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‘Palestinian liberation incomplete without the liberation of all’–a statement on the siege of Yarmouk

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A Palestinian woman protests in Ramallah in solidarity with the Palestinian Yarmouk refugee camp in Syria. (Photo: Nasser Nasser/AP)

A Palestinian woman protests in Ramallah in solidarity with the Palestinian Yarmouk refugee camp in Syria. (Photo: Nasser Nasser/AP)

Note: This statement, originally published on Sixteen Minutes to Palestine, is a response to the posting from Cornell SJP on the situation in Yarmouk camp in Syria. This is not meant as a comprehensive statement on the conflict in Syria. It is also not our intention to cast aspersions on or vilify Cornell SJP but to respond to the content of their statement. If you would like to add your name to this statement, either as an individual, or as an SJP chapter, please email [email protected] with the name as it should appear.

All of us have seen the horrifying pictures coming out of Yarmouk refugee camp. Each of us holds our sisters, our brothers, our nieces and nephews, our seedos a little tighter as we struggle to see what can be done for Palestinians who are literally starving to death. Many of those killed by the Assad regime in the past three years were Palestinians, some carrying cameras to document the regime’s brutality, some delivering aid to besieged Syrians, some carrying a weapon while fighting for freedom and dignity, and some sitting quietly in their homes when a TNT barrel fell through their roof. Yarmouk was home to over 100,000 Palestinians. Suffice it to say that there are those in Yarmouk who support the armed resistance, those who don’t, and those who simply want to live, all of them wish to return to their homes in Palestine.

Yet we also know that ultimately Palestinian liberation is incomplete without the liberation of all oppressed people, whether their oppression comes from occupation and settler-colonialism or a repressive regime from within.

We therefore stand in solidarity not only with the Palestinians of Yarmouk, but also with the people of Syria, fighting for freedom and a better future for their children. We totally reject holding the armed resistance responsible for the crimes the Assad regime has committed against the people of Yarmouk and the people of Syria. The government of Syria has the responsibility to protect innocent civilians and allow vital aid to reach those in need. We condemn the Assad regime’s siege on Yarmouk in the strongest terms. To abrogate any of the regime’s responsibility for their own actions is outrageous.

We will not attempt to speak for the people of Yarmouk or Syria, or continue the cynical use of these people as pawns, either in war or in debate. As solidarity activists, and more importantly, as human beings, we stand with the downtrodden, the abject, and the oppressed.

Until freedom,

Individuals, Students and Alumni
Neda Kit, Rutgers SJP
Mohannad Rachid, Loyola University of Chicago SJP
Tarek M. Khalil, University of Illinois at Chicago SJP Alum
Bekah Wolf, University of California, Hastings College of the Law
Dina Sayed-Ahmad, Rutgers SJP
Ahmad Aburas, Rutgers SJP
Noran Elzarka, Drew SJP
Ephrain Hussain, Montclaire State University
Shiyam Galyon, University of Texas at Austin PSC Alum
Baha Abusharara, University of Illinois at Chicago SJP
Toufic Haddad, School of Oriental and African Studies
Wael Alasady, Portland State University
George Kadifa, alum of SJP UC Berkeley
Rasha El Endari, University of Toronto
Daniela Jorge, Steinbeis University
Sherry Wolf

SJP Chapters
SJP Ryerson
Rutgers-Newark SJP
Loyola University of Chicago SJP
Drew University SJP
University of Illinois at Chicago SJP
Students Against Israeli Apartheid- University of Toronto (Mississauga)

Others
MENA Solidarity Network-US
Salim Salamah-Yarmouk, Syria

Open Letter
About Open Letter

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39 Responses

  1. Renato Oliveira
    Renato Oliveira
    January 20, 2014, 10:28 am

    “all of them wish to return to their homes in Palestine”

    Has anyone asked them? I’m sure the ‘refugees’ would rather be treated as normal citizens where they live than be used as pawns for ‘leaders’ who care less about them than about their prides.

    • annie
      annie
      January 20, 2014, 10:58 am

      Has anyone asked them?

      have you? then how can you be “sure” of anything. you don’t even seem to be sure whether they are refugees or not w/your lil quote marks. what’s up w/that?

    • amigo
      amigo
      January 20, 2014, 11:23 am

      “Has anyone asked them? I’m sure the ‘refugees’ would rather be treated as normal citizens where they live than be used as pawns for ‘leaders’ who care less about them than about their prides.” Renato O

      They would much prefer to go back to their homes that zionist thieves expelled then from at the point of a gun.

