2013, 7:40 am

    Hmm I don’t know, you guys seem to be slamming down Open Zion pretty hard. Afterall, it did have an array of decent articles from time to time, from great writers.

    As for Beinart himself… can’t really comment. His liberal Zionism is a bit much to handle.

  20. hophmi
    hophmi
    November 6, 2013, 10:44 am

    Honestly, I think he needs to make money. He lives on the UWS. It’s expensive, and I’m sure teaching and running Open Zion doesn’t pay the bills.

    The question is why no one can take over for him.

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