      As to caring less about these PEOPLE, since when do you give a flying ??? about the people you refer to as Palis.

      Crawl back into your rat hole a,,hole.

    • W.Jones
      W.Jones
      January 20, 2014, 1:20 pm

      than about their prides.

      May I ask what country you are from?

      I think in Spanish and English pride is not changed into the plural.

    • talknic
      talknic
      January 24, 2014, 2:06 pm

      @ Renato Oliveira “Has anyone asked them? I’m sure the ‘refugees’ would rather be treated as normal citizens where they live ..”

      Odd. One of the main stumbling blocks to so called negotiations has been RoR. The Palestinians have been asking for RoR since UNGA res 194, 1948. Why would they want to live in a foreign country?

  2. Taxi
    Taxi
    January 20, 2014, 12:19 pm

    You and your “open letter” have the freaking gall to completely bypass the alquaida army of freakazoid cannibals on a mass killing spree in Syria?!! Calling them “resistance fighters”?!

    Buzz off! You are using the Palestinians in a disgustingly cynical way!

    You and your zio-saudi sugar-daddies have lost the war and lost the plot!

    Unbelievable!

    Unbelievable too that Adam and Phil would fall, twice in a row, for BS infiltrators such as the article above and Talal’s article yesterday – same wording, same lies, SAME MESSAGE OF BASHAR IS BAAAAAAAAD….. for Palestine!

    Well he ain’t bad for Palestine and Syria can show you DECADES of support for Palestininas – but he sure is bad for your al Nusra and alquaida heros!

    Saudi and israel want to divide the mideast between them. The only way they can do this is if they break up old friends and neighbors. Your letter is part and parcel of that diabolical plot and you’re either useful idiots or downright evil.

    • W.Jones
      W.Jones
      January 20, 2014, 1:29 pm

      Hi Taxi.
      I noticed that the several signers on were Middle eastern or were SJP chapters, so it would surprise me that they were all intentionally trying to ruin the Middle East. I admit that Bekah Wolf is a signer, and she previously openly denounced Greta Berlin as anti-semitic based on intolerant posts made on Greta’s forum by a past Mondoweiss comment poster:
      http://mondoweiss.net/2012/10/if-only-it-was-just-one-tweet-one-activists-experience-in-the-our-land-facebook-group.html

      In any case, I think Palestinians themselves are divided about the war in Syria, which as you noted is a proxy.

    • Bandolero
      Bandolero
      January 20, 2014, 11:14 pm

      Taxi

      I find OK that different sides hold different views. However, what I find important is that both sides in a conflict get a voice. What I miss here is voices like this one:

      Archbishop Hanna: Terrorists and their supporters are responsible for situation in Yarmouk Camp

      Occupied Jerusalem, (SANA) – Greek Orthodox Archbishop of Sebastia Atallah Hanna held the armed terrorist groups and those who support and fund them responsible for the disastrous humanitarian condition in Yarmouk Camp.

      In a speech during a sit-in held on Friday evening at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in occupied Jerusalem to show solidarity with Yarmouk Camp, Archbishop Hanna voiced surprise over the media misdirection regarding what is happening in the Camp, as it is clear that those who fund the terrorists which use the Camp’s occupants as human shields are the very same ones who mislead public opinion by claiming that the Syrian government is besieging the camp.

      “Those who are hijacking Yarmouk Camp are the same people who are conspiring against the Syrian state, and they shed crocodile tears over Palestinian refugees in Yarmouk,” he said, describing what is happening there is a disgrace to humanity and saying that it’s a shame that Arab money is used for destroying the Arab nation.

      Source

      I’ld expect that people in the Palestine Solidarity movement have an idea of the power of misleading mass media, as we all know what hasbara is.

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        January 21, 2014, 8:20 pm

        Bandolero:

        What a remarkable quote!

        Archbishop Hanna is one of the several authors of the Kairos Palestine Document.

    • UshPhe
      UshPhe
      January 20, 2014, 11:48 pm

      it’s a statement condemning the siege…lighten up. this is a chapter of SJP and you’re calling them zio-Saudi Sugar daddies???? do you think before you write? or is now every Palestinian activist who condemns the siege a Zio-Saudi Sugar Daddie and supporter of Western imperialism??

      • Taxi
        Taxi
        January 21, 2014, 12:17 pm

        It’s a statement condemning the siege alright, Ushphe – except they’re falsely pinning it on the wrong side: “We totally reject holding the armed resistance responsible for the crimes the Assad regime has committed against the people of Yarmouk and the people of Syria.”

        DO YOU EVEN READ BEFORE YOU JUDGE????!

        Buzz off!

  3. W.Jones
    W.Jones
    January 20, 2014, 1:17 pm

    Thank you for posting this. Certainly, statements by SJP chapters are important.

    Regarding this statement:

    We therefore stand in solidarity not only with the Palestinians of Yarmouk, but also with the people of Syria, fighting for freedom…

    Is there any way to measure roughly what percent of Syrian people support the insurgent fighters?

    One of the main bodies that is democratic and organized and in opposition to Assad is the Local Coordinating Committees. Their statements are strongly anti-Assad and they receive US funding. However, on their website as of a few days ago the most recent statement repeated perhaps 6 times that they wanted peaceful resistance. A statement from 2011-2012 about them in Wikipedia also said they wanted peaceful resistance.

    I am unaware of any other significant liberal or secular groups with Sizable forces in Syria. I am doubtful whether the Free Syria army is secular, and would be interested to know what portion of its factions are not conservative.

    • Bandolero
      Bandolero
      January 20, 2014, 11:07 pm

      I would set the marker different:

      …fighting for freedom

      Besides the Kurdish YPG, which behave quite responsible in interacting with the Syrian Army, there are currently three major groups of anti-government fighters active in Syria:

      – Islamic Front
      – Nusra Front
      – Islamic State in Iraq and Sham

      Now, the one million Dollar question: which of these groups fight for freedom?

      Not, that I find fighting for an Islamic caliphate unworthy, and I acknowledge that – for example – many things in the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan were better than they are today under Karzai, but under a fight for “freedom” I understand something different.

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        January 21, 2014, 3:41 pm

        Bandolero,

        Isn’t there a Free Syria Army that is backed by the West and is allied with a Syrian National Council of some kind, whose general Idriss recently evacuated from Syria to Turkey?

        Is that just a coalition of the above named groups?

        I found this map of the battle of Aleppo on the internet:
        https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BeS-k4qCMAADpvk.jpg:large

        It has different flags for the rebel forces. Some of the flags look like the Syrian flag, but different. They have red stars instead. Perhaps this refers to a more liberal or moderate rebel force?

        If so, how moderate?

        To me, the brutal treatment of the dictator Gaddafi and his supporters by the “resistance” did not seem very “liberal” or “moderate.” And Syria’s conflict reminds me of Libya’s.

      • Bandolero
        Bandolero
        January 21, 2014, 5:33 pm

        W.Jones

        Cloudflare prevented me from answering you here, so I put my answer for you in a pastie:

        http://justpaste.it/e637

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        January 22, 2014, 11:31 am

        Thanks for your answer, Bandolero.

        You say that the FSA practically no longer exists. However Wikipedia said they had 45,000 fighters (1/3 of the total insurgency). This could be old data, but what happened? Did most of them get killed and the rest joined the fundamentalists (2/3 of the fighters according to Wikipedia)?

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        January 22, 2014, 2:56 am

        Bandolero,
        According to Wikipedia, the FSA makes up about 45k fighters, while the other insurgents (basically nonmoderates AFAIK) make up about 90k – a 2:1 ratio.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_Civil_War

        Further, of those FSA troops. how many of them are moderate or nonreligious anyway?

      • Bandolero
        Bandolero
        January 22, 2014, 1:20 pm

        W.Jones

        Wikipedia is peddling lot’s of hasbara nonsense. The Wikipedia claim that FSA has 40-50k fighters is totally bogus. Even the source cited in Wikipedia to base this claim on doesn’t mention any remaining FSA strength.

        But let’s assume for a moment the Jamal Marouf’s SRF guys, which are loyal to the SNC and Idriss, are kind of a rebranded FSA. As I said above, they got control over some villages in Idlib province and some influence in East Aleppo and Aleppo countryside. Their numbers is likely somewhere in the single digit thousands, though any numbers of fighters are all taken with a very big shovel of salt, as there is lot’s of big manipulations going on there. All groups tend to present themselves much bigger as they really are to get more money from sponsors.

        The question, whether these forces are moderate or nonreligious misses the important point: how do these forces behave in reality? Essentially, these forces are death squads, as one of their strongest supporters I quoted in my postie above, proudly admits: their method is “no survivors, no mercy!” And indeed, where they appeared and won, none of their ISIS adversaries seems to have survived where they could get them – not even women or children. In Aleppo, these forces are known as robbers, thiefs and simply criminals. The SOHR – who supports them generally – said, one these “moderate forces” aligned with the SRF even raped the mother of an ISIS commander to put pressure on him.

        These guys were running East Aleppo for some months after the invasion in summer 2012. At the beginning of 2013 the population supported Al Qaeda in efforts to get rid of these moderates because the people saw the Al Qaeda forces as the lesser evil – compared to these moderates. Back then, Al Qaeda took over, executed some of the “moderate” ganster FSA rebel bosses, chopped some of their heads off, and most of the rest of the nihilist criminals called “moderate FSA” went on the run.

        I hope that gives you an idea of what’s really going on.

      • Bandolero
        Bandolero
        January 23, 2014, 2:41 pm

        You say that the FSA practically no longer exists. However Wikipedia said they had 45,000 fighters (1/3 of the total insurgency). This could be old data, but what happened? Did most of them get killed and the rest joined the fundamentalists (2/3 of the fighters according to Wikipedia)?

        While the Wikipedia numbers are bogus the decline of the FSA begs for an explanation.

        From what I see from my sources coming out of Syria, the answer is:

        Some were killed, some were badly wounded, some imprisoned, some switched – alone or with whole brigades – to other forces like to Al Qaeda, to the Syrian government’s side, to neighborhood protection units cooperating with the government or to Kurdish YPG forces, but the very most of them went just to noncombattant status: they were simply fed up fighting, silently laying down their weapons, staying at home or fleeing somewhere to find safety and become refugees.

        Only die hard fanatics still fight the Syrian government forces – under various flags.

  4. ToivoS
    ToivoS
    January 20, 2014, 3:04 pm

    The logic of this letter seems to be that the Palestinians will never find justice until Saudi-Western backed al Qaida forces in Syria overthrow the Assad regime. It is hard to imagine a more cynical use of the Palestinian cause. There is even one commentator here that refers to the Palestinian people as Palis who decries their oppression (by Syria, for course).

    Right now the quickest way to see the end of the suffering for all of the people of Syria, including their Palestinian guests, is for the war to end. That will happen with the military defeat of the foreign al Aqaida militias which we are in the process of watching now. This war is close to over. Geneva II should lead to a process whereby the rest of the world works to escort those foreign fighters back to their countries of origin.

    • Keith
      Keith
      January 20, 2014, 7:40 pm

      TOIVOS- “The logic of this letter seems to be that the Palestinians will never find justice until Saudi-Western backed al Qaida forces in Syria overthrow the Assad regime. It is hard to imagine a more cynical use of the Palestinian cause.”

      I agree completely. Is it coincidence that one of the signatories to this open letter is Bekah Wolf? Is this the same Bekah Wolf who is a Mondoweiss contributor and accuser of Greta Berlin? If so, I find this most interesting.

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        January 21, 2014, 1:30 am

        Is this the same Bekah Wolf who is a Mondoweiss contributor and accuser of Greta Berlin?
        But who else?

  5. Walid
    Walid
    January 20, 2014, 3:21 pm

    The term “people dying of hunger” is used loosely by Arabs to dramatically describe harsh times and should not be taken literally. It’s origin dates back to Ottoman times when people were so taxed, they were left with so little to eat that some people actually starved. So the term was handed down from generation to generation and today it’s used in all sauces and it’s being annoyingly used for political reasons, but it doesn’t mean that Palestinians are not having it very rough inside the camp. It’s current use in the Syrian conflict is somewhat like the State Dept -instigated story of the Iraqi soldiers in Kuwait having thrown babies on the floor to steal the incubators from the hospital, which was a bogus story but super charged emotionally to have launched the first Iraq War of 1990. The current version is about “people dying of hunger”.

    Rumours are being circulated that the Palestinians in Yarmouk are down to having to eat cats while others are eating grass. The grass part is probably true but Palestinian leaders from Hamas, Fateh and the NGO that distributes food in the camp have flatly denied the story about cats.

    There are 12 Palestinian camps in Syria. So why a siege of Yarmouk only and why aren’t rebel fighters in the camp also dying? Talal’s piece was bogus and pure propaganda; today’s is honest but it’s based on the same misinformed facts as the Cornell one from the day before, so we shouldn’t be upset with it.

    • W.Jones
      W.Jones
      January 20, 2014, 5:04 pm

      What do you mean “why aren’t rebel fighters in the camp also dying?”

      It sounds like you have alot of facts at your hands and it would be nice if you wrote an article for MW about this, IMO, because you have a dissident view about this.

      • Walid
        Walid
        January 21, 2014, 7:36 am

        W.Jones, I don’t have access to any more information than you do. The difference you’re seeing in my view is that it’s being formed on historical and current facts, and not by emotional mush being conjured up by tales of famine by propagandists. We had the same type of PR campaign about the Syrian army using chemicals on civilians. When I hear interviewed senior members of Hamas, Fatah and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine that are opposed to each other and prone to exaggerating anything and everything now unanimously declaring that there is no one dying of starvation in the camp, I have to believe it. You have to look at what’s happening in the bigger picture. The Palestinian refugees that numbered over 400,000 spread out over 12 refugee communities of which a quarter were at Yarmuk are now down to less than 20,000 in Yarmuk. Many made it to Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon and many scattered in various towns and regions in Syria. But they are no longer a large homogeneous collective voice to talk of and remind the world about their right of return. Refugees don’t usually migrate back and forth between countries, so don’t expect those Palestinian refugees to return to the same camps in Syria. What’s happening in Syria and especially with the dispersion of Palestinian refugees is another step closer towards capitulation to Israel.

      • Bandolero
        Bandolero
        January 21, 2014, 12:51 pm

        Walid

        “What’s happening in Syria and especially with the dispersion of Palestinian refugees is another step closer towards capitulation to Israel.”

        Very well said. It’s kind of a bloody fitna in camp pro-Palestine. Israel sees it as a boon when arabs, muslims and especially Palestianians fight and kill eash other in Syria and other ME countries, the Brotherhood against the Syrian Arab Army, Hamas against Hisbollah, PFLP & Liwa’a Abu Fadl al-Abbas, Al Qaeda against the Houthis, the Taliban against IRGC and so on: it’s just a dream for Israel.

        “We therefore stand in solidarity not only with the Palestinians of Yarmouk, but also with the people of Syria, fighting for freedom and a better future for their children.”

        It could have come directly from the hasbara ministry. It sounds like: Palestinians, please go all fighting against the Syrian government and it’s allies in Syria, and thereby make sure Syria’s next government will be one controlled by Riyad, Paris and Washington.

        Israel will help this therefore with some discrete hasbara lies to get such fighting going as much as possible, make sure it won’t stop and create a deep rift in the Palestine Solidarity movement.

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        January 21, 2014, 8:17 pm

        You see, Walid, just in your reply post you have pointed to good facts and analysis. I would like you to please reconsider writing something, even for the analysis alone.

        Peace.

    • Bandolero
      Bandolero
      January 21, 2014, 1:41 am

      “The grass part is probably true…”

      Just call the grass “parsley” and you got probably part of the answer what is shown what “grass” people eat there in their soups.

    • Danaa
      Danaa
      January 21, 2014, 2:03 pm

      Walid, I second W. Jones. Won’t you consider a front page post for MW collating all the good information you have been giving out here? I think it would be more valuable than searching through scores of comments?

      I think the site desperately needs another voice to counter the propaganda lines disseminated by now three posts. You would be the best person to do it, IMO. And yes, I know it’s trouble…but perhaps just staple together your selected comments?

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        January 22, 2014, 11:33 am

        Yes. And Bandoldero’s “Paste It” post above showed good knowledge.

        If Palestinians have different opinions about this, then the blog can reflect that.

  6. ivri
    ivri
    January 20, 2014, 4:49 pm

    Here is another way to see it all. At long last it downed on people that the “Palestinian cause” has been for too long a distraction of Arabs from their real problems, which are a myriad and lies elsewhere. This abnormal focus on tiny Israel as the “big target” didn`t make sense in the first place yet nobody in the Arab world had the courage or the will to stand up to it – and foreign “friends” did their share in encouraging this mistaken trend, which only brought calamity to the Arab world (while the potential gains in regard to the “eternal struggle” with Israel have always been negligent in comparison). It is possible that the extent of the tragedy in Syria is, at long last, opening some eyes. Arabs want to deal with what really matters. It is indeed possible that some types of contacts will open between Saudi-Arabia and Israel and other things too but that is only natural.

    • Walid
      Walid
      January 21, 2014, 6:19 am

      “Arabs want to deal with what really matters. It is indeed possible that some types of contacts will open between Saudi-Arabia and Israel and other things too but that is only natural.”

      What really matters like the total destruction of Iraq, Libya and now Syria? Contacts have been open between these 2 countries for decades and one of them is now helping Israel by trying to put the Syrian opposition to it to rest and this is what this about. It wasn’t too long ago that you heard of Israel’s flight plan across Saudia to reach Iran and Israeli visits to the Gulf countries are now regular fare.

    • LeaNder
      LeaNder
      January 21, 2014, 8:13 am

      Arabs want to deal with what really matters. It is indeed possible that some types of contacts will open between Saudi-Arabia and Israel and other things too but that is only natural.

      Yes, ivri, the Saudis of all “Arabs” may well finally sponsor Israel’s old transfer dream, an idea including the backing of the funds raised for the effort, if I understand correctly, even Britain backed out of, but at least it surrendered to Zionist pressure to not allow a Palestinian parliamentarian representation.

      No problem to work in this context with the top sponsor of Salafi-Takfiris? Good for the business, dangerous neighborhood and all? As long as “they fight among each other” elsewhere?

  7. Danaa
    Danaa
    January 20, 2014, 5:29 pm

    I agree with other posters here – Taxi, Walid, ToivoS – this is basically an attempt at infiltration and a cynical co-opting of the Palestinian tragic narrative for extremely dubious ends.

    Seeing that this is one of three posts just in the past 2 days – all written in impeccable English – can’t help but wonder – who is paying for this campaign?

    I do hope people who read this will take the trouble to find out what’s really happening at Yarmook Camp, which was effectively overtaken by Jihadi Terrorists who are holding the civilians there hostage.

    The Syrian government has been more than generous to the Palestinians over many decades when few others were. But given the huge amount of money dropped by the saudis and Quataris to fuel the destruction of Syria, it’s no wonder that there will be some Palestinians who will fall for this. But, like Taxi and walid know – along with many others, bandar bin moron is far from a real friend to the Palestinians. He and the despotic tyranical monarch he serves have made more than one deal with Israel and perhaps they are now receiving the benefits in the form of a carefully staged “Saudi Hasbarbara”.

    What the palestinian civilians in yarmook need to do is to hand over the Jihadi/salafists terrorizing their camp to the Syrian authorities and join in the campaign to clean up Syria of these brutal miscreants.

    • Walid
      Walid
      January 21, 2014, 6:36 am

      Dana, the terrorists appear to number less than 100. An agreement was reached a couple of days back by which most factions in the camp will be evicting the terrorists and if it goes according to plan, this should happen in a few days. People here are confounding which party is holding the camp hostage and which has it under siege. In fact, the party doing both from the inside is the terrorist one. The Syrian army has allowed over 40,000 Palestinian refugees to exit Yarmuk without a hitch and had been allowing regular food deliveries to the 18 or 20 thousand that refused to leave until October when the terrorists started preventing them. The poison gas gimmick didn’t work, so now they are charging back with the story on how the Syrian army is starving the refugees. People in Yarmuk are very hungry, but they are not starving. Think back to the incubators story.

      • Danaa
        Danaa
        January 21, 2014, 1:58 pm

        Walid, I have been reading some of the same things but you are always bringing new information to light, for which I thank you. One can only hope more would be willing to process reality instead of fantasies. I still think though the deliberate promulgation an/or acceptance of misconceptions is due to a strange reluctance ton the part of some otherwise well meaning people to learn more about the situation in Syria (ie, when it’s not deliberate propaganda). Perhaps it’s just too complicated for the great western minds?

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        January 21, 2014, 8:16 pm

        Yes, Walid, even if you have the same facts as everyone, your analysis is very good and that alone should be enough for you to write a short article on MW. Just start with an outline of some facts you have and what they tell us about the conflict.

  8. Sibiriak
    Sibiriak
    January 21, 2014, 7:43 am

    The government of Syria has the responsibility to protect innocent civilians and allow vital aid to reach those in need.

    And the anti-Assad forces have the same responsibility. Why should they be immune from blame?

  9. Bandolero
    Bandolero
    January 21, 2014, 6:53 pm

    For whom is interested:

    It looks like Dan Rivers of ITV just broadcasted some pictures from inside the Yarmouk camp. ITV doesn’t say it’s inside the Yarmouk camp, but my friends told me the “rebels” shown in the video look like the Yarmouk camp, or, if not, the area close to it, maybe Hajjar Aswad.

    For those who don’t have a imagination how things look like in that area I think the video is well worth watching:

    http://www.itv.com/news/2014-01-20/the-disillusioned-defectors-joining-assads-forces/

    The text is made like a home story what I don’t find very useful, but the pictures speak for themselves how it looks like over there.

